Tag Archives: roles

Now Use AWS IAM to Delete a Service-Linked Role When You No Longer Require an AWS Service to Perform Actions on Your Behalf

Post Syndicated from Ujjwal Pugalia original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/now-use-aws-iam-to-delete-a-service-linked-role-when-you-no-longer-require-an-aws-service-to-perform-actions-on-your-behalf/

Earlier this year, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) introduced service-linked roles, which provide you an easy and secure way to delegate permissions to AWS services. Each service-linked role delegates permissions to an AWS service, which is called its linked service. Service-linked roles help with monitoring and auditing requirements by providing a transparent way to understand all actions performed on your behalf because AWS CloudTrail logs all actions performed by the linked service using service-linked roles. For information about which services support service-linked roles, see AWS Services That Work with IAM. Over time, more AWS services will support service-linked roles.

Today, IAM added support for the deletion of service-linked roles through the IAM console and the IAM API/CLI. This means you now can revoke permissions from the linked service to create and manage AWS resources in your account. When you delete a service-linked role, the linked service no longer has the permissions to perform actions on your behalf. To ensure your AWS services continue to function as expected when you delete a service-linked role, IAM validates that you no longer have resources that require the service-linked role to function properly. This prevents you from inadvertently revoking permissions required by an AWS service to manage your existing AWS resources and helps you maintain your resources in a consistent state. If there are any resources in your account that require the service-linked role, you will receive an error when you attempt to delete the service-linked role, and the service-linked role will remain in your account. If you do not have any resources that require the service-linked role, you can delete the service-linked role and IAM will remove the service-linked role from your account.

In this blog post, I show how to delete a service-linked role by using the IAM console. To learn more about how to delete service-linked roles by using the IAM API/CLI, see the DeleteServiceLinkedRole API documentation.

Note: The IAM console does not currently support service-linked role deletion for Amazon Lex, but you can delete your service-linked role by using the Amazon Lex console. To learn more, see Service Permissions.

How to delete a service-linked role by using the IAM console

If you no longer need to use an AWS service that uses a service-linked role, you can remove permissions from that service by deleting the service-linked role through the IAM console. To delete a service-linked role, you must have permissions for the iam:DeleteServiceLinkedRole action. For example, the following IAM policy grants the permission to delete service-linked roles used by Amazon Redshift. To learn more about working with IAM policies, see Working with Policies.

{ 
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "AllowDeletionOfServiceLinkedRolesForRedshift",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": ["iam:DeleteServiceLinkedRole"],
            "Resource": ["arn:aws:iam::*:role/aws-service-role/redshift.amazonaws.com/AWSServiceRoleForRedshift*"]
	 }
    ]
}

To delete a service-linked role by using the IAM console:

  1. Navigate to the IAM console and choose Roles from the navigation pane.

Screenshot of the Roles page in the IAM console

  1. Choose the service-linked role you want to delete and then choose Delete role. In this example, I choose the  AWSServiceRoleForRedshift service-linked role.

Screenshot of the AWSServiceRoleForRedshift service-linked role

  1. A dialog box asks you to confirm that you want to delete the service-linked role you have chosen. In the Last activity column, you can see when the AWS service last used the service-linked role, which tells you when the linked service last used the service-linked role to perform an action on your behalf. If you want to continue to delete the service-linked role, choose Yes, delete to delete the service-linked role.

Screenshot of the "Delete role" window

  1. IAM then checks whether you have any resources that require the service-linked role you are trying to delete. While IAM checks, you will see the status message, Deletion in progress, below the role name. Screenshot showing "Deletion in progress"
  1. If no resources require the service-linked role, IAM deletes the role from your account and displays a success message on the console.

Screenshot of the success message

  1. If there are AWS resources that require the service-linked role you are trying to delete, you will see the status message, Deletion failed, below the role name.

Screenshot showing the "Deletion failed"

  1. If you choose View details, you will see a message that explains the deletion failed because there are resources that use the service-linked role.
    Screenshot showing details about why the role deletion failed
  2. Choose View Resources to view the Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) of the first five resources that require the service-linked role. You can delete the service-linked role only after you delete all resources that require the service-linked role. In this example, only one resource requires the service-linked role.

Conclusion

Service-linked roles make it easier for you to delegate permissions to AWS services to create and manage AWS resources on your behalf and to understand all actions the service will perform on your behalf. If you no longer need to use an AWS service that uses a service-linked role, you can remove permissions from that service by deleting the service-linked role through the IAM console. However, before you delete a service-linked role, you must delete all the resources associated with that role to ensure that your resources remain in a consistent state.

If you have any questions, submit a comment in the “Comments” section below. If you need help working with service-linked roles, start a new thread on the IAM forum or contact AWS Support.

– Ujjwal

Surviving Your First Year

Post Syndicated from Gleb Budman original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/startup-stages-surviving-your-first-year/

Surviving Your First Year

This post by Backblaze’s CEO and co-founder Gleb Budman is the fifth in a series about entrepreneurship. You can choose posts in the series from the list below:

  1. How Backblaze got Started: The Problem, The Solution, and the Stuff In-Between
  2. Building a Competitive Moat: Turning Challenges Into Advantages
  3. From Idea to Launch: Getting Your First Customers
  4. How to Get Your First 1,000 Customers
  5. Surviving Your First Year

Use the Join button above to receive notification of new posts in this series.

In my previous posts, I talked about coming up with an idea, determining the solution, and getting your first customers. But you’re building a company, not a product. Let’s talk about what the first year should look like.

The primary goals for that first year are to: 1) set up the company; 2) build, launch, and learn; and 3) survive.

Setting Up the Company

The company you’re building is more than the product itself, and you’re not going to do it alone. You don’t want to spend too much time on this since getting customers is key, but if you don’t set up the basics, there are all sorts of issues down the line.

startup idea board

Find Your Co-Founders & Determine Roles

You may already have the idea, but who do you need to execute it? At Backblaze, we needed people to build the web experience, the client backup application, and the server/storage side. We also needed someone to handle the business/marketing aspects, and we felt that the design and user experience were critical. As a result, we started with five co-founders: three engineers, a designer, and me for the business and marketing.

Of course not every role needs to be filled by a co-founder. You can hire employees for positions as well. But think through the strategic skills you’ll need to launch and consider co-founders with those skill sets.

Too many people think they can just “work together” on everything. Don’t. Determine roles as quickly as possible so that it’s clear who is responsible for what work and which decisions. We were lucky in that we had worked together and thus knew what each person would do, but even so we assigned titles early on to clarify roles.

Takeaway:   Fill critical roles and explicitly split roles and responsibilities.

Get Your Legal Basics In Place

When we’re excited about building a product, legal basics are often the last thing we want to deal with. You don’t need to go overboard, but it’s critical to get certain things done.

  1. Determine ownership split. What is the percentage breakdown of the company that each of the founders will own? It can be a tough discussion, but it only becomes more difficult later when there is more value and people have put more time into it. At Backblaze we split the equity equally five ways. This is uncommon. The benefit of this is that all the founders feel valued and “in it together.” The benefit of the more common split where someone has a dominant share is that person is typically empowered to be the ultimate decision-maker. Slicing Pie provides some guidance on how to think about splitting equity. Regardless of which way you want you go, don’t put it off.
  2. Incorporate. Hard to be a company if you’re not. There are various formats, but if you plan to raise angel/venture funding, a Delaware-based C-corp is standard.
  3. Deal With Stock. At a minimum, issue stock to the founders, have each one buy their shares, and file an 83(b). Buying your shares at this stage might be $100. Filing the 83(b) election marks the date at which you purchased your shares, and shows that you bought them for what they were worth. This one piece of paper paper can make the difference between paying long-term capital gains rates (~20%) or income tax rates (~40%).
  4. Assign Intellectual Property. Ask everyone to sign a Proprietary Information and Inventions Assignment (“PIIA”). This document says that what they do at the company is owned by the company. Early on we had a friend who came by and brainstormed ideas. We thought of it as interesting banter. He later said he owned part of our storage design. While we worked it out together, a PIIA makes ownership clear.

The ownership split can be worked out by the founders directly. For the other items, I would involve lawyers. Some law firms will set up the basics and defer payment until you raise money or the business can pay for services out of operations. Gunderson Dettmer did that for us (ask for Bennett Yee). Cooley will do this on a casey-by-case basis as well.

Takeaway:  Don’t let the excitement of building a company distract you from filing the basic legal documents required to protect and grow your company.

Get Health Insurance

This item may seem out of place, but not having health insurance can easily bankrupt you personally, and that certainly won’t bode well for your company. While you can buy individual health insurance, it will often be less expensive to buy it as a company. Also, it will make recruiting employees more difficult if you do not offer healthcare. When we contacted brokers they asked us to send the W-2 of each employee that wanted coverage, but the founders weren’t taking a salary at first. To work around this, make the founders ‘officers’ of the company, and the healthcare brokers can then insure them. (Of course, you need to be ok with your co-founders being officers, but hopefully, that is logical anyway.)

Takeaway:  Don’t take your co-founders’ physical and financial health for granted. Health insurance can serve as both individual protection and a recruiting tool for future employees.

Building, Launching & Learning

Getting the company set up gives you the foundation, but ultimately a company with no product and no customers isn’t very interesting.

Build

Ideally, you have one person on the team focusing on all of the items above and everyone else can be heads-down building product. There is a lot to say about building product, but for this post, I’ll just say that your goal is to get something out the door that is good enough to start collecting feedback. It doesn’t have to have every feature you dream of and doesn’t have to support 1 billion users on day one.

Launch

If you’re building a car or rocket, that may take some time. But with the availability of open-source software and cloud services, most startups should launch inside of a year.

Launching forces a scoping of the feature set to what’s critical, rallies the company around a goal, starts building awareness of your company and solution, and pushes forward the learning process. Backblaze launched in public beta on June 2, 2008, eight months after the founders all started working on it full-time.

Takeaway:  Focus on the most important features and launch.

Learn & Iterate

As much as we think we know about the customers and their needs, the launch process and beyond opens up all sorts of insights. This early period is critical to collect feedback and iterate, especially while both the product and company are still quite malleable. We initially planned on building peer-to-peer and local backup immediately on the heels of our online offering, but after launching found minimal demand for those features. On the other hand, there was tremendous demand from companies and resellers.

Takeaway:  Use the critical post-launch period to collect feedback and iterate.

Surviving

“Live to fight another day.” If the company doesn’t survive, it’s hard to change the world. Let’s talk about some of the survival components.

Consider What You As A Founding Team Want & How You Work

Are you doing this because you hope to get rich? See yourself on the cover of Fortune? Make your own decisions? Work from home all the time? Founder fighting is the number one reason companies fail; the founders need to be on the same page as much as possible.

At Backblaze we agreed very early on that we wanted three things:

  1. Build products we were proud of
  2. Have fun
  3. Make money

This has driven various decisions over the years and has evolved into being part of the culture. For example, while Backblaze is absolutely a company with a profit motive, we do not compromise the product to make more money. Other directions are not bad; they’re just different.

Do you want a lifestyle business? Or want to build a billion dollar business? Want to run it forever or build it for a couple years and do something else?

Pretend you’re getting married to each other. Do some introspection and talk about your vision of the future a lot. Do you expect everyone to work 20 or 100 hours every week? In the office or remote? How do you like to work? What pet peeves do you have?

When getting married each person brings the “life they’ve known,” often influenced by the life their parents lived. Together they need to decide which aspects of their previous lives they want to keep, toss, or change. As founders coming together, you have the same opportunity for your new company.

Takeaway:  In order for a company to survive, the founders must agree on what they want the company to be. Have the discussions early.

Determine How You Will Fund Your Business

Raising venture capital is often seen as the only path, and considered the most important thing to start doing on day one. However, there are a variety of options for funding your business, including using money from savings, part-time work, friends & family money, loans, angels, and customers. Consider the right option for you, your founding team, and your business.

Conserve Cash

Whichever option you choose for funding your business, chances are high that you will not be flush with cash on day one. In certain situations, you actually don’t want to conserve cash because you’ve raised $100m and now you want to run as fast as you can to capture a market — cash is plentiful and time is not. However, with the exception of founder struggles, running out of cash is the most common way companies go under. There are many ways to conserve cash — limit hiring of employees and consultants, use lawyers and accountants sparingly, don’t spend on advertising, work from a home office, etc. The most important way is to simply ensure that you and your team are cash conscious, challenging decisions that commit you to spending cash.

Backblaze spent a total of $94,122 to get to public beta launch. That included building the backup application, our own server infrastructure, the website with account/billing/restore functionality, the marketing involved in getting to launch, and all the steps above in setting up the company, paying for healthcare, etc. The five founders took no salary during this time (which, of course, would have cost dramatically more), so most of this money went to computers, servers, hard drives, and other infrastructure.

Takeaway:  Minimize cash burn — it extends your runway and gives you options.

Slowly Flesh Out Your Team

We started with five co-founders, and thus a fairly fleshed-out team. A year in, we only added one person, a Mac architect. Three months later we shipped a beta of our Mac version, which has resulted in more than 50% of our revenue.

Minimizing hiring is key to cash conservation, and hiring ahead of getting market feedback is risky since you may realize that the talent you need will change. However, once you start getting feedback, think about the key people that you need to move your company forward. But be rigorous in determining whether they’re critical. We didn’t hire our first customer support person until all five founders were spending 20% of their time on it.

Takeaway:  Don’t hire in anticipation of market growth; hire to fuel the growth.

Keep Your Spirits Up

Startups are roller coasters of emotion. There have been some serious articles about founders suffering from depression and worse. The idea phase is exhilarating, then there is the slog of building. The launch is a blast, but the week after there are crickets.

On June 2, 2008, we launched in public beta with great press and hordes of customers. But a few months later we were signing up only about 10 new customers per month. That’s $50 new monthly recurring revenue (MRR) after a year of work and no salary.

On August 25, 2008, we brought on our Mac architect. Two months later, on October 26, 2008, Apple launched Time Machine — completely free and built-in backup for all Macs.

There were plenty of times when our prospects looked bleak. In the rearview mirror it’s easy to say, “well sure, but now you have lots of customers,” or “yes, but Time Machine doesn’t do cloud backup.” But at the time neither of these were a given.

Takeaway:  Getting up each day and believing that as a team you’ll figure it out will let you get to the point where you can look in the rearview mirror and say, “It looked bleak back then.”

Succeeding in Your First Year

I titled the post “Surviving Your First Year,” but if you manage to, 1) set up the company; 2) build, launch, and learn; and 3) survive, you will have done more than survive: you’ll have truly succeeded in your first year.

The post Surviving Your First Year appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Greater Transparency into Actions AWS Services Perform on Your Behalf by Using AWS CloudTrail

Post Syndicated from Ujjwal Pugalia original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/get-greater-transparency-into-actions-aws-services-perform-on-your-behalf-by-using-aws-cloudtrail/

To make managing your AWS account easier, some AWS services perform actions on your behalf, including the creation and management of AWS resources. For example, AWS Elastic Beanstalk automatically handles the deployment details of capacity provisioning, load balancing, auto-scaling, and application health monitoring. To make these AWS actions more transparent, AWS adds an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) service-linked roles to your account for each linked service you use. Service-linked roles let you view all actions an AWS service performs on your behalf by using AWS CloudTrail logs. This helps you monitor and audit the actions AWS services perform on your behalf. No additional actions are required from you and you can continue using AWS services the way you do today.

To learn more about which AWS services use service-linked roles and log actions on your behalf to CloudTrail, see AWS Services That Work with IAM. Over time, more AWS services will support service-linked roles. For more information about service-linked roles, see Role Terms and Concepts.

In this blog post, I demonstrate how to view CloudTrail logs so that you can more easily monitor and audit AWS services performing actions on your behalf. First, I show how AWS creates a service-linked role in your account automatically when you configure an AWS service that supports service-linked roles. Next, I show how you can view the policies of a service-linked role that grants an AWS service permission to perform actions on your behalf. Finally, I  use the configured AWS service to perform an action and show you how the action appears in your CloudTrail logs.

How AWS creates a service-linked role in your account automatically

I will use Amazon Lex as the AWS service that performs actions on your behalf for this post. You can use Amazon Lex to create chatbots that allow for highly engaging conversational experiences through voice and text. You also can use chatbots on mobile devices, web browsers, and popular chat platform channels such as Slack. Amazon Lex uses Amazon Polly on your behalf to synthesize speech that sounds like a human voice.

Amazon Lex uses two IAM service-linked roles:

  • AWSServiceRoleForLexBots — Amazon Lex uses this service-linked role to invoke Amazon Polly to synthesize speech responses for your chatbot.
  • AWSServiceRoleForLexChannels — Amazon Lex uses this service-linked role to post text to your chatbot when managing channels such as Slack.

You don’t need to create either of these roles manually. When you create your first chatbot using the Amazon Lex console, Amazon Lex creates the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots role for you. When you first associate a chatbot with a messaging channel, Amazon Lex creates the AWSServiceRoleForLexChannels role in your account.

1. Start configuring the AWS service that supports service-linked roles

Navigate to the Amazon Lex console, and choose Get Started to navigate to the Create your Lex bot page. For this example, I choose a sample chatbot called OrderFlowers. To learn how to create a custom chatbot, see Create a Custom Amazon Lex Bot.

Screenshot of making the choice to create an OrderFlowers chatbot

2. Complete the configuration for the AWS service

When you scroll down, you will see the settings for the OrderFlowers chatbot. Notice the field for the IAM role with the value, AWSServiceRoleForLexBots. This service-linked role is “Automatically created on your behalf.” After you have entered all details, choose Create to build your sample chatbot.

Screenshot of the automatically created service-linked role

AWS has created the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role in your account. I will return to using the chatbot later in this post when I discuss how Amazon Lex performs actions on your behalf and how CloudTrail logs these actions. First, I will show how you can view the permissions for the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role by using the IAM console.

How to view actions in the IAM console that AWS services perform on your behalf

When you configure an AWS service that supports service-linked roles, AWS creates a service-linked role in your account automatically. You can view the service-linked role by using the IAM console.

1. View the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role on the IAM console

Go to the IAM console, and choose AWSServiceRoleForLexBots on the Roles page. You can confirm that this role is a service-linked role by viewing the Trusted entities column.

Screenshot of the service-linked role

2.View the trusted entities that can assume the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role

Choose the Trust relationships tab on the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots role page. You can view the trusted entities that can assume the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role to perform actions on your behalf. In this example, the trusted entity is lex.amazonaws.com.

Screenshot of the trusted entities that can assume the service-linked role

3. View the policy attached to the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role

Choose AmazonLexBotPolicy on the Permissions tab to view the policy attached to the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role. You can view the policy summary to see that AmazonLexBotPolicy grants permission to Amazon Lex to use Amazon Polly.

Screenshot showing that AmazonLexBotPolicy grants permission to Amazon Lex to use Amazon Polly

4. View the actions that the service-linked role grants permissions to use

Choose Polly to view the action, SynthesizeSpeech, that the AmazonLexBotPolicy grants permission to Amazon Lex to perform on your behalf. Amazon Lex uses this permission to synthesize speech responses for your chatbot. I show later in this post how you can monitor this SynthesizeSpeech action in your CloudTrail logs.

Screenshot showing the the action, SynthesizeSpeech, that the AmazonLexBotPolicy grants permission to Amazon Lex to perform on your behalf

Now that I know the trusted entity and the policy attached to the service-linked role, let’s go back to the chatbot I created earlier and see how CloudTrail logs the actions that Amazon Lex performs on my behalf.

How to use CloudTrail to view actions that AWS services perform on your behalf

As discussed already, I created an OrderFlowers chatbot on the Amazon Lex console. I will use the chatbot and display how the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role helps me track actions in CloudTrail. First, though, I must have an active CloudTrail trail created that stores the logs in an Amazon S3 bucket. I will use a trail called TestTrail and an S3 bucket called account-ids-slr.

1. Use the Amazon Lex chatbot via the Amazon Lex console

In Step 2 in the first section of this post, when I chose Create, Amazon Lex built the OrderFlowers chatbot. After the chatbot was built, the right pane showed that a Test Bot was created. Now, I choose the microphone symbol in the right pane and provide voice input to test the OrderFlowers chatbot. In this example, I tell the chatbot, “I would like to order some flowers.” The bot replies to me by asking, “What type of flowers would you like to order?”

Screenshot of voice input to test the OrderFlowers chatbot

When the chatbot replies using voice, Amazon Lex uses Amazon Polly to synthesize speech from text to voice. Amazon Lex assumes the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role to perform the SynthesizeSpeech action.

2. Check CloudTrail to view actions performed on your behalf

Now that I have created the chatbot, let’s see which actions were logged in CloudTrail. Choose CloudTrail from the Services drop-down menu to reach the CloudTrail console. Choose Trails and choose the S3 bucket in which you are storing your CloudTrail logs.

Screenshot of the TestTrail trail

In the S3 bucket, you will find log entries for the SynthesizeSpeech event. This means that CloudTrail logged the action when Amazon Lex assumed the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role to invoke Amazon Polly to synthesize speech responses for your chatbot. You can monitor and audit this invocation, and it provides you with transparency into Amazon Polly’s SynthesizeSpeech action that Amazon Lex invoked on your behalf. The applicable CloudTrail log section follows and I have emphasized the key lines.

{  
         "eventVersion":"1.05",
         "userIdentity":{  
           "type":"AssumedRole",
            "principalId":"{principal-id}:OrderFlowers",
            "arn":"arn:aws:sts::{account-id}:assumed-role/AWSServiceRoleForLexBots/OrderFlowers",
            "accountId":"{account-id}",
            "accessKeyId":"{access-key-id}",
            "sessionContext":{  
               "attributes":{  
                  "mfaAuthenticated":"false",
                  "creationDate":"2017-09-17T17:30:05Z"
               },
               "sessionIssuer":{  
                  "type":"Role",
                  "principalId":"{principal-id}",
                  "arn":"arn:aws:iam:: {account-id}:role/aws-service-role/lex.amazonaws.com/AWSServiceRoleForLexBots",
                  "accountId":"{account-id",
                  "userName":"AWSServiceRoleForLexBots"
               }
            },
            "invokedBy":"lex.amazonaws.com"
         },
         "eventTime":"2017-09-17T17:30:05Z",
         "eventSource":"polly.amazonaws.com",
         "eventName":"SynthesizeSpeech",
         "awsRegion":"us-east-1",
         "sourceIPAddress":"lex.amazonaws.com",
         "userAgent":"lex.amazonaws.com",
         "requestParameters":{  
            "outputFormat":"mp3",
            "textType":"text",
            "voiceId":"Salli",
            "text":"**********"
         },
         "responseElements":{  
            "requestCharacters":45,
            "contentType":"audio/mpeg"
         },
         "requestID":"{request-id}",
         "eventID":"{event-id}",
         "eventType":"AwsApiCall",
         "recipientAccountId":"{account-id}"
      }

Conclusion

Service-linked roles make it easier for you to track and view actions that linked AWS services perform on your behalf by using CloudTrail. When an AWS service supports service-linked roles to enable this additional logging, you will see a service-linked role added to your account.

If you have comments about this post, submit a comment in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about working with service-linked roles, start a new thread on the IAM forum or contact AWS Support.

– Ujjwal

Manage Kubernetes Clusters on AWS Using CoreOS Tectonic

Post Syndicated from Arun Gupta original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/kubernetes-clusters-aws-coreos-tectonic/

There are multiple ways to run a Kubernetes cluster on Amazon Web Services (AWS). The first post in this series explained how to manage a Kubernetes cluster on AWS using kops. This second post explains how to manage a Kubernetes cluster on AWS using CoreOS Tectonic.

Tectonic overview

Tectonic delivers the most current upstream version of Kubernetes with additional features. It is a commercial offering from CoreOS and adds the following features over the upstream:

  • Installer
    Comes with a graphical installer that installs a highly available Kubernetes cluster. Alternatively, the cluster can be installed using AWS CloudFormation templates or Terraform scripts.
  • Operators
    An operator is an application-specific controller that extends the Kubernetes API to create, configure, and manage instances of complex stateful applications on behalf of a Kubernetes user. This release includes an etcd operator for rolling upgrades and a Prometheus operator for monitoring capabilities.
  • Console
    A web console provides a full view of applications running in the cluster. It also allows you to deploy applications to the cluster and start the rolling upgrade of the cluster.
  • Monitoring
    Node CPU and memory metrics are powered by the Prometheus operator. The graphs are available in the console. A large set of preconfigured Prometheus alerts are also available.
  • Security
    Tectonic ensures that cluster is always up to date with the most recent patches/fixes. Tectonic clusters also enable role-based access control (RBAC). Different roles can be mapped to an LDAP service.
  • Support
    CoreOS provides commercial support for clusters created using Tectonic.

Tectonic can be installed on AWS using a GUI installer or Terraform scripts. The installer prompts you for the information needed to boot the Kubernetes cluster, such as AWS access and secret key, number of master and worker nodes, and instance size for the master and worker nodes. The cluster can be created after all the options are specified. Alternatively, Terraform assets can be downloaded and the cluster can be created later. This post shows using the installer.

CoreOS License and Pull Secret

Even though Tectonic is a commercial offering, a cluster for up to 10 nodes can be created by creating a free account at Get Tectonic for Kubernetes. After signup, a CoreOS License and Pull Secret files are provided on your CoreOS account page. Download these files as they are needed by the installer to boot the cluster.

IAM user permission

The IAM user to create the Kubernetes cluster must have access to the following services and features:

  • Amazon Route 53
  • Amazon EC2
  • Elastic Load Balancing
  • Amazon S3
  • Amazon VPC
  • Security groups

Use the aws-policy policy to grant the required permissions for the IAM user.

DNS configuration

A subdomain is required to create the cluster, and it must be registered as a public Route 53 hosted zone. The zone is used to host and expose the console web application. It is also used as the static namespace for the Kubernetes API server. This allows kubectl to be able to talk directly with the master.

The domain may be registered using Route 53. Alternatively, a domain may be registered at a third-party registrar. This post uses a kubernetes-aws.io domain registered at a third-party registrar and a tectonic subdomain within it.

Generate a Route 53 hosted zone using the AWS CLI. Download jq to run this command:

ID=$(uuidgen) && \
aws route53 create-hosted-zone \
--name tectonic.kubernetes-aws.io \
--caller-reference $ID \
| jq .DelegationSet.NameServers

The command shows an output such as the following:

[
  "ns-1924.awsdns-48.co.uk",
  "ns-501.awsdns-62.com",
  "ns-1259.awsdns-29.org",
  "ns-749.awsdns-29.net"
]

Create NS records for the domain with your registrar. Make sure that the NS records can be resolved using a utility like dig web interface. A sample output would look like the following:

The bottom of the screenshot shows NS records configured for the subdomain.

Download and run the Tectonic installer

Download the Tectonic installer (version 1.7.1) and extract it. The latest installer can always be found at coreos.com/tectonic. Start the installer:

./tectonic/tectonic-installer/$PLATFORM/installer

Replace $PLATFORM with either darwin or linux. The installer opens your default browser and prompts you to select the cloud provider. Choose Amazon Web Services as the platform. Choose Next Step.

Specify the Access Key ID and Secret Access Key for the IAM role that you created earlier. This allows the installer to create resources required for the Kubernetes cluster. This also gives the installer full access to your AWS account. Alternatively, to protect the integrity of your main AWS credentials, use a temporary session token to generate temporary credentials.

You also need to choose a region in which to install the cluster. For the purpose of this post, I chose a region close to where I live, Northern California. Choose Next Step.

Give your cluster a name. This name is part of the static namespace for the master and the address of the console.

To enable in-place update to the Kubernetes cluster, select the checkbox next to Automated Updates. It also enables update to the etcd and Prometheus operators. This feature may become a default in future releases.

Choose Upload “tectonic-license.txt” and upload the previously downloaded license file.

Choose Upload “config.json” and upload the previously downloaded pull secret file. Choose Next Step.

Let the installer generate a CA certificate and key. In this case, the browser may not recognize this certificate, which I discuss later in the post. Alternatively, you can provide a CA certificate and a key in PEM format issued by an authorized certificate authority. Choose Next Step.

Use the SSH key for the region specified earlier. You also have an option to generate a new key. This allows you to later connect using SSH into the Amazon EC2 instances provisioned by the cluster. Here is the command that can be used to log in:

ssh –i <key> [email protected]<ec2-instance-ip>

Choose Next Step.

Define the number and instance type of master and worker nodes. In this case, create a 6 nodes cluster. Make sure that the worker nodes have enough processing power and memory to run the containers.

An etcd cluster is used as persistent storage for all of Kubernetes API objects. This cluster is required for the Kubernetes cluster to operate. There are three ways to use the etcd cluster as part of the Tectonic installer:

  • (Default) Provision the cluster using EC2 instances. Additional EC2 instances are used in this case.
  • Use an alpha support for cluster provisioning using the etcd operator. The etcd operator is used for automated operations of the etcd master nodes for the cluster itself, in addition to for etcd instances that are created for application usage. The etcd cluster is provisioned within the Tectonic installer.
  • Bring your own pre-provisioned etcd cluster.

Use the first option in this case.

For more information about choosing the appropriate instance type, see the etcd hardware recommendation. Choose Next Step.

Specify the networking options. The installer can create a new public VPC or use a pre-existing public or private VPC. Make sure that the VPC requirements are met for an existing VPC.

Give a DNS name for the cluster. Choose the domain for which the Route 53 hosted zone was configured earlier, such as tectonic.kubernetes-aws.io. Multiple clusters may be created under a single domain. The cluster name and the DNS name would typically match each other.

To select the CIDR range, choose Show Advanced Settings. You can also choose the Availability Zones for the master and worker nodes. By default, the master and worker nodes are spread across multiple Availability Zones in the chosen region. This makes the cluster highly available.

Leave the other values as default. Choose Next Step.

Specify an email address and password to be used as credentials to log in to the console. Choose Next Step.

At any point during the installation, you can choose Save progress. This allows you to save configurations specified in the installer. This configuration file can then be used to restore progress in the installer at a later point.

To start the cluster installation, choose Submit. At another time, you can download the Terraform assets by choosing Manually boot. This allows you to boot the cluster later.

The logs from the Terraform scripts are shown in the installer. When the installation is complete, the console shows that the Terraform scripts were successfully applied, the domain name was resolved successfully, and that the console has started. The domain works successfully if the DNS resolution worked earlier, and it’s the address where the console is accessible.

Choose Download assets to download assets related to your cluster. It contains your generated CA, kubectl configuration file, and the Terraform state. This download is an important step as it allows you to delete the cluster later.

Choose Next Step for the final installation screen. It allows you to access the Tectonic console, gives you instructions about how to configure kubectl to manage this cluster, and finally deploys an application using kubectl.

Choose Go to my Tectonic Console. In our case, it is also accessible at http://cluster.tectonic.kubernetes-aws.io/.

As I mentioned earlier, the browser does not recognize the self-generated CA certificate. Choose Advanced and connect to the console. Enter the login credentials specified earlier in the installer and choose Login.

The Kubernetes upstream and console version are shown under Software Details. Cluster health shows All systems go and it means that the API server and the backend API can be reached.

To view different Kubernetes resources in the cluster choose, the resource in the left navigation bar. For example, all deployments can be seen by choosing Deployments.

By default, resources in the all namespace are shown. Other namespaces may be chosen by clicking on a menu item on the top of the screen. Different administration tasks such as managing the namespaces, getting list of the nodes and RBAC can be configured as well.

Download and run Kubectl

Kubectl is required to manage the Kubernetes cluster. The latest version of kubectl can be downloaded using the following command:

curl -LO https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/$(curl -s https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/stable.txt)/bin/darwin/amd64/kubectl

It can also be conveniently installed using the Homebrew package manager. To find and access a cluster, Kubectl needs a kubeconfig file. By default, this configuration file is at ~/.kube/config. This file is created when a Kubernetes cluster is created from your machine. However, in this case, download this file from the console.

In the console, choose admin, My Account, Download Configuration and follow the steps to download the kubectl configuration file. Move this file to ~/.kube/config. If kubectl has already been used on your machine before, then this file already exists. Make sure to take a backup of that file first.

Now you can run the commands to view the list of deployments:

~ $ kubectl get deployments --all-namespaces
NAMESPACE         NAME                                    DESIRED   CURRENT   UP-TO-DATE   AVAILABLE   AGE
kube-system       etcd-operator                           1         1         1            1           43m
kube-system       heapster                                1         1         1            1           40m
kube-system       kube-controller-manager                 3         3         3            3           43m
kube-system       kube-dns                                1         1         1            1           43m
kube-system       kube-scheduler                          3         3         3            3           43m
tectonic-system   container-linux-update-operator         1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   default-http-backend                    1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   kube-state-metrics                      1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   kube-version-operator                   1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   prometheus-operator                     1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-channel-operator               1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-console                        2         2         2            2           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-identity                       2         2         2            2           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-ingress-controller             1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-monitoring-auth-alertmanager   1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-monitoring-auth-prometheus     1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-prometheus-operator            1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-stats-emitter                  1         1         1            1           40m

This output is similar to the one shown in the console earlier. Now, this kubectl can be used to manage your resources.

Upgrade the Kubernetes cluster

Tectonic allows the in-place upgrade of the cluster. This is an experimental feature as of this release. The clusters can be updated either automatically, or with manual approval.

To perform the update, choose Administration, Cluster Settings. If an earlier Tectonic installer, version 1.6.2 in this case, is used to install the cluster, then this screen would look like the following:

Choose Check for Updates. If any updates are available, choose Start Upgrade. After the upgrade is completed, the screen is refreshed.

This is an experimental feature in this release and so should only be used on clusters that can be easily replaced. This feature may become a fully supported in a future release. For more information about the upgrade process, see Upgrading Tectonic & Kubernetes.

Delete the Kubernetes cluster

Typically, the Kubernetes cluster is a long-running cluster to serve your applications. After its purpose is served, you may delete it. It is important to delete the cluster as this ensures that all resources created by the cluster are appropriately cleaned up.

The easiest way to delete the cluster is using the assets downloaded in the last step of the installer. Extract the downloaded zip file. This creates a directory like <cluster-name>_TIMESTAMP. In that directory, give the following command to delete the cluster:

TERRAFORM_CONFIG=$(pwd)/.terraformrc terraform destroy --force

This destroys the cluster and all associated resources.

You may have forgotten to download the assets. There is a copy of the assets in the directory tectonic/tectonic-installer/darwin/clusters. In this directory, another directory with the name <cluster-name>_TIMESTAMP contains your assets.

Conclusion

This post explained how to manage Kubernetes clusters using the CoreOS Tectonic graphical installer.  For more details, see Graphical Installer with AWS. If the installation does not succeed, see the helpful Troubleshooting tips. After the cluster is created, see the Tectonic tutorials to learn how to deploy, scale, version, and delete an application.

Future posts in this series will explain other ways of creating and running a Kubernetes cluster on AWS.

Arun

Delivering Graphics Apps with Amazon AppStream 2.0

Post Syndicated from Deepak Suryanarayanan original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/delivering-graphics-apps-with-amazon-appstream-2-0/

Sahil Bahri, Sr. Product Manager, Amazon AppStream 2.0

Do you need to provide a workstation class experience for users who run graphics apps? With Amazon AppStream 2.0, you can stream graphics apps from AWS to a web browser running on any supported device. AppStream 2.0 offers a choice of GPU instance types. The range includes the newly launched Graphics Design instance, which allows you to offer a fast, fluid user experience at a fraction of the cost of using a graphics workstation, without upfront investments or long-term commitments.

In this post, I discuss the Graphics Design instance type in detail, and how you can use it to deliver a graphics application such as Siemens NX―a popular CAD/CAM application that we have been testing on AppStream 2.0 with engineers from Siemens PLM.

Graphics Instance Types on AppStream 2.0

First, a quick recap on the GPU instance types available with AppStream 2.0. In July, 2017, we launched graphics support for AppStream 2.0 with two new instance types that Jeff Barr discussed on the AWS Blog:

  • Graphics Desktop
  • Graphics Pro

Many customers in industries such as engineering, media, entertainment, and oil and gas are using these instances to deliver high-performance graphics applications to their users. These instance types are based on dedicated NVIDIA GPUs and can run the most demanding graphics applications, including those that rely on CUDA graphics API libraries.

Last week, we added a new lower-cost instance type: Graphics Design. This instance type is a great fit for engineers, 3D modelers, and designers who use graphics applications that rely on the hardware acceleration of DirectX, OpenGL, or OpenCL APIs, such as Siemens NX, Autodesk AutoCAD, or Adobe Photoshop. The Graphics Design instance is based on AMD’s FirePro S7150x2 Server GPUs and equipped with AMD Multiuser GPU technology. The instance type uses virtualized GPUs to achieve lower costs, and is available in four instance sizes to scale and match the requirements of your applications.

Instance vCPUs Instance RAM (GiB) GPU Memory (GiB)
stream.graphics-design.large 2 7.5 GiB 1
stream.graphics-design.xlarge 4 15.3 GiB 2
stream.graphics-design.2xlarge 8 30.5 GiB 4
stream.graphics-design.4xlarge 16 61 GiB 8

The following table compares all three graphics instance types on AppStream 2.0, along with example applications you could use with each.

  Graphics Design Graphics Desktop Graphics Pro
Number of instance sizes 4 1 3
GPU memory range
1–8 GiB 4 GiB 8–32 GiB
vCPU range 2–16 8 16–32
Memory range 7.5–61 GiB 15 GiB 122–488 GiB
Graphics libraries supported AMD FirePro S7150x2 NVIDIA GRID K520 NVIDIA Tesla M60
Price range (N. Virginia AWS Region) $0.25 – $2.00/hour $0.5/hour $2.05 – $8.20/hour
Example applications Adobe Premiere Pro, AutoDesk Revit, Siemens NX AVEVA E3D, SOLIDWORKS AutoDesk Maya, Landmark DecisionSpace, Schlumberger Petrel

Example graphics instance set up with Siemens NX

In the section, I walk through setting up Siemens NX with Graphics Design instances on AppStream 2.0. After set up is complete, users can able to access NX from within their browser and also access their design files from a file share. You can also use these steps to set up and test your own graphics applications on AppStream 2.0. Here’s the workflow:

  1. Create a file share to load and save design files.
  2. Create an AppStream 2.0 image with Siemens NX installed.
  3. Create an AppStream 2.0 fleet and stack.
  4. Invite users to access Siemens NX through a browser.
  5. Validate the setup.

To learn more about AppStream 2.0 concepts and set up, see the previous post Scaling Your Desktop Application Streams with Amazon AppStream 2.0. For a deeper review of all the setup and maintenance steps, see Amazon AppStream 2.0 Developer Guide.

Step 1: Create a file share to load and save design files

To launch and configure the file server

  1. Open the EC2 console and choose Launch Instance.
  2. Scroll to the Microsoft Windows Server 2016 Base Image and choose Select.
  3. Choose an instance type and size for your file server (I chose the general purpose m4.large instance). Choose Next: Configure Instance Details.
  4. Select a VPC and subnet. You launch AppStream 2.0 resources in the same VPC. Choose Next: Add Storage.
  5. If necessary, adjust the size of your EBS volume. Choose Review and Launch, Launch.
  6. On the Instances page, give your file server a name, such as My File Server.
  7. Ensure that the security group associated with the file server instance allows for incoming traffic from the security group that you select for your AppStream 2.0 fleets or image builders. You can use the default security group and select the same group while creating the image builder and fleet in later steps.

Log in to the file server using a remote access client such as Microsoft Remote Desktop. For more information about connecting to an EC2 Windows instance, see Connect to Your Windows Instance.

To enable file sharing

  1. Create a new folder (such as C:\My Graphics Files) and upload the shared files to make available to your users.
  2. From the Windows control panel, enable network discovery.
  3. Choose Server Manager, File and Storage Services, Volumes.
  4. Scroll to Shares and choose Start the Add Roles and Features Wizard. Go through the wizard to install the File Server and Share role.
  5. From the left navigation menu, choose Shares.
  6. Choose Start the New Share Wizard to set up your folder as a file share.
  7. Open the context (right-click) menu on the share and choose Properties, Permissions, Customize Permissions.
  8. Choose Permissions, Add. Add Read and Execute permissions for everyone on the network.

Step 2:  Create an AppStream 2.0 image with Siemens NX installed

To connect to the image builder and install applications

  1. Open the AppStream 2.0 management console and choose Images, Image Builder, Launch Image Builder.
  2. Create a graphics design image builder in the same VPC as your file server.
  3. From the Image builder tab, select your image builder and choose Connect. This opens a new browser tab and display a desktop to log in to.
  4. Log in to your image builder as ImageBuilderAdmin.
  5. Launch the Image Assistant.
  6. Download and install Siemens NX and other applications on the image builder. I added Blender and Firefox, but you could replace these with your own applications.
  7. To verify the user experience, you can test the application performance on the instance.

Before you finish creating the image, you must mount the file share by enabling a few Microsoft Windows services.

To mount the file share

  1. Open services.msc and check the following services:
  • DNS Client
  • Function Discovery Resource Publication
  • SSDP Discovery
  • UPnP Device H
  1. If any of the preceding services have Startup Type set to Manual, open the context (right-click) menu on the service and choose Start. Otherwise, open the context (right-click) menu on the service and choose Properties. For Startup Type, choose Manual, Apply. To start the service, choose Start.
  2. From the Windows control panel, enable network discovery.
  3. Create a batch script that mounts a file share from the storage server set up earlier. The file share is mounted automatically when a user connects to the AppStream 2.0 environment.

Logon Script Location: C:\Users\Public\logon.bat

Script Contents:

:loop

net use H: \\path\to\network\share 

PING localhost -n 30 >NUL

IF NOT EXIST H:\ GOTO loop

  1. Open gpedit.msc and choose User Configuration, Windows Settings, Scripts. Set logon.bat as the user logon script.
  2. Next, create a batch script that makes the mounted drive visible to the user.

Logon Script Location: C:\Users\Public\startup.bat

Script Contents:
REG DELETE “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer” /v “NoDrives” /f

  1. Open Task Scheduler and choose Create Task.
  2. Choose General, provide a task name, and then choose Change User or Group.
  3. For Enter the object name to select, enter SYSTEM and choose Check Names, OK.
  4. Choose Triggers, New. For Begin the task, choose At startup. Under Advanced Settings, change Delay task for to 5 minutes. Choose OK.
  5. Choose Actions, New. Under Settings, for Program/script, enter C:\Users\Public\startup.bat. Choose OK.
  6. Choose Conditions. Under Power, clear the Start the task only if the computer is on AC power Choose OK.
  7. To view your scheduled task, choose Task Scheduler Library. Close Task Scheduler when you are done.

Step 3:  Create an AppStream 2.0 fleet and stack

To create a fleet and stack

  1. In the AppStream 2.0 management console, choose Fleets, Create Fleet.
  2. Give the fleet a name, such as Graphics-Demo-Fleet, that uses the newly created image and the same VPC as your file server.
  3. Choose Stacks, Create Stack. Give the stack a name, such as Graphics-Demo-Stack.
  4. After the stack is created, select it and choose Actions, Associate Fleet. Associate the stack with the fleet you created in step 1.

Step 4:  Invite users to access Siemens NX through a browser

To invite users

  1. Choose User Pools, Create User to create users.
  2. Enter a name and email address for each user.
  3. Select the users just created, and choose Actions, Assign Stack to provide access to the stack created in step 2. You can also provide access using SAML 2.0 and connect to your Active Directory if necessary. For more information, see the Enabling Identity Federation with AD FS 3.0 and Amazon AppStream 2.0 post.

Your user receives an email invitation to set up an account and use a web portal to access the applications that you have included in your stack.

Step 5:  Validate the setup

Time for a test drive with Siemens NX on AppStream 2.0!

  1. Open the link for the AppStream 2.0 web portal shared through the email invitation. The web portal opens in your default browser. You must sign in with the temporary password and set a new password. After that, you get taken to your app catalog.
  2. Launch Siemens NX and interact with it using the demo files available in the shared storage folder – My Graphics Files. 

After I launched NX, I captured the screenshot below. The Siemens PLM team also recorded a video with NX running on AppStream 2.0.

Summary

In this post, I discussed the GPU instances available for delivering rich graphics applications to users in a web browser. While I demonstrated a simple setup, you can scale this out to launch a production environment with users signing in using Active Directory credentials,  accessing persistent storage with Amazon S3, and using other commonly requested features reviewed in the Amazon AppStream 2.0 Launch Recap – Domain Join, Simple Network Setup, and Lots More post.

To learn more about AppStream 2.0 and capabilities added this year, see Amazon AppStream 2.0 Resources.

A Framework for Cyber Security Insurance

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/08/a_framework_for.html

New paper: “Policy measures and cyber insurance: a framework,” by Daniel Woods and Andrew Simpson, Journal of Cyber Policy, 2017.

Abstract: The role of the insurance industry in driving improvements in cyber security has been identified as mutually beneficial for both insurers and policy-makers. To date, there has been no consideration of the roles governments and the insurance industry should pursue in support of this public­-private partnership. This paper rectifies this omission and presents a framework to help underpin such a partnership, giving particular consideration to possible government interventions that might affect the cyber insurance market. We have undertaken a qualitative analysis of reports published by policy-making institutions and organisations working in the cyber insurance domain; we have also conducted interviews with cyber insurance professionals. Together, these constitute a stakeholder analysis upon which we build our framework. In addition, we present a research roadmap to demonstrate how the ideas described might be taken forward.

New AWS DevOps Blog Post: How to Help Secure Your Code in a Cross-Region/Cross-Account Deployment Solution on AWS

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/new-aws-devops-blog-post-how-to-help-secure-your-code-in-a-cross-regioncross-account-deployment-solution/

Security image

You can help to protect your data in a number of ways while it is in transit and at rest, such as by using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or client-side encryption. AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) is a managed service that makes it easy for you to create, control, rotate, and use your encryption keys. AWS KMS allows you to create custom keys, which you can share with AWS Identity and Access Management users and roles in your AWS account or in an AWS account owned by someone else.

In a new AWS DevOps Blog post, BK Chaurasiya describes a solution for building a cross-region/cross-account code deployment solution on AWS. BK explains options for helping to protect your source code as it travels between regions and between AWS accounts.

For more information, see the full AWS DevOps Blog post.

– Craig

Newly Updated: Example AWS IAM Policies for You to Use and Customize

Post Syndicated from Deren Smith original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/newly-updated-example-policies-for-you-to-use-and-customize/

To help you grant access to specific resources and conditions, the Example Policies page in the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) documentation now includes more than thirty policies for you to use or customize to meet your permissions requirements. The AWS Support team developed these policies from their experiences working with AWS customers over the years. The example policies cover common permissions use cases you might encounter across services such as Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon EC2, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon RDS, Amazon S3, and IAM.

In this blog post, I introduce the updated Example Policies page and explain how to use and customize these policies for your needs.

The new Example Policies page

The Example Policies page in the IAM User Guide now provides an overview of the example policies and includes a link to view each policy on a separate page. Note that each of these policies has been reviewed and approved by AWS Support. If you would like to submit a policy that you have found to be particularly useful, post it on the IAM forum.

To give you an idea of the policies we have included on this page, the following are a few of the EC2 policies on the page:

To see the full list of available policies, see the Example Polices page.

In the following section, I demonstrate how to use a policy from the Example Policies page and customize it for your needs.

How to customize an example policy for your needs

Suppose you want to allow an IAM user, Bob, to start and stop EC2 instances with a specific resource tag. After looking through the Example Policies page, you see the policy, Allows Starting or Stopping EC2 Instances a User Has Tagged, Programmatically and in the Console.

To apply this policy to your specific use case:

  1. Navigate to the Policies section of the IAM console.
  2. Choose Create policy.
    Screenshot of choosing "Create policy"
  3. Choose the Select button next to Create Your Own Policy. You will see an empty policy document with boxes for Policy Name, Description, and Policy Document, as shown in the following screenshot.
  4. Type a name for the policy, copy the policy from the Example Policies page, and paste the policy in the Policy Document box. In this example, I use “start-stop-instances-for-owner-tag” as the policy name and “Allows users to start or stop instances if the instance tag Owner has the value of their user name” as the description.
  5. Update the placeholder text in the policy (see the full policy that follows this step). For example, replace <REGION> with a region from AWS Regions and Endpoints and <ACCOUNTNUMBER> with your 12-digit account number. The IAM policy variable, ${aws:username}, is a dynamic property in the policy that automatically applies to the user to which it is attached. For example, when the policy is attached to Bob, the policy replaces ${aws:username} with Bob. If you do not want to use the key value pair of Owner and ${aws:username}, you can edit the policy to include your desired key value pair. For example, if you want to use the key value pair, CostCenter:1234, you can modify “ec2:ResourceTag/Owner”: “${aws:username}” to “ec2:ResourceTag/CostCenter”: “1234”.
    {
        "Version": "2012-10-17",
        "Statement": [
           {
          "Effect": "Allow",
          "Action": [
              "ec2:StartInstances",
              "ec2:StopInstances"
          ],
                 "Resource": "arn:aws:ec2:<REGION>:<ACCOUNTNUMBER>:instance/*",
                 "Condition": {
              "StringEquals": {
                  "ec2:ResourceTag/Owner": "${aws:username}"
              }
          }
            },
            {
                 "Effect": "Allow",
                 "Action": "ec2:DescribeInstances",
                 "Resource": "*"
            }
        ]
    }

  6. After you have edited the policy, choose Create policy.

You have created a policy that allows an IAM user to stop and start EC2 instances in your account, as long as these instances have the correct resource tag and the policy is attached to your IAM users. You also can attach this policy to an IAM group and apply the policy to users by adding them to that group.

Summary

We updated the Example Policies page in the IAM User Guide so that you have a central location where you can find examples of the most commonly requested and used IAM policies. In addition to these example policies, we recommend that you review the list of AWS managed policies, including the AWS managed policies for job functions. You can choose these predefined policies from the IAM console and associate them with your IAM users, groups, and roles.

We will add more IAM policies to the Example Policies page over time. If you have a useful policy you would like to share with others, post it on the IAM forum. If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below.

– Deren

Run Common Data Science Packages on Anaconda and Oozie with Amazon EMR

Post Syndicated from John Ohle original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/run-common-data-science-packages-on-anaconda-and-oozie-with-amazon-emr/

In the world of data science, users must often sacrifice cluster set-up time to allow for complex usability scenarios. Amazon EMR allows data scientists to spin up complex cluster configurations easily, and to be up and running with complex queries in a matter of minutes.

Data scientists often use scheduling applications such as Oozie to run jobs overnight. However, Oozie can be difficult to configure when you are trying to use popular Python packages (such as “pandas,” “numpy,” and “statsmodels”), which are not included by default.

One such popular platform that contains these types of packages (and more) is Anaconda. This post focuses on setting up an Anaconda platform on EMR, with an intent to use its packages with Oozie. I describe how to run jobs using a popular open source scheduler like Oozie.

Walkthrough

For this post, you walk through the following tasks:

  • Create an EMR cluster.
  • Download Anaconda on your master node.
  • Configure Oozie.
  • Test the steps.

Create an EMR cluster

Spin up an Amazon EMR cluster using the console or the AWS CLI. Use the latest release, and include Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark, Apache Hive, and Oozie.

To create a three-node cluster in the us-east-1 region, issue an AWS CLI command such as the following. This command must be typed as one line, as shown below. It is shown here separated for readability purposes only.

aws emr create-cluster \ 
--release-label emr-5.7.0 \ 
 --name '<YOUR-CLUSTER-NAME>' \
 --applications Name=Hadoop Name=Oozie Name=Spark Name=Hive \ 
 --ec2-attributes '{"KeyName":"<YOUR-KEY-PAIR>","SubnetId":"<YOUR-SUBNET-ID>","EmrManagedSlaveSecurityGroup":"<YOUR-EMR-SLAVE-SECURITY-GROUP>","EmrManagedMasterSecurityGroup":"<YOUR-EMR-MASTER-SECURITY-GROUP>"}' \ 
 --use-default-roles \ 
 --instance-groups '[{"InstanceCount":1,"InstanceGroupType":"MASTER","InstanceType":"<YOUR-INSTANCE-TYPE>","Name":"Master - 1"},{"InstanceCount":<YOUR-CORE-INSTANCE-COUNT>,"InstanceGroupType":"CORE","InstanceType":"<YOUR-INSTANCE-TYPE>","Name":"Core - 2"}]'

One-line version for reference:

aws emr create-cluster --release-label emr-5.7.0 --name '<YOUR-CLUSTER-NAME>' --applications Name=Hadoop Name=Oozie Name=Spark Name=Hive --ec2-attributes '{"KeyName":"<YOUR-KEY-PAIR>","SubnetId":"<YOUR-SUBNET-ID>","EmrManagedSlaveSecurityGroup":"<YOUR-EMR-SLAVE-SECURITY-GROUP>","EmrManagedMasterSecurityGroup":"<YOUR-EMR-MASTER-SECURITY-GROUP>"}' --use-default-roles --instance-groups '[{"InstanceCount":1,"InstanceGroupType":"MASTER","InstanceType":"<YOUR-INSTANCE-TYPE>","Name":"Master - 1"},{"InstanceCount":<YOUR-CORE-INSTANCE-COUNT>,"InstanceGroupType":"CORE","InstanceType":"<YOUR-INSTANCE-TYPE>","Name":"Core - 2"}]'

Download Anaconda

SSH into your EMR master node instance and download the official Anaconda installer:

wget https://repo.continuum.io/archive/Anaconda2-4.4.0-Linux-x86_64.sh

At the time of publication, Anaconda 4.4 is the most current version available. For the download link location for the latest Python 2.7 version (Python 3.6 may encounter issues), see https://www.continuum.io/downloads.  Open the context (right-click) menu for the Python 2.7 download link, choose Copy Link Location, and use this value in the previous wget command.

This post used the Anaconda 4.4 installation. If you have a later version, it is shown in the downloaded filename:  “anaconda2-<version number>-Linux-x86_64.sh”.

Run this downloaded script and follow the on-screen installer prompts.

chmod u+x Anaconda2-4.4.0-Linux-x86_64.sh
./Anaconda2-4.4.0-Linux-x86_64.sh

For an installation directory, select somewhere with enough space on your cluster, such as “/mnt/anaconda/”.

The process should take approximately 1–2 minutes to install. When prompted if you “wish the installer to prepend the Anaconda2 install location”, select the default option of [no].

After you are done, export the PATH to include this new Anaconda installation:

export PATH=/mnt/anaconda/bin:$PATH

Zip up the Anaconda installation:

cd /mnt/anaconda/
zip -r anaconda.zip .

The zip process may take 4–5 minutes to complete.

(Optional) Upload this anaconda.zip file to your S3 bucket for easier inclusion into future EMR clusters. This removes the need to repeat the previous steps for future EMR clusters.

Configure Oozie

Next, you configure Oozie to use Pyspark and the Anaconda platform.

Get the location of your Oozie sharelibupdate folder. Issue the following command and take note of the “sharelibDirNew” value:

oozie admin -sharelibupdate

For this post, this value is “hdfs://ip-192-168-4-200.us-east-1.compute.internal:8020/user/oozie/share/lib/lib_20170616133136”.

Pass in the required Pyspark files into Oozies sharelibupdate location. The following files are required for Oozie to be able to run Pyspark commands:

  • pyspark.zip
  • py4j-0.10.4-src.zip

These are located on the EMR master instance in the location “/usr/lib/spark/python/lib/”, and must be put into the Oozie sharelib spark directory. This location is the value of the sharelibDirNew parameter value (shown above) with “/spark/” appended, that is, “hdfs://ip-192-168-4-200.us-east-1.compute.internal:8020/user/oozie/share/lib/lib_20170616133136/spark/”.

To do this, issue the following commands:

hdfs dfs -put /usr/lib/spark/python/lib/py4j-0.10.4-src.zip hdfs://ip-192-168-4-200.us-east-1.compute.internal:8020/user/oozie/share/lib/lib_20170616133136/spark/
hdfs dfs -put /usr/lib/spark/python/lib/pyspark.zip hdfs://ip-192-168-4-200.us-east-1.compute.internal:8020/user/oozie/share/lib/lib_20170616133136/spark/

After you’re done, Oozie can use Pyspark in its processes.

Pass the anaconda.zip file into HDFS as follows:

hdfs dfs -put /mnt/anaconda/anaconda.zip /tmp/myLocation/anaconda.zip

(Optional) Verify that it was transferred successfully with the following command:

hdfs dfs -ls /tmp/myLocation/

On your master node, execute the following command:

export PYSPARK_PYTHON=/mnt/anaconda/bin/python

Set the PYSPARK_PYTHON environment variable on the executor nodes. Put the following configurations in your “spark-opts” values in your Oozie workflow.xml file:

–conf spark.executorEnv.PYSPARK_PYTHON=./anaconda_remote/bin/python
–conf spark.yarn.appMasterEnv.PYSPARK_PYTHON=./anaconda_remote/bin/python

This is referenced from the Oozie job in the following line in your workflow.xml file, also included as part of your “spark-opts”:

--archives hdfs:///tmp/myLocation/anaconda.zip#anaconda_remote

Your Oozie workflow.xml file should now look something like the following:

<workflow-app name="spark-wf" xmlns="uri:oozie:workflow:0.5">
<start to="start_spark" />
<action name="start_spark">
    <spark xmlns="uri:oozie:spark-action:0.1">
        <job-tracker>${jobTracker}</job-tracker>
        <name-node>${nameNode}</name-node>
        <prepare>
            <delete path="/tmp/test/spark_oozie_test_out3"/>
        </prepare>
        <master>yarn-cluster</master>
        <mode>cluster</mode>
        <name>SparkJob</name>
        <class>clear</class>
        <jar>hdfs:///user/oozie/apps/myPysparkProgram.py</jar>
        <spark-opts>--queue default
            --conf spark.ui.view.acls=*
            --executor-memory 2G --num-executors 2 --executor-cores 2 --driver-memory 3g
            --conf spark.executorEnv.PYSPARK_PYTHON=./anaconda_remote/bin/python
            --conf spark.yarn.appMasterEnv.PYSPARK_PYTHON=./anaconda_remote/bin/python
            --archives hdfs:///tmp/myLocation/anaconda.zip#anaconda_remote
        </spark-opts>
    </spark>
    <ok to="end"/>
    <error to="kill"/>
</action>
        <kill name="kill">
                <message>Action failed, error message[${wf:errorMessage(wf:lastErrorNode())}]</message>
        </kill>
        <end name="end"/>
</workflow-app>

Test steps

To test this out, you can use the following job.properties and myPysparkProgram.py file, along with the following steps:

job.properties

masterNode ip-xxx-xxx-xxx-xxx.us-east-1.compute.internal
nameNode hdfs://${masterNode}:8020
jobTracker ${masterNode}:8032
master yarn
mode cluster
queueName default
oozie.libpath ${nameNode}/user/oozie/share/lib
oozie.use.system.libpath true
oozie.wf.application.path ${nameNode}/user/oozie/apps/

Note: You can get your master node IP address (denoted as “ip-xxx-xxx-xxx-xxx” here) from the value for the sharelibDirNew parameter noted earlier.

myPysparkProgram.py

from pyspark import SparkContext, SparkConf
import numpy
import sys

conf = SparkConf().setAppName('myPysparkProgram')
sc = SparkContext(conf=conf)

rdd = sc.textFile("/user/hadoop/input.txt")

x = numpy.sum([3,4,5]) #total = 12

rdd = rdd.map(lambda line: line + str(x))
rdd.saveAsTextFile("/user/hadoop/output")

Put the “myPysparkProgram.py” into the location mentioned between the “<jar>xxxxx</jar>” tags in your workflow.xml. In this example, the location is “hdfs:///user/oozie/apps/”. Use the following command to move the “myPysparkProgram.py” file to the correct location:

hdfs dfs -put myPysparkProgram.py /user/oozie/apps/

Put the above workflow.xml file into the “/user/oozie/apps/” location in hdfs:

hdfs dfs –put workflow.xml /user/oozie/apps/

Note: The job.properties file is run locally from the EMR master node.

Create a sample input.txt file with some data in it. For example:

input.txt

This is a sentence.
So is this. 
This is also a sentence.

Put this file into hdfs:

hdfs dfs -put input.txt /user/hadoop/

Execute the job in Oozie with the following command. This creates an Oozie job ID.

oozie job -config job.properties -run

You can check the Oozie job state with the command:

oozie job -info <Oozie job ID>

  1. When the job is successfully finished, the results are located at:
/user/hadoop/output/part-00000
/user/hadoop/output/part-00001

  1. Run the following commands to view the output:
hdfs dfs -cat /user/hadoop/output/part-00000
hdfs dfs -cat /user/hadoop/output/part-00001

The output will be:

This is a sentence. 12
So is this 12
This is also a sentence 12

Summary

The myPysparkProgram.py has successfully imported the numpy library from the Anaconda platform and has produced some output with it. If you tried to run this using standard Python, you’d encounter the following error:

Now when your Python job runs in Oozie, any imported packages that are implicitly imported by your Pyspark script are imported into your job within Oozie directly from the Anaconda platform. Simple!

If you have questions or suggestions, please leave a comment below.


Additional Reading

Learn how to use Apache Oozie workflows to automate Apache Spark jobs on Amazon EMR.

 


About the Author

John Ohle is an AWS BigData Cloud Support Engineer II for the BigData team in Dublin. He works to provide advice and solutions to our customers on their Big Data projects and workflows on AWS. In his spare time, he likes to play music, learn, develop tools and write documentation to further help others – both colleagues and customers alike.

 

 

 

Use CloudFormation StackSets to Provision Resources Across Multiple AWS Accounts and Regions

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/use-cloudformation-stacksets-to-provision-resources-across-multiple-aws-accounts-and-regions/

AWS CloudFormation helps AWS customers implement an Infrastructure as Code model. Instead of setting up their environments and applications by hand, they build a template and use it to create all of the necessary resources, collectively known as a CloudFormation stack. This model removes opportunities for manual error, increases efficiency, and ensures consistent configurations over time.

Today I would like to tell you about a new feature that makes CloudFormation even more useful. This feature is designed to help you to address the challenges that you face when you use Infrastructure as Code in situations that include multiple AWS accounts and/or AWS Regions. As a quick review:

Accounts – As I have told you in the past, many organizations use a multitude of AWS accounts, often using AWS Organizations to arrange the accounts into a hierarchy and to group them into Organizational Units, or OUs (read AWS Organizations – Policy-Based Management for Multiple AWS Accounts to learn more). Our customers use multiple accounts for business units, applications, and developers. They often create separate accounts for development, testing, staging, and production on a per-application basis.

Regions – Customers also make great use of the large (and ever-growing) set of AWS Regions. They build global applications that span two or more regions, implement sophisticated multi-region disaster recovery models, replicate S3, Aurora, PostgreSQL, and MySQL data in real time, and choose locations for storage and processing of sensitive data in accord with national and regional regulations.

This expansion into multiple accounts and regions comes with some new challenges with respect to governance and consistency. Our customers tell us that they want to make sure that each new account is set up in accord with their internal standards. Among other things, they want to set up IAM users and roles, VPCs and VPC subnets, security groups, Config Rules, logging, and AWS Lambda functions in a consistent and reliable way.

Introducing StackSet
In order to address these important customer needs, we are launching CloudFormation StackSet today. You can now define an AWS resource configuration in a CloudFormation template and then roll it out across multiple AWS accounts and/or Regions with a couple of clicks. You can use this to set up a baseline level of AWS functionality that addresses the cross-account and cross-region scenarios that I listed above. Once you have set this up, you can easily expand coverage to additional accounts and regions.

This feature always works on a cross-account basis. The master account owns one or more StackSets and controls deployment to one or more target accounts. The master account must include an assumable IAM role and the target accounts must delegate trust to this role. To learn how to do this, read Prerequisites in the StackSet Documentation.

Each StackSet references a CloudFormation template and contains lists of accounts and regions. All operations apply to the cross-product of the accounts and regions in the StackSet. If the StackSet references three accounts (A1, A2, and A3) and four regions (R1, R2, R3, and R4), there are twelve targets:

  • Region R1: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.
  • Region R2: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.
  • Region R3: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.
  • Region R4: Accounts A1, A2, and A3.

Deploying a template initiates creation of a CloudFormation stack in an account/region pair. Templates are deployed sequentially to regions (you control the order) to multiple accounts within the region (you control the amount of parallelism). You can also set an error threshold that will terminate deployments if stack creation fails.

You can use your existing CloudFormation templates (taking care to make sure that they are ready to work across accounts and regions), create new ones, or use one of our sample templates. We are launching with support for the AWS partition (all public regions except those in China), and expect to expand it to to the others before too long.

Using StackSets
You can create and deploy StackSets from the CloudFormation Console, via the CloudFormation APIs, or from the command line.

Using the Console, I start by clicking on Create StackSet. I can use my own template or one of the samples. I’ll use the last sample (Add config rule encrypted volumes):

I click on View template to learn more about the template and the rule:

I give my StackSet a name. The template that I selected accepts an optional parameter, and I can enter it at this time:

Next, I choose the accounts and regions. I can enter account numbers directly, reference an AWS organizational unit, or upload a list of account numbers:

I can set up the regions and control the deployment order:

I can also set the deployment options. Once I am done I click on Next to proceed:

I can add tags to my StackSet. They will be applied to the AWS resources created during the deployment:

The deployment begins, and I can track the status from the Console:

I can open up the Stacks section to see each stack. Initially, the status of each stack is OUTDATED, indicating that the template has yet to be deployed to the stack; this will change to CURRENT after a successful deployment. If a stack cannot be deleted, the status will change to INOPERABLE.

After my initial deployment, I can click on Manage StackSet to add additional accounts, regions, or both, to create additional stacks:

Now Available
This new feature is available now and you can start using it today at no extra charge (you pay only for the AWS resources created on your behalf).

Jeff;

PS – If you create some useful templates and would like to share them with other AWS users, please send a pull request to our AWS Labs GitHub repo.

Drupal Association and project lead statement regarding Larry Garfield

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/727948/rss

The Drupal Association has issued a
lengthy statement
on why Larry Garfield has been removed from his
management roles in the Drupal project. “Larry’s subsequent blog
posts harmed the community and had a material impact on the Drupal
Association, including membership cancellations from those who believed we
doxed, bullied, and discriminated against Larry as well as significant
staff disruption. Due to the harm caused, the Drupal Association is
removing Larry Garfield from leadership roles that we are responsible for,
effective today.
” See this article
for background information.