Tag Archives: community

Getting started with Git and GitHub is easier than ever with GitHub Desktop 2.2

Post Syndicated from Amanda Pinsker original https://github.blog/2019-10-02-get-started-easier-with-github-desktop-2-2/

Anyone who uses Git knows that it has a steep learning curve. We’ve learned from developers that most people tend to learn from a buddy, whether that’s a coworker, a professor, a friend, or even a YouTube video. In GitHub Desktop 2.2, we’re releasing the first version of an interactive Git and GitHub tutorial that can be your buddy and help you get started. If you’re new to Desktop, you can download and try out the tutorial at desktop.github.com.

Get set up

To get set up, we help you through two major pieces: creating a repository and connecting an editor. When you first open Desktop, a welcome page appears with a new option to “Create a Tutorial Repository”. Starting with this option creates a tutorial repository that guides you through the core concepts of working with Git using GitHub Desktop.

There are a lot of tools you need to get started with Git and GitHub. The most important of these is your code editor. In the first step of the tutorial, you’re prompted to install an editor if you don’t have one already.

Learn the GitHub flow

Next, we guide you through how to use GitHub Desktop to make changes to code locally and get your work on GitHub. You’ll create a new branch, make a change to a file, commit it, push it to GitHub, and open your first pull request.

We’ve also heard that new users initially experience confusion between Git, GitHub, and GitHub Desktop. We cover these differences in the tutorial and make sure to reinforce the explanations.

Keep going with your own project

In GitHub Desktop 1.6, we introduced suggested next steps based on the state of your repository. Now when you complete the tutorial, we similarly suggest next steps: exploring projects on GitHub that you might want to contribute to, creating a new project, or adding an existing project to Desktop. We always want GitHub Desktop to be the tool that makes your next steps clear, whether you’re in the flow of your work, or you’re a new developer just getting started.

What’s next?

With GitHub Desktop 2.2, we’re making the product our users love more approachable to newcomers. We’ll be iterating on the tutorial based on your feedback, and we’ll continue to build on the connection between GitHub and your local machine. If you want to start building something but don’t know how, think of GitHub Desktop as your buddy to help you get started.

Learn more about GitHub Desktop

The post Getting started with Git and GitHub is easier than ever with GitHub Desktop 2.2 appeared first on The GitHub Blog.

Run your code aboard the International Space Station with Astro Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/run-your-code-aboard-the-international-space-station-with-astro-pi/

Each year, the European Astro Pi Challenge allows students and young people in ESA Member States (or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta) to write code for their own experiments, which could run on two Raspberry Pi units aboard the International Space Station.

The Astro Pi Challenge is a lot of fun, it’s about space, and so that we in the Raspberry Pi team don’t have to miss out despite being adults, many of us mentor their own Astro Pi teams — and you should too!

So, gather your team, stock up on freeze-dried ice cream, and let’s do it again: the European Astro Pi Challenge 2019/2020 launches today!

Luca Parmitano launches the 2019-20 European Astro Pi Challenge

ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano is this year’s ambassador of the European Astro Pi Challenge. In this video, he welcomes students to the challenge and gives an overview of the project. Learn more about Astro Pi: http://bit.ly/AstroPiESA ★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe and click twice on the bell button to receive our notifications.

The European Astro Pi Challenge 2019/2020 is made up of two missions: Mission Zero and Mission Space Lab.

Astro Pi Mission Zero

Mission Zero has been designed for beginners/younger participants up to 14 years old and can be completed in a single session. It’s great for coding clubs or any groups of students don’t have coding experience but still want to do something cool — because having confirmation that code you wrote has run aboard the International Space Station is really, really cool! Teams write a simple Python program to display a message and temperature reading on an Astro Pi computer, for the astronauts to see as they go about their daily tasks on the ISS. No special hardware or prior coding skills are needed, and all teams that follow the challenge rules are guaranteed to have their programs run in space!

Astro Pi Mission Zero logo

Mission Zero eligibility

  • Participants must be no older than 14 years
  • 2 to 4 people per team
  • Participants must be supervised by a teacher, mentor, or educator, who will be the point of contact with the Astro Pi team
  • Teams must be made up of at least 50% team members who are citizens of an ESA Member* State, or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta

Astro Pi Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab is aimed at more experienced/older participants up to 19 years old, and it takes place in 4 phases over the course of 8 months. The challenge is to design and write a program for a scientific experiment to be run on an Astro Pi computer. The best experiments will be deployed to the ISS, and teams will have the opportunity to analyse and report on their results.

Astro Pi Mission Space Lab logo

Mission Space Lab eligibility

  • Participants must be no older than 19 years
  • 2 to 6 people per team
  • Participants must be supervised by a teacher, mentor, or educator, who will be the point of contact with the Astro Pi team
  • Teams must be made up of at least 50% team members who are citizens of an ESA Member State*, or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta

How to plan your Astro Pi Mission Space Lab experiment

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspberry Pi from one of our Approved Resellers: http://rpf.io/ytproducts Find out more about the #RaspberryPi Foundation: Raspberry Pi http://rpf.io/ytrpi Code Club UK http://rpf.io/ytccuk Code Club International http://rpf.io/ytcci CoderDojo http://rpf.io/ytcd Check out our free online training courses: http://rpf.io/ytfl Find your local Raspberry Jam event: http://rpf.io/ytjam Work through our free online projects: http://rpf.io/ytprojects Do you have a question about your Raspberry Pi?

For both missions, each member of the team has to be at least one of the following:

  • Enrolled full-time in a primary or secondary school in an ESA Member State, or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta
  • Homeschooled (certified by the National Ministry of Education or delegated authority in an ESA Member State or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta)
  • A member of a club or after-school group (such as Code Club, CoderDojo, or Scouts) located in an ESA Member State*, or Slovenia, Canada, or Malta

Take part

To take part in the European Astro Pi Challenge, head over to the Astro Pi website, where you’ll find more information on how to get started getting your team’s code into SPACE!

Obligatory photo of Raspberry Pis floating in space!

*ESA Member States: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom

The post Run your code aboard the International Space Station with Astro Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Accelerating the GitHub Sponsors beta with Stripe Connect

Post Syndicated from Katie Delfin original https://github.blog/2019-09-10-accelerating-the-github-sponsors-beta/

Update: GitHub Sponsors is available in every country where GitHub does business, not just the 30 countries supported by Stripe Connect. We’ll continue to use our existing manual payout system for anyone outside of Connect’s list of currently supported countries.


Back in May, we announced GitHub Sponsors, a new way to support the developers who build and maintain the open source software you use every day. We launched in beta as early as possible so we could work closely with the community to address feedback and understand their needs before adding more developers to the program. Today, we’re taking the next step in accelerating the availability of GitHub Sponsors through a new streamlined onboarding and payment experience with Stripe Connect.

The early days of manual payments

Within hours of announcing GitHub Sponsors, thousands of people signed up for the waitlist from all over the world. It was awesome to see so much excitement for the program, but we knew this meant we had a lot of work ahead of us. 

We started the beta with a small group of sponsored developers, and every few weeks, we invited more into the program. Everything was a manual process—setting up account information, verifying identity, waiting for approval, running reports, and processing payouts across multiple departments. Due to the manual nature of the process, we were limited to a small number of people in the program until we could automate and streamline our operations.

Onboarding more developers, faster

At GitHub, we do business with companies of all sizes, from Fortune 50 companies to early stage startups from all over the world. Collecting revenue globally is something we’ve done for years, but with GitHub Sponsors, it’s not just about receiving money—it’s also about paying it out. This means providing a seamless and secure experience for sponsored developers to verify their identities, enter banking information, receive funds, and manage payouts. We also know that, for many maintainers, this will be the first time they’ve been financially rewarded for their contributions to open source. We want to ensure the process is easy for developers to complete, so they can spend more time doing what they love, like contributing to open source.

Stripe Connect Express offers a simple, low overhead onboarding experience that complies with web accessibility guidelines, coupled with the ability to localize the experience to simplify payouts in countries with unique tax laws and compliance regulations. And by not building our own onboarding solution, we’re able to save months of engineering and maintenance time, and start onboarding more sponsored developers today.

Localization

One of Stripe Connect’s features that’s helped us deliver a great experience to our users is their localization support. Stripe just released international support for 30 countries (with more to come) for Connect Express. With this expanded support, Stripe takes care of adjusting for localized rules and regulations for supported countries—no small feat. We couldn’t be more thrilled to be one of the first to offer support across all 30 countries to serve our global community.

Our maintainer onboarding process can now start to keep up with the growing demand of the program. With Stripe, users can onboard using Connect Express, reducing onboarding time from a week-long process to under five minutes.  

And there’s much more to come. While we’re just under four months into the program, we’re focused on making GitHub Sponsors available to even more developers around the world.

Sign up to join the beta—you’ll hear from us soon.

Learn more about GitHub Sponsors

The post Accelerating the GitHub Sponsors beta with Stripe Connect appeared first on The GitHub Blog.

Save the date for Coolest Projects 2020

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/save-the-date-for-coolest-projects-2020/

Coolest Projects is the world’s leading technology fair for young people. It’s our event series where young creators, makers, and innovators share their projects with fellow creators and the public, and they explore each others’ work. And it’s awesome!

Launching Coolest Projects 2020!

Coolest Projects is a world-leading showcase that enables and inspires the next generation of digital creators and innovators to present the projects that they have created with code. Find out more: http://coolestprojects.org/ Sign up for the latest Coolest Projects news: http://eepurl.com/dG4UJb

Coolest Projects 2020

In 2020, we’ll run three Coolest Projects events:

  • USA, Discovery Cube Orange County, CA: 7 March 2020
  • UK, The Sharp Project, Manchester: 4 April 2020
  • International, RDS Main Hall, Dublin, Ireland: 6 June 2020

Mark the dates of the UK, USA, and International events in your diary today! Our community also runs regional Coolest Projects events in Belgium, Malaysia, and beyond.

Get involved in Coolest Projects

Visit a Coolest Projects event

You’ll get to see first-hand what the next generation is creating with technology. Young people in our community are brimming with new, cutting-edge ideas and enjoy expressing their creativity through making digital projects.

You’ll also get to flex your own technical and maker skills: our Coolest Projects events have a Discovery Zone, where the maker community and local organisations run unique, hands-on activities!

Support a young person to participate

If you’re an educator, maker, or tech professional, you can support young people you know to participate, as individuals or in teams with their friends. Whether you know young tech enthusiasts through Code Club, CoderDojo, another club, or your school — anyone aged 7–18 can enter Coolest Projects, and you can help them get showcase-ready!

Check out our ‘How to make a project’ workbook, which is perfect for supporting young people through the project building process step by step.

Encourage your company to become a partner or give a donation

Help us continue to make Coolest Projects events free to enter and attend for young people so they can dream big and be inspired by their peers’ creations!

Email [email protected] to learn more about supporting Coolest Projects.

Stay up to date

Project registration and visitor tickets aren’t available just yet — sign up to the Coolest Projects newsletter to be the first to hear when we launch them!

The post Save the date for Coolest Projects 2020 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Keynote speeches from Scratch Conference Europe 2019

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/keynote-speeches-scratch-conference-europe-2019/

This weekend, the Raspberry Pi Foundation hosted Scratch Conference Europe 2019 at Churchill College in Cambridge, UK.

Framing the busy weekend’s schedule were presentations from:

  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab’s Mitchel Resnick, co-inventor of Scratch himself
  • Science presenter Neil Monterio
  • Raspberry Pi favourite, the fire-loving Fran Scott

Since not everyone was able to travel to Cambridge to attend the conference, we wanted to make sure you’re not missing out, so we filmed their presentations, for you to watch at your leisure.

For the full Scratch Conference experience, we suggest gathering together a group of like-minded people to watch the videos and discuss your thoughts. Alternatively, use #ScratchEurope on Twitter to join in the conversation with the conference attendees online.

Enjoy!

Mitch Resnick presents at Scratch Conference Europe 2019

Mitch Resnick addresses the attendees of Scratch Conference Europe, hosted by the Raspberry Pi Foundation at Churchill College, Cambridge, UK on 24 August 2019.

Neil Monteiro presents at Scratch Conference Europe 2019

Neil Monteiro closes the show on day two of Scratch Conference Europe, hosted by the Raspberry Pi Foundation at Churchill College, Cambridge, UK on 24 August 2019. In this show, Neil takes the audience on a journey into a dangerous labyrinth…in code!

Fran Scott presents at Scratch Conference Europe 2019

Fran Scott closes the show on day three of Scratch Conference Europe, hosted by the Raspberry Pi Foundation at Churchill College, Cambridge, UK on 25 August 2019.

 

The post Keynote speeches from Scratch Conference Europe 2019 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

It’s GCSE results day!

Post Syndicated from Dan Fisher original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/its-gcse-results-day/

Today is GCSE results day, and with it comes the usual amount of excitement and trepidation as thousands of young people in the UK find out whether they got the grades they wanted. So here’s a massive CONGRATULATIONS from everyone at the Raspberry Pi Foundation to all the students out there who have worked so hard to get their GCSEs, A levels, BTECs, IBs, and a host of other qualifications.

We also want to highlight the efforts of the amazing teachers who have spent countless hours thinking up new ways to bring their subjects to life and inspire the next generation.

Looking at the initial data from the Department for Education, it’s clear that:

  • The number of students entering the Computer Science GCSE has gone up by 7.6%, so this is the sixth year running that the subject has gained popularity — great news!
  • The number of girls entering the Computer Science GCSE has grown by 14.5% compared to last year!
  • The proportion of Computer Science GCSE students achieving top grades (9 to 7) has gone up, and there’s been an even bigger increase in the proportion achieving a good pass (9 to 4) — amazing!

Views from teachers

From L to R: Rebecca Franks, Allen Heard, Ben Garside, Carrie Anne Philbin

I caught up with four former teachers on our team to reflect on these findings and their own experiences of results days…

What thoughts and emotions are going through your head as a teacher on results day?

Ben: It’s certainly a nerve-wracking time! You hope that your students have reached the potential that you know that they are capable of. You log onto the computer the second you wake up to see if you’ve got access to the exam boards results page yet. It was always great being there to see their faces, to give them a high five, and to support them with working out their options going forward.

Rebecca: I think that head teachers want you to be worried about targets and whether you’ve met them, but as a teacher, when you look at each individual students’ results, you see their journey, and you know how much effort they’ve put in. You are just really proud of how well they have done, and it’s lovely to have those post-results conversations and celebrate with them. It makes it all worth it.

Allen: I liken the feeling to that of an expectant father! You have done as much as you can to make sure things run smoothly, you’ve tried to keep all those involved calm, and now the moment is here and you just want everything to be OK.

Carrie Anne: As a teacher, I always felt both nerves and excitement for results day, probably more so than my students did. Sleepless nights in the run-up to the big day were common! But I always enjoyed seeing my students, who I’d worked with since they were youngsters, see the culmination of their hard work into something useful. I always felt proud of them for how far they’d come.

There has been an increased uptake of students taking computing-related subjects at GCSE since last year. What do you think about this?

Ben: It’s great news and shows that schools are realising how important the subject is to prepare our young people for the future workplace.

Carrie Anne: It’s a sign that our message — that all students should have access to a Computing qualification of rigour, and that there is a willing and ready audience hungry for the opportunity to study Computing at a deeper level — is making traction. My hope is to see this number increase as teachers take part in the free National Centre for Computing Education professional development and certification over the coming years.

Rebecca: I think it’s a step in the right direction, but we definitely have a long way to go. We must make sure that computing is at the forefront of any curriculum model in our secondary schools, which is why the National Centre for Computing Education is so important. In particular, we must support schools in ensuring that KS3 computing is given the time it needs to give students the grounding for GCSE.

Allen: I agree with Rebecca: more needs to be done about teacher training and helping schools see the overall benefit to students in undertaking such subjects. Schools that are investing time in nurturing these subjects in their curriculum provision are seeing them become more popular and enjoying success. Patience is the key for senior leadership teams, and teachers need support and to have confidence in their ability to continue to deliver the subject.

Why is it important that more students learn about computing?

Rebecca: Computing feeds into so much of our everyday lives, and we must prepare our young people for a world that doesn’t exist yet. Computing teaches you logical thinking and problem-solving. These skills are transferable and can be used in all sorts of situations. Computing also teaches you essential digital literacy skills that can help you keep safe whilst using online tools.

Ben: For me, it’s really important that young people pick this subject to help them understand the world around them. They’ll hopefully then be able to see the potential of computing as a power for good and harness it, rather than becoming passive consumers of technology.

Carrie Anne: Following on from what Ben said, I also think it’s important that technology developed in the future reflects the people and industries using it. The tech industry needs to become more diverse in its workforce, and non-technical fields will begin to use more technology in the coming years. If we equip young people with a grounding in computing, they will be equipped to enter these fields and find solutions to technical solutions without relying on a small technical elite.

Imagine I’m a GCSE student who has just passed my Computer Science exams. What resources should I look at if I want to learn more about computing with the Raspberry Pi Foundation for free?

Rebecca: Isaac Computer Science would be the best place to start, because it supports students through their A level Computer Science. If you wanted to experiment and try some physical computing, then you could take a look at the Projects page of the Raspberry Pi Foundation website. You can filter this page by ‘Software type: Python’ and find some ideas to keep you occupied!

Allen: First and foremost, I would advise you to keep your hard-earned coding skills on point, as moving on to the next level of complexity can be a shock. Now is the time to start building on your already sound knowledge and get prepared for A level Computer Science in September. Isaac Computer Science would be a great place to start to undertake some further learning over the summer and prime yourself for further study.

Ben: Same as Rebecca and Allen, I’d be telling you to get started with Isaac Computer Science too. The resources that are being provided for free are second to none, and will really help you get a good feel for what A level Computer Science is all about.

Carrie Anne: Beyond the Raspberry Pi projects site and Isaac Computer Science, I’d recommend getting some face-to-face experience. Every year the Python community holds a conference that’s open to everyone. It’s a great opportunity to meet new people and learn new skills. PyConUK 2019 is taking place in September and has bursaries to support people in full-time education to attend.

We’ve been working on providing support for secondary and GCSE teachers as part of the National Centre for Computing Education this year. Could you talk about the support we’ve got available?

Allen: We’re producing resources to cover the whole range of topics that appear in all the Computing/Computer Science specifications. The aim of these resources is to provide teachers — both experienced and new to the subject — with the support they need to deliver quality, engaging lessons. Founded on sound pedagogical principles and created by a number of well-established teachers, these resources will help reduce workload and increase productivity for teachers, and increase engagement of students. This will ultimately result in some fantastic out-turns for schools, as well as developing confident computing teachers along the way.

Rebecca: As Allen explained, we are busy creating new, free teaching resources for KS3 and GCSE. The units will cover the national curriculum and beyond, and the lessons will be fully resourced. They will be accessible to teachers with varying levels of experience, and there will be lots of support along the way through online courses and face-to-face training if teachers want to know more. Teachers can already take our ‘CS Accelerator’ programme, which is extremely popular and has excellent reviews.

Thanks for your time, everyone!

How was your GCSE results day? Are your students, or young people you know, receiving their results today? Tell us about it in the comments below.

The post It’s GCSE results day! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Terminating Service for 8Chan

Post Syndicated from Matthew Prince original https://blog.cloudflare.com/terminating-service-for-8chan/

The mass shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio are horrific tragedies. In the case of the El Paso shooting, the suspected terrorist gunman appears to have been inspired by the forum website known as 8chan. Based on evidence we’ve seen, it appears that he posted a screed to the site immediately before beginning his terrifying attack on the El Paso Walmart killing 20 people.

Unfortunately, this is not an isolated incident. Nearly the same thing happened on 8chan before the terror attack in Christchurch, New Zealand. The El Paso shooter specifically referenced the Christchurch incident and appears to have been inspired by the largely unmoderated discussions on 8chan which glorified the previous massacre. In a separate tragedy, the suspected killer in the Poway, California synagogue shooting also posted a hate-filled “open letter” on 8chan. 8chan has repeatedly proven itself to be a cesspool of hate.

8chan is among the more than 19 million Internet properties that use Cloudflare’s service. We just sent notice that we are terminating 8chan as a customer effective at midnight tonight Pacific Time. The rationale is simple: they have proven themselves to be lawless and that lawlessness has caused multiple tragic deaths. Even if 8chan may not have violated the letter of the law in refusing to moderate their hate-filled community, they have created an environment that revels in violating its spirit.

We do not take this decision lightly. Cloudflare is a network provider. In pursuit of our goal of helping build a better internet, we’ve considered it important to provide our security services broadly to make sure as many users as possible are secure, and thereby making cyberattacks less attractive — regardless of the content of those websites.  Many of our customers run platforms of their own on top of our network. If our policies are more conservative than theirs it effectively undercuts their ability to run their services and set their own policies. We reluctantly tolerate content that we find reprehensible, but we draw the line at platforms that have demonstrated they directly inspire tragic events and are lawless by design. 8chan has crossed that line. It will therefore no longer be allowed to use our services.

What Will Happen Next

Unfortunately, we have seen this situation before and so we have a good sense of what will play out. Almost exactly two years ago we made the determination to kick another disgusting site off Cloudflare’s network: the Daily Stormer. That caused a brief interruption in the site’s operations but they quickly came back online using a Cloudflare competitor. That competitor at the time promoted as a feature the fact that they didn’t respond to legal process. Today, the Daily Stormer is still available and still disgusting. They have bragged that they have more readers than ever. They are no longer Cloudflare’s problem, but they remain the Internet’s problem.

I have little doubt we’ll see the same happen with 8chan. While removing 8chan from our network takes heat off of us, it does nothing to address why hateful sites fester online. It does nothing to address why mass shootings occur. It does nothing to address why portions of the population feel so disenchanted they turn to hate. In taking this action we’ve solved our own problem, but we haven’t solved the Internet’s.

In the two years since the Daily Stormer what we have done to try and solve the Internet’s deeper problem is engage with law enforcement and civil society organizations to try and find solutions. Among other things, that resulted in us cooperating around monitoring potential hate sites on our network and notifying law enforcement when there was content that contained an indication of potential violence. We will continue to work within the legal process to share information when we can to hopefully prevent horrific acts of violence. We believe this is our responsibility and, given Cloudflare’s scale and reach, we are hopeful we will continue to make progress toward solving the deeper problem.

Rule of Law

We continue to feel incredibly uncomfortable about playing the role of content arbiter and do not plan to exercise it often. Some have wrongly speculated this is due to some conception of the United States’ First Amendment. That is incorrect. First, we are a private company and not bound by the First Amendment. Second, the vast majority of our customers, and more than 50% of our revenue, comes from outside the United States where the First Amendment and similarly libertarian freedom of speech protections do not apply. The only relevance of the First Amendment in this case and others is that it allows us to choose who we do and do not do business with; it does not obligate us to do business with everyone.

Instead our concern has centered around another much more universal idea: the Rule of Law. The Rule of Law requires policies be transparent and consistent. While it has been articulated as a framework for how governments ensure their legitimacy, we have used it as a touchstone when we think about our own policies.

We have been successful because we have a very effective technological solution that provides security, performance, and reliability in an affordable and easy-to-use way. As a result of that, a huge portion of the Internet now sits behind our network. 10% of the top million, 17% of the top 100,000, and 19% of the top 10,000 Internet properties use us today. 10% of the Fortune 1,000 are paying Cloudflare customers.

Cloudflare is not a government. While we’ve been successful as a company, that does not give us the political legitimacy to make determinations on what content is good and bad. Nor should it. Questions around content are real societal issues that need politically legitimate solutions. We will continue to engage with lawmakers around the world as they set the boundaries of what is acceptable in their countries through due process of law. And we will comply with those boundaries when and where they are set.

Europe, for example, has taken a lead in this area. As we’ve seen governments there attempt to address hate and terror content online, there is recognition that different obligations should be placed on companies that organize and promote content — like Facebook and YouTube — rather than those that are mere conduits for that content. Conduits, like Cloudflare, are not visible to users and therefore cannot be transparent and consistent about their policies.

The unresolved question is how should the law deal with platforms that ignore or actively thwart the Rule of Law? That’s closer to the situation we have seen with the Daily Stormer and 8chan. They are lawless platforms. In cases like these, where platforms have been designed to be lawless and unmoderated, and where the platforms have demonstrated their ability to cause real harm, the law may need additional remedies. We and other technology companies need to work with policy makers in order to help them understand the problem and define these remedies. And, in some cases, it may mean moving enforcement mechanisms further down the technical stack.

Our Obligation

Cloudflare’s mission is to help build a better Internet. At some level firing 8chan as a customer is easy. They are uniquely lawless and that lawlessness has contributed to multiple horrific tragedies. Enough is enough.

What’s hard is defining the policy that we can enforce transparently and consistently going forward. We, and other technology companies like us that enable the great parts of the Internet, have an obligation to help propose solutions to deal with the parts we’re not proud of. That’s our obligation and we’re committed to it.

Unfortunately the action we take today won’t fix hate online. It will almost certainly not even remove 8chan from the Internet. But it is the right thing to do. Hate online is a real issue. Here are some organizations that have active work to help address it:

Our whole Cloudflare team’s thoughts are with the families grieving in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio this evening.

Remembering Andy Baker

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/remembering-andy-baker/

We are immensely sad to learn of the death, on 1 June, of Andy Baker, joint founder and organiser of the brilliant Cotswold Raspberry Jam. Andy had been suffering from brain cancer.

andy baker pistuffing

Together with co-founder Andrew Oakley, Andy worked incredibly hard to make the Cotswold Jam one of the most exciting Jams of all, with over 150 people of all ages attending its most popular events. He started working with Raspberry Pis back in 2012, and developed a seriously impressive degree of technical expertise: among his projects were a series of Pi-powered quadcopters, no less, including an autonomous drone. Many of us will forever associate Andy with a memorably fiery incident at the Raspberry Pi Big Birthday Weekend in 2016, which he handled with grace and good humour that eludes most of us:

Raspberry Pi Party Autonomous drone demo + fire

At the Raspberry Pi IV party and there is a great demo of an Autonomous drone which is very impressive with only using a Pi. However it caught on fire. But i believe it does actually work.

Andy maintained his involvement with the Raspberry Pi community, and especially the Cotswold Jam, for several years while living with a brain tumour, and shared his skills and enthusiasm with hundreds of others. He was at the heart of the Raspberry Pi community. When our patron, His Royal Highness the Duke of York, kindly hosted a reception at St. James’s Palace in October 2016 to recognise the Raspberry Pi community, Andy joined us to celebrate in style:

Cotswold Jam on Twitter

@ben_nuttall @DougGore @PiStuffing @rjam_chat Cheers, Ben! Fab photo of Prince Andrew being ignored by @davejavupride & Andy Baker @PiStuffing who are too busy drinking… “It’s what he would have wanted…” 🙂 https://t.co/FK7sk1CoDs

Andy suggested that, if people would like to make a donation in his name, they support his local school’s IT department, somewhere else he used to volunteer. The department isn’t able to accept online donations, but cheques in pounds sterling can be made out to “Gloucestershire County Council” and posted to a local funeral director who will collect and forward them:

Andy Baker memorial fund
c/o Blackwells of Cricklade
Thames House
Thames Lane
Cricklade
SN6 6BH

We owe Andy immense gratitude for all his work to help people learn and have a great time with Raspberry Pi. We were very lucky indeed to have him as part of our community. We will miss him.

The post Remembering Andy Baker appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Possibilities of the Raspberry Pi — from Code Club to Coolest Projects USA

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/possibilities-of-the-raspberry-pi-from-code-club-to-coolest-projects-usa/

Yolanda Payne is a veteran teacher and Raspberry Pi Certified Educator. After discovering a love for computers at an early age (through RadioShack Tandy), Yolanda pursued degrees in Instructional/Educational Technology at Mississippi State University, the University of Florida, and the University of Georgia. She has worked as an instructional designer, webmaster, and teacher, and she loves integrating technology into her lessons. Here’s Yolanda’s story:

My journey to becoming a Raspberry Pi Certified Educator started when an esteemed mentor, Juan Valentin, tweeted about the awesome experience he had while attending Picademy. Having never heard of Picademy or the Raspberry Pi, I decided to check out the website and instantly became intrigued. I applied for a Raspberry Pi STEM kit from the Civil Air Patrol and received a Raspberry Pi and a ton of accessories. My curiosity would not be satisfied until I learned just what I could do with the box of goodies. So I decided to apply to Picademy and was offered a spot after being waitlisted. Thus my obsession with the possibilities of the Raspberry Pi began.

Code Club allows me to provide a variety of lessons, tailored to my students’ interests and skill levels, without me having to be an expert

While at Picademy, I learned about Code Club. Code Club allows me to provide a variety of lessons tailored to my learners’ interests and skill levels, without me having to be an expert in all of the lessons. My students are 6th- to 8th-graders, and there are novice coders as well as intermediate and advanced coders in the group. We work through lessons together, and I get to be a student with them.

I have found a myriad of resources to support their dreams of making

Although I may not have all the answers to their questions, I’m willing to work to secure whatever supplies they need for their project making. Whether through DonorsChoose, grants, student fundraising, or my personal contributions, I have found a myriad of resources to support their dreams of making.

Raspberry Pi group photo!

My district has invested in a one-to-one computer initiative for students, and I am happy to help students become creators of technology and not just consumers. Having worked with Code Club through the Raspberry Pi Foundation, my students and I realize just how achievable this dream can be. I’m able to enhance my Pi skills by teaching a summer hacking camp at our local university, and next year, we have goals to host a Pi Jam! Thankfully, my principal is very supportive of our endeavours.

Students at Coolest Projects USA 2018

This year, a few of my students and my son were able to participate in Coolest Projects USA 2018 to show off their projects, including a home surveillance camera, a RetroPie arcade game, a Smart Mirror, and a photo booth and dash cam. They dedicated a lot of time and effort to bring these projects to life, often on their own and beyond the hours of our Code Club. This adventure has inspired them, and they are already recruiting other students to join them next year! The possibilities of the Raspberry Pi constantly rejuvenates my curiosity and enhances the creativity that I get to bring to my teaching — both inside and outside the classroom.

Learn more

Learn more about the free programmes and resources Yolanda has used on her computer science education journey, such as Picademy, Code Club, and Coolest Projects, by visiting the Education section of our website.

The post Possibilities of the Raspberry Pi — from Code Club to Coolest Projects USA appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Meet us at Maker Faire Bay Area 2019

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/maker-faire-bay-area-2019/

We’ll be attending Maker Faire Bay Area this month and we’d love to see as many of you there as we can, so be sure to swing by the Raspberry Pi stand and say hi!

Our North America team will be on-hand and hands-on all weekend to show you the wonders of the Raspberry Pi, with some great tech experiments for you to try. Do you like outer space? Of course, why wouldn’t you? So come try out the Sense HAT, our multi-sensor add-on board that we created especially for our two Astro Pi units aboard the International Space Station!

We’ll also have stickers, leaflets, and a vast array of information to share about the Raspberry Pi, our clubs and programmes, and how you can get more involved in the Raspberry Pi community.

And that’s not all!

Onstage talks!

Matt Richardson, Executive Director of the Raspberry Pi Foundation North America and all-round incredible person, will be making an appearance on the Make: Electronics by Digi-Key stage at 3pm Saturday 18 May to talk about Making Art with Raspberry Pi.

Matt Richardson

Hi, Matt!

And I’m presenting too! On the Sunday, I’ll be on the DIY Content Creators Stage at 12:30pm with special guests Joel “3D Printing Nerd” Telling and Estefannie Explains it All for a live recording of my podcast to discuss the importance of community for makers and brands.

There will also be a whole host of incredible creations by makers from across the globe, and a wide variety of talks and presentations throughout the weekend. So if you’re a fan of creative contraptions and beastly builds, you’ll be blown away at this year’s Maker Faire.

Showcasing your projects

If you’re planning to attend Maker Faire to showcase your project, we want to hear from you. Leave a comment below with information on your build so we can come and find you on the day. Our trusty videographer Fiacre and I will be scouting for our next favourite Raspberry Pi make, and we’ll also have Andrew with us, who is eager to fill the pages of HackSpace magazine with any cool, creative wonders we find — Pi-related or otherwise!

Discounted tickets!

Maker Fair Bay Area 2019 will be running at the San Mateo County Event Center from Friday 17 to Sunday 19 May.

If you’re in the area and would like to attend Maker Fair Bay Area, make use of  our 15% community discount on tickets. Wooh!

For more information on Maker Faire, check out the Maker Faire website, or follow Maker Faire on Twitter.

See you there!

The post Meet us at Maker Faire Bay Area 2019 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Help us update the Cloudflare Blog!

Post Syndicated from Ryan Knight original https://blog.cloudflare.com/help-us-update-the-cloudflare-blog/

Help us update the Cloudflare Blog!

Help us update the Cloudflare Blog!

Want to get right to the feedback? Click here.

As you’ve probably noticed over the years, we’re always evolving and improving the look and feel of different aspects of the Cloudflare experience. Sometimes it’s more about function, other times it’s more about form, and most of the time it’s a combination of both. But there’s one area of the site that many users visit even more frequently than they visit the homepage or their dashboard, and strangely enough it hasn’t really seen any major updates in years. And if you’re reading this, that means you’re looking at it.

With more than 150 current contributors, and more than 1,000 posts, we have a lot of people dedicating a lot of their time to writing blog posts. And based on the responses I see in the comments, and on Twitter, there are a lot of people who really like to read what these authors have to say (whether it has much to do with Cloudflare or not).

Well, we’d like to finally give some love to the blog. And we really want to know what you, our loyal (or even occasional) readers, think. There are two options to choose from. Simply click the feedback button below and you can either answer some questions on a survey, or if you want to really go the extra mile you can choose to participate in a short, remote, user study with one of our researchers. Either way, we want to know what you think!

Submit Feedback

MagPi 79: get making in March with #MonthOfMaking

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-79-monthofmaking/

Hi folks! Rob from The MagPi here. This month in issue 79 of The MagPi, we’re doing something a little different: we invite all of you (yes, you!) to join us in the #MonthOfMaking.

Learn more about the #MonthOfMaking inside issue 79!

#MonthOfMaking

What does this mean? Well, throughout March, we want you to post pictures of your works-in-progress and completed projects on Twitter with the hashtag #MonthOfMaking.

#MonthOfMaking

As well as showing off the cool stuff you’re creating, we also want you to feel comfortable to ask for help with projects, and to share top tips for those that might be struggling.

If you’re not sure where to start, we’ve put together a massive feature in issue 79 of The MagPi, out now, to help you decide. On top of various project ideas for different skill levels, our feature includes some essential resources to look at, as well as inspirational YouTubers to follow, and some competitions you might want to take part in!

So, go forth and make! I’m really looking forward to seeing what you all get up to during this inaugural #MonthOfMaking!

Get The MagPi 79

You can get The MagPi 79 from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. If you live in the US, head over to your local Barnes & Noble or Micro Center in the next few days for a print copy. You can also get the issue online: check it out on our store, or digitally via our Android or iOS apps. And don’t forget, there’s always the free PDF.

Free Raspberry Pi 3A+ offer!

We’re still running our super special Raspberry Pi 3A+ subscription offer! If you subscribe to twelve months of The MagPi, you’ll get a Raspberry Pi 3A+ completely free while stocks last. Make sure to check out our other subs offers while you’re there, like three issues for £5, and our rolling monthly subscription.

Get a 3A+ completely free while stocks last!

The post MagPi 79: get making in March with #MonthOfMaking appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Celebrate with us this weekend!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/celebrate-with-us-this-weekend/

The Raspberry Jam Big Birthday is almost here! In celebration of our seventh birthday, we’re coordinating with over 130 community‑led Raspberry Jams in 40 countries across six continents this weekend, 3-4 March 2019.

Raspberry Jams come in all shapes and sizes. They range from small pub gatherings fueled by local beer and amiable nerdy chatter to vast multi-room events with a varied programme of project displays, workshops, and talks.

To find your nearest Raspberry Jam, check out our interactive Jam map.

And if you can’t get to a Jam location this time, follow #PiParty on Twitter, where people around the world are already getting excited about their Big Birthday Weekend plans. Over the weekend you’ll see Raspberry Jams happening from the UK to the US, from Africa to – we hope – Antarctica, and everywhere in between.

Coolest Projects UK

The first of this year’s Coolest Projects events is also taking place this weekend in Manchester, UK. Coolest Projects is the world’s leading technology fair for young people, showcasing some of the very best creations by young makers across the country (and beyond), and it’s open for members of the public to attend.

Tickets are still available from the Coolest Projects website, and you can follow the action on #CoolestProjects on Twitter.

CBeebies’ Maddie Moate and the BBC’s Greg Foot will be taking over Raspberry Pi’s Instagram story on the day, so be sure to follow @RaspberryPiFoundation on Instagram.

The post Celebrate with us this weekend! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Highlights from Git 2.21

Post Syndicated from Taylor Blau original https://github.blog/2019-02-24-highlights-from-git-2-21/

The open source Git project just released Git 2.21 with features and bug fixes from over 60 contributors. We last caught up with you on the latest Git releases when 2.19 was released. Here’s a look at some of the most interesting features and changes introduced since then.

Human-readable dates with --date=human

As part of its output, git log displays the date each commit was authored. Without making an alternate selection, timestamps will display in Git’s “default” format (for example, “Tue Feb 12 09:00:33 2019 -0800”).

That’s very precise, but a lot of those details are things that you might already know, or don’t care about. For example, if the commit happened today, you already know what year it is. Likewise, if a commit happened seven years ago, you don’t care which second it was authored. So what do you do? You could use --date=relative, which would give you output like 6 days ago, but often, you want to relate “six days ago” to a specific event, like “my meeting last Wednesday.” So, was six days ago Tuesday, or was it Wednesday that you were interested in?

Git 2.21 introduces a new date format that tells you exactly when something occurred with just the right amount of detail: --date=human. Here’s how git log looks with the new format:

git log --date=human example

That’s both more accurate than --date=relative and easier to consume than the full weight of --date=default.

But what about when you’re scripting? Here, you might want to frequently switch between the human and machine-readable formats while putting together a pipeline. Git 2.21 has an option suitable for this setting, too: --date=auto:human. When printing output to a pager, if Git is given this option it will act as if it had been passed --date=human. When otherwise printing output to a non-pager, Git will act as if no format had been given at all. If human isn’t quite your speed, you can combine auto with any other format of your choosing, like --date=auto:relative.

git log --date=auto:human example[source]

Detecting case-insensitive path collisions

One commonly asked Git question is, “After cloning a repository, why does git status report some of the files as modified?” Quite often, the answer is that the repository contains a tree which cannot be represented on your file system. For instance, if it contains both file as well as FILE and your file system is case-insensitive, Git can only checkout one of those files. Worse, Git doesn’t actually detect this case during the clone; it simply writes out each path, unaware that the file system considers them to be the same file. You only find out something has gone wrong when you see a mystery modification.

The exact rules for when this occurs will vary from system to system. In addition to “folding” what we normally consider upper and lowercase characters in English, you may also see this from language-specific conversions, non-printing characters, or Unicode normalization.

In Git 2.20, git clone now detects and reports colliding groups during the initial checkout, which should remove some of the confusion. Unfortunately, Git can’t actually fix the problem for you. What the original committer put in the repository can’t be checked out as-is on your file system. So if you’re thinking about putting files into a multi-platform project that differ only in case, the best advice is still: don’t.

git
[source]

Performance improvements and other bits

Behind the scenes, a lot has changed over the last couple of Git releases, too. We’re dedicating this section to overview a few of these changes. Not all of them will impact your Git usage day-to-day, but some will, and all of the changes are especially important for server administrators.

Multi-pack indexes

Git stores objects (e.g., representations of the files, directories, and more that make up your Git repository) in both the “loose” and “packed” formats. A “loose” object is a compressed encoding of an object, stored in a file. A “packed” object is stored in a packfile, which is a collection of objects, written in terms of deltas of one another.

Because it can be costly to rewrite these packs every time a new object is added to the repository, repositories tend to accumulate many loose objects or individual packs over time. Eventually, these are reconciled during a “repack” operation. However, this reconciliation is not possible for larger repositories, like the Windows repository.

Instead of repacking, Git can now create a multi-pack index file, which is a listing of objects residing in multiple packs, removing the need to perform expensive repacks (in many cases).

[source]

Delta islands

An important optimization for Git servers is that the format for transmitted objects is the same as the heavily-compressed on-disk packfiles. That means that in many cases, Git can serve repositories to clients by simply copying bytes off disk without having to inflate individual objects.

But sometimes this assumption breaks down. Objects on disk may be stored as “deltas” against one another. When two versions of a file have similar content, we might store the full contents of one version (the “base”), but only the differences against the base for the other version. This creates a complication when serving a fetch. If object A is stored as a delta against object B, we can only send the client our on-disk version of A if we are also sending them B (or if we know they already have B). Otherwise, we have to reconstruct the full contents of A and re-compress it.

This happens rarely in many repositories where clients clone all of the objects stored by the server. But it can be quite common when multiple distinct but overlapping sets of objects are stored in the same packfile (for example, due to repository forks or unmerged pull requests). Git may store a delta between objects found only in two different forks. When someone clones one of the forks, they want only one of the objects, and we have to discard the delta.

Git 2.20 solves this by introducing the concept of “delta islands. Repository administrators can partition the ref namespace into distinct “islands”, and Git will avoid making deltas between islands. The end result is a repository which is slightly larger on disk but is still able to serve client fetches much more cheaply.

[source 1, source 2]

Delta reuse with bitmaps

We already discussed the importance of reusing on-disk deltas when serving fetches, but how do we know when the other side has the base object they’ need to use the delta we send them? If we’re sending them the base, too, then the answer is easy. But if we’re not, how do we know if they have it?

That answer is deceptively simple: the client will have already told us which commits it has (so that we don’t bother sending them again). If they claim to have a commit which contains the base object, then we can re-use the delta. But there’s one hitch: we not only need to know about the commit they mentioned, but also the entire object graph. The base may have been part of a commit hundreds or thousands of commits deep in the history of the project.

Git doesn’t traverse the entire object graph to check for possible bases because it’s too expensive to do so. For instance, walking the entire graph of a Linux kernel takes roughly 30 seconds.

Fortunately, there’s already a solution within Git: reachability bitmaps. Git has an optional on-disk data structure to record the sets of objects “reachable” from each commit. When this data is available, we can query it to quickly determine whether the client has a base object. This results in the server generating smaller packs that are produced more quickly for an overall faster fetch experience.

[source]

Custom alternates reference advertisement

Repository alternates are a tool that server administrators have at their disposal to reduce redundant information. When two repositories are known to share objects (like a fork and its parent), the fork can list the parent as an “alternate”, and any objects the fork doesn’t have itself, it can look for in its parent. This is helpful since we can avoid storing twice the vast number of objects shared between the fork and parent.

Likewise, a repository with alternates advertises “tips” it has when receiving a push. In other words, before writing from your computer to a remote, that remote will tell you what the tips of its branches are, so you can determine information that is already known by the remote, and therefore use less bandwidth. When a repository has alternates, the tips advertisement is the union of all local and alternate branch tips.

But what happens when computing the tips of an alternate is more expensive than a client sending redundant data? It makes the push so slow that we have disabled this feature for years at GitHub. In Git 2.20, repositories can hook into the way that they enumerate alternate tips, and make the corresponding transaction much faster.

[source]

Tidbits

Now that we’ve highlighted a handful of the changes in the past two releases, we want to share a summary of a few other interesting changes. As always, you can learn more by clicking the “source” link, or reading the documentation or release notes.

  • Have you ever tried to run git cherry-pick on a merge commit only to have it fail? You might have found that the fix involves passing -m1 and moved on. In fact, -m1 says to select the first parent as the mainline, and it replays the relevant commits. Prior to Git 2.21, passing this option on a non-merge commit caused an error, but now it transparently does what you meant. [source]

  • Veteran Git users from our last post might recall that git branch -l establishes a reflog for a newly created branch, instead of listing all branches. Now, instead of doing something you almost certainly didn’t mean, git branch -l will list all of your repository’s branches, keeping in line with other commands that accept -l. [source]

  • If you’ve ever been stuck or forgotten what a certain command or flag does, you might have run git --help (or git -h) to learn more. In Git 2.21, this invocation now follows aliases, and shows the aliased command’s helptext. [source]

  • In repositories with large on-disk checkouts, git status can take a long time to complete. In order to indicate that it’s making progress, the status command now displays a progress bar. [source]

  • Many parts of Git have historically been implemented as shell scripts, calling into tools written in C to do the heavy lifting. While this allowed rapid prototyping, the resulting tools could often be slow due to the overhead of running many separate programs. There are continuing efforts to move these scripts into C, affecting git submodule, git bisect, and git rebase. You may notice rebase in particular being much faster, due to the hard work of the Summer of Code students, Pratik Karki and Alban Gruin.

  • The -G option tells git log to only show commits whose diffs match a particular pattern. But until Git 2.21, it was searching binary files as if they were text, which made things slower and often produced confusing results. [source]

That’s all for now

We went through a few of the changes that have happened over the last couple of versions, but there’s a lot more to discover. Read the release notes for 2.21, or review the release notes for previous versions in the Git repository.

The post Highlights from Git 2.21 appeared first on The GitHub Blog.

What we are learning about learning

Post Syndicated from Oliver Quinlan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/what-we-are-learning-about-learning/

Across Code Clubs, CoderDojos, Raspberry Jams, and all our other education programmes, we’re working with hundreds of thousands of young people. They are all making different projects and learning different things while they are making. The research team at the Raspberry Pi Foundation does lots of work to help us understand what exactly these young people learn, and how the adults and peers who mentor them share their skills with them.

Coolest Projects International 2018

Senior Research Manager Oliver Quinlan chats to participants at Coolest Projects 2018

We do our research work by:

  • Visiting clubs, Dojos, and events, seeing how they run, and talking to the adults and young people involved
  • Running surveys to get feedback on how people are helping young people learn
  • Testing new approaches and resources with groups of clubs and Dojos to try different ways which might help to engage more young people or help them learn more effectively

Over the last few months, we’ve been running lots of research projects and gained some fascinating insights into how young people are engaging with digital making. As well as using these findings to shape our education work, we also publish what we find, for free, over on our research page.

How do children tackle digital making projects?

We found that making ambitious digital projects is a careful balance between ideas, technology, and skills. Using this new understanding, we will help children and the adults that support them plan a process for exploring open-ended projects.

Coolest Projects USA 2018

Coolest Projects USA 2018

For this piece of research, we interviewed children and young people at last year’s Coolest Projects International and Coolest Projects UK , asking questions about the kinds of projects they made and how they created them. We found that the challenge they face is finding a balance between three things: the ideas and problems they want to address, the technologies they have access to, and their skills. Different children approached their projects in different ways, some starting with the technology they had access to, others starting with an idea or with a problem they wanted to solve.

Achieving big ambitions with the technology you have to hand while also learning the skills you need can be tricky. We’re planning to develop more resources to help young people with this.

Coolest Projects International 2018

Research Assistant Lucia Florianova learns about Rebel Girls at Coolest Projects International 2018

We also found out a lot about the power of seeing other children’s projects, what children learn, and the confidence they develop in presenting their projects at these events. Alongside our analysis, we’ve put together some case studies of the teams we interviewed, so people can read in-depth about their projects and the stories of how they created them.

Who comes to Code Club?

In another research project, we found that Code Clubs in schools are often diverse and cater well for the communities the schools serve; Code Club is not an exclusive club, but something for everyone.

Code Club Athens

Code Clubs are run by volunteers in all sorts of schools, libraries, and other venues across the world; we know a lot about the spaces the clubs take place in and the volunteers who run them, but less about the children who choose to take part. We’ve started to explore this through structured visits to clubs in a sample of schools across the West Midlands in England, interviewing teachers about the groups of children in their club. We knew Code Clubs were reaching schools that cater for a whole range of communities, and the evidence of this project suggests that the children who attend the Code Club in those schools come from a range of backgrounds themselves.

Scouts Raspberry Pi

Photo c/o Dave Bird — thanks, Dave!

We found that in these primary schools, children were motivated to join Code Club more because the club is fun rather than because the children see themselves as people who are programmers. This is partly because adults set up Code Clubs with an emphasis on fun: although children are learning, they are not perceiving Code Club as an academic activity linked with school work. Our project also showed us how Code Clubs fit in with the other after-school clubs in schools, and that children often choose Code Club as part of a menu of after-school clubs.

Raspberry Jam

Visitors to Pi Towers Raspberry Jam get hands-on with coding

In the last few months we’ve also published insights into how Raspberry Pi Certified Educators are using their training in schools, and into how schools are using Raspberry Pi computers. You can find our reports on all of these topics over at our research page.

Thanks to all the volunteers, educators, and young people who are finding time to help us with their research. If you’re involved in any of our education programmes and want to take part in a research project, or if you are doing your own research into computing education and want to start a conversation, then reach out to us via [email protected]aspberrypi.org.

The post What we are learning about learning appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Celebrate our seventh birthday at a Raspberry Jam near you!

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-jam-seventh-birthday-near-you/

Seven years ago, the Raspberry Pi was launched, and that kickstarted everything the Foundation has done. We always celebrate this “birthday” with community-focused events, and this year on the first March weekend, we are again coordinating local Jams all over the world so you can join the party!

Raspberry Pi - Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend animated GIF

Calling all community members

Whether you’re a Raspberry Pi user, club volunteer, avid forum question answerer, regular blog commenter, or brand-new community member, we want you to feel welcome! Look at the map, find a Jam near you, and meet the real-world Raspberry Pi community on 2 or 3 March.

Interactive map of Raspberry Jam locations across the globe

Click through for an up-to-date interactive map

Manchester is coolest!

Coolest Projects UK, our world-leading technology fair for young people, will take place in Manchester on 2 March, and Manchester’s Birthday Jam is going to happen inside the Coolest Projects venue! We’re tying the two events together so that those of you in the North West can attend Coolest Projects without missing out on the Birthday Jam. Keep your eye on mcrraspjam.org.uk for information on Jam tickets — coming soon!

Project idea registration for Coolest Projects UK is on closing 10 Feb — only a scant few days left for the creative young maker in your life to register their idea! If you know someone who might want to participate, head over to the Coolest Projects UK website for more details.

Photobooth fun

One of the treats in the Big Birthday Weekend kit we’ve got for Jam organisers is an arcade button they can use to make their own Raspberry Pi–powered tweeting photobooths for the big day. Download the code for the project and make it your own!

A Raspberry Pi-based photobooth created for last years Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend

RGVSA on Twitter

PiParty photo booth @RGVSA & @ @Nerdvana_io #Rjam

There’s still time

If you’re only just hearing about this now, and you want to run a Jam on the Big Birthday Weekend, all you need to do is:

  1. Find a venue
  2. Create a sign-up page (e.g. on Eventbrite)
  3. Submit the event to the Jam map

Once we’ve checked your submission, we’ll add your Jam to the map and send you a coupon you can use to get a free Big Birthday Weekend kit from ModMyPi.

Along with the kit, you’ll also get up to three free T-shirts. They’re also available to buy just £5.65.

A Raspberry Jam t-shirt - black, with the logo on the front

2020 vision

I’m already looking forward to our eighth birthday — next year is a leap year, so we’ll be able to celebrate on Saturday 29 February 2020!

The post Celebrate our seventh birthday at a Raspberry Jam near you! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Our ultimate guide to running your own Coolest Projects event

Post Syndicated from Sinead Gleeson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/our-ultimate-guide-to-running-your-own-coolest-projects-event/

Coolest Projects, our world-leading technology fair for young people, takes place in seven countries this year: Ireland, the UK, USA, Netherlands, Belgium, Bulgaria, and Milan in Italy.

Coolest Projects 2019 Logo

Volunteer-led Coolest Projects events

Teams of marvellous volunteers organise and run the events in the Netherlands, Belgium, Bulgaria, and Milan! They are doing incredible work to give children in their regions the chance to present their tech creations and be celebrated for their skills and creativity.

And we want to support you in our global community to do the same: organise your own regional Coolest Projects events, wherever you are, so that young people near you can showcase their work and be inspired by others’ inventions.

5 reasons to host your own Coolest Projects event

Running your own Coolest Projects is your chance to:

  1. Celebrate the creativity of young creators
  2. Grow your local coding and volunteer community
  3. Engage parents and educators with technology
  4. Develop connections with local businesses
  5. Build the worldwide network of Coolest Projects participants, partners, and volunteers

The Coolest Projects Regional Handbook

We’ve put together a free Coolest Projects Regional Handbook that walks you through everything you need to organise your own Coolest Projects event!

Our brand-new handbook brings together everything you need to plan, prepare for, and host your own regional Coolest Projects event. It includes practical advice on:

  • Building your Coolest Projects team
  • Managing an event budget
  • Choosing a venue
  • Sponsorship and partner management
  • Communications and marketing
  • Coolest Projects licensing

Your regional event does not have to be large or formal — it can be as big or small as your community’s volunteers want it to be, and tailored to your community’s needs and interests.

Coolest Projects UK 2018 Raspberry Pi Foundation CoderDojo

Like the volunteer teams who already run regional Coolest Projects, you too can run your own event — with our handbook as guidance.

Download your free handbook now!

If you’re interested in bringing Coolest Projects to your community, email us at [email protected] so we can connect you to other volunteers in your region who have expressed their interest to us! Letting us know you want to be involved will also enable us to give you more support while you’re getting started.

You’ve only got a little time left to register your idea

To participate in this year’s Coolest Projects, just register your project idea by the deadline (see below)! And don’t fret: you don’t have to have started your project to register, just the idea is enough.

If you don’t want to present something by yourself, you can register in a team of up to five members.

And you don’t need to have finished your project to present it at the event, because the most important thing is to showcase your love and enthusiasm for tech!

Registration deadlines:

Registration for all Coolest Projects events is free! And you’re also more than welcome to visit and check out the amazing projects without submitting your own. For more information, and to get your free visitor tickets, visit the Coolest Projects website and select your nearest event.

The post Our ultimate guide to running your own Coolest Projects event appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

New Picademy North America dates for 2019

Post Syndicated from Andrew Collins original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/new-picademy-2019-dates/

Hooray, Picademy is back! We’re excited to bring our free computer science and digital making professional development program for educators to three new cities this summer:



Picademy 2019 dates

We’re thrilled to kick off our 2019 season, partnering with three new venues: we’ll be at Computer History Museum in the Bay Area the first week in June, at the University of California, Irvine in July, and at the Toronto Public Library in the second week in August. A big thank you to these venues for hosting us and supporting local educators to attend our free professional development program!



Picademy 2018 highlights

Last year, we partnered with four awesome venues to host eight Picademy events in the United States. Across the country at each Picademy, we met incredibly talented educators who are passionate about bringing digital making to their learners. Whether at the Liberty Science Center makerspace, on Georgia Tech University’s campus, or within the archives of the Living Computer Museum, we were truly inspired by all of our Picademy attendees, and thrilled to welcome them to the Raspberry Pi Certified Educator community.

Picademy at Liberty Science Center (June 18, 2018 – June 22, 2018)

A total of 80 educators from all over the globe visited Liberty Science Center the week of June 18 – 22 to learn coding and technology skills as part of the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s Picademy program. The week of learning culminated in a programming design challenge where the participants created projects using their new skills via the Raspberry Pi computer.

The 2018 Picademy cohorts were diverse and experienced in their field: more than 300 educators from 48 different U.S. states and 9 countries participated — a mix of high school, middle, and elementary classroom teachers, librarians, museum staff, university lecturers, and teacher trainers. We loved having the chance to welcome educators from such different backgrounds and help them learn, connect, collaborate, and create awesome projects together.

Picademy has a big impact on educators: last year, 78% of our graduates said they felt confident using Raspberry Pi after attending, and 70% said they were very likely to share their experience with their students and colleagues. And the majority of our Picademy attendees also developed an interest in starting a Code Club or a CoderDojo in their community!








Ready to join us for Picademy 2019? Learn more and apply now.

The post New Picademy North America dates for 2019 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Staff Picademy and the sacrificial Babbage

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/staff-picademy-and-the-sacrificial-babbage/

Refill the coffee machine, unpack the sacrificial Babbages, and refresh the micro SD cards — it’s staff Picademy time!

Raspberry Pi Staff Picademy

Staff Picademy

Once a year, when one of our all-staff meeting brings together members of the Raspberry Pi team from across the globe, we host staff Picademy at our office. It’s two days of making and breaking where the coding-uninitiated — as well as the more experienced people! — are put through their paces and rewarded with Raspberry Pi Certified Educator status at the end.

Lest we forget the sacrificial Babbages and all they have done in the name of professional development

What is Picademy?

Picademy is our free two-day professional development programme where educators come together to gain knowledge and confidence in digital making and computing. On Day 1, you learn new skills; on Day 2, you put your learning to the test by finding some other participants and creating a project together, from scratch!

Our Picademy events in the United Kingdom and in North America have hosted more than 2000 Raspberry Pi Certified Educators, who have gone on to create after-school coding clubs, makerspaces, school computing labs, and other amazing things to increasethe accessibility of computing and digital making for tens of thousands of young people.

Why do we run staff Picademy?

Because we stand by what we preach: we believe in learning through making, and we want our staff to be able to attend events, volunteer at Picademy, Code Clubs, CoderDojos, and Raspberry Jams, and feel confident in what they say and do.

And also, because Picademy is really fun!

Stuff and things, bits and bobs: staples of any good Picademy

You don’t need to be techy to work at Raspberry Pi: we’re not all engineers. Our staff ranges from educators and web developers to researchers, programme managers, administrators, and accountants. And we think everyone should give coding a shot, so we love getting our staff together to allow them to explore a new skill — and have some fun in the process.

I *think* this has something to do with The MagPi and a Christmas tree?

At our staff Picademy events, we’ve made everything from automated rock bands out of tin foil to timelapse buggies, and it really is a wonderful experience to see people come together and, within two days, take a skillset that may be completely new to them and use it to create a fully working, imaginative project.

Timelapse buggy is a thing is beauty…as is Brian

Your turn

If you’re an educator looking to try something new in your classroom, keep an eye on our channels, because we’ll be announcing dates for Picademy 2019 soon. You will find them on the Picademy page and see them pop up if you follow the #Picademy tag on Twitter. We’ll also announce the dates and locations in our Raspberry Pi LEARN newsletter, so be sure to sign up.

And if you’d like to join the Raspberry Pi team and build something silly and/or amazing at next year’s staff Picademy, we have roles available in the UK, Ireland, and North America.

The post Staff Picademy and the sacrificial Babbage appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Take part in Hour of Code 2018

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hour-of-code-2018/

Every year for the last five years, Hour of Code has encouraged school students to spend just one hour writing some code, in the hope that they get bitten by the bug rather than generating too many bugs! This year, you can find activities from the Raspberry Pi Foundation, Code Club, and CoderDojo on the official Hour of Code website.

Boat race

Boat race, a Code Club resource, is a one-hour project aimed at beginners. It guides students to use Scratch to create a game in which the player uses their mouse to navigate a boat to a desert island without bumping into obstacles.

Scratch can run in any browser, or directly from a Raspberry Pi, making it on of the easiest ways for students to get into coding for the Hour of Code.

The Boat race resource is available in many languages, including Arabic, Simplified Chinese, Czech, Greek, Hebrew, and Ukrainian.

Beginner Scratch Sushi Cards

Again using Scratch, this CoderDojo project walks students through how to create a fish-catching game where the player controls a shark sprite.

Astro Pi Mission Zero

In in the Mission Zero project, students write a short Python program that checks the ambient temperature onboard the International Space Station, and leaves a message for the astronauts there!

Students complete this Hour of Code challenge using the Trinket online Astro Pi simulator, and those based in an ESA Member or Associate States can submit their code to run onboard the ISS. They’ll even receive an official certificate showing where the ISS was when their code ran.

A full list of ESA Member and Associate States can be found here.

Us too!

We don’t just create activities for other people to experience digital making and learning — we also get involved ourselves! Every month we host a maker day for our staff, where everyone can try out our digital making projects or even work on their own project. Our December maker day is during Hour of Code week, and we are going to make an extra-special effort and try to get as many staff members as possible coding!

The educators at Raspberry Pi are fans of Seymour Papert’s constructionist learning philosophy — you can read his Mindstorms book in this free PDF — and the joy of learning through making isn’t just a thing for kids; adults get just as much positivity out of creating digital fart noises or animating crazed chickens to chase the Scratch cat. With the right support from our wide range of projects, anyone can make their own ideas a reality through coding — Senior Learning Manager Lauren, for example, got very excited about her Morrissey haiku project!

Being able to code is creative; it lets you bring your idea to life, whether that’s something that could help millions of people or simply something you think would be cool.

So, whether you’re an absolute beginner to coding or you’ve fixed so many bugs that your nickname is ‘The Exterminator’, what will YOU code this week?

The post Take part in Hour of Code 2018 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.