Tag Archives: AWS CLI

New IAMCTL tool compares multiple IAM roles and policies

Post Syndicated from Sudhir Reddy Maddulapally original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/new-iamctl-tool-compares-multiple-iam-roles-and-policies/

If you have multiple Amazon Web Services (AWS) accounts, and you have AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles among those multiple accounts that are supposed to be similar, those roles can deviate over time from your intended baseline due to manual actions performed directly out-of-band called drift. As part of regular compliance checks, you should confirm that these roles have no deviations. In this post, we present a tool called IAMCTL that you can use to extract the IAM roles and policies from two accounts, compare them, and report out the differences and statistics. We will explain how to use the tool, and will describe the key concepts.

Prerequisites

Before you install IAMCTL and start using it, here are a few prerequisites that need to be in place on the computer where you will run it:

To follow along in your environment, clone the files from the GitHub repository, and run the steps in order. You won’t incur any charges to run this tool.

Install IAMCTL

This section describes how to install and run the IAMCTL tool.

To install and run IAMCTL

  1. At the command line, enter the following command:
    pip3 install git+ssh://[email protected]/aws-samples/[email protected]
    

    You will see output similar to the following.

    Figure 1: IAMCTL tool installation output

    Figure 1: IAMCTL tool installation output

  2. To confirm that your installation was successful, enter the following command.
    iamctl –h
    

    You will see results similar to those in figure 2.

    Figure 2: IAMCTL help message

    Figure 2: IAMCTL help message

Now that you’ve successfully installed the IAMCTL tool, the next section will show you how to use the IAMCTL commands.

Example use scenario

Here is an example of how IAMCTL can be used to find differences in IAM roles between two AWS accounts.

A system administrator for a product team is trying to accelerate a product launch in the middle of testing cycles. Developers have found that the same version of their application behaves differently in the development environment as compared to the QA environment, and they suspect this behavior is due to differences in IAM roles and policies.

The application called “app1” primarily reads from an Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) bucket, and runs on an Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instance. In the development (DEV) account, the application uses an IAM role called “app1_dev” to access the S3 bucket “app1-dev”. In the QA account, the application uses an IAM role called “app1_qa” to access the S3 bucket “app1-qa”. This is depicted in figure 3.

Figure 3: Showing the “app1” application in the development and QA accounts

Figure 3: Showing the “app1” application in the development and QA accounts

Setting up the scenario

To simulate this setup for the purpose of this walkthrough, you don’t have to create the EC2 instance or the S3 bucket, but just focus on the IAM role, inline policy, and trust policy.

As noted in the prerequisites, you will switch between the two AWS accounts by using the AWS CLI named profiles “dev-profile” and “qa-profile”, which are configured to point to the DEV and QA accounts respectively.

Start by using this command:

mkdir -p iamctl_test iamctl_test/dev iamctl_test/qa

The command creates a directory structure that looks like this:
Iamctl_test
|– qa
|– dev

Now, switch to the dev folder to run all the following example commands against the DEV account, by using this command:

cd iamctl_test/dev

To create the required policies, first create a file named “app1_s3_access_policy.json” and add the following policy to it. You will use this file’s content as your role’s inline policy.

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "s3:Get*",
                "s3:List*"
            ],
            "Resource": [
         "arn:aws:s3:::app1-dev/shared/*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

Second, create a file called “app1_trust_policy.json” and add the following policy to it. You will use this file’s content as your role’s trust policy.

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "ec2.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    }
  ]
}

Now use the two files to create an IAM role with the name “app1_dev” in the account by using these command(s), run in the same order as listed here:

#create role with trust policy

aws --profile dev-profile iam create-role --role-name app1_dev --assume-role-policy-document file://app1_trust_policy.json

#put inline policy to the role created above
 
aws --profile dev-profile iam put-role-policy --role-name app1_dev --policy-name s3_inline_policy --policy-document file://app1_s3_access_policy.json

In the QA account, the IAM role is named “app1_qa” and the S3 bucket is named “app1-qa”.

Repeat the steps from the prior example against the QA account by changing dev to qa where shown in bold in the following code samples. Change the directory to qa by using this command:

cd ../qa

To create the required policies, first create a file called “app1_s3_access_policy.json” and add the following policy to it.

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "s3:Get*",
                "s3:List*"
            ],
            "Resource": [
         "arn:aws:s3:::app1-qa/shared/*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

Next, create a file, called “app1_trust_policy.json” and add the following policy.

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "ec2.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    }
  ]
}

Now, use the two files created so far to create an IAM role with the name “app1_qa” in your QA account by using these command(s), run in the same order as listed here:

#create role with trust policy
aws --profile qa-profile iam create-role --role-name app1_qa --assume-role-policy-document file://app1_trust_policy.json

#put inline policy to the role create above
aws --profile qa-profile iam put-role-policy --role-name app1_qa --policy-name s3_inline_policy --policy-document file://app1_s3_access_policy.json

So far, you have two accounts with an IAM role created in each of them for your application. In terms of permissions, there are no differences other than the name of the S3 bucket resource the permission is granted against.

You can expect IAMCTL to generate a minimal set of differences between the DEV and QA accounts, assuming all other IAM roles and policies are the same, but to be sure about the current state of both accounts, in IAMCTL you can run a process called baselining.

Through the process of baselining, you will generate an equivalency dictionary that represents all the known string patterns that reduce the noise in the generated deviations list, and then you will introduce a change into one of the IAM roles in your QA account, followed by a final IAMCTL diff to show the deviations.

Baselining

Baselining is the process of bringing two accounts to an “equivalence” state for IAM roles and policies by establishing a baseline, which future diff operations can leverage. The process is as simple as:

  1. Run the iamctl diff command.
  2. Capture all string substitutions into an equivalence dictionary to remove or reduce noise.
  3. Save the generated detailed files as a snapshot.

Now you can go through these steps for your baseline.

Go ahead and run the iamctl diff command against these two accounts by using the following commands.

#change directory from qa to iamctl-test
cd ..

#run iamctl init
iamctl init

The results of running the init command are shown in figure 4.

Figure 4: Output of the iamctl init command

Figure 4: Output of the iamctl init command

If you look at the iamctl_test directory now, shown in figure 5, you can see that the init command created two files in the iamctl_test directory.

Figure 5: The directory structure after running the init command

Figure 5: The directory structure after running the init command

These two files are as follows:

  1. iam.jsonA reference file that has all AWS services and actions listed, among other things. IAMCTL uses this to map the resource listed in an IAM policy to its corresponding AWS resource, based on Amazon Resource Name (ARN) regular expression.
  2. equivalency_list.jsonThe default sample dictionary that IAMCTL uses to suppress false alarms when it compares two accounts. This is where the known string patterns that need to be substituted are added.

Note: A best practice is to make the directory where you store the equivalency dictionary and from which you run IAMCTL to be a Git repository. Doing this will let you capture any additions or modifications for the equivalency dictionary by using Git commits. This will not only give you an audit trail of your historical baselines but also gives context to any additions or modifications to the equivalency dictionary. However, doing this is not necessary for the regular functioning of IAMCTL.

Next, run the iamctl diff command:

#run iamctl diff
iamctl diff dev-profile dev qa-profile qa
Figure 6: Result of diff command

Figure 6: Result of diff command

Figure 6 shows the results of running the diff command. You can see that IAMCTL considers the app1_qa and app1_dev roles as unique to the DEV and QA accounts, respectively. This is because IAMCTL uses role names to decide whether to compare the role or tag the role as unique.

You will add the strings “dev” and “qa” to the equivalency dictionary to instruct IAMCTL to substitute occurrences of these two strings with “accountname” by adding the follow JSON to the equivalency_list.json file. You will also clean up some defaults already present in there.

echo “{“accountname”:[“dev”,”qa”]}” > equivalency_list.json

Figure 7 shows the equivalency dictionary before you take these actions, and figure 8 shows the dictionary after these actions.

Figure 7: Equivalency dictionary before

Figure 7: Equivalency dictionary before

Figure 8: Equivalency dictionary after

Figure 8: Equivalency dictionary after

There’s another thing to notice here. In this example, one common role was flagged as having a difference. To know which role this is and what the difference is, go to the detail reports folder listed at the bottom of the summary report. The directory structure of this folder is shown in figure 9.

Notice that the reports are created under your home directory with a folder structure that mimics the time stamp down to the second. IAMCTL does this to maintain uniqueness for each run.

tree /Users/<username>/aws-idt/output/2020/08/24/08/38/49/
Figure 9: Files written to the output reports directory

Figure 9: Files written to the output reports directory

You can see there is a file called common_roles_in_dev_with_differences.csv, and it lists a role called “AwsSecurity***Audit”.

You can see there is another file called dev_to_qa_common_role_difference_items.csv, and it lists the granular IAM items from the DEV account that belong to the “AwsSecurity***Audit” role as compared to QA, but which have differences. You can see that all entries in the file have the DEV account number in the resource ARN, whereas in the qa_to_dev_common_role_difference_items.csv file, all entries have the QA account number for the same role “AwsSecurity***Audit”.

Add both of the account numbers to the equivalency dictionary to substitute them with a placeholder number, because you don’t want this role to get flagged as having differences.

echo “{“accountname”:[“dev”,”qa”],”000000000000”:[“123456789012”,”987654321098”]}” > equivalency_list.json

Now, re-run the diff command.

#run iamctl diff
iamctl diff dev-profile dev qa-profile qa

As you can see in figure 10, you get back the result of the diff command that shows that the DEV account doesn’t have any differences in IAM roles as compared to the QA account.

Figure 10: Output showing no differences after completion of baselining

Figure 10: Output showing no differences after completion of baselining

This concludes the baselining for your DEV and QA accounts. Now you will introduce a change.

Introducing drift

Drift occurs when there is a difference in actual vs expected values in the definition or configuration of a resource. There are several reasons why drift occurs, but for this scenario you will use “intentional need to respond to a time-sensitive operational event” as a reason to mimic and introduce drift into what you have built so far.

To simulate this change, add “s3:PutObject” to the qa app1_s3_access_policy.json file as shown in the following example.

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "s3:Get*",
                "s3:List*",
                "s3:PutObject"
            ],
            "Resource": [
         "arn:aws:s3:::app1-qa/shared/*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

Put this new inline policy on your existing role “app1_qa” by using this command:

aws --profile qa-profile iam put-role-policy --role-name app1_qa --policy-name s3_inline_policy --policy-document file://app1_s3_access_policy.json

The following table represents the new drift in the accounts.

ActionAccount-DEV
Role name: app1_dev
Account-QA
Role name: app1_qa
s3:Get*YesYes
s3:List*YesYes
s3: PutObjectNoYes

Next, run the iamctl diff command to see how it picks up the drift from your previously baselined accounts.

#change directory from qa to iamctL-test
cd ..
iamctl diff dev-profile dev qa-profile qa
Figure 11: Output showing the one deviation that was introduced

Figure 11: Output showing the one deviation that was introduced

You can see that IAMCTL now shows that the QA account has one difference as compared to DEV, which is what we expect based on the deviation you’ve introduced.

Open up the file qa_to_dev_common_role_difference_items.csv to look at the one difference. Again, adjust the following path example with the output from the iamctl diff command at the bottom of the summary report in Figure 11.

cat /Users/<username>/aws-idt/output/2020/09/18/07/38/15/qa_to_dev_common_role_difference_items.csv

As shown in figure 12, you can see that the file lists the specific S3 action “PutObject” with the role name and other relevant details.

Figure 12: Content of file qa_to_dev_common_role_difference_items.csv showing the one deviation that was introduced

Figure 12: Content of file qa_to_dev_common_role_difference_items.csv showing the one deviation that was introduced

You can use this information to remediate the deviation by performing corrective actions in either your DEV account or QA account. You can confirm the effectiveness of the corrective action by re-baselining to make sure that zero deviations appear.

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to use the IAMCTL tool to compare IAM roles between two accounts, to arrive at a granular list of meaningful differences that can be used for compliance audits or for further remediation actions. If you’ve created your IAM roles by using an AWS CloudFormation stack, you can turn on drift detection and easily capture the drift because of changes done outside of AWS CloudFormation to those IAM resources. For more information about drift detection, see Detecting unmanaged configuration changes to stacks and resources. Lastly, see the GitHub repository where the tool is maintained with documentation describing each of the subcommand concepts. We welcome any pull requests for issues and enhancements.

If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below. If you have questions about this post, start a new thread on the AWS IAM forum or contact AWS Support.

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Author

Sudhir Reddy Maddulapally

Sudhir is a Senior Partner Solution Architect who builds SaaS solutions for partners by day and is a tech tinkerer by night. He enjoys trips to state and national parks, and Yosemite is his favorite thus far!

Author

Soumya Vanga

Soumya is a Cloud Application Architect with AWS Professional Services in New York, NY, helping customers design solutions and workloads and to adopt Cloud Native services.

Enhance programmatic access for IAM users using a YubiKey for multi-factor authentication

Post Syndicated from Edouard Kachelmann original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/enhance-programmatic-access-for-iam-users-using-yubikey-for-multi-factor-authentication/

Organizations are increasingly providing access to corporate resources from employee laptops and are required to apply the correct permissions to these computing devices to make sure that secrets and sensitive data are adequately protected. The combination of Amazon Web Services (AWS) long-term credentials and a YubiKey security token for multi-factor authentication (MFA) is an option for providing secure programmatic access to AWS for organizations that aren’t yet ready or able to use identity federation. For example, a user should be able to list AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles with their default programmatic access, but would be required to provide MFA to assume an IAM role.

In this blog post, we show you how to use a YubiKey token for MFA with the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) to create temporary credentials with the permissions that developers need to perform tasks. The user will configure the long-term credentials and then temporarily assume a role with broader permissions by using MFA when needed. MFA adds extra security, because it requires users to provide second-factor authentication from an AWS-supported MFA mechanism in addition to static security credentials such as their user name and password.

The goal for any organization is to move to the recommended best practices for allowing individual programmatic access that include using temporary security credentials that aren’t stored with the user, but are generated dynamically and provided to the user when requested, such as identity federation due to the temporary nature of those credentials. If your organization uses AWS Single Sign-On (AWS SSO) along with an identity provider (IdP) such as Okta, Azure Active Directory (AD), or AWS Managed Microsoft AD, you can then use the instructions from this earlier blog post to leverage the AWS CLI v2 native integration with AWS SSO and take advantage of the multi-factor authentication support of your IdP.

Overview

This post describes the configuration of IAM users and roles and initialization of the YubiKey token as an MFA device by an administrator, and then how developers can use the YubiKey device to retrieve temporary credentials and assume a role with elevated permissions within the AWS CLI.

The overall process flow looks like this:

  1. Create an IAM user with programmatic access, MFA, and a policy that allows you to assume a more privileged IAM role. The user will retrieve a Time-based One-time Password (TOTP) token code by using a YubiKey as MFA.
  2. Assume the more privileged role, which is restricted by an MFA conditional, by using the TOTP token code.

Figure 1 shows the steps of the process.

Figure 1: A visual overview of the steps to assume roles with elevated permissions by using a YubiKey for MFA

Figure 1: A visual overview of the steps to assume roles with elevated permissions by using a YubiKey for MFA

Prerequisites

To get started you need:

  • An AWS account.
  • A YubiKey (available on Amazon.com). YubiKey 4 and 5 series are compatible, because they support the required OATH application.

    Note: The Yubico Security Keys (the blue tokens) aren’t supported, because they lack the OATH application. If you already have a corporate YubiKey device, this capability might have been disabled.

  • To complete the process for:

Notes:

  • AWS CLI v2 doesn’t yet support Universal 2nd factor (U2F) MFA. As a workaround, we use a YubiKey as a virtual device MFA.
  • OATH (Initiative for Open Authentication) is an organization that specifies two open authentication standards: TOTP and HMAC-based One-time Password (HOTP). For this solution, we use the TOTP standard.

Getting started

Initializing YubiKey for MFA

The following steps show you, as cloud administrator, how to initialize the YubiKey as a virtual MFA device and configure an IAM user that can assume a role with elevated permissions, on the condition that the user is using an MFA device. In this example, your developers will assume a role with permissions to access Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2).

To configure the IAM user and initialize the YubiKey device as MFA

  1. Create a role with elevated permissions that your developers can assume.
    1. Sign in to the AWS IAM console, and in the right-hand pane, choose Roles. Then choose Create role.

      Figure 2: Create a role in the IAM console

      Figure 2: Create a role in the IAM console

    2. For the type of trusted entity, choose Another AWS account. Enter your account ID, which you can find by using these methods, described in the IAM User Guide. Choose Next:Permissions.

      Figure 3: Select the type of trusted entity and provide the account ID

    3. Search for the AmazonEC2FullAccess policy, and select the check box next to it. Choose Next:Tags, and add relevant tags if needed. Choose Next:Review.
    4. Name the role developer-ec2-mfa, and then choose Create role.
    5. Go back to the role you just created. Change the maximum session duration value to limit how long the developer’s session can be valid after assuming the role. For this example, we set the duration to 1 hour (3,600 seconds) by using a custom value. Limit this duration to abide by your organization’s recommended authentication time.
    6. Take note of the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) for the new role as shown on the summary page.

      Figure 4: Summary page of the new role

      Figure 4: Summary page of the new role

  2. Create a new IAM policy that provides a limited scope of actions for users when they use their long-term credentials.
    1. Navigate to the AWS IAM console, and in the navigation pane, choose Policies. Choose Create policy.

      Figure 5: Create a policy in the IAM console

      Figure 5: Create a policy in the IAM console

    2. Because we’ve already written the policy in JSON, you don’t need to use the Visual Editor, so you can choose the JSON tab and paste the content of the following JSON policy document (remember to replace the placeholder for the role ARN).Following the least privilege approach, add only the Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) of the role or roles with required elevated permissions that the developer will be able to assume. In this case, use the developer-ec2-mfa ARN for the role that you created previously.
      {
         "Version": "2012-10-17",
         "Statement": [
            {
               "Sid": "",
               "Effect": "Allow",
               "Action": "sts:AssumeRole",
               "Resource": <Elevated Role ARN(s)>,
               "Condition": {
                  "Bool": {
                     "aws:multifactorAuthPresent": true
                  }
               }
            }
         ]
      }
      

      Note: The condition “aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent”: “true” requires that the user who assumes the role has been authenticated with an AWS MFA device.

    3. Choose Review policy.
    4. Name the policy yubi-policy-mfa-level-one. Choose Create policy.
  3. Create a new IAM group that lets you specify permissions for multiple users and makes it easier to manage the permissions for those users.
    1. Navigate to the IAM console, and in the navigation pane, choose Groups. Choose Create New Group.

      Figure 6: Create a group in the IAM console

      Figure 6: Create a group in the IAM console

    2. Enter developers-mfa as the group name. Choose Next Step.
    3. On the Attach Policy screen, in the filter box, search for the policy yubi-policy-mfa-level-one that you created in the previous step. Make sure you select the check box next to the policy, and then choose Next Step.

      Figure 7: Attach the policy to the IAM group

      Figure 7: Attach the policy to the IAM group

    4. Review the group information, and then choose Create Group.
  4. Create a user in IAM for the developer using the AWS CLI.
    1. Navigate to the IAM console and in the navigation pane, choose Users. Choose Add user.
    2. On the Add user screen, enter the name for your user. In this example, our developer is named JohnDoe. For Access type, select the check box next to Programmatic access. Choose Next: Permissions.

      Figure 8: Create an IAM user with programmatic access

      Figure 8: Create an IAM user with programmatic access

    3. For permissions, select Add user to group, and select the developers-mfa group. Choose Next: Tags.
    4. Add the relevant tags if needed, and then choose Next: Review.
    5. Review the user configuration, and then choose Create user.
    6. Make sure you save the access key ID and secret access key to share with your user. Choose Close.
  5. Assign an MFA device to the user.
    1. Go back to the Users section of the IAM console. Choose the IAM user that you created previously, and go to the Security credentials tab. For Assigned MFA device, choose Manage.

      Figure 9: Assign MFA device to the IAM user

      Figure 9: Assign MFA device to the IAM user

    2. Select Virtual MFA device, because the AWS CLI doesn’t yet support U2F MFA. Choose Continue.

      Figure 10: Select the Virtual MFA device type

      Figure 10: Select the Virtual MFA device type

    3. Instead of using the QR code, choose Show secret key.

      Note: The secret key is a randomly generated string shared between IAM and the physical YubiKey. It is used to generate a one-time password using a hash function with the current timestamp.

       

      Figure 11: Retrieve the secret key on the virtual MFA device configuration page

      Figure 11: Retrieve the secret key on the virtual MFA device configuration page

    4. Copy the secret key to use in the next step as the MFA_SECRET to configure the MFA device.
  6. To obtain the TOTP token codes from the YubiKey to synchronize the key with the IAM user, do the following.
    1. Insert the YubiKey token in your USB port, and verify that the OATH application is enabled for your YubiKey by running the following command and looking for Enabled USB interfaces: OTP+FIDO+CCID in the output.
      $ ykman info
      
      Device type: YubiKey 5 NFC
      Serial number: 123456789
      Firmware version: 5.2.4
      Form factor: Keychain (USB-A)
      Enabled USB interfaces: OTP+FIDO+CCID
      NFC interface is enabled.
      
      Applications USB NFC
      OTP Enabled Enabled
      FIDO U2F Enabled Enabled
      OpenPGP Enabled Enabled
      PIV Enabled Enabled
      OATH Enabled Enabled
      FIDO2 Enabled Enabled
      

    2. For each MFA device, you need to generate a unique identifier that will be used during the process. We recommend that you create this identifier based on the ARN of the IAM user, by using the following template.
      arn:aws:iam::<ACCOUNT_ID>:mfa/<IAM_USERNAME>
      

    3. Add a new credential to your YubiKey based on the MFA device ARN. Use the MFA_SECRET that you copied in the previous step (step 5).
      ykman oath add -t arn:aws:iam::<ACCOUNT_ID>:mfa/<IAM_USERNAME> <MFA_SECRET>
      

    4. Obtain two TOTP token codes by using the following command (remember to replace the placeholder for the <MFA device ARN>). Wait up to 30 seconds for the device to generate the second token code (you will be prompted to touch the token).
      ykman oath code <MFA device ARN>
      

    5. After obtaining each of the TOTP token codes, go back to the IAM console where you were setting up the virtual MFA device, and enter the code in the MFA code box. After entering the two MFA codes, choose Assign MFA.

      Figure 12: Enter the two consecutive YubiKey codes in the virtual MFA device configuration page

      Figure 12: Enter the two consecutive YubiKey codes in the virtual MFA device configuration page

  7. You can then provide the following information to your developer:
    1. The YubiKey device along with the generated MFA device ARN
    2. The ARNs for the roles that will be assumed
    3. The long-term AWS credentials

Assuming a role with the YubiKey as MFA

The following steps show how you, as a developer, can retrieve temporary credentials using the YubiKey device as MFA, and assume a role with wider permissions. You can do this after the YubiKey device, one or more role ARNs, and long-term credentials have been shared with you by the cloud administrator.

To assume a role with broader permissions by using YubiKey

  1. As part of the prerequisites, you should have the AWS CLI v2 already installed. Now configure the default profile with the long-term credentials provided by your cloud administrator, by using the following command.
    $ aws configure
    
    AWS Access Key ID [None]: <Enter your AWS access key>
    AWS Secret Access Key [None]: <Enter your AWS secret access key>
    Default region name [None]: <Enter your AWS default region>
    Default output format [None]: <Enter your output default format>
    

  2. Obtain a TOTP code from YubiKey (you will be prompted to touch the token). Submit your request immediately after generating the codes. If you generate the codes and then wait too long to submit the request, the code won’t be valid anymore.
    ykman oath code arn:aws:iam::<ACCOUNT_ID>:mfa/<IAM_USERNAME>
    

  3. Using the MFA token code you obtained by using the YubiKey, assume the relevant role that will provide access to larger permissions. In our example, the ARN is for the role developer-ec2-mfa that was provided by the IAM administrator. Enter a role session name that will uniquely identify a session when the same role is assumed by different principals.
    aws sts assume-role --role-arn <Role ARN> --role-session-name <Role Name> --serial-number <MFA device ARN> --token-code <token code> --duration-seconds 3600 
    

    Note: The user should only have access to sts:AssumeRole for a specific set of roles. Here we chose the session duration of one hour. You can edit the session duration so the developer can authenticate for the duration of a workday (the default value is 1 hour and can be up to 12 hours). Limit this duration to abide by your organization’s recommended authentication time.

    You should see the following output.

    {
       "AssumedRoleUser": {
          "AssumedRoleId": "ABCD123ABCDEFGHIJKLMN:<role-session-name>",
          "Arn": "arn:aws:sts::<ACCOUNT_ID>:assumed-role/developer-ec2-mfa/<role-session-name>"
       },
       "Credentials": {
          "SecretAccessKey": <aws_secret_access_key>,
          "SessionToken": <aws_session_token>,
          "Expiration": "2020-07-13T19:24:20Z",
          "AccessKeyId": <aws_access_key_id>
       }
    }
    

  4. Edit a new AWS CLI profile named johndoe-developer-role as seen following. Copy the access key and secret key that were retrieved as temporary credentials from the get-session-token command. Then set the additional parameter aws_session_token, which was returned along with the temporary credentials. Edit your CLI with the information for the new role.
    aws configure --profile johndoe-developer-role
    aws configure --profile johndoe-developer-role set aws_session_token <Session Token> 
    

  5. Attempt to make a call to relevant services that are allowed by the newly assumed role. Here’s an example using the Amazon EC2 API to describe the EC2 instances.
    aws --profile johndoe-developer-role ec2 describe-instances
    

The developer now has access to the larger permissions set through the assumed role for the next hour.

Summary

In this post, we introduced the capability to further secure long-term AWS credentials with a YubiKey for MFA, for organizations that are still using long-term credentials. These credentials are stored in the ~/.aws/credentials file. If an unauthorized user was able to retrieve these long-term credentials, they wouldn’t be able to use them, because the user needs to have the physical MFA in order to assume a role with broader permissions. The steps in this blog post can be converted to a script that your developers can use repeatedly to simplify the process.

In general, we recommend that all customers move away from using IAM users and static credentials and instead use IAM roles and temporary credentials wherever possible. An easy way to get started down that road is by using AWS SSO for identity federation.

If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below. If you have questions about this post, start a new thread on the AWS IAM forum or contact AWS Support.

Want more AWS Security how-to content, news, and feature announcements? Follow us on Twitter.

Author

Edouard Kachelmann

Edouard is an Enterprise Solutions Architect at Amazon Web Services. He is a passionate technology enthusiast who enjoys working with customers and helping them build innovative solutions. Prior to his work at AWS, Edouard worked for the French National Cybersecurity Agency, sharing its security expertise and assisting government departments and operators of vital importance. In his free time, Edouard likes to explore new places to eat, try new French recipes, and play with his kid.

Author

Anthony Pasquariello

Anthony is an Enterprise Solutions Architect based in New York City. He provides technical consultation to customers during their cloud journey, especially around security best practices. He has an MS and BS in electrical & computer engineering from Boston University. In his free time, he enjoys ramen, writing nonfiction, and philosophy.

Federated multi-account access for AWS CodeCommit

Post Syndicated from Steven David original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/federated-multi-account-access-for-aws-codecommit/

As a developer working in a large enterprise or for a group that supports multiple products, you may often find yourself accessing Git repositories from different organizations. Currently, to securely access multiple Git repositories in other popular tools, you need SSH keys, GPG keys, a Git credential helper, and a significant amount of setup by the developer hoping to commit to the repository. In addition, administrators must be aware of the various ways to remove all the permissions granted to the developer.

AWS CodeCommit is a managed source control service. Combined with AWS Single Sign-On (AWS SSO) and git-remote-codecommit, you can quickly and easily switch between repositories owned by different groups or even managed in separate AWS accounts. You can control those permissions with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles to allow for the automated removal of the user’s permission as part of their off-boarding procedure for the company.

This post demonstrates how to grant access to various CodeCommit repositories without access keys.

Solution overview

In this solution, the user’s access is controlled with federated login via AWS SSO. You can grant that access using AWS native authentication, which eliminates the need for a Git credential helper, SSH, and GPG keys. In addition, this allows the administrator to control access by adding or removing the user’s IAM role access.

The following diagram shows the code access pattern you can achieve by using AWS SSO and git-remote-codecommit to access CodeCommit across multiple accounts.

git-remote-codecommit overview diagram

Prerequisites

To complete this tutorial, you must have the following prerequisites:

  • CodeCommit repositories in two separate accounts. For instructions, see Create an AWS CodeCommit repository.
  • AWS SSO set up to handle access federation. For instructions, see Enable AWS SSO.
  • Python 3.6 or higher installed on the developer’s local machine. To download and install the latest version of Python, see the Python website.
    • On a Mac, it can be difficult to ensure that you’re using Python 3.6, because 2.7 is installed and required by the OS. For more information about checking your version of Python, see the following GitHub repo.
  • Git installed on your local machine. To download Git, see Git Downloads.
  • PIP version 9.0.3 or higher installed on your local machine. For instructions, see Installation on the PIP website.

Configuring AWS SSO role permissions

As your first step, you should make sure each AWS SSO role has the correct permissions to access the CodeCommit repositories.

  1. On the AWS SSO console, choose AWS Accounts.
  2. On the Permissions Sets tab, choose Create permission set.
  3. On the Create a new permission set page, select Create a custom permission set.
  4. For Name, enter CodeCommitDeveloperAccess.
  5. For Description, enter This permission set gives the user access to work with CodeCommit for common developer tasks.
  6. For Session duration, choose 12 hours.

Create new permissions

  1. For Relay state, leave blank.
  2. For What policies do you want to include in your permissions set?, select Create a custom permissions policy.
  3. Use the following policy:
{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
             "Sid": "CodeCommitDeveloperAccess",
             "Effect": "Allow",
             "Action": [
                 "codecommit:GitPull",
                 "codecommit:GitPush",
                 "codecommit:ListRepositories"
             ],
             "Resource": "*"
         }
      ]
}

The preceding code grants access to all the repositories in the account. You could limit to a specific list of repositories, if needed.

  1. Choose Create.

Creating your AWS SSO group

Next, we need to create the SSO Group we want to assign the permissions.

  1. On the AWS SSO console, choose Groups.
  2. Choose create group.
  3. For Group name, enter CodeCommitAccessGroup.
  4. For Description, enter Users assigned to this group will have access to work with CodeCommit.

Create Group

  1. Choose Create.

Assigning your group and permission sets to your accounts

Now that we have our group and permission sets created, we need to assign them to the accounts with the CodeCommit repositories.

  1. On the AWS SSO console, choose AWS Accounts.
  2. Choose the account you want to use in your new group.
  3. On the account Details page, choose Assign Users.
  4. On the Select users or groups page, choose Group.
  5. Select CodeCommitGroup.
  6. Choose NEXT: Permission Sets.
  7. Choose the CodeCommitDeveloperAccess permission set and choose Finish

Assign Users

  1. Choose Proceed to Accounts to return to the AWS SSO console.
  2. Repeat these steps for each account that has a CodeCommit repository.

Assigning a user to the group

To wrap up our AWS SSO configuration, we need to assign the user to the group.

  1. On the AWS SSO console, choose Groups.
  2. Choose CodeCommitAccessGroup.
  3. Choose Add user.
  4. Select all the users you want to add to this group.
  5. Choose Add user(s).
  6. From the navigation pane, choose Settings.
  7. Record the user portal URL to use later.

Enabling AWS SSO login

The second main feature we want to enable is AWS SSO login from the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) on our local machine.

  1. Run the following command from the AWS CLI. You need to enter the user portal URL from the previous step and tell the CLI what Region has your AWS SSO deployment. The following code example has AWS SSO deployed in us-east-1:
aws configure sso 
SSO start URL [None]: https://my-sso-portal.awsapps.com/start 
SSO region [None]:us-east-1

You’re redirected to your default browser.

  1. Sign in to AWS SSO.

When you return to the CLI, you must choose your account. See the following code:

There are 2 AWS accounts available to you.
> DeveloperResearch, [email protected] (123456789123)
DeveloperTrading, [email protected] (123456789444)
  1. Choose the account with your CodeCommit repository.

Next, you see the permissions sets available to you in the account you just picked. See the following code:

Using the account ID 123456789123
There are 2 roles available to you.
> ReadOnly
CodeCommitDeveloperAccess
  1. Choose the CodeCommitDeveloperAccess permissions.

You now see the options for the profile you’re creating for these AWS SSO permissions:

CLI default client Region [None]: us-west-2<ENTER>
CLI default output format [None]: json<ENTER>
CLI profile name [123456789011_ReadOnly]: DevResearch-profile<ENTER>
  1. Repeat these steps for each AWS account you want to access.

For example, I create DevResearch-profile for my DeveloperResearch account and DevTrading-profile for the DeveloperTrading account.

Installing git-remote-codecommit

Finally, we want to install the recently released git-remote-codecommit and start working with our Git repositories.

  1. Install git-remote-codecommit with the following code:
pip install git-remote-codecommit

With some operating systems, you might need to run the following code instead:

sudo pip install git-remote-codecommit
  1. Clone the code from one of your repositories. For this use case, my CodeCommit repository is named MyDemoRepo. See the following code:
git clone codecommit://[email protected] my-demo-repo
  1. After that solution is cloned locally, you can copy code from another federated profile by simply changing to that profile and referencing the repository in that account named MyDemoRepo2. See the following code:
git clone codecommit://[email protected] my-demo-repo2

Cleaning up

At the end of this tutorial, complete the following steps to undo the changes you made to your local system and AWS:

  1. On the AWS SSO console, remove the user from the group you created, so any future access requests fail.
  2. To remove the AWS SSO login profiles, open the local config file with your preferred tool and remove the profile.
    1. The config file is located at %UserProfile%/.aws/config for Windows and $HOME/.aws/config for Linux or Mac.
  3. To remove git-remote-codecommit, run the PIP uninstall command:
pip uninstall git-remote-codecommit

With some operating systems, you might need to run the following code instead:

sudo pip uninstall git-remote-codecommit

Conclusion

This post reviewed an approach to securely switch between repositories and work without concerns about one Git repository’s security credentials interfering with the other Git repository. User access is controlled by the permissions assigned to the profile via federated roles from AWS SSO. This allows for access control to CodeCommit without needing access keys.

About the Author

Steven David
Steven David

Steven David is an Enterprise Solutions Architect at Amazon Web Services. He helps customers build secure and scalable solutions. He has background in application development and containers.

Jump-starting your serverless development environment

Post Syndicated from Benjamin Smith original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/jump-starting-your-serverless-development-environment/

Developers building serverless applications often wonder how they can jump-start their local development environment. This blog post provides a broad guide for those developers wanting to set up a development environment for building serverless applications.

serverless development environment

AWS and open source tools for a serverless development environment .

To use AWS Lambda and other AWS services, create and activate an AWS account.

Command line tooling

Command line tools are scripts, programs, and libraries that enable rapid application development and interactions from within a command line shell.

The AWS CLI

The AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) is an open source tool that enables developers to interact with AWS services using a command line shell. In many cases, the AWS CLI increases developer velocity for building cloud resources and enables automating repetitive tasks. It is an important piece of any serverless developer’s toolkit. Follow these instructions to install and configure the AWS CLI on your operating system.

AWS enables you to build infrastructure with code. This provides a single source of truth for AWS resources. It enables development teams to use version control and create deployment pipelines for their cloud infrastructure. AWS CloudFormation provides a common language to model and provision these application resources in your cloud environment.

AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM CLI)

AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) is an extension for CloudFormation that further simplifies the process of building serverless application resources.

It provides shorthand syntax to define Lambda functions, APIs, databases, and event source mappings. During deployment, the AWS SAM syntax is transformed into AWS CloudFormation syntax, enabling you to build serverless applications faster.

The AWS SAM CLI is an open source command line tool used to locally build, test, debug, and deploy serverless applications defined with AWS SAM templates.

Install AWS SAM CLI on your operating system.

Test the installation by initializing a new quick start project with the following command:

$ sam init
  1. Choose 1 for the “Quick Start Templates
  2. Choose 1 for the “Node.js runtime
  3. Use the default name.

The generated /sam-app/template.yaml contains all the resource definitions for your serverless application. This includes a Lambda function with a REST API endpoint, along with the necessary IAM permissions.

Resources:
  HelloWorldFunction:
    Type: AWS::Serverless::Function # More info about Function Resource: https://github.com/awslabs/serverless-application-model/blob/master/versions/2016-10-31.md#awsserverlessfunction
    Properties:
      CodeUri: hello-world/
      Handler: app.lambdaHandler
      Runtime: nodejs12.x
      Events:
        HelloWorld:
          Type: Api # More info about API Event Source: https://github.com/awslabs/serverless-application-model/blob/master/versions/2016-10-31.md#api
          Properties:
            Path: /hello
            Method: get

Deploy this application using the AWS SAM CLI guided deploy:

$ sam deploy -g

Local testing with AWS SAM CLI

The AWS SAM CLI requires Docker containers to simulate the AWS Lambda runtime environment on your local development environment. To test locally, install Docker Engine and run the Lambda function with following command:

$ sam local invoke "HelloWorldFunction" -e events/event.json

The first time this function is invoked, Docker downloads the lambci/lambda:nodejs12.x container image. It then invokes the Lambda function with a pre-defined event JSON file.

Helper tools

There are a number of open source tools and packages available to help you monitor, author, and optimize your Lambda-based applications. Some of the most popular tools are shown in the following list.

Template validation tooling

CloudFormation Linter is a validation tool that helps with your CloudFormation development cycle. It analyses CloudFormation YAML and JSON templates to resolve and validate intrinsic functions and resource properties. By analyzing your templates before deploying them, you can save valuable development time and build automated validation into your deployment release cycle.

Follow these instructions to install the tool.

Once, installed, run the cfn-lint command with the path to your AWS SAM template provided as the first argument:

cfn-lint template.yaml
AWS SAM template validation with cfn-lint

AWS SAM template validation with cfn-lint

The following example shows that the template is not valid because the !GettAtt function does not evaluate correctly.

IDE tooling

Use AWS IDE plugins to author and invoke Lambda functions from within your existing integrated development environment (IDE). AWS IDE toolkits are available for PyCharm, IntelliJ. Visual Studio.

The AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio Code provides an integrated experience for developing serverless applications. It enables you to invoke Lambda functions, specify function configurations, locally debug, and deploy—all conveniently from within the editor. The toolkit supports Node.js, Python, and .NET.

The AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio Code

From Visual Studio Code, choose the Extensions icon on the Activity Bar. In the Search Extensions in Marketplace box, enter AWS Toolkit and then choose AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio Code as shown in the following example. This opens a new tab in the editor showing the toolkit’s installation page. Choose the Install button in the header to add the extension.

AWS Toolkit extension for Visual Studio Code

AWS Toolkit extension for Visual Studio Code

AWS Cloud9

Another option to build a development environment without having to install anything locally is to use AWS Cloud9. AWS Cloud9 is a cloud-based integrated development environment (IDE) for writing, running, and debugging code from within the browser.

It provides a seamless experience for developing serverless applications. It has a preconfigured development environment that includes AWS CLI, AWS SAM CLI, SDKs, code libraries, and many useful plugins. AWS Cloud9 also provides an environment for locally testing and debugging AWS Lambda functions. This eliminates the need to upload your code to the Lambda console. It allows developers to iterate on code directly, saving time, and improving code quality.

Follow this guide to set up AWS Cloud9 in your AWS environment.

Advanced tooling

Efficient configuration of Lambda functions is critical when expecting optimal cost and performance of your serverless applications. Lambda allows you to control the memory (RAM) allocation for each function.

Lambda charges based on the number of function requests and the duration, the time it takes for your code to run. The price for duration depends on the amount of RAM you allocate to your function. A smaller RAM allocation may reduce the performance of your application if your function is running compute-heavy workloads. If performance needs outweigh cost, you can increase the memory allocation.

Cost and performance optimization tooling

AWS Lambda power tuner is an open source tool that uses an AWS Step Functions state machine to suggest cost and performance optimizations for your Lambda functions. It invokes a given function with multiple memory configurations. It analyzes the execution log results to determine and suggest power configurations that minimize cost and maximize performance.

To deploy the tool:

  1. Clone the repository as follows:
    $ git clone https://github.com/alexcasalboni/aws-lambda-power-tuning.git
  2. Create an Amazon S3 bucket and enter the deployment configurations in /scripts/deploy.sh:
    # config
    BUCKET_NAME=your-sam-templates-bucket
    STACK_NAME=lambda-power-tuning
    PowerValues='128,512,1024,1536,3008'
  3. Run the deploy.sh script from your terminal, this uses the AWS SAM CLI to deploy the application:
    $ bash scripts/deploy.sh
  4. Run the power tuning tool from the terminal using the AWS CLI:
    aws stepfunctions start-execution \
    --state-machine-arn arn:aws:states:us-east-1:0123456789:stateMachine:powerTuningStateMachine-Vywm3ozPB6Am \
    --input "{\"lambdaARN\": \"arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:1234567890:function:testytest\", \"powerValues\":[128,256,512,1024,2048],\"num\":50,\"payload\":{},\"parallelInvocation\":true,\"strategy\":\"cost\"}" \
    --output json
  5. The Step Functions execution output produces a link to a visual summary of the suggested results:

    AWS Lambda power tuning results

    AWS Lambda power tuning results

Monitoring and debugging tooling

Sls-dev-tools is an open source serverless tool that delivers serverless metrics directly to the terminal. It provides developers with feedback on their serverless application’s metrics and key bindings that deploy, open, and manipulate stack resources. Bringing this data directly to your terminal or IDE, reduces context switching between the developer environment and the web interfaces. This can increase application development speed and improve user experience.

Follow these instructions to install the tool onto your development environment.

To open the tool, run the following command:

$ Sls-dev-tools

Follow the in-terminal interface to choose which stack to monitor or edit.

The following example shows how the tool can be used to invoke a Lambda function with a custom payload from within the IDE.

Invoke an AWS Lambda function with a custom payload using sls-dev-tools

Invoke an AWS Lambda function with a custom payload using sls-dev-tools

Serverless database tooling

NoSQL Workbench for Amazon DynamoDB is a GUI application for modern database development and operations. It provides a visual IDE tool for data modeling and visualization with query development features to help build serverless applications with Amazon DynamoDB tables. Define data models using one or more tables and visualize the data model to see how it works in different scenarios. Run or simulate operations and generate the code for Python, JavaScript (Node.js), or Java.

Choose the correct operating system link to download and install NoSQL Workbench on your development machine.

The following example illustrates a connection to a DynamoDB table. A data scan is built using the GUI, with Node.js code generated for inclusion in a Lambda function:

Connecting to an Amazon DynamoBD table with NoSQL Workbench for AmazonDynamoDB

Connecting to an Amazon DynamoDB table with NoSQL Workbench for Amazon DynamoDB

Generating query code with NoSQL Workbench for Amazon DynamoDB

Generating query code with NoSQL Workbench for Amazon DynamoDB

Conclusion

Building serverless applications allows developers to focus on business logic instead of managing and operating infrastructure. This is achieved by using managed services. Developers often struggle with knowing which tools, libraries, and frameworks are available to help with this new approach to building applications. This post shows tools that builders can use to create a serverless developer environment to help accelerate software development.

This list represents AWS and open source tools but does not include our APN Partners. For partner offers, check here.

Read more to start building serverless applications.

Optimizing the cost of running AWS Elastic Beanstalk Workloads

Post Syndicated from Mina Gerges original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/optimizing-the-cost-of-running-aws-elastic-beanstalk-workloads/

AWS Elastic Beanstalk handles provisioning resources, maintenance, health checks, automatic scaling, and other common tasks necessary to keep your application running, which allows you to focus on your application code.

You can now run your applications on Elastic Beanstalk using Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2). Spot Instances in both single instance and load balanced environments, For more information see Spot instances support. Spot Instances let you take advantage of unused Amazon EC2 capacity in the AWS Cloud. Spot Instances are available at up to a 90% discount compared to On-Demand prices, which are also available for other deployment services like Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS) and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS). You can use Spot Instances for various stateless, fault-tolerant, or flexible applications, and other test and development workloads.

Customers often ask how to save costs when running their Elastic Beanstalk applications, especially when it comes to test or stage workloads, which don’t need to run all the time. This post walks you through different automation techniques that can reduce your AWS monthly bill significantly.

Converting the environment type

If you have multiple load balanced test environments and want to keep them running after work hours with the lowest possible cost, you can convert the environment type from load balanced to single instance after work hours and back to load balanced in the morning using Amazon Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) commands. For more information see Elastic Beanstalk configuration options.

To convert from load balanced to single instance, enter the following code:

$ aws elasticbeanstalk update-environment --application-name YOUR-APP_NAME --environment-name ENV_NAME --option-settings Namespace=aws:elasticbeanstalk:environment,OptionName=EnvironmentType,Value=SingleInstance

To convert from single instance to load balanced, enter the following code:

$ aws elasticbeanstalk update-environment --application-name YOUR-APP_NAME --environment-name ENV_NAME --option-settings Namespace=aws:elasticbeanstalk:environment,OptionName=EnvironmentType,Value=LoadBalanced

You can then configure cron jobs for these commands at the required times:

# ┌───────────── minute (0 - 59)
# │ ┌───────────── hour (0 - 23)
# │ │ ┌───────────── day of the month (1 - 31)
# │ │ │ ┌───────────── month (1 - 12)
# │ │ │ │ ┌───────────── day of the week (0 - 6) (Sunday to Saturday; 7 is also Sunday on some systems)
# │ │ │ │ │                                  
# * * * * * command to execute

Setting the number of instances

When you have many resources in Elastic Beanstalk environments and want to the optimize the cost during low-traffic times or after work hours while keeping the environment running, a good approach is to set the number of instances to (0 or 1) or any minimal number of instances for all test environments. See the following code:

$ aws elasticbeanstalk update-environment --environment-name ENV-NAME --option-settings Namespace=aws:autoscaling:asg,OptionName=MinSize,Value=0

The preceding code sets the number of instances to 0 while the environment is still running. You can automate this approach for a number of Elastic Beanstalk environments using the following sample bash script:

#!/bin/bash
if [ -z "$1" ] ; then
     echo "$0: <instances to set>"
     exit 1
else
    INSTANCES=$1
fi
 
for environment in environment-1  environment-2 ; do            //please provide here environment names
    aws elasticbeanstalk update-environment --environment-name $environment --option-settings Namespace=aws:autoscaling:asg,OptionName=MinSize,Value=$INSTANCES
done

You can configure a cron job to run this script on a daily basis as per the following example code:

# To set number of instances to 0 (for example at 5:00 PM every day)
$ 0 17 * * * sh test.sh 0    
# To set number of instances to 1 (for example at 8 am)
$ 0 8 * * *  sh test.sh 1 

Stopping your testing environments

When you want to stop all your testing environments overnight, you can terminate Elastic Beanstalk environments after work times and restore them again in the morning. See the following code:

# To terminate environment using AWS CLI (for example at 5:00 PM every day)
$ 0 17 * * * aws elasticbeanstalk terminate-environment --environment-name my-stage-env 
# To restore environment (for example at 8 am)
$ 0 8 * * * eb restore environment-id

For more information, see Terminate an Elastic Beanstalk environment and Rebuilding a terminated environment.

When you terminate Elastic Beanstalk environments, you lose any Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) instances that was created previously as a part of the environment. To avoid this, decouple Amazon RDS from your environments. For instructions see, How do I decouple an Amazon RDS instance from an Elastic Beanstalk environment.

Conclusion

In this post, we discussed how different automation techniques can optimize the cost of running Elastic Beanstalk applications, which can result in a significant cost savings. Please feel free to use any approach that suits you or a combination of all of them, depending on your use case.

We appreciate your feedback.

 

How to use G Suite as an external identity provider for AWS SSO

Post Syndicated from Yegor Tokmakov original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-use-g-suite-as-external-identity-provider-aws-sso/

Do you want to control access to your Amazon Web Services (AWS) accounts with G Suite? In this post, we show you how to set up G Suite as an external identity provider in AWS Single Sign-On (SSO). We also show you how to configure permissions for your users, and how they can access different accounts.

Introduction

G Suite is used for common business functions like email, calendar, and document sharing. If your organization is using AWS and G Suite, you can use G Suite as an identity provider (IdP) for AWS. You can connect AWS SSO to G Suite, allowing your users to access AWS accounts with their G Suite credentials.

You can grant access by assigning G Suite users to accounts governed by AWS Organizations. The user’s effective permissions in an account are determined by permission sets defined in AWS SSO. They allow you to define and grant permissions based on the user’s job function (such as administrator, data scientist, or developer). These should follow the least privilege principle, granting only permissions that are necessary to perform the job. This way, you can centrally manage user accounts for your employees in the Google Admin console and have fine-grained control over the access permissions of individual users to AWS resources.

In this post, we walk you through the process of setting up G Suite as an external IdP in AWS SSO.

How it works

AWS SSO authenticates your G Suite users by using Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0 authentication. SAML is an open standard for secure exchange of authentication and authorization data between IdPs and service providers without exposing users’ credentials. When you use AWS as a service provider and G Suite as an external IdP, the login process is as follows:

  1. A user with a G Suite account opens the link to the AWS SSO user portal of your AWS Organizations.
  2. If the user isn’t already authenticated, they will be redirected to the G Suite account login. The user will log in using their G Suite credentials.
  3. If the login is successful, a response is created and sent to AWS SSO. It contains three different types of SAML assertions: authentication, authorization, and user attributes.
  4. When AWS SSO receives the response, the user’s access to the AWS SSO user portal is determined. A successful login shows accessible AWS accounts.
  5. The user selects the account to access and is redirected to the AWS Management Console.

This authentication flow is shown in the following diagram.

Figure 1: AWS SSO authentication flow

Figure 1: AWS SSO authentication flow

The user journey starts at the AWS SSO user portal and ends with the access to the AWS Management Console. Your users experience a unified access to the AWS Cloud, and you don’t have to manage user accounts in AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) or AWS Directory Service.

User permissions in an AWS account are controlled by permission sets and groups in AWS SSO. A permission set is a collection of administrator-defined policies that determine a user’s effective permissions in an account. They can contain AWS managed policies or custom policies that are stored in AWS SSO, and are ultimately created as IAM roles in a given AWS account. Your users assume these roles when they access a given AWS account and get their effective permissions. This obliges you to fine control the access to the accounts, following the shared-responsibility model established in the cloud.

When you use G Suite to authenticate and manage your users, you have to create a user entity in AWS SSO. The user entity is not a user account, but a logical object. It maps a G Suite user via its primary email address as the username to the user account in AWS SSO. The user entity in AWS SSO allows you to grant a G Suite user access to AWS accounts and define its permissions in those accounts.

AWS SSO initial setup

The AWS SSO service has some prerequisites. You need to first set up AWS Organizations with All features set to enabled, and then sign in with the AWS Organization’s master account credentials. You also need super administrator privileges in G Suite and access to the Google Admin console.

If you’re already using AWS SSO in your account, refer to Considerations for Changing Your Identity Source before making changes.

To set up an external identity provider in AWS SSO

  1. Open the service page in the AWS Management Console. Then choose Enable AWS SSO.

    Figure 2: AWS SSO service welcome page

    Figure 2: AWS SSO service welcome page

  2. After AWS SSO is enabled, you can connect an identity source. On the overview page of the service, select Choose your identity source.

    Figure 3: Choose your identity source

    Figure 3: Choose your identity source

  3. In the Settings, look for Identity source and choose Change.

    Figure 4: Settings

    Figure 4: Settings

  4. By default, AWS SSO uses its own directory as the identity provider. To use G Suite as your identity provider, you have to switch to an external identity provider. Select External identity provider from the available identity sources.

    Figure 5: AWS SSO identity provider options

    Figure 5: AWS SSO identity provider options

  5. Choosing the External identity provider option reveals additional information needed to configure it. Choose Show individual metadata values to show the information you need to configure a custom SAML application.

    Figure 6: AWS SSO SAML metadata

    Figure 6: AWS SSO SAML metadata

For the next steps, you need to switch to your Google Admin console and use the service provider metadata information to configure AWS SSO as a custom SAML application.

G Suite SAML application setup

Open your Google Admin console in a new browser tab, so that you can easily copy the metadata information from the previous step. Now use the information to configure a custom SAML application.

To configure a custom SAML application in G Suite

  1. Navigate to the SAML Applications section in the Admin console and choose Add a service/App to your domain.

    Figure 7: Add a service or app

    Figure 7: Add a service or app

  2. In the modal dialog that opens, choose SETUP MY OWN CUSTOM APP.

    Figure 8: Set up a custom app

    Figure 8: Set up a custom app

  3. Go to Option 2 and choose Download to download the Google IdP metadata. It downloads an XML file named GoogleIDPMetadata-your_domain.xml, which you will use to configure G Suite as the IdP in AWS SSO. Choose Next.

    Figure 9: Download IdP metadata

    Figure 9: Download IdP metadata

  4. Configure the name and description of the application. Enter AWS SSO as the application name or use a name that clearly identifies this application for your users. Choose Next to continue.

    Figure 10: Name and describe your app

    Figure 10: Name and describe your app

  5. Fill in the Service Provider Details using the metadata information from AWS SSO, then choose Next to create your custom application. The mapping for the metadata is:
    • Enter the AWS SSO Sign in URL as the Start URL
    • Enter the AWS SSO ACS URL as the ACS URL
    • Enter the AWS SSO Issue URL as the Entity ID

     

    Figure 11: Add service provider details

    Figure 11: Add service provider details

  6. Next is a confirmation screen with a reminder that you have some steps still to do. Choose OK to continue.

    Figure 12: Reminder of remaining steps

    Figure 12: Reminder of remaining steps

  7. The final steps enable the application for your users. Select the application from the list and choose EDIT SERVICE from the top corner.

    Figure 13: Edit service

    Figure 13: Edit service

  8. Change the service status to ON for everyone and choose SAVE. If you want to manage access for particular users you can do this via organizational units (for example, you can enable the AWS SSO application for your engineering department). This doesn’t give access to any resources inside of your AWS accounts. Permissions are granted in AWS SSO.

    Figure 14: Service on for everyone

    Figure 14: Service on for everyone

You’re done configuring AWS SSO in G Suite. Return to the browser tab with the AWS SSO configuration.

AWS SSO configuration

After creating the G Suite application, you can finish SSO setup by uploading Google IdP metadata in the AWS Management Console.

To add identity provider metadata in AWS SSO

  1. When you configured the custom application in G Suite, you downloaded the GoogleIDPMetadata-your_domain.xml file. Choose Browse… on the configuration page and select this file from your download folder. Finish this step by choosing Next: Review.

    Figure 15: Upload IdP SAML metadata file

    Figure 15: Upload IdP SAML metadata file

  2. Type CONFIRM at the bottom of the list of changes and choose Change identity source to complete the setup.

    Figure 16: Confirm changes

    Figure 16: Confirm changes

  3. Next is a message that your change to the configuration is complete. At this point, you can choose Return to settings and proceed to user provisioning.

    Figure 17: Settings complete

    Figure 17: Settings complete

Manage Users and Permissions

AWS SSO supports automatic user provisioning via the System for Cross-Identity Management (SCIM). However, this is not yet supported for G Suite custom SAML applications. To add a user to AWS SSO, you have to add the user manually. The username in AWS SSO must be the primary email address of that user, and it must follow the pattern username@gsuite_domain.com.

To add a user to AWS SSO

  1. Select Users from the sidebar of the AWS SSO overview and then choose Add user.

    Figure 18: Add user

    Figure 18: Add user

  2. Enter the user details and use your user’s primary email address as the username. Choose Next: Groups to add the user to a group.

    Figure 19: Add user

    Figure 19: Add user

  3. We aren’t going to create user groups in this walkthrough. Skip the Add user to groups step by choosing Add user. You will reach the user list page displaying your newly created user and status enabled.

    Figure 20: User list

    Figure 20: User list

  4. The next step is to assign the user to a particular AWS account in your AWS Organization. This allows the user to access the assigned account. Select the account you want to assign your user to and choose Assign users.

    Figure 21: Assign users

    Figure 21: Assign users

  5. Select the user you just added, then choose Next: Permission sets to continue configuring the effective permissions of the user in the assigned account.

    Figure 22: Select user

    Figure 22: Select user

  6. Since you didn’t configure a permission set before, you need to configure one now. Choose Create new permission set.

    Figure 23: Create new permission set

    Figure 23: Create new permission set

  7. AWS SSO has managed permission sets that are similar to the AWS managed policies you already know. Make sure that Use an existing job function policy is selected, then select PowerUserAccess from the list of existing job function policies and choose Create.

    Figure 24: Create permission set

    Figure 24: Create permission set

  8. You can now select the created permission set from the list of available sets for the user. Select the PowerUserAccess permission set and choose Finish to assign the user to the account.

    Figure 25: Select permission set

    Figure 25: Select permission set

  9. You see a message that the assignment has been successful.

    Figure 26: Assignment complete

    Figure 26: Assignment complete

Access an AWS Account with G Suite

You can find your user portal URL in the AWS SSO settings, as shown in the following screenshot. Unauthenticated users who use the link will be redirected to the Google account login page and use their G Suite credentials to log in.

Figure 27: The user portal URL

Figure 27: The user portal URL

After authenticating, users are redirected to the user portal. They can select from the list of assigned accounts, as shown in the following example, and access the AWS Management Console of these accounts.

Figure 28: Select an assigned account

Figure 28: Select an assigned account

You’ve successfully set up G Suite as an external identity provider for AWS SSO. Your users can access your AWS accounts using the credentials they already use.

Another way your users can use AWS SSO is by selecting it from their Google Apps to be redirected to the user portal, as shown in the following screenshot. That is one of the quickest ways for users to access accounts.

Figure 29: Apps in the user portal

Figure 29: Apps in the user portal

Using AWS CLI with SSO

You can use the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) to access AWS resources. AWS CLI version 2 supports access via AWS SSO. You can automatically or manually configure a profile for the CLI to access resources in your AWS accounts. To authenticate your user, it opens the user portal in your default browser. If you aren’t authenticated, you’re redirected to the G Suite login page. After a successful login, you can select the AWS account you want to access from the terminal.

To upgrade to AWS CLI version 2, follow the instructions in the AWS CLI user guide.

Conclusion

You’ve set up G Suite as an external IdP for AWS SSO, granted access to an AWS account for a G Suite user, and enforced fine-grained permission controls for this user. This enables your business to have easy access to the AWS Cloud.

If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below. If you have questions about this post, start a new thread on the AWS Single Sign-on forum or contact AWS Support.

Want more AWS Security how-to content, news, and feature announcements? Follow us on Twitter.

Author

Yegor Tokmakov

Yegor is a solutions architect at AWS, working with startups. Previously, he was Chief Technology Officer at a healthcare startup in Berlin and was responsible for architecture and operations, as well as product development and growth of the tech team. Yegor is passionate about novel AI applications and data analytics. In his free time, he enjoys traveling, surfing, and cycling.

Sebastian Doell

Sebastian is a solutions architect at AWS. He helps startups to execute on their ideas at speed and at scale. Sebastian maintains a number of open source projects and is an advocate of Dart and Flutter.

Deploying a ASP.NET Core web application to Amazon ECS using an Azure DevOps pipeline

Post Syndicated from John Formento original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/deploying-a-asp-net-core-web-application-to-amazon-ecs-using-an-azure-devops-pipeline/

For .NET developers, leveraging Team Foundation Server (TFS) has been the cornerstone for CI/CD over the years. As more and more .NET developers start to deploy onto AWS, they have been asking questions about using the same tools to deploy to the AWS cloud. By configuring a pipeline in Azure DevOps to deploy to the AWS cloud, you can easily use familiar Microsoft development tools to build great applications.

Solution overview

This blog post demonstrates how to create a simple Azure DevOps project, repository, and pipeline to deploy an ASP.NET Core web application to Amazon ECS using Azure DevOps. The following screenshot shows a high-level architecture diagram of the pipeline:

 

Solution Architecture Diagram

In this example, you perform the following steps:

  1. Create an Azure DevOps Project, clone project repo, and push ASP.NET Core web application.
  2. Create a pipeline in Azure DevOps
  3. Build an Amazon ECS Cluster, Task and Service.
  4. Kick-off deployment of the ASP.Net Core web application using the newly create Azure DevOps pipeline.

 

Prerequisites

Ensure you have the following prerequisites set up:

  • An Amazon ECR repository
  • An IAM user with permissions for Amazon ECR and Amazon ECS (the user will need an access key and secret access key)

 

Create an Azure DevOps Project, clone project repo, and push ASP.NET Core web application

Follow these steps to deploy a .NET Core app onto your Amazon ECS cluster using the Azure DevOps (ADO) repository and pipeline:

 

  1. Login to dev.azure.com and navigate to the marketplace.
  2. Go to Visual Studio, search for “AWS”, and add the AWS Tools for Microsoft Visual Studio Team Services.
  3. Create a project in ADO: Provide a project name and choose Create.
  4. On the Project Summary page, choose Project Settings.
  5. In the Project Settings pane, navigate to the Service Connections page.
  6. Choose Create service connection, select AWS, and choose Next.
  7. Input an Access Key ID and Secret Access Key. (You’ll need an IAM user with permissions for Amazon ECR and Amazon ECS in order to deploy via the Azure DevOps pipeline.) Choose Save.
  8. Choose Repos in the left pane, then Clone in Visual Studio under Clone to your computer.
  9. Create a ASP.NET Core web application in Visual Studio, set the location to locally cloned repository, and check Enable Docker support.
  10. Once you’ve created the new project, perform an initial commit and push to the repository in Azure DevOps.

 

Creating a pipeline in Azure DevOps

Now that you have synced the repository, create a pipeline in Azure DevOps.

  1. Go to the pipeline page within Azure DevOps and choose Create Pipeline.
  2. Choose Use the classic editor.Pipeline configuration with repository
  3. Select Azure Repos Git for the location of your code and select the repository you created earlier.
  4. On the Choose a Template page, select Docker Container and choose Apply.
  5. Remove the Push an image step.
  6. Add an Amazon ECR Push task by choosing the + symbol next to Agent job 1. You can search for “AWS” in the Add tasks pane to filter for all AWS tasks.

 

Now, configure each task:

  1. Choose the Build an image task and ensure that the action is set to Build an image. Additionally, you can modify the Image Name to your standards.Pipeline configuration page Azure DevOps
  2. Choose the Push Image task and provide the following
    • Enter a name under Display Name.
    • Select the AWS Credentials that you created in Service Connections.
    • Select the AWS Region.
    • Provide the source image name, which you can find in the setting for the Build an image task.
    • Enter the name of the repository in Amazon ECR to which the image is pushedPipeline configuration page Azure DevOps
  3. Choose Save and queue.

Build Amazon ECS Cluster, Task, and Service

The goal here is to test up to building the Docker image and ensure it’s pushed to Amazon ECR. Once the Docker image is in Amazon ECR, you can create the Amazon ECS cluster, task definition, and service leveraging the newly created Docker image.

  1. Create an Amazon ECS cluster.
  2. Create an Amazon ECS task definition. When you create the task definition and configure the container, use the Amazon ECR URI for the Docker image that was just pushed to Amazon ECR.
  3. Create an Amazon ECS service.

Go back and edit the pipeline:

  1. Add the last step by choosing the + symbol next to Agent job 1.
  2. Search for “AWS CLI” in the search bar and add the task.
  3. Choose AWS CLI and configure the task.
  4. Enter a name under Display Name, such as Update ECS Service.
  5. Select the AWS Credentials that you created in Service Connections.
  6. Select the AWS Region.
  7. Input the following command, which updates the Amazon ECS service after a new image is pushed to Amazon ECR. Replace <clustername> and <servicename> with your Amazon ECS cluster and service names.
    • Command:ecs
    • Subcommand:update-service
    • Options and parameters: --cluster <clustername> --service <servicename> --force-new-deployment
  8. Now choose the Triggers tab and select Enable continuous integration with the repository you created.
  9. Choose Save and queue.

 

At this point, your build pipeline kicks off and builds a Docker image from the source code in the repository you created, pushes the image to Amazon ECR, and updates the Amazon ECS service with the new image.

You can verify by viewing the build. Choose Pipelines in Azure DevOps, selecting the entry for the latest run, and then the icon under the status column. Once it successfully completes, you can log in to the AWS console and view the updated image in Amazon ECR and the updated service in Amazon ECS.Pipeline status page Azure DevOps

Every time you commit and push your code through Visual Studio, this pipeline kicks off and builds and deploys your application to Amazon ECS.

Cleanup

At the end of this example, once you’ve completed all steps and are finished testing, follow these steps to disable or delete resources to avoid incurring costs:

  1. Go to the Amazon ECS console within the AWS Console.
  2. Navigate to the cluster you created, then choose the Tasks tab.
  3. Choose Stop all to turn off the tasks.

Conclusion

This blog post reviewed how to create a CI/CD pipeline in Azure DevOps to deploy a Docker Image to Amazon ECR and container to Amazon ECS. It provided detailed steps on how to set up a basic CI/CD pipeline, leveraging tools with which .NET developers are familiar and the steps needed to integrate with Amazon ECR and Amazon ECS.

I hope this post was informative and has helped you learn the basics of how to integrate Amazon ECR and Amazon ECS with Azure DevOps to create a robust CI/CD pipeline.

About the Authors

John Formento

 

 

John Formento is a Solution Architect at Amazon Web Services. He helps large enterprises achieve their goals by architecting secure and scalable solutions on the AWS Cloud.

Running Simcenter STAR-CCM+ on AWS with AWS ParallelCluster, Elastic Fabric Adapter and Amazon FSx for Lustre

Post Syndicated from Bala Thekkedath original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/running-simcenter-star-ccm-on-aws/

This post is contributed by Anh Tran, Senior HPC Specialist Solution Architect, AWS

Introduction

AWS recently introduced many HPC services that boost the performance and scalability of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workloads on AWS. These services include: Amazon FSx for Lustre, Elastic Fabric Adapter (EFA), and AWS ParallelCluster 2.5.1. In this technical post, I walk through these three services. Additionally, I outline an example of using AWS ParallelCluster to set up an HPC system with EFA and Amazon FSx Lustre to run a CFD workload.  The CFD application that you will set up during this blog post is Simcenter STAR-CCM+  – the predominant CFD application from Siemens.

Service and solution overview

Services

This blog primarily uses three services – Amazon FSx for Lustre, EFA, and AWS ParallelCluster. Let’s dig into each of these services before reviewing the solution.

Amazon FSx for Lustre

In December 2018, AWS released Amazon FSx for Lustre. This is a fully managed, high-performance file system, optimized for fast processing workloads, like HPC. Amazon FSx for Lustre allows users to access and alter data from either Amazon S3 or on-premises seamlessly and exceptionally fast. For example, you can launch and run a file system that provides low latency access to your data. Additionally, you can read and write data at speeds of up to hundreds of gigabytes per second of throughput, and millions of IOPS. This speed and low-latency unleashes innovation at an unparalleled pace.  This blog post uses the latest version of Amazon FSx for Lustre which recently added a new API for moving data in and out of Amazon S3. This API also includes POSIX support, which allows files to mount with the same user id. Additionally, the latest version also includes a new backup feature that allows you to back up your files to an S3 bucket. I go into more detail of how to take advantage of this at the end of the blog.

Elastic Fabric Adapter

In April of 2019, AWS released EFA. This enables you to run applications requiring high levels of inter-node communications at scale on AWS.

AWS ParallelCluster 2.5.1.

AWS ParallelCluster is an open source cluster management tool that simplifies deploying and managing HPC clusters with Amazon FSx for Lustre, EFA, a variety of job schedulers, and the MPI library of your choice. AWS ParallelCluster simplifies cluster orchestration on AWS so that HPC environments become easy-to-use even for if you’re new to the cloud.  AWS recently released AWS ParallelCluster 2.5.1 – which is the version we will use for this blog.

These three AWS HPC components are optimal for CFD applications. Together, they provide simple deployment of HPC systems on AWS, low latency network communication for MPI workloads, and a fast, parallel filesystem. Now, let’s take a look at how these services come together and seamlessly run a real CFD application: Simcenter STAR-CCM+.

Solution

AWS has a long-standing collaboration with Siemens. AWS and Siemens are dedicated to enhancing Siemens’ customer experiences when they run Simcenter STAR-CCM+ apps on AWS. I am excited to walk you through the steps and the best practices for running Simcenter STAR-CCM+, the predominant CFD application from Siemens.

The Simcenter STAR-CCM+ application runs on an HPC system. This system is optimized with EFA and Amazon FSx for Lustre — all of which is managed by AWS ParallelCluster. AWS ParallelCluster simplifies the deployment process to such an extent that you can set up your HPC cluster with a high throughput parallel file system (Amazon FSx for Lustre), a high-throughput and low-latency network interface (EFA), and high-bandwidth network interconnects (100 Gbps using C5n instances) in less than 15 minutes.

Now that you have the services and solution overviews, we can get started. This blog post includes the following steps:

  1. Creating an HPC infrastructure stack on AWS, which will include:
    • How to set up AWS ParallelCluster for best performance
    • How to enable EFA
    • How to enable the Amazon FSx Lustre file system and how to use some basic Amazon FSx for Lustre for STAR-CCM+
    • How to connect to a remote desktop session using NICE DCV
  2. Installing the Simcenter STAR-CCM+ application and how to submit a Simcenter STAR-CCM+ job to HPC cluster.

The following diagram outlines the steps

Steps

Setting up the HPC infrastructure stack

Before you can run Simcenter STAR-CCM+, you need to build an HPC cluster first.  Some best practices that you should consider when setting up a cluster on AWS include:

  • Turn off Hyper-Threading (HT): AWS instances have HT turned on by default.
  • Use EFA and a cluster placement group for your compute fleet to minimize the latency between nodes.
  • Select the right instance type for your compute fleet. Here, I use C5n.18xlarge because of its high-performance CPU, high-bandwidth bandwidth networking, and the EFA network interface capabilities.

With HPC best practices in mind, you can set up your AWS ParallelCluster

Set up AWS ParallelCluster:

$aws s3 mb s3://benchmark-starccm
make_bucket: benchmark-starccm

*Note: As an example, I create an S3 bucket benchmark-starccm, however you should create an S3 bucket with a different name of your choice because the S3 bucket name must be globally unique.

Let’s download the STAR-CCM+ installation file and a case file, then upload them to the S3 bucket that we just created.

  • Download latest Simcenter STAR-CCM+ package from the Siemens portal. It will look something like this: STAR-CCM+15.02.003_01_linux-x86_64-2.12_gnu7.1.zip
  • Download the Le Mans case file. The Le Mans case is 104 Million cells, which even today is considered large for a CFD case.  The file will look something like this:  LeMans_104M.sim

After downloading the STAR-CCM+ software and LeMans case file, upload them to the S3 bucket created above

aws s3 cp STAR-CCM+15.02.003_01_linux-x86_64-2.12_gnu7.1.zip s3://benchmark-starccm
aws s3 cp LeMans_104M.sim s3://benchmark-starccm/

We will use this same S3 bucket to install the Simcenter STAR-CCM+ application later in this tutorial

With all the ground work done, we can now build our HPC cluster. For more detailed instructions, you can consult Getting Started with AWS ParallelCluster.

  • Install AWS ParallelCluster
pip install aws-parallelcluster
  • Configure AWS ParallelCluster with some basic network information such as AWS Region ID, VPC ID, Subnet ID

pcluster configure

Modify your ~/.parallelcluster/config file to include a cluster section that minimally includes the following:

[aws]
aws_region_name = us-east-2

[cluster default]
vpc_settings = public
key_name = <Key-Name>
initial_queue_size = 2
max_queue_size = 100
maintain_initial_size = true
placement_group = DYNAMIC
placement = cluster
master_instance_type = c5.xlarge
compute_instance_type = c5n.18xlarge
cluster_type = ondemand

base_os = centos7
tags = {“Name” : “STARCCM”}

enable_efa = compute
fsx_settings = fsxshared
disable_hyperthreading = true

dcv_settings = hpc-dcv

[vpc public]
master_subnet_id = subnet-<Subnet-ID>
vpc_id = vpc-<VPC-ID>

[global]
update_check = true
sanity_check = true
cluster_template = default

[dcv hpc-dcv]

enable = master

[fsx fsxshared]
shared_dir = /fsx
storage_capacity = 1200
imported_file_chunk_size = 1024
import_path = s3://benchmark-starccm

export_path = s3://benchmark-starccm

[aliases]
ssh = ssh {CFN_USER}@{MASTER_IP} {ARGS}

  • Now, create your first HPC cluster with the name starccmby running

pcluster create starccm

Your HPC cluster should be ready in about 15 minutes.

While you’re waiting for your cluster to be ready, let’s take a deeper look at what some of the different parameters we used mean for our HPC cluster:

initial_queue_size: We will start with two compute instances after the HPC cluster is up.

max_queue_size: We will limit the maximum compute fleet to 100 instances. This allows us room to scale our jobs up to a large number of cores while putting a limit on the number of compute nodes to help control costs.

base_os: For this blog, we will select centos 7 as a base os. Currently we support Amazon Linux (alinux), Centos 7 (centos7), Ubuntu 16.04 (ubuntu1604), and Ubuntu 18.04 (ubuntu1804) with EFA.

master_instance_type: This can be any instance type. Here we choose c5.xlarge because it is inexpensive and relatively fast for the head node.

compute_instance_type: We select C5n.18xlarge because it is optimized for compute-intensive workloads and supports EFA for better scaling of HPC. Note that EFA is currently only available on c5n.18xlarge, c5n.metal, i3en.24xlarge, p3dn.24xlarge, inf1.24xlarge, m5dn.24xlarge, m5n.24xlarge, r5dn.24xlarge, r5n.24xlarge, and p3dn.24xlarge. See the docs for Currently supported instances.

placement_group: We use placement_group to ensure our instances are located as physically close to one another as possible to minimize the latency between compute nodes and take advantage of EFA’s low latency networking.

enable_efa: with just one configuration line, we can easily turn on EFA support for our HPC cluster.

dcv_settings = hpc-dcv: With AWS ParallelCluster 2.5.1 you can use NICE DCV to support your remote visualization needs.

disable_hyperthreading: This setting turns off hyper-threading on the cluster

[fsx fsxshared]: This section contains the settings to define your FSx for Lustre parallel file system, including the location where the shared directory will be mounted, the storage capacity for the filesystem, the chunk size for files to be imported, and the location from which the data will be imported. You can read more about FSx for Lustre here.

[dcv hpc-dcv]: This section contains the settings to define your remote visualization setup. You can read more about DCV with AWS ParallelCluster here.

  •  After you set up your config file for AWS ParallelCluster, log in and verify that you can access the cluster’s head node
pcluster ssh starccm -i ~/path/to/ssh_key
  • Verify the compute nodes are up. We should see two c5n.18xlarge nodes.
$ qhost
HOSTNAME ARCH NCPU NSOC NCOR NTHR LOAD MEMTOT MEMUSE SWAPTO SWAPUS
global - - - - - - - - - -
ip-172-31-14-220 lx-amd64 36 2 36 36 0.49 184.6G 11.7G 0.0 0.0
ip-172-31-2-137 lx-amd64 36 2 36 36 0.45 184.6G 11.7G 0.0 0.0
  • Verify the EFA driver has been loaded successfully.

In order to verify if EFA is installed correctly you will need to ssh into one of compute nodes and run :

[[email protected] ~]$ which mpirun
/opt/amazon/openmpi/bin/mpirun

[[email protected] ~]$ fi_info -p efa

provider: efa
fabric: EFA-fe80::97:9fff:fe1e:4e78
domain: efa_0-rdm
version: 2.0
type: FI_EP_RDM
protocol: FI_PROTO_EFA

provider: efa
fabric: EFA-fe80::97:9fff:fe1e:4e78
domain: efa_0-dgrm
version: 2.0
type: FI_EP_DGRAM
protocol: FI_PROTO_EFA
provider: efa;ofi_rxd
fabric: EFA-fe80::97:9fff:fe1e:4e78
domain: efa_0-dgrm
version: 1.0
type: FI_EP_RDM
protocol: FI_PROTO_RXD

At this point, EFA is verified.

Install Simcenter STAR-CCM+ application

Now that the HPC cluster using AWS ParallelCluster is set up, it’s time to install the Simcenter STAR-CCM+ application.  In the prior steps, you uploaded a Simcenter STAR-CCM+ application and a case file to S3 bucket and used that S3 bucket as a source for the Amazon FSx for Lustre /fsx storage. As soon as the cluster created, the installation file and the case file will be available in /fsx

[[email protected] fsx]$ cd /fsx
[[email protected] fsx]$ ls
LeMans_104M.sim  STAR-CCM-14.06.013_01_linux-x86_64.tar.gz  STAR-CCM+14.06.013_01_linux-x86_64.tar.gz

As you can see, Amazon FSx for Lustre has already downloaded the case file from the S3 bucket to the /fsx partition, so now you can start install Simcenter STAR-CCM+ software using the following steps.

  • Install Simcenter STAR-CCM+: install Simcenter STAR-CCM+ on /fsx  – a 1.2TB Lustre filesystem that you configured in a previous step.
cd /fsx
sudo unzip STAR-CCM+15.02.003_01_linux-x86_64-2.12_gnu7.1.zip
cd STAR-CCM+15.02.003_01_linux-x86_64-2.12_gnu7.1
./STAR-CCM+15.02.003_01_linux-x86_64-2.12_gnu7.1.sh
Select Installation Location : /fsx/Siemens

After following all the standard installation steps from Simcenter STAR-CCM+, the application should be installed at the following location:

/fsx/Siemens/15.02.003/STAR-CCM+15.02.003/

  • Test the installation
[[email protected] fsx]$ /fsx/Siemens/15.02.003/STAR-CCM+15.02.003/star/bin/starccm+ -version
Simcenter STAR-CCM+ 2020.1 Build 15.02.003 (linux-x86_64-2.12/gnu7.1)

When the above code shows up, you correctly installed Simcenter STAR-CCM+, so now you can run the application.

Running Simcenter STAR-CCM+ on AWS ParallelCluster

Before I move on, let’s recap what you’ve have done so far.

  1. You set up an HPC cluster using AWS ParallelCluster with compute-optimized C5n instances, an Amazon FSx for Lustre filesystem, and EFA-enabled networking.
  2. You installed Simcenter STAR-CCM+ application

Now, let us create an SGE submission script and submit a job to the HPC cluster.

  • Create an SGE job submission script :
cd /fsx/

vi star-ccm.qsub

#!/bin/bash
#$ -N check
#$ -cwd
#$ -j Y
#$ -pe mpi 252

date

your_pod_key="your license key"
ccmp=" /fsx/Siemens/15.02.003/STAR-CCM+15.02.003/star/bin/starccm+”
case="/fsx/LeMans_104M.sim"

fabric="OFI"
tag="fsx-${fabric}"

${ccmp} \
-power \
-podkey $your_pod_key \
-licpath [email protected] \
-mpi openmpi \
-bs sge \
-benchmark:"-preits 40 -nits 20 -nps ${NSLOTS} -tag ${tag}" \
${case}

date

mkdir ${NSLOTS}new
mv *xml ${NSLOTS}new
  • Submit your Simcenter STAR-CCM+ job to your HPC cluster
qsub -V star-ccm.qsub

Now you have submitted an HPC job that requests 252 cores of c5n.18xlarge.

  • Check the status of your jobs by running
qstat -f

Simcenter STAR-CCM+ result analysis

Here are sample scaling results for the LeMans 104M cell benchmark case. As you can see, the Simcenter STAR-CCM+ result shows exciting performance and scaling results running on AWS. The performance is fast and the simulation scales very well with EFA-based networking and great CPU performance.

Connect to a NICE DCV session

AWS ParallelCluster is now natively integrated with NICE DCV. You can configure a NICE DCV session to visualize your STAR-CCM+ result or connect to the application remotely.

As you will recall from when we configured our AWS ParallelCluster in the previous section, I named the DCV server as hpc-dcv.  To create and connect to a NICE DCV session, just run:

pcluster dcv connect hpc-dcv -k <Key-Name>

After you connect to NICE DCV session, you will be able to access to a Linux desktop to work with STAR-CCM+ application.

Backup SIMCENTER STAR-CCM+ result to S3 bucket

After you finish your STAR-CCM+ simulation, you can backup data in /fsx to your S3 bucket that you created from running your application. You can now use Data Repository Tasks. Data Repository Tasks represent bulk operations between your Amazon FSx for Lustre file system and your S3 bucket. One of the jobs is to export your changed file system contents back to its linked S3 bucket.

*Note: in order to use new Amazon FSx for Lustre feature, you will need to have AWS CLI version 1.16.309 or above.

In this case, I select to export the  STAR-CCM+ application directory Siemens as an example.

  • Exit the HPC head node, and go back to your laptop or Cloud9 environment where you have configured your AWS CLI. Find out your Amazon FSx Lustre ID by running:
aws fsx describe-file-systems
  • After you find the Amazon FSx for Lustre ID, which looks simiar to fs-0d72d520f620d765a, create a backup of the data by running:
create-data-repository-task

aws fsx create-data-repository-task --file-system-id fs-0d72d520f620d765a --type EXPORT_TO_REPOSITORY --paths Siemens,testfsx --report Enabled=true,Scope=FAILED_FILES_ONLY,Format=REPORT_CSV_20191124,Path=s3://benchmark-starccm/

Explanation:

–file-system-id: your file system ID

–type EXPORT_TO_REPOSITORY: we will export the data back to the S3 bucket

–paths Siemens,testfsx: the directories you want to export to S3 bucket

Format=REPORT_CSV_20191124:  note this is only name the Amazon FSx Lustre supports. Please keep it the same.

  • Check the status of the backup by running describe-create-data-repository-task
aws fsx describe-data-repository-tasks

As you can see, I can now use FSx for Lustre to install the Simcenter STAR-CCM+ application, and seamlessly move case data between on-premise to Amazon S3 and AWS HPC system. I can create a file system linked to a S3 bucket, create a FSx for Lustre filesystem, and export data back to their S3 bucket after running the CFD app.

Conclusion

Give it a try, set up an HPC environment, and let us know how it goes! If you need more information about running CFD and HPC cases on AWS you can find it on our HPC home page. Please feel free to contact us with questions that you might have.

 

DevOps at re:Invent 2019!

Post Syndicated from Matt Dwyer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/devops-at-reinvent-2019/

re:Invent 2019 is fast approaching (NEXT WEEK!) and we here at the AWS DevOps blog wanted to take a moment to highlight DevOps focused presentations, share some tips from experienced re:Invent pro’s, and highlight a few sessions that still have availability for pre-registration. We’ve broken down the track into one overarching leadership session and four topic areas: (a) architecture, (b) culture, (c) software delivery/operations, and (d) AWS tools, services, and CLI.

In total there will be 145 DevOps track sessions, stretched over 5 days, and divided into four distinct session types:

  • Sessions (34) are one-hour presentations delivered by AWS experts and customer speakers who share their expertise / use cases
  • Workshops (20) are two-hours and fifteen minutes, hands-on sessions where you work in teams to solve problems using AWS services
  • Chalk Talks (41) are interactive white-boarding sessions with a smaller audience. They typically begin with a 10–15-minute presentation delivered by an AWS expert, followed by 45–50-minutes of Q&A
  • Builders Sessions (50) are one-hour, small group sessions with six customers and one AWS expert, who is there to help, answer questions, and provide guidance
  • Select DevOps focused sessions have been highlighted below. If you want to view and/or register for any session, including Keynotes, builders’ fairs, and demo theater sessions, you can access the event catalog using your re:Invent registration credentials.

Reserve your seat for AWS re:Invent activities today >>

re:Invent TIP #1: Identify topics you are interested in before attending re:Invent and reserve a seat. We hold space in sessions, workshops, and chalk talks for walk-ups, however, if you want to get into a popular session be prepared to wait in line!

Please see below for select sessions, workshops, and chalk talks that will be conducted during re:Invent.

LEADERSHIP SESSION DELIVERED BY KEN EXNER, DIRECTOR AWS DEVELOPER TOOLS

[Session] Leadership Session: Developer Tools on AWS (DOP210-L) — SPACE AVAILABLE! REGISTER TODAY!

Speaker 1: Ken Exner – Director, AWS Dev Tools, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Kyle Thomson – SDE3, Amazon Web Services

Join Ken Exner, GM of AWS Developer Tools, as he shares the state of developer tooling on AWS, as well as the future of development on AWS. Ken uses insight from his position managing Amazon’s internal tooling to discuss Amazon’s practices and patterns for releasing software to the cloud. Additionally, Ken provides insight and updates across many areas of developer tooling, including infrastructure as code, authoring and debugging, automation and release, and observability. Throughout this session Ken will recap recent launches and show demos for some of the latest features.

re:Invent TIP #2: Leadership Sessions are a topic area’s State of the Union, where AWS leadership will share the vision and direction for a given topic at AWS.re:Invent.

(a) ARCHITECTURE

[Session] Amazon’s approach to failing successfully (DOP208-RDOP208-R1) — SPACE AVAILABLE! REGISTER TODAY!

Speaker: Becky Weiss – Senior Principal Engineer, Amazon Web Services

Welcome to the real world, where things don’t always go your way. Systems can fail despite being designed to be highly available, scalable, and resilient. These failures, if used correctly, can be a powerful lever for gaining a deep understanding of how a system actually works, as well as a tool for learning how to avoid future failures. In this session, we cover Amazon’s favorite techniques for defining and reviewing metrics—watching the systems before they fail—as well as how to do an effective postmortem that drives both learning and meaningful improvement.

[Session] Improving resiliency with chaos engineering (DOP309-RDOP309-R1) — SPACE AVAILABLE! REGISTER TODAY!

Speaker 1: Olga Hall – Senior Manager, Tech Program Management
Speaker 2: Adrian Hornsby – Principal Evangelist, Amazon Web Services

Failures are inevitable. Regardless of the engineering efforts put into building resilient systems and handling edge cases, sometimes a case beyond our reach turns a benign failure into a catastrophic one. Therefore, we should test and continuously improve our system’s resilience to failures to minimize impact on a user’s experience. Chaos engineering is one of the best ways to achieve that. In this session, you learn how Amazon Prime Video has implemented chaos engineering into its regular testing methods, helping it achieve increased resiliency.

[Session] Amazon’s approach to security during development (DOP310-RDOP310-R1) — SPACE AVAILABLE! REGISTER TODAY!

Speaker: Colm MacCarthaigh – Senior Principal Engineer, Amazon Web Services

At AWS we say that security comes first—and we really mean it. In this session, hear about how AWS teams both minimize security risks in our products and respond to security issues proactively. We talk through how we integrate security reviews, penetration testing, code analysis, and formal verification into the development process. Additionally, we discuss how AWS engineering teams react quickly and decisively to new security risks as they emerge. We also share real-life firefighting examples and the lessons learned in the process.

[Session] Amazon’s approach to building resilient services (DOP342-RDOP342-R1) — SPACE AVAILABLE! REGISTER TODAY!

Speaker: Marc Brooker – Senior Principal Engineer, Amazon Web Services

One of the biggest challenges of building services and systems is predicting the future. Changing load, business requirements, and customer behavior can all change in unexpected ways. In this talk, we look at how AWS builds, monitors, and operates services that handle the unexpected. Learn how to make your own services handle a changing world, from basic design principles to patterns you can apply today.

re:Invent TIP #3: Not sure where to spend your time? Let an AWS Hero give you some pointers. AWS Heroes are prominent AWS advocates who are passionate about sharing AWS knowledge with others. They have written guides to help attendees find relevant activities by providing recommendations based on specific demographics or areas of interest.

(b) CULTURE

[Session] Driving change and building a high-performance DevOps culture (DOP207-R; DOP207-R1)

Speaker: Mark Schwartz – Enterprise Strategist, Amazon Web Services

When it comes to digital transformation, every enterprise is different. There is often a person or group with a vision, knowledge of good practices, a sense of urgency, and the energy to break through impediments. They may be anywhere in the organizational structure: high, low, or—in a typical scenario—somewhere in middle management. Mark Schwartz, an enterprise strategist at AWS and the author of “The Art of Business Value” and “A Seat at the Table: IT Leadership in the Age of Agility,” shares some of his research into building a high-performance culture by driving change from every level of the organization.

[Session] Amazon’s approach to running service-oriented organizations (DOP301-R; DOP301-R1DOP301-R2)

Speaker: Andy Troutman – Director AWS Developer Tools, Amazon Web Services

Amazon’s “two-pizza teams” are famously small teams that support a single service or feature. Each of these teams has the autonomy to build and operate their service in a way that best supports their customers. But how do you coordinate across tens, hundreds, or even thousands of two-pizza teams? In this session, we explain how Amazon coordinates technology development at scale by focusing on strategies that help teams coordinate while maintaining autonomy to drive innovation.

re:Invent TIP #4: The max number of 60-minute sessions you can attend during re:Invent is 24! These sessions (e.g., sessions, chalk talks, builders sessions) will usually make up the bulk of your agenda.

(c) SOFTWARE DELIVERY AND OPERATIONS

[Session] Strategies for securing code in the cloud and on premises. Speakers: (DOP320-RDOP320-R1) — SPACE AVAILABLE! REGISTER TODAY!

Speaker 1: Craig Smith – Senior Solutions Architect
Speaker 2: Lee Packham – Solutions Architect

Some people prefer to keep their code and tooling on premises, though this can create headaches and slow teams down. Others prefer keeping code off of laptops that can be misplaced. In this session, we walk through the alternatives and recommend best practices for securing your code in cloud and on-premises environments. We demonstrate how to use services such as Amazon WorkSpaces to keep code secure in the cloud. We also show how to connect tools such as Amazon Elastic Container Registry (Amazon ECR) and AWS CodeBuild with your on-premises environments so that your teams can go fast while keeping your data off of the public internet.

[Session] Deploy your code, scale your application, and lower Cloud costs using AWS Elastic Beanstalk (DOP326) — SPACE AVAILABLE! REGISTER TODAY!

Speaker: Prashant Prahlad – Sr. Manager

You can effortlessly convert your code into web applications without having to worry about provisioning and managing AWS infrastructure, applying patches and updates to your platform or using a variety of tools to monitor health of your application. In this session, we show how anyone- not just professional developers – can use AWS Elastic Beanstalk in various scenarios: From an administrator moving a Windows .NET workload into the Cloud, a developer building a containerized enterprise app as a Docker image, to a data scientist being able to deploy a machine learning model, all without the need to understand or manage the infrastructure details.

[Session] Amazon’s approach to high-availability deployment (DOP404-RDOP404-R1) — SPACE AVAILABLE! REGISTER TODAY!

Speaker: Peter Ramensky – Senior Manager

Continuous-delivery failures can lead to reduced service availability and bad customer experiences. To maximize the rate of successful deployments, Amazon’s development teams implement guardrails in the end-to-end release process to minimize deployment errors, with a goal of achieving zero deployment failures. In this session, learn the continuous-delivery practices that we invented that help raise the bar and prevent costly deployment failures.

[Session] Introduction to DevOps on AWS (DOP209-R; DOP209-R1)

Speaker 1: Jonathan Weiss – Senior Manager
Speaker 2: Sebastien Stormacq – Senior Technical Evangelist

How can you accelerate the delivery of new, high-quality services? Are you able to experiment and get feedback quickly from your customers? How do you scale your development team from 1 to 1,000? To answer these questions, it is essential to leverage some key DevOps principles and use CI/CD pipelines so you can iterate on and quickly release features. In this talk, we walk you through the journey of a single developer building a successful product and scaling their team and processes to hundreds or thousands of deployments per day. We also walk you through best practices and using AWS tools to achieve your DevOps goals.

[Workshop] DevOps essentials: Introductory workshop on CI/CD practices (DOP201-R; DOP201-R1; DOP201-R2; DOP201-R3)

Speaker 1: Leo Zhadanovsky – Principal Solutions Architect
Speaker 2: Karthik Thirugnanasambandam – Partner Solutions Architect

In this session, learn how to effectively leverage various AWS services to improve developer productivity and reduce the overall time to market for new product capabilities. We demonstrate a prescriptive approach to incrementally adopt and embrace some of the best practices around continuous integration and delivery using AWS developer tools and third-party solutions, including, AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodeBuild, Jenkins, AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS X-Ray and AWS Cloud9. We also highlight some best practices and productivity tips that can help make your software release process fast, automated, and reliable.

[Workshop] Implementing GitFLow with AWS tools (DOP202-R; DOP202-R1; DOP202-R2)

Speaker 1: Amit Jha – Sr. Solutions Architect
Speaker 2: Ashish Gore – Sr. Technical Account Manager

Utilizing short-lived feature branches is the development method of choice for many teams. In this workshop, you learn how to use AWS tools to automate merge-and-release tasks. We cover high-level frameworks for how to implement GitFlow using AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS CodeDeploy. You also get an opportunity to walk through a prebuilt example and examine how the framework can be adopted for individual use cases.

[Chalk Talk] Generating dynamic deployment pipelines with AWS CDK (DOP311-R; DOP311-R1; DOP311-R2)

Speaker 1: Flynn Bundy – AppDev Consultant
Speaker 2: Koen van Blijderveen – Senior Security Consultant

In this session we dive deep into dynamically generating deployment pipelines that deploy across multiple AWS accounts and Regions. Using the power of the AWS Cloud Development Kit (AWS CDK), we demonstrate how to simplify and abstract the creation of deployment pipelines to suit a range of scenarios. We highlight how AWS CodePipeline—along with AWS CodeBuild, AWS CodeCommit, and AWS CodeDeploy—can be structured together with the AWS deployment framework to get the most out of your infrastructure and application deployments.

[Chalk Talk] Customize AWS CloudFormation with open-source tools (DOP312-R; DOP312-R1; DOP312-E)

Speaker 1: Luis Colon – Senior Developer Advocate
Speaker 2: Ryan Lohan – Senior Software Engineer

In this session, we showcase some of the best open-source tools available for AWS CloudFormation customers, including conversion and validation utilities. Get a glimpse of the many open-source projects that you can use as you create and maintain your AWS CloudFormation stacks.

[Chalk Talk] Optimizing Java applications for scale on AWS (DOP314-R; DOP314-R1; DOP314-R2)

Speaker 1: Sam Fink – SDE II
Speaker 2: Kyle Thomson – SDE3

Executing at scale in the cloud can require more than the conventional best practices. During this talk, we offer a number of different Java-related tools you can add to your AWS tool belt to help you more efficiently develop Java applications on AWS—as well as strategies for optimizing those applications. We adapt the talk on the fly to cover the topics that interest the group most, including more easily accessing Amazon DynamoDB, handling high-throughput uploads to and downloads from Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), troubleshooting Amazon ECS services, working with local AWS Lambda invocations, optimizing the Java SDK, and more.

[Chalk Talk] Securing your CI/CD tools and environments (DOP316-R; DOP316-R1; DOP316-R2)

Speaker: Leo Zhadanovsky – Principal Solutions Architect

In this session, we discuss how to configure security for AWS CodePipeline, deployments in AWS CodeDeploy, builds in AWS CodeBuild, and git access with AWS CodeCommit. We discuss AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) best practices, to allow you to set up least-privilege access to these services. We also demonstrate how to ensure that your pipelines meet your security and compliance standards with the CodePipeline AWS Config integration, as well as manual approvals. Lastly, we show you best-practice patterns for integrating security testing of your deployment artifacts inside of your CI/CD pipelines.

[Chalk Talk] Amazon’s approach to automated testing (DOP317-R; DOP317-R1; DOP317-R2)

Speaker 1: Carlos Arguelles – Principal Engineer
Speaker 2: Charlie Roberts – Senior SDET

Join us for a session about how Amazon uses testing strategies to build a culture of quality. Learn Amazon’s best practices around load testing, unit testing, integration testing, and UI testing. We also discuss what parts of testing are automated and how we take advantage of tools, and share how we strategize to fail early to ensure minimum impact to end users.

[Chalk Talk] Building and deploying applications on AWS with Python (DOP319-R; DOP319-R1; DOP319-R2)

Speaker 1: James Saryerwinnie – Senior Software Engineer
Speaker 2: Kyle Knapp – Software Development Engineer

In this session, hear from core developers of the AWS SDK for Python (Boto3) as we walk through the design of sample Python applications. We cover best practices in using Boto3 and look at other libraries to help build these applications, including AWS Chalice, a serverless microframework for Python. Additionally, we discuss testing and deployment strategies to manage the lifecycle of your applications.

[Chalk Talk] Deploying AWS CloudFormation StackSets across accounts and Regions (DOP325-R; DOP325-R1)

Speaker 1: Mahesh Gundelly – Software Development Manager
Speaker 2: Prabhu Nakkeeran – Software Development Manager

AWS CloudFormation StackSets can be a critical tool to efficiently manage deployments of resources across multiple accounts and regions. In this session, we cover how AWS CloudFormation StackSets can help you ensure that all of your accounts have the proper resources in place to meet security, governance, and regulation requirements. We also cover how to make the most of the latest functionalities and discuss best practices, including how to plan for safe deployments with minimal blast radius for critical changes.

[Chalk Talk] Monitoring and observability of serverless apps using AWS X-Ray (DOP327-R; DOP327-R1; DOP327-R2)

Speaker 1 (R, R1, R2): Shengxin Li – Software Development Engineer
Speaker 2 (R, R1): Sirirat Kongdee – Solutions Architect
Speaker 3 (R2): Eric Scholz – Solutions Architect, Amazon

Monitoring and observability are essential parts of DevOps best practices. You need monitoring to debug and trace unhandled errors, performance bottlenecks, and customer impact in the distributed nature of a microservices architecture. In this chalk talk, we show you how to integrate the AWS X-Ray SDK to your code to provide observability to your overall application and drill down to each service component. We discuss how X-Ray can be used to analyze, identify, and alert on performance issues and errors and how it can help you troubleshoot application issues faster.

[Chalk Talk] Optimizing deployment strategies for speed & safety (DOP341-R; DOP341-R1; DOP341-R2)

Speaker: Karan Mahant – Software Development Manager, Amazon

Modern application development moves fast and demands continuous delivery. However, the greatest risk to an application’s availability can occur during deployments. Join us in this chalk talk to learn about deployment strategies for web servers and for Amazon EC2, container-based, and serverless architectures. Learn how you can optimize your deployments to increase productivity during development cycles and mitigate common risks when deploying to production by using canary and blue/green deployment strategies. Further, we share our learnings from operating production services at AWS.

[Chalk Talk] Continuous integration using AWS tools (DOP216-R; DOP216-R1; DOP216-R2)

Speaker: Richard Boyd – Sr Developer Advocate, Amazon Web Services

Today, more teams are adopting continuous-integration (CI) techniques to enable collaboration, increase agility, and deliver a high-quality product faster. Cloud-based development tools such as AWS CodeCommit and AWS CodeBuild can enable teams to easily adopt CI practices without the need to manage infrastructure. In this session, we showcase best practices for continuous integration and discuss how to effectively use AWS tools for CI.

re:Invent TIP #5: If you’re traveling to another session across campus, give yourself at least 60 minutes!

(d) AWS TOOLS, SERVICES, AND CLI

[Session] Best practices for authoring AWS CloudFormation (DOP302-R; DOP302-R1)

Speaker 1: Olivier Munn – Sr Product Manager Technical, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Dan Blanco – Developer Advocate, Amazon Web Services

Incorporating infrastructure as code into software development practices can help teams and organizations improve automation and throughput without sacrificing quality and uptime. In this session, we cover multiple best practices for writing, testing, and maintaining AWS CloudFormation template code. You learn about IDE plug-ins, reusability, testing tools, modularizing stacks, and more. During the session, we also review sample code that showcases some of the best practices in a way that lends more context and clarity.

[Chalk Talk] Using AWS tools to author and debug applications (DOP215-RDOP215-R1DOP215-R2) — SPACE AVAILABLE! REGISTER TODAY!

Speaker: Fabian Jakobs – Principal Engineer, Amazon Web Services

Every organization wants its developers to be faster and more productive. AWS Cloud9 lets you create isolated cloud-based development environments for each project and access them from a powerful web-based IDE anywhere, anytime. In this session, we demonstrate how to use AWS Cloud9 and provide an overview of IDE toolkits that can be used to author application code.

[Session] Migrating .Net frameworks to the cloud (DOP321) — SPACE AVAILABLE! REGISTER TODAY!

Speaker: Robert Zhu – Principal Technical Evangelist, Amazon Web Services

Learn how to migrate your .NET application to AWS with minimal steps. In this demo-heavy session, we share best practices for migrating a three-tiered application on ASP.NET and SQL Server to AWS. Throughout the process, you get to see how AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio can enable you to fully leverage AWS services such as AWS Elastic Beanstalk, modernizing your application for more agile and flexible development.

[Session] Deep dive into AWS Cloud Development Kit (DOP402-R; DOP402-R1)

Speaker 1: Elad Ben-Israel – Principal Software Engineer, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Jason Fulghum – Software Development Manager, Amazon Web Services

The AWS Cloud Development Kit (AWS CDK) is a multi-language, open-source framework that enables developers to harness the full power of familiar programming languages to define reusable cloud components and provision applications built from those components using AWS CloudFormation. In this session, you develop an AWS CDK application and learn how to quickly assemble AWS infrastructure. We explore the AWS Construct Library and show you how easy it is to configure your cloud resources, manage permissions, connect event sources, and build and publish your own constructs.

[Session] Introduction to the AWS CLI v2 (DOP406-R; DOP406-R1)

Speaker 1: James Saryerwinnie – Senior Software Engineer, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Kyle Knapp – Software Development Engineer, Amazon Web Services

The AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) is a command-line tool for interacting with AWS services and managing your AWS resources. We’ve taken all of the lessons learned from AWS CLI v1 (launched in 2013), and have been working on AWS CLI v2—the next major version of the AWS CLI—for the past year. AWS CLI v2 includes features such as improved installation mechanisms, a better getting-started experience, interactive workflows for resource management, and new high-level commands. Come hear from the core developers of the AWS CLI about how to upgrade and start using AWS CLI v2 today.

[Session] What’s new in AWS CloudFormation (DOP408-R; DOP408-R1; DOP408-R2)

Speaker 1: Jing Ling – Senior Product Manager, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Luis Colon – Senior Developer Advocate, Amazon Web Services

AWS CloudFormation is one of the most widely used AWS tools, enabling infrastructure as code, deployment automation, repeatability, compliance, and standardization. In this session, we cover the latest improvements and best practices for AWS CloudFormation customers in particular, and for seasoned infrastructure engineers in general. We cover new features and improvements that span many use cases, including programmability options, cross-region and cross-account automation, operational safety, and additional integration with many other AWS services.

[Workshop] Get hands-on with Python/boto3 with no or minimal Python experience (DOP203-R; DOP203-R1; DOP203-R2)

Speaker 1: Herbert-John Kelly – Solutions Architect, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Carl Johnson – Enterprise Solutions Architect, Amazon Web Services

Learning a programming language can seem like a huge investment. However, solving strategic business problems using modern technology approaches, like machine learning and big-data analytics, often requires some understanding. In this workshop, you learn the basics of using Python, one of the most popular programming languages that can be used for small tasks like simple operations automation, or large tasks like analyzing billions of records and training machine-learning models. You also learn about and use the AWS SDK (software development kit) for Python, called boto3, to write a Python program running on and interacting with resources in AWS.

[Workshop] Building reusable AWS CloudFormation templates (DOP304-R; DOP304-R1; DOP304-R2)

Speaker 1: Chelsey Salberg – Front End Engineer, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Dan Blanco – Developer Advocate, Amazon Web Services

AWS CloudFormation gives you an easy way to define your infrastructure as code, but are you using it to its full potential? In this workshop, we take real-world architecture from a sandbox template to production-ready reusable code. We start by reviewing an initial template, which you update throughout the session to incorporate AWS CloudFormation features, like nested stacks and intrinsic functions. By the end of the workshop, expect to have a set of AWS CloudFormation templates that demonstrate the same best practices used in AWS Quick Starts.

[Workshop] Building a scalable serverless application with AWS CDK (DOP306-R; DOP306-R1; DOP306-R2; DOP306-R3)

Speaker 1: David Christiansen – Senior Partner Solutions Architect, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Daniele Stroppa – Solutions Architect, Amazon Web Services

Dive into AWS and build a web application with the AWS Mythical Mysfits tutorial. In this workshop, you build a serverless application using AWS Lambda, Amazon API Gateway, and the AWS Cloud Development Kit (AWS CDK). Through the tutorial, you get hands-on experience using AWS CDK to model and provision a serverless distributed application infrastructure, you connect your application to a backend database, and you capture and analyze data on user behavior. Other AWS services that are utilized include Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose and Amazon DynamoDB.

[Chalk Talk] Assembling an AWS CloudFormation authoring tool chain (DOP313-R; DOP313-R1; DOP313-R2)

Speaker 1: Nathan McCourtney – Sr System Development Engineer, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Dan Blanco – Developer Advocate, Amazon Web Services

In this session, we provide a prescriptive tool chain and methodology to improve your coding productivity as you create and maintain AWS CloudFormation stacks. We cover authoring recommendations from editors and plugins, to setting up a deployment pipeline for your AWS CloudFormation code.

[Chalk Talk] Build using JavaScript with AWS Amplify, AWS Lambda, and AWS Fargate (DOP315-R; DOP315-R1; DOP315-R2)

Speaker 1: Trivikram Kamat – Software Development Engineer, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Vinod Dinakaran – Software Development Manager, Amazon Web Services

Learn how to build applications with AWS Amplify on the front end and AWS Fargate and AWS Lambda on the backend, and protocols (like HTTP/2), using the JavaScript SDKs in the browser and node. Leverage the AWS SDK for JavaScript’s modular NPM packages in resource-constrained environments, and benefit from the built-in async features to run your node and mobile applications, and SPAs, at scale.

[Chalk Talk] Scaling CI/CD adoption using AWS CodePipeline and AWS CloudFormation (DOP318-R; DOP318-R1; DOP318-R2)

Speaker 1: Andrew Baird – Principal Solutions Architect, Amazon Web Services
Speaker 2: Neal Gamradt – Applications Architect, WarnerMedia

Enabling CI/CD across your organization through repeatable patterns and infrastructure-as-code templates can unlock development speed while encouraging best practices. The SEAD Architecture team at WarnerMedia helps encourage CI/CD adoption across their company. They do so by creating and maintaining easily extensible infrastructure-as-code patterns for creating new services and deploying to them automatically using CI/CD. In this session, learn about the patterns they have created and the lessons they have learned.

re:Invent TIP #6: There are lots of extra activities at re:Invent. Expect your evenings to fill up onsite! Check out the peculiar programs including, board games, bingo, arts & crafts or ‘80s sing-alongs…

Sharing automated blueprints for Amazon ECS continuous delivery using AWS Service Catalog

Post Syndicated from Ignacio Riesgo original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/sharing-automated-blueprints-for-amazon-ecs-continuous-delivery-using-aws-service-catalog/

This post is contributed by Mahmoud ElZayet | Specialist SA – Dev Tech, AWS

 

Modern application development processes enable organizations to improve speed and quality continually. In this innovative culture, small, autonomous teams own the entire application life cycle. While such nimble, autonomous teams speed product delivery, they can also impose costs on compliance, quality assurance, and code deployment infrastructures.

Standardized tooling and application release code helps share best practices across teams, reduce duplicated code, speed on-boarding, create consistent governance, and prevent resource over-provisioning.

 

Overview

In this post, I show you how to use AWS Service Catalog to provide standardized and automated deployment blueprints. This helps accelerate and improve your product teams’ application release workflows on Amazon ECS. Follow my instructions to create a sample blueprint that your product teams can use to release containerized applications on ECS. You can also apply the blueprint concept to other technologies, such as serverless or Amazon EC2–based deployments.

The sample templates and scripts provided here are for demonstration purposes and should not be used “as-is” in your production environment. After you become familiar with these resources, create customized versions for your production environment, taking account of in-house tools and team skills, as well as all applicable standards and restrictions.

 

Prerequisites

To use this solution, you need the following resources:

 

Sample scenario

Example Corp. has various product teams that develop applications and services on AWS. Example Corp. teams have expressed interest in deploying their containerized applications managed by AWS Fargate on ECS. As part of Example Corp’s central tooling team, you want to enable teams to quickly release their applications on Fargate. However, you also make sure that they comply with all best practices and governance requirements.

For convenience, I also assume that you have supplied product teams working on the same domain, application, or project with a shared AWS account for service deployment. Using this account, they all deploy to the same ECS cluster.

In this scenario, you can author and provide these teams with a shared deployment blueprint on ECS Fargate. Using AWS Service Catalog, you can share the blueprint with teams as follows:

  1. Every time that a product team wants to release a new containerized application on ECS, they retrieve a new AWS Service Catalog ECS blueprint product. This enables them to obtain the required infrastructure, permissions, and tools. As a prerequisite, the ECS blueprint requires building blocks such as a git repository or an AWS CodeBuild project. Again, you can acquire those blocks through another AWS Service Catalog product.
  2. The product team completes the ECS blueprint’s required parameters, such as the desired number of ECS tasks and application name. As an administrator, you can constrain the value of some parameters such as the VPC and the cluster name. For more information, see AWS Service Catalog Template Constraints.
  3. The ECS blueprint product deploys all the required ECS resources, configured according to best practices. You can also use the AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) to maintain and provision pre-defined constructs for your infrastructure.
  4. A standardized CI/CD pipeline also generates, enabling your product teams to publish their application to ECS automatically. Ideally, this pipeline should have all stages, practices, security checks, and standards required for application release. Product teams must still author application code, create a Dockerfile, build specifications, run automated tests and deployment scripts, and complete other tasks required for application release.
  5. The ECS blueprint can be continually updated based on organization-wide feedback and to support new use cases. Your product team can always access the latest version through AWS Service Catalog. I recommend retaining multiple, customizable blueprints for various technologies.

 

For simplicity’s sake, my explanation envisions your environment as consisting of one AWS account. In practice, you can use IAM controls to segregate teams’ access to each other’s resources, even when they share an account. However, I recommend having at least two AWS accounts, one for testing and one for production purposes.

To see an example framework that helps deploy your AWS Service Catalog products to multiple accounts, see AWS Deployment Framework (ADF). This framework can also help you create cross-account pipelines that cater to different product teams’ needs, even when these teams deploy to the same technology stack.

To set up shared deployment blueprints for your production teams, follow the steps outlined in the following sections.

 

Set up the environment

In this section, I explain how to create a central ECS cluster in the appropriate VPC where teams can deploy their containers. I provide an AWS CloudFormation template to help you set up these resources. This template also creates an IAM role to be used by AWS Service Catalog later.

To run the CloudFormation template:

1. Use a git client to clone the following GitHub repository to a local directory. This will be the directory where you will run all the subsequent AWS CLI commands.

2. Using the AWS CLI, run the following commands. Replace <Application_Name> with a lowercase string with no spaces representing the application or microservice that your product team plans to release—for example, myapp.

aws cloudformation create-stack --stack-name "fargate-blueprint-prereqs" --template-body file://environment-setup.yaml --capabilities CAPABILITY_NAMED_IAM --parameters ParameterKey=ApplicationName,ParameterValue=<Application_Name>

3. Keep running the following command until the output reads CREATE_COMPLETE:

aws cloudformation describe-stacks --stack-name "fargate-blueprint-prereqs" --query Stacks[0].StackStatus

4. In case of error, use the describe-events CLI command or review error details on the console.

5. When the stack creation reads CREATE_COMPLETE, run the following command, and make a note of the output values in an editor of your choice. You need this information for a later step:

aws cloudformation describe-stacks  --stack-name fargate-blueprint-prereqs --query Stacks[0].Outputs

6. Run the following commands to copy those CloudFormation templates to Amazon S3. Replace <Template_Bucket_Name> with the template bucket output value you just copied into your editor of choice:

aws s3 cp core-build-tools.yml s3://<Template_Bucket_Name>/core-build-tools.yml

aws s3 cp ecs-fargate-deployment-blueprint.yml s3://<Template_Bucket_Name>/ecs-fargate-deployment-blueprint.yml

Create AWS Service Catalog products

In this section, I show you how to create two AWS Service Catalog products for teams to use in publishing their containerized app:

  1. Core Build Tools
  2. ECS Fargate Deployment Blueprint

To create an AWS Service Catalog portfolio that includes these products:

1. Using the AWS CLI, run the following command, replacing <Application_Name>
with the application name you defined earlier and replacing <Template_Bucket_Name>
with the template bucket output value you copied into your editor of choice:

aws cloudformation create-stack --stack-name "fargate-blueprint-catalog-products" --template-body file://catalog-products.yaml --parameters ParameterKey=ApplicationName,ParameterValue=<Application_Name> ParameterKey=TemplateBucketName,ParameterValue=<Template_Bucket_Name>

2. After a few minutes, check the stack creation completion. Run the following command until the output reads CREATE_COMPLETE:

aws cloudformation describe-stacks --stack-name "fargate-blueprint-catalog-products" --query Stacks[0].StackStatus

3. In case of error, use the describe-events CLI command or check error details in the console.

Your AWS Service Catalog configuration should now be ready.

 

Test product teams experience

In this section, I show you how to use IAM roles to impersonate a product team member and simulate their first experience of containerized application deployment.

 

Assume team role

To assume the role that you created during the environment setup step

1.     In the Management console, follow the instructions in Switching a Role.

  • For Account, enter the account ID used in the sample solution. To learn more about how to find an AWS account ID, see Your AWS Account ID and Its Alias.
  • For Role, enter <Application_Name>-product-team-role, where <Application_Name> is the same application name you defined in Environment Setup section.
  • (Optional) For Display name, enter a custom session value.

You are now logged in as a member of the product team.

 

Provision core build product

Next, provision the core build tools for your blueprint:

  1. In the Service Catalog console, you should now see the two products created earlier listed under Products.
  2. Select the first product, Core Build Tools.
  3. Choose LAUNCH PRODUCT.
  4. Name the product something such as <Application_Name>-build-tools, replacing <Application_Name> with the name previously defined for your application.
  5. Provide the same application name you defined previously.
  6. Leave the ContainerBuild parameter default setting as yes, as you are building a container requiring a container repository and its associated permissions.
  7. Choose NEXT three times, then choose LAUNCH.
  8. Under Events, watch the Status property. Keep refreshing until the status reads Succeeded. In case of failure, choose the URL value next to the key CloudformationStackARN. This choice takes you to the CloudFormation console, where you can find more information on the errors.

Now you have the following build tools created along with the required permissions:

  • AWS CodeCommit repository to store your code
  • CodeBuild project to build your container image and test your application code
  • Amazon ECR repository to store your container images
  • Amazon S3 bucket to store your build and release artifacts

 

Provision ECS Fargate deployment blueprint

In the Service Catalog console, follow the same steps to deploy the blueprint for ECS deployment. Here are the product provisioning details:

  • Product Name: <Application_Name>-fargate-blueprint.
  • Provisioned Product Name: <Application_Name>-ecs-fargate-blueprint.
  • For the parameters Subnet1, Subnet2, VpcId, enter the output values you copied earlier into your editor of choice in the Setup Environment section.
  • For other parameters, enter the following:
    • ApplicationName: The same application name you defined previously.
    • ClusterName: Enter the value example-corp-ecs-cluster, which is the name chosen in the template for the central cluster.
  • Leave the DesiredCount and LaunchType parameters to their default values.

After the blueprint product creation completes, you should have an ECS service with a sample task definition for your product team. The build tools created earlier include the permissions required for deploying to the ECS service. Also, a CI/CD pipeline has been created to guide your product teams as they publish their application to the ECS service. Ideally, this pipeline should have all stages, practices, security checks, and standards required for application release.

Product teams still have to author application code, create a Dockerfile, build specifications, run automated tests and deployment scripts, and perform other tasks required for application release. The blueprint product can provide wiki links to reference examples for these steps, or access to pre-provisioned sample pipelines.

 

Test your pipeline

Now, upload a sample app to test your pipeline:

  1. Log in with the product team role.
  2. In the CodeCommit console, select the repository with the application name that you defined in the environment setup section.
  3. Scroll down, choose Add file, Create file.
  4. Paste the following in the page editor, which is a script to build the container image and push it to the ECR repository:
version: 0.2
phases:
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - $(aws ecr get-login --no-include-email)
      - TAG="$(echo $CODEBUILD_RESOLVED_SOURCE_VERSION | head -c 8)"
      - IMAGE_URI="${REPOSITORY_URI}:${TAG}"
  build:
    commands:
      - docker build --tag "$IMAGE_URI" .
  post_build:
    commands:
      - docker push "$IMAGE_URI"      
      - printf '[{"name":"%s","imageUri":"%s"}]' "$APPLICATION_NAME" "$IMAGE_URI" > images.json
artifacts:
  files: 
    - images.json
    - '**/*'

5. For File name, enter buildspec.yml.

6. For Author name and Email address, enter your name and your preferred email address for the commit. Although optional, the addition of a commit message is a good practice.

7. Choose Commit changes.

8. Repeat the same steps for the Dockerfile. The sample Dockerfile creates a straightforward PHP application. Typically, you add your application content to that image.

File name: Dockerfile

File content:

FROM ubuntu:12.04

# Install dependencies
RUN apt-get update -y
RUN apt-get install -y git curl apache2 php5 libapache2-mod-php5 php5-mcrypt php5-mysql

# Configure apache
RUN a2enmod rewrite
RUN chown -R www-data:www-data /var/www
ENV APACHE_RUN_USER www-data
ENV APACHE_RUN_GROUP www-data
ENV APACHE_LOG_DIR /var/log/apache2

EXPOSE 80

CMD ["/usr/sbin/apache2", "-D",  "FOREGROUND"]

Your pipeline should now be ready to run successfully. Although you can list all current pipelines in the Region, you can only describe and modify pipelines that have a prefix matching your application name. To confirm:

  1. In the AWS CodePipeline console, select the pipeline <Application_Name>-ecs-fargate-pipeline.
  2. The pipeline should now be running.

Because you performed two commits to the repository from the console, you must wait for the second run to complete before successful deployment to ECS Fargate.

 

Clean up

To clean up the environment, run the following commands in the AWS CLI, replacing <Application_Name>
with your application name, <Account_Id> with your AWS Account ID with no hyphens and <Template_Bucket_Name>
with the template bucket output value you copied into your editor of choice:

aws ecr delete-repository --repository-name <Application_Name> --force

aws s3 rm s3://<Application_Name>-artifactbucket-<Account_Id> --recursive

aws s3 rm s3://<Template_Bucket_Name> --recursive

 

To remove the AWS Service Catalog products:

  1. Log in with the Product team role
  2. In the console, follow the instructions at Deleting Provisioned Products.
  3. Delete the AWS Service Catalog products in reverse order, starting with the blueprint product.

Run the following commands to delete the administrative resources:

aws cloudformation delete-stack --stack-name fargate-blueprint-catalog-products

aws cloudformation delete-stack --stack-name fargate-blueprint-prereqs

Conclusion

In this post, I showed you how to design and build ECS Fargate deployment blueprints. I explained how these accelerate and standardize the release of containerized applications on AWS. Your product teams can keep getting the latest standards and coded best practices through those automated blueprints.

As always, AWS welcomes feedback. Please submit comments or questions below.

Using Git with AWS CodeCommit Across Multiple AWS Accounts

Post Syndicated from Steve Engledow original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/using-git-with-aws-codecommit-across-multiple-aws-accounts/

I use AWS CodeCommit to host all of my private Git repositories. My repositories are split across several AWS accounts for different purposes: personal projects, internal projects at work, and customer projects.

The CodeCommit documentation shows you how to configure and clone a repository from one place, but in this blog post I want to share how I manage my Git configuration across multiple AWS accounts.

Background

First, I have profiles configured for each of my AWS environments. I connect to some of them using IAM user credentials and others by using cross-account roles.

I intentionally do not have any credentials associated with the default profile. That way I must always be sure I have selected a profile before I run any AWS CLI commands.

Here’s an anonymized copy of my ~/.aws/config file:

[profile personal]
region = eu-west-1
aws_access_key_id = ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST
aws_secret_access_key = uvwxyz0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwx

[profile work]
region = us-east-1
aws_access_key_id = ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST
aws_secret_access_key = uvwxyz0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwx

[profile customer]
region = eu-west-2
source_profile = work
role_arn = arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/CrossAccountPowerUser

If I am doing some work in one of those accounts, I run export AWS_PROFILE=work and use the AWS CLI as normal.

The problem

I use the Git credential helper so that the Git client works seamlessly with CodeCommit. However, because I use different profiles for different repositories, my use case is a little more complex than the average.

In general, to use the credential helper, all you need to do is place the following options into your ~/.gitconfig file, like this:

[credential]
    helper = !aws codecommit credential-helper [email protected]
    UserHttpPath = true

I could make this work across accounts by setting the appropriate value for AWS_PROFILE before I use Git in a repository, but there is a much neater way to deal with this situation using a feature released in Git version 2.13, conditional includes.

A solution

First, I separate my work into different folders. My ~/code/ directory looks like this:

code
    personal
        repo1
        repo2
    work
        repo3
        repo4
    customer
        repo5
        repo6

Using this layout, each folder that is directly underneath the code folder has different requirements in terms of configuration for use with CodeCommit.

Solving this has two parts; first, I create a .gitconfig file in each of the three folder locations. The .gitconfig files contain any customization (specifically, configuration for the credential helper) that I want in place while I work on projects in those folders.

For example:

[user]
    # Use a custom email address
    email = [email protected]

[credential]
    # Note the use of the --profile switch
    helper = !aws --profile work codecommit credential-helper [email protected]
    UseHttpPath = true

I also make sure to specify the AWS CLI profile to use in the .gitconfig file which means that, when I am working in the folder, I don’t need to set AWS_PROFILE before I run git push, etc.

Secondly, to make use of these folder-level .gitconfig files, I need to reference them in my global Git configuration at ~/.gitconfig

This is done through the includeIf section. For example:

[includeIf "gitdir:~/code/personal/"]
    path = ~/code/personal/.gitconfig

This example specifies that if I am working with a Git repository that is located anywhere under ~/code/personal/``, Git should load additional configuration from ~/code/personal/.gitconfig. That additional file specifies the appropriate credential helper invocation with the corresponding AWS CLI profile selected as detailed earlier.

The contents of the new file are treated as if they are inserted into the main .gitconfig file at the location of the includeIf section. This means that the included configuration will only override any configuration specified earlier in the config.

I hope you find this approach useful. If you have any questions or feedback, please free to leave them in the comments.

Protecting your API using Amazon API Gateway and AWS WAF — Part I

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/protecting-your-api-using-amazon-api-gateway-and-aws-waf-part-i/

This post courtesy of Thiago Morais, AWS Solutions Architect

When you build web applications or expose any data externally, you probably look for a platform where you can build highly scalable, secure, and robust REST APIs. As APIs are publicly exposed, there are a number of best practices for providing a secure mechanism to consumers using your API.

Amazon API Gateway handles all the tasks involved in accepting and processing up to hundreds of thousands of concurrent API calls, including traffic management, authorization and access control, monitoring, and API version management.

In this post, I show you how to take advantage of the regional API endpoint feature in API Gateway, so that you can create your own Amazon CloudFront distribution and secure your API using AWS WAF.

AWS WAF is a web application firewall that helps protect your web applications from common web exploits that could affect application availability, compromise security, or consume excessive resources.

As you make your APIs publicly available, you are exposed to attackers trying to exploit your services in several ways. The AWS security team published a whitepaper solution using AWS WAF, How to Mitigate OWASP’s Top 10 Web Application Vulnerabilities.

Regional API endpoints

Edge-optimized APIs are endpoints that are accessed through a CloudFront distribution created and managed by API Gateway. Before the launch of regional API endpoints, this was the default option when creating APIs using API Gateway. It primarily helped to reduce latency for API consumers that were located in different geographical locations than your API.

When API requests predominantly originate from an Amazon EC2 instance or other services within the same AWS Region as the API is deployed, a regional API endpoint typically lowers the latency of connections. It is recommended for such scenarios.

For better control around caching strategies, customers can use their own CloudFront distribution for regional APIs. They also have the ability to use AWS WAF protection, as I describe in this post.

Edge-optimized API endpoint

The following diagram is an illustrated example of the edge-optimized API endpoint where your API clients access your API through a CloudFront distribution created and managed by API Gateway.

Regional API endpoint

For the regional API endpoint, your customers access your API from the same Region in which your REST API is deployed. This helps you to reduce request latency and particularly allows you to add your own content delivery network, as needed.

Walkthrough

In this section, you implement the following steps:

  • Create a regional API using the PetStore sample API.
  • Create a CloudFront distribution for the API.
  • Test the CloudFront distribution.
  • Set up AWS WAF and create a web ACL.
  • Attach the web ACL to the CloudFront distribution.
  • Test AWS WAF protection.

Create the regional API

For this walkthrough, use an existing PetStore API. All new APIs launch by default as the regional endpoint type. To change the endpoint type for your existing API, choose the cog icon on the top right corner:

After you have created the PetStore API on your account, deploy a stage called “prod” for the PetStore API.

On the API Gateway console, select the PetStore API and choose Actions, Deploy API.

For Stage name, type prod and add a stage description.

Choose Deploy and the new API stage is created.

Use the following AWS CLI command to update your API from edge-optimized to regional:

aws apigateway update-rest-api \
--rest-api-id {rest-api-id} \
--patch-operations op=replace,path=/endpointConfiguration/types/EDGE,value=REGIONAL

A successful response looks like the following:

{
    "description": "Your first API with Amazon API Gateway. This is a sample API that integrates via HTTP with your demo Pet Store endpoints", 
    "createdDate": 1511525626, 
    "endpointConfiguration": {
        "types": [
            "REGIONAL"
        ]
    }, 
    "id": "{api-id}", 
    "name": "PetStore"
}

After you change your API endpoint to regional, you can now assign your own CloudFront distribution to this API.

Create a CloudFront distribution

To make things easier, I have provided an AWS CloudFormation template to deploy a CloudFront distribution pointing to the API that you just created. Click the button to deploy the template in the us-east-1 Region.

For Stack name, enter RegionalAPI. For APIGWEndpoint, enter your API FQDN in the following format:

{api-id}.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com

After you fill out the parameters, choose Next to continue the stack deployment. It takes a couple of minutes to finish the deployment. After it finishes, the Output tab lists the following items:

  • A CloudFront domain URL
  • An S3 bucket for CloudFront access logs
Output from CloudFormation

Output from CloudFormation

Test the CloudFront distribution

To see if the CloudFront distribution was configured correctly, use a web browser and enter the URL from your distribution, with the following parameters:

https://{your-distribution-url}.cloudfront.net/{api-stage}/pets

You should get the following output:

[
  {
    "id": 1,
    "type": "dog",
    "price": 249.99
  },
  {
    "id": 2,
    "type": "cat",
    "price": 124.99
  },
  {
    "id": 3,
    "type": "fish",
    "price": 0.99
  }
]

Set up AWS WAF and create a web ACL

With the new CloudFront distribution in place, you can now start setting up AWS WAF to protect your API.

For this demo, you deploy the AWS WAF Security Automations solution, which provides fine-grained control over the requests attempting to access your API.

For more information about deployment, see Automated Deployment. If you prefer, you can launch the solution directly into your account using the following button.

For CloudFront Access Log Bucket Name, add the name of the bucket created during the deployment of the CloudFormation stack for your CloudFront distribution.

The solution allows you to adjust thresholds and also choose which automations to enable to protect your API. After you finish configuring these settings, choose Next.

To start the deployment process in your account, follow the creation wizard and choose Create. It takes a few minutes do finish the deployment. You can follow the creation process through the CloudFormation console.

After the deployment finishes, you can see the new web ACL deployed on the AWS WAF console, AWSWAFSecurityAutomations.

Attach the AWS WAF web ACL to the CloudFront distribution

With the solution deployed, you can now attach the AWS WAF web ACL to the CloudFront distribution that you created earlier.

To assign the newly created AWS WAF web ACL, go back to your CloudFront distribution. After you open your distribution for editing, choose General, Edit.

Select the new AWS WAF web ACL that you created earlier, AWSWAFSecurityAutomations.

Save the changes to your CloudFront distribution and wait for the deployment to finish.

Test AWS WAF protection

To validate the AWS WAF Web ACL setup, use Artillery to load test your API and see AWS WAF in action.

To install Artillery on your machine, run the following command:

$ npm install -g artillery

After the installation completes, you can check if Artillery installed successfully by running the following command:

$ artillery -V
$ 1.6.0-12

As the time of publication, Artillery is on version 1.6.0-12.

One of the WAF web ACL rules that you have set up is a rate-based rule. By default, it is set up to block any requesters that exceed 2000 requests under 5 minutes. Try this out.

First, use cURL to query your distribution and see the API output:

$ curl -s https://{distribution-name}.cloudfront.net/prod/pets
[
  {
    "id": 1,
    "type": "dog",
    "price": 249.99
  },
  {
    "id": 2,
    "type": "cat",
    "price": 124.99
  },
  {
    "id": 3,
    "type": "fish",
    "price": 0.99
  }
]

Based on the test above, the result looks good. But what if you max out the 2000 requests in under 5 minutes?

Run the following Artillery command:

artillery quick -n 2000 --count 10  https://{distribution-name}.cloudfront.net/prod/pets

What you are doing is firing 2000 requests to your API from 10 concurrent users. For brevity, I am not posting the Artillery output here.

After Artillery finishes its execution, try to run the cURL request again and see what happens:

 

$ curl -s https://{distribution-name}.cloudfront.net/prod/pets

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<HTML><HEAD><META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<TITLE>ERROR: The request could not be satisfied</TITLE>
</HEAD><BODY>
<H1>ERROR</H1>
<H2>The request could not be satisfied.</H2>
<HR noshade size="1px">
Request blocked.
<BR clear="all">
<HR noshade size="1px">
<PRE>
Generated by cloudfront (CloudFront)
Request ID: [removed]
</PRE>
<ADDRESS>
</ADDRESS>
</BODY></HTML>

As you can see from the output above, the request was blocked by AWS WAF. Your IP address is removed from the blocked list after it falls below the request limit rate.

Conclusion

In this first part, you saw how to use the new API Gateway regional API endpoint together with Amazon CloudFront and AWS WAF to secure your API from a series of attacks.

In the second part, I will demonstrate some other techniques to protect your API using API keys and Amazon CloudFront custom headers.

From Framework to Function: Deploying AWS Lambda Functions for Java 8 using Apache Maven Archetype

Post Syndicated from Ryosuke Iwanaga original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/from-framework-to-function-deploying-aws-lambda-functions-for-java-8-using-apache-maven-archetype/

As a serverless computing platform that supports Java 8 runtime, AWS Lambda makes it easy to run any type of Java function simply by uploading a JAR file. To help define not only a Lambda serverless application but also Amazon API Gateway, Amazon DynamoDB, and other related services, the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM) allows developers to use a simple AWS CloudFormation template.

AWS provides the AWS Toolkit for Eclipse that supports both Lambda and SAM. AWS also gives customers an easy way to create Lambda functions and SAM applications in Java using the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI). After you build a JAR file, all you have to do is type the following commands:

aws cloudformation package 
aws cloudformation deploy

To consolidate these steps, customers can use Archetype by Apache Maven. Archetype uses a predefined package template that makes getting started to develop a function exceptionally simple.

In this post, I introduce a Maven archetype that allows you to create a skeleton of AWS SAM for a Java function. Using this archetype, you can generate a sample Java code example and an accompanying SAM template to deploy it on AWS Lambda by a single Maven action.

Prerequisites

Make sure that the following software is installed on your workstation:

  • Java
  • Maven
  • AWS CLI
  • (Optional) AWS SAM CLI

Install Archetype

After you’ve set up those packages, install Archetype with the following commands:

git clone https://github.com/awslabs/aws-serverless-java-archetype
cd aws-serverless-java-archetype
mvn install

These are one-time operations, so you don’t run them for every new package. If you’d like, you can add Archetype to your company’s Maven repository so that other developers can use it later.

With those packages installed, you’re ready to develop your new Lambda Function.

Start a project

Now that you have the archetype, customize it and run the code:

cd /path/to/project_home
mvn archetype:generate \
  -DarchetypeGroupId=com.amazonaws.serverless.archetypes \
  -DarchetypeArtifactId=aws-serverless-java-archetype \
  -DarchetypeVersion=1.0.0 \
  -DarchetypeRepository=local \ # Forcing to use local maven repository
  -DinteractiveMode=false \ # For batch mode
  # You can also specify properties below interactively if you omit the line for batch mode
  -DgroupId=YOUR_GROUP_ID \
  -DartifactId=YOUR_ARTIFACT_ID \
  -Dversion=YOUR_VERSION \
  -DclassName=YOUR_CLASSNAME

You should have a directory called YOUR_ARTIFACT_ID that contains the files and folders shown below:

├── event.json
├── pom.xml
├── src
│   └── main
│       ├── java
│       │   └── Package
│       │       └── Example.java
│       └── resources
│           └── log4j2.xml
└── template.yaml

The sample code is a working example. If you install SAM CLI, you can invoke it just by the command below:

cd YOUR_ARTIFACT_ID
mvn -P invoke verify
[INFO] Scanning for projects...
[INFO]
[INFO] ---------------------------< com.riywo:foo >----------------------------
[INFO] Building foo 1.0
[INFO] --------------------------------[ jar ]---------------------------------
...
[INFO] --- maven-jar-plugin:3.0.2:jar (default-jar) @ foo ---
[INFO] Building jar: /private/tmp/foo/target/foo-1.0.jar
[INFO]
[INFO] --- maven-shade-plugin:3.1.0:shade (shade) @ foo ---
[INFO] Including com.amazonaws:aws-lambda-java-core:jar:1.2.0 in the shaded jar.
[INFO] Replacing /private/tmp/foo/target/lambda.jar with /private/tmp/foo/target/foo-1.0-shaded.jar
[INFO]
[INFO] --- exec-maven-plugin:1.6.0:exec (sam-local-invoke) @ foo ---
2018/04/06 16:34:35 Successfully parsed template.yaml
2018/04/06 16:34:35 Connected to Docker 1.37
2018/04/06 16:34:35 Fetching lambci/lambda:java8 image for java8 runtime...
java8: Pulling from lambci/lambda
Digest: sha256:14df0a5914d000e15753d739612a506ddb8fa89eaa28dcceff5497d9df2cf7aa
Status: Image is up to date for lambci/lambda:java8
2018/04/06 16:34:37 Invoking Package.Example::handleRequest (java8)
2018/04/06 16:34:37 Decompressing /tmp/foo/target/lambda.jar
2018/04/06 16:34:37 Mounting /private/var/folders/x5/ldp7c38545v9x5dg_zmkr5kxmpdprx/T/aws-sam-local-1523000077594231063 as /var/task:ro inside runtime container
START RequestId: a6ae19fe-b1b0-41e2-80bc-68a40d094d74 Version: $LATEST
Log output: Greeting is 'Hello Tim Wagner.'
END RequestId: a6ae19fe-b1b0-41e2-80bc-68a40d094d74
REPORT RequestId: a6ae19fe-b1b0-41e2-80bc-68a40d094d74	Duration: 96.60 ms	Billed Duration: 100 ms	Memory Size: 128 MB	Max Memory Used: 7 MB

{"greetings":"Hello Tim Wagner."}


[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] BUILD SUCCESS
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] Total time: 10.452 s
[INFO] Finished at: 2018-04-06T16:34:40+09:00
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------

This maven goal invokes sam local invoke -e event.json, so you can see the sample output to greet Tim Wagner.

To deploy this application to AWS, you need an Amazon S3 bucket to upload your package. You can use the following command to create a bucket if you want:

aws s3 mb s3://YOUR_BUCKET --region YOUR_REGION

Now, you can deploy your application by just one command!

mvn deploy \
    -DawsRegion=YOUR_REGION \
    -Ds3Bucket=YOUR_BUCKET \
    -DstackName=YOUR_STACK
[INFO] Scanning for projects...
[INFO]
[INFO] ---------------------------< com.riywo:foo >----------------------------
[INFO] Building foo 1.0
[INFO] --------------------------------[ jar ]---------------------------------
...
[INFO] --- exec-maven-plugin:1.6.0:exec (sam-package) @ foo ---
Uploading to aws-serverless-java/com.riywo:foo:1.0/924732f1f8e4705c87e26ef77b080b47  11657 / 11657.0  (100.00%)
Successfully packaged artifacts and wrote output template to file target/sam.yaml.
Execute the following command to deploy the packaged template
aws cloudformation deploy --template-file /private/tmp/foo/target/sam.yaml --stack-name <YOUR STACK NAME>
[INFO]
[INFO] --- maven-deploy-plugin:2.8.2:deploy (default-deploy) @ foo ---
[INFO] Skipping artifact deployment
[INFO]
[INFO] --- exec-maven-plugin:1.6.0:exec (sam-deploy) @ foo ---

Waiting for changeset to be created..
Waiting for stack create/update to complete
Successfully created/updated stack - archetype
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] BUILD SUCCESS
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] Total time: 37.176 s
[INFO] Finished at: 2018-04-06T16:41:02+09:00
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------

Maven automatically creates a shaded JAR file, uploads it to your S3 bucket, replaces template.yaml, and creates and updates the CloudFormation stack.

To customize the process, modify the pom.xml file. For example, to avoid typing values for awsRegion, s3Bucket or stackName, write them inside pom.xml and check in your VCS. Afterward, you and the rest of your team can deploy the function by typing just the following command:

mvn deploy

Options

Lambda Java 8 runtime has some types of handlers: POJO, Simple type and Stream. The default option of this archetype is POJO style, which requires to create request and response classes, but they are baked by the archetype by default. If you want to use other type of handlers, you can use handlerType property like below:

## POJO type (default)
mvn archetype:generate \
 ...
 -DhandlerType=pojo

## Simple type - String
mvn archetype:generate \
 ...
 -DhandlerType=simple

### Stream type
mvn archetype:generate \
 ...
 -DhandlerType=stream

See documentation for more details about handlers.

Also, Lambda Java 8 runtime supports two types of Logging class: Log4j 2 and LambdaLogger. This archetype creates LambdaLogger implementation by default, but you can use Log4j 2 if you want:

## LambdaLogger (default)
mvn archetype:generate \
 ...
 -Dlogger=lambda

## Log4j 2
mvn archetype:generate \
 ...
 -Dlogger=log4j2

If you use LambdaLogger, you can delete ./src/main/resources/log4j2.xml. See documentation for more details.

Conclusion

So, what’s next? Develop your Lambda function locally and type the following command: mvn deploy !

With this Archetype code example, available on GitHub repo, you should be able to deploy Lambda functions for Java 8 in a snap. If you have any questions or comments, please submit them below or leave them on GitHub.

Analyze data in Amazon DynamoDB using Amazon SageMaker for real-time prediction

Post Syndicated from YongSeong Lee original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/analyze-data-in-amazon-dynamodb-using-amazon-sagemaker-for-real-time-prediction/

Many companies across the globe use Amazon DynamoDB to store and query historical user-interaction data. DynamoDB is a fast NoSQL database used by applications that need consistent, single-digit millisecond latency.

Often, customers want to turn their valuable data in DynamoDB into insights by analyzing a copy of their table stored in Amazon S3. Doing this separates their analytical queries from their low-latency critical paths. This data can be the primary source for understanding customers’ past behavior, predicting future behavior, and generating downstream business value. Customers often turn to DynamoDB because of its great scalability and high availability. After a successful launch, many customers want to use the data in DynamoDB to predict future behaviors or provide personalized recommendations.

DynamoDB is a good fit for low-latency reads and writes, but it’s not practical to scan all data in a DynamoDB database to train a model. In this post, I demonstrate how you can use DynamoDB table data copied to Amazon S3 by AWS Data Pipeline to predict customer behavior. I also demonstrate how you can use this data to provide personalized recommendations for customers using Amazon SageMaker. You can also run ad hoc queries using Amazon Athena against the data. DynamoDB recently released on-demand backups to create full table backups with no performance impact. However, it’s not suitable for our purposes in this post, so I chose AWS Data Pipeline instead to create managed backups are accessible from other services.

To do this, I describe how to read the DynamoDB backup file format in Data Pipeline. I also describe how to convert the objects in S3 to a CSV format that Amazon SageMaker can read. In addition, I show how to schedule regular exports and transformations using Data Pipeline. The sample data used in this post is from Bank Marketing Data Set of UCI.

The solution that I describe provides the following benefits:

  • Separates analytical queries from production traffic on your DynamoDB table, preserving your DynamoDB read capacity units (RCUs) for important production requests
  • Automatically updates your model to get real-time predictions
  • Optimizes for performance (so it doesn’t compete with DynamoDB RCUs after the export) and for cost (using data you already have)
  • Makes it easier for developers of all skill levels to use Amazon SageMaker

All code and data set in this post are available in this .zip file.

Solution architecture

The following diagram shows the overall architecture of the solution.

The steps that data follows through the architecture are as follows:

  1. Data Pipeline regularly copies the full contents of a DynamoDB table as JSON into an S3
  2. Exported JSON files are converted to comma-separated value (CSV) format to use as a data source for Amazon SageMaker.
  3. Amazon SageMaker renews the model artifact and update the endpoint.
  4. The converted CSV is available for ad hoc queries with Amazon Athena.
  5. Data Pipeline controls this flow and repeats the cycle based on the schedule defined by customer requirements.

Building the auto-updating model

This section discusses details about how to read the DynamoDB exported data in Data Pipeline and build automated workflows for real-time prediction with a regularly updated model.

Download sample scripts and data

Before you begin, take the following steps:

  1. Download sample scripts in this .zip file.
  2. Unzip the src.zip file.
  3. Find the automation_script.sh file and edit it for your environment. For example, you need to replace 's3://<your bucket>/<datasource path>/' with your own S3 path to the data source for Amazon ML. In the script, the text enclosed by angle brackets—< and >—should be replaced with your own path.
  4. Upload the json-serde-1.3.6-SNAPSHOT-jar-with-dependencies.jar file to your S3 path so that the ADD jar command in Apache Hive can refer to it.

For this solution, the banking.csv  should be imported into a DynamoDB table.

Export a DynamoDB table

To export the DynamoDB table to S3, open the Data Pipeline console and choose the Export DynamoDB table to S3 template. In this template, Data Pipeline creates an Amazon EMR cluster and performs an export in the EMRActivity activity. Set proper intervals for backups according to your business requirements.

One core node(m3.xlarge) provides the default capacity for the EMR cluster and should be suitable for the solution in this post. Leave the option to resize the cluster before running enabled in the TableBackupActivity activity to let Data Pipeline scale the cluster to match the table size. The process of converting to CSV format and renewing models happens in this EMR cluster.

For a more in-depth look at how to export data from DynamoDB, see Export Data from DynamoDB in the Data Pipeline documentation.

Add the script to an existing pipeline

After you export your DynamoDB table, you add an additional EMR step to EMRActivity by following these steps:

  1. Open the Data Pipeline console and choose the ID for the pipeline that you want to add the script to.
  2. For Actions, choose Edit.
  3. In the editing console, choose the Activities category and add an EMR step using the custom script downloaded in the previous section, as shown below.

Paste the following command into the new step after the data ­­upload step:

s3://#{myDDBRegion}.elasticmapreduce/libs/script-runner/script-runner.jar,s3://<your bucket name>/automation_script.sh,#{output.directoryPath},#{myDDBRegion}

The element #{output.directoryPath} references the S3 path where the data pipeline exports DynamoDB data as JSON. The path should be passed to the script as an argument.

The bash script has two goals, converting data formats and renewing the Amazon SageMaker model. Subsequent sections discuss the contents of the automation script.

Automation script: Convert JSON data to CSV with Hive

We use Apache Hive to transform the data into a new format. The Hive QL script to create an external table and transform the data is included in the custom script that you added to the Data Pipeline definition.

When you run the Hive scripts, do so with the -e option. Also, define the Hive table with the 'org.openx.data.jsonserde.JsonSerDe' row format to parse and read JSON format. The SQL creates a Hive EXTERNAL table, and it reads the DynamoDB backup data on the S3 path passed to it by Data Pipeline.

Note: You should create the table with the “EXTERNAL” keyword to avoid the backup data being accidentally deleted from S3 if you drop the table.

The full automation script for converting follows. Add your own bucket name and data source path in the highlighted areas.

#!/bin/bash
hive -e "
ADD jar s3://<your bucket name>/json-serde-1.3.6-SNAPSHOT-jar-with-dependencies.jar ; 
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS blog_backup_data ;
CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE blog_backup_data (
 customer_id map<string,string>,
 age map<string,string>, job map<string,string>, 
 marital map<string,string>,education map<string,string>, 
 default map<string,string>, housing map<string,string>,
 loan map<string,string>, contact map<string,string>, 
 month map<string,string>, day_of_week map<string,string>, 
 duration map<string,string>, campaign map<string,string>,
 pdays map<string,string>, previous map<string,string>, 
 poutcome map<string,string>, emp_var_rate map<string,string>, 
 cons_price_idx map<string,string>, cons_conf_idx map<string,string>,
 euribor3m map<string,string>, nr_employed map<string,string>, 
 y map<string,string> ) 
ROW FORMAT SERDE 'org.openx.data.jsonserde.JsonSerDe' 
LOCATION '$1/';

INSERT OVERWRITE DIRECTORY 's3://<your bucket name>/<datasource path>/' 
SELECT concat( customer_id['s'],',', 
 age['n'],',', job['s'],',', 
 marital['s'],',', education['s'],',', default['s'],',', 
 housing['s'],',', loan['s'],',', contact['s'],',', 
 month['s'],',', day_of_week['s'],',', duration['n'],',', 
 campaign['n'],',',pdays['n'],',',previous['n'],',', 
 poutcome['s'],',', emp_var_rate['n'],',', cons_price_idx['n'],',',
 cons_conf_idx['n'],',', euribor3m['n'],',', nr_employed['n'],',', y['n'] ) 
FROM blog_backup_data
WHERE customer_id['s'] > 0 ; 

After creating an external table, you need to read data. You then use the INSERT OVERWRITE DIRECTORY ~ SELECT command to write CSV data to the S3 path that you designated as the data source for Amazon SageMaker.

Depending on your requirements, you can eliminate or process the columns in the SELECT clause in this step to optimize data analysis. For example, you might remove some columns that have unpredictable correlations with the target value because keeping the wrong columns might expose your model to “overfitting” during the training. In this post, customer_id  columns is removed. Overfitting can make your prediction weak. More information about overfitting can be found in the topic Model Fit: Underfitting vs. Overfitting in the Amazon ML documentation.

Automation script: Renew the Amazon SageMaker model

After the CSV data is replaced and ready to use, create a new model artifact for Amazon SageMaker with the updated dataset on S3.  For renewing model artifact, you must create a new training job.  Training jobs can be run using the AWS SDK ( for example, Amazon SageMaker boto3 ) or the Amazon SageMaker Python SDK that can be installed with “pip install sagemaker” command as well as the AWS CLI for Amazon SageMaker described in this post.

In addition, consider how to smoothly renew your existing model without service impact, because your model is called by applications in real time. To do this, you need to create a new endpoint configuration first and update a current endpoint with the endpoint configuration that is just created.

#!/bin/bash
## Define variable 
REGION=$2
DTTIME=`date +%Y-%m-%d-%H-%M-%S`
ROLE="<your AmazonSageMaker-ExecutionRole>" 


# Select containers image based on region.  
case "$REGION" in
"us-west-2" )
    IMAGE="174872318107.dkr.ecr.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/linear-learner:latest"
    ;;
"us-east-1" )
    IMAGE="382416733822.dkr.ecr.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/linear-learner:latest" 
    ;;
"us-east-2" )
    IMAGE="404615174143.dkr.ecr.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/linear-learner:latest" 
    ;;
"eu-west-1" )
    IMAGE="438346466558.dkr.ecr.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/linear-learner:latest" 
    ;;
 *)
    echo "Invalid Region Name"
    exit 1 ;  
esac

# Start training job and creating model artifact 
TRAINING_JOB_NAME=TRAIN-${DTTIME} 
S3OUTPUT="s3://<your bucket name>/model/" 
INSTANCETYPE="ml.m4.xlarge"
INSTANCECOUNT=1
VOLUMESIZE=5 
aws sagemaker create-training-job --training-job-name ${TRAINING_JOB_NAME} --region ${REGION}  --algorithm-specification TrainingImage=${IMAGE},TrainingInputMode=File --role-arn ${ROLE}  --input-data-config '[{ "ChannelName": "train", "DataSource": { "S3DataSource": { "S3DataType": "S3Prefix", "S3Uri": "s3://<your bucket name>/<datasource path>/", "S3DataDistributionType": "FullyReplicated" } }, "ContentType": "text/csv", "CompressionType": "None" , "RecordWrapperType": "None"  }]'  --output-data-config S3OutputPath=${S3OUTPUT} --resource-config  InstanceType=${INSTANCETYPE},InstanceCount=${INSTANCECOUNT},VolumeSizeInGB=${VOLUMESIZE} --stopping-condition MaxRuntimeInSeconds=120 --hyper-parameters feature_dim=20,predictor_type=binary_classifier  

# Wait until job completed 
aws sagemaker wait training-job-completed-or-stopped --training-job-name ${TRAINING_JOB_NAME}  --region ${REGION}

# Get newly created model artifact and create model
MODELARTIFACT=`aws sagemaker describe-training-job --training-job-name ${TRAINING_JOB_NAME} --region ${REGION}  --query 'ModelArtifacts.S3ModelArtifacts' --output text `
MODELNAME=MODEL-${DTTIME}
aws sagemaker create-model --region ${REGION} --model-name ${MODELNAME}  --primary-container Image=${IMAGE},ModelDataUrl=${MODELARTIFACT}  --execution-role-arn ${ROLE}

# create a new endpoint configuration 
CONFIGNAME=CONFIG-${DTTIME}
aws sagemaker  create-endpoint-config --region ${REGION} --endpoint-config-name ${CONFIGNAME}  --production-variants  VariantName=Users,ModelName=${MODELNAME},InitialInstanceCount=1,InstanceType=ml.m4.xlarge

# create or update the endpoint
STATUS=`aws sagemaker describe-endpoint --endpoint-name  ServiceEndpoint --query 'EndpointStatus' --output text --region ${REGION} `
if [[ $STATUS -ne "InService" ]] ;
then
    aws sagemaker  create-endpoint --endpoint-name  ServiceEndpoint  --endpoint-config-name ${CONFIGNAME} --region ${REGION}    
else
    aws sagemaker  update-endpoint --endpoint-name  ServiceEndpoint  --endpoint-config-name ${CONFIGNAME} --region ${REGION}
fi

Grant permission

Before you execute the script, you must grant proper permission to Data Pipeline. Data Pipeline uses the DataPipelineDefaultResourceRole role by default. I added the following policy to DataPipelineDefaultResourceRole to allow Data Pipeline to create, delete, and update the Amazon SageMaker model and data source in the script.

{
 "Version": "2012-10-17",
 "Statement": [
 {
 "Effect": "Allow",
 "Action": [
 "sagemaker:CreateTrainingJob",
 "sagemaker:DescribeTrainingJob",
 "sagemaker:CreateModel",
 "sagemaker:CreateEndpointConfig",
 "sagemaker:DescribeEndpoint",
 "sagemaker:CreateEndpoint",
 "sagemaker:UpdateEndpoint",
 "iam:PassRole"
 ],
 "Resource": "*"
 }
 ]
}

Use real-time prediction

After you deploy a model into production using Amazon SageMaker hosting services, your client applications use this API to get inferences from the model hosted at the specified endpoint. This approach is useful for interactive web, mobile, or desktop applications.

Following, I provide a simple Python code example that queries against Amazon SageMaker endpoint URL with its name (“ServiceEndpoint”) and then uses them for real-time prediction.

=== Python sample for real-time prediction ===

#!/usr/bin/env python
import boto3
import json 

client = boto3.client('sagemaker-runtime', region_name ='<your region>' )
new_customer_info = '34,10,2,4,1,2,1,1,6,3,190,1,3,4,3,-1.7,94.055,-39.8,0.715,4991.6'
response = client.invoke_endpoint(
    EndpointName='ServiceEndpoint',
    Body=new_customer_info, 
    ContentType='text/csv'
)
result = json.loads(response['Body'].read().decode())
print(result)
--- output(response) ---
{u'predictions': [{u'score': 0.7528127431869507, u'predicted_label': 1.0}]}

Solution summary

The solution takes the following steps:

  1. Data Pipeline exports DynamoDB table data into S3. The original JSON data should be kept to recover the table in the rare event that this is needed. Data Pipeline then converts JSON to CSV so that Amazon SageMaker can read the data.Note: You should select only meaningful attributes when you convert CSV. For example, if you judge that the “campaign” attribute is not correlated, you can eliminate this attribute from the CSV.
  2. Train the Amazon SageMaker model with the new data source.
  3. When a new customer comes to your site, you can judge how likely it is for this customer to subscribe to your new product based on “predictedScores” provided by Amazon SageMaker.
  4. If the new user subscribes your new product, your application must update the attribute “y” to the value 1 (for yes). This updated data is provided for the next model renewal as a new data source. It serves to improve the accuracy of your prediction. With each new entry, your application can become smarter and deliver better predictions.

Running ad hoc queries using Amazon Athena

Amazon Athena is a serverless query service that makes it easy to analyze large amounts of data stored in Amazon S3 using standard SQL. Athena is useful for examining data and collecting statistics or informative summaries about data. You can also use the powerful analytic functions of Presto, as described in the topic Aggregate Functions of Presto in the Presto documentation.

With the Data Pipeline scheduled activity, recent CSV data is always located in S3 so that you can run ad hoc queries against the data using Amazon Athena. I show this with example SQL statements following. For an in-depth description of this process, see the post Interactive SQL Queries for Data in Amazon S3 on the AWS News Blog. 

Creating an Amazon Athena table and running it

Simply, you can create an EXTERNAL table for the CSV data on S3 in Amazon Athena Management Console.

=== Table Creation ===
CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE datasource (
 age int, 
 job string, 
 marital string , 
 education string, 
 default string, 
 housing string, 
 loan string, 
 contact string, 
 month string, 
 day_of_week string, 
 duration int, 
 campaign int, 
 pdays int , 
 previous int , 
 poutcome string, 
 emp_var_rate double, 
 cons_price_idx double,
 cons_conf_idx double, 
 euribor3m double, 
 nr_employed double, 
 y int 
)
ROW FORMAT DELIMITED 
FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' ESCAPED BY '\\' LINES TERMINATED BY '\n' 
LOCATION 's3://<your bucket name>/<datasource path>/';

The following query calculates the correlation coefficient between the target attribute and other attributes using Amazon Athena.

=== Sample Query ===

SELECT corr(age,y) AS correlation_age_and_target, 
 corr(duration,y) AS correlation_duration_and_target, 
 corr(campaign,y) AS correlation_campaign_and_target,
 corr(contact,y) AS correlation_contact_and_target
FROM ( SELECT age , duration , campaign , y , 
 CASE WHEN contact = 'telephone' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS contact 
 FROM datasource 
 ) datasource ;

Conclusion

In this post, I introduce an example of how to analyze data in DynamoDB by using table data in Amazon S3 to optimize DynamoDB table read capacity. You can then use the analyzed data as a new data source to train an Amazon SageMaker model for accurate real-time prediction. In addition, you can run ad hoc queries against the data on S3 using Amazon Athena. I also present how to automate these procedures by using Data Pipeline.

You can adapt this example to your specific use case at hand, and hopefully this post helps you accelerate your development. You can find more examples and use cases for Amazon SageMaker in the video AWS 2017: Introducing Amazon SageMaker on the AWS website.

 


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Serving Real-Time Machine Learning Predictions on Amazon EMR and Analyzing Data in S3 using Amazon Athena.

 


About the Author

Yong Seong Lee is a Cloud Support Engineer for AWS Big Data Services. He is interested in every technology related to data/databases and helping customers who have difficulties in using AWS services. His motto is “Enjoy life, be curious and have maximum experience.”

 

 

Implementing safe AWS Lambda deployments with AWS CodeDeploy

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/implementing-safe-aws-lambda-deployments-with-aws-codedeploy/

This post courtesy of George Mao, AWS Senior Serverless Specialist – Solutions Architect

AWS Lambda and AWS CodeDeploy recently made it possible to automatically shift incoming traffic between two function versions based on a preconfigured rollout strategy. This new feature allows you to gradually shift traffic to the new function. If there are any issues with the new code, you can quickly rollback and control the impact to your application.

Previously, you had to manually move 100% of traffic from the old version to the new version. Now, you can have CodeDeploy automatically execute pre- or post-deployment tests and automate a gradual rollout strategy. Traffic shifting is built right into the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM), making it easy to define and deploy your traffic shifting capabilities. SAM is an extension of AWS CloudFormation that provides a simplified way of defining serverless applications.

In this post, I show you how to use SAM, CloudFormation, and CodeDeploy to accomplish an automated rollout strategy for safe Lambda deployments.

Scenario

For this walkthrough, you write a Lambda application that returns a count of the S3 buckets that you own. You deploy it and use it in production. Later on, you receive requirements that tell you that you need to change your Lambda application to count only buckets that begin with the letter “a”.

Before you make the change, you need to be sure that your new Lambda application works as expected. If it does have issues, you want to minimize the number of impacted users and roll back easily. To accomplish this, you create a deployment process that publishes the new Lambda function, but does not send any traffic to it. You use CodeDeploy to execute a PreTraffic test to ensure that your new function works as expected. After the test succeeds, CodeDeploy automatically shifts traffic gradually to the new version of the Lambda function.

Your Lambda function is exposed as a REST service via an Amazon API Gateway deployment. This makes it easy to test and integrate.

Prerequisites

To execute the SAM and CloudFormation deployment, you must have the following IAM permissions:

  • cloudformation:*
  • lambda:*
  • codedeploy:*
  • iam:create*

You may use the AWS SAM Local CLI or the AWS CLI to package and deploy your Lambda application. If you choose to use SAM Local, be sure to install it onto your system. For more information, see AWS SAM Local Installation.

All of the code used in this post can be found in this GitHub repository: https://github.com/aws-samples/aws-safe-lambda-deployments.

Walkthrough

For this post, use SAM to define your resources because it comes with built-in CodeDeploy support for safe Lambda deployments.  The deployment is handled and automated by CloudFormation.

SAM allows you to define your Serverless applications in a simple and concise fashion, because it automatically creates all necessary resources behind the scenes. For example, if you do not define an execution role for a Lambda function, SAM automatically creates one. SAM also creates the CodeDeploy application necessary to drive the traffic shifting, as well as the IAM service role that CodeDeploy uses to execute all actions.

Create a SAM template

To get started, write your SAM template and call it template.yaml.

AWSTemplateFormatVersion : '2010-09-09'
Transform: AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31
Description: An example SAM template for Lambda Safe Deployments.

Resources:

  returnS3Buckets:
    Type: AWS::Serverless::Function
    Properties:
      Handler: returnS3Buckets.handler
      Runtime: nodejs6.10
      AutoPublishAlias: live
      Policies:
        - Version: "2012-10-17"
          Statement: 
          - Effect: "Allow"
            Action: 
              - "s3:ListAllMyBuckets"
            Resource: '*'
      DeploymentPreference:
          Type: Linear10PercentEvery1Minute
          Hooks:
            PreTraffic: !Ref preTrafficHook
      Events:
        Api:
          Type: Api
          Properties:
            Path: /test
            Method: get

  preTrafficHook:
    Type: AWS::Serverless::Function
    Properties:
      Handler: preTrafficHook.handler
      Policies:
        - Version: "2012-10-17"
          Statement: 
          - Effect: "Allow"
            Action: 
              - "codedeploy:PutLifecycleEventHookExecutionStatus"
            Resource:
              !Sub 'arn:aws:codedeploy:${AWS::Region}:${AWS::AccountId}:deploymentgroup:${ServerlessDeploymentApplication}/*'
        - Version: "2012-10-17"
          Statement: 
          - Effect: "Allow"
            Action: 
              - "lambda:InvokeFunction"
            Resource: !Ref returnS3Buckets.Version
      Runtime: nodejs6.10
      FunctionName: 'CodeDeployHook_preTrafficHook'
      DeploymentPreference:
        Enabled: false
      Timeout: 5
      Environment:
        Variables:
          NewVersion: !Ref returnS3Buckets.Version

This template creates two functions:

  • returnS3Buckets
  • preTrafficHook

The returnS3Buckets function is where your application logic lives. It’s a simple piece of code that uses the AWS SDK for JavaScript in Node.JS to call the Amazon S3 listBuckets API action and return the number of buckets.

'use strict';

var AWS = require('aws-sdk');
var s3 = new AWS.S3();

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
	console.log("I am here! " + context.functionName  +  ":"  +  context.functionVersion);

	s3.listBuckets(function (err, data){
		if(err){
			console.log(err, err.stack);
			callback(null, {
				statusCode: 500,
				body: "Failed!"
			});
		}
		else{
			var allBuckets = data.Buckets;

			console.log("Total buckets: " + allBuckets.length);
			callback(null, {
				statusCode: 200,
				body: allBuckets.length
			});
		}
	});	
}

Review the key parts of the SAM template that defines returnS3Buckets:

  • The AutoPublishAlias attribute instructs SAM to automatically publish a new version of the Lambda function for each new deployment and link it to the live alias.
  • The Policies attribute specifies additional policy statements that SAM adds onto the automatically generated IAM role for this function. The first statement provides the function with permission to call listBuckets.
  • The DeploymentPreference attribute configures the type of rollout pattern to use. In this case, you are shifting traffic in a linear fashion, moving 10% of traffic every minute to the new version. For more information about supported patterns, see Serverless Application Model: Traffic Shifting Configurations.
  • The Hooks attribute specifies that you want to execute the preTrafficHook Lambda function before CodeDeploy automatically begins shifting traffic. This function should perform validation testing on the newly deployed Lambda version. This function invokes the new Lambda function and checks the results. If you’re satisfied with the tests, instruct CodeDeploy to proceed with the rollout via an API call to: codedeploy.putLifecycleEventHookExecutionStatus.
  • The Events attribute defines an API-based event source that can trigger this function. It accepts requests on the /test path using an HTTP GET method.
'use strict';

const AWS = require('aws-sdk');
const codedeploy = new AWS.CodeDeploy({apiVersion: '2014-10-06'});
var lambda = new AWS.Lambda();

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {

	console.log("Entering PreTraffic Hook!");
	
	// Read the DeploymentId & LifecycleEventHookExecutionId from the event payload
    var deploymentId = event.DeploymentId;
	var lifecycleEventHookExecutionId = event.LifecycleEventHookExecutionId;

	var functionToTest = process.env.NewVersion;
	console.log("Testing new function version: " + functionToTest);

	// Perform validation of the newly deployed Lambda version
	var lambdaParams = {
		FunctionName: functionToTest,
		InvocationType: "RequestResponse"
	};

	var lambdaResult = "Failed";
	lambda.invoke(lambdaParams, function(err, data) {
		if (err){	// an error occurred
			console.log(err, err.stack);
			lambdaResult = "Failed";
		}
		else{	// successful response
			var result = JSON.parse(data.Payload);
			console.log("Result: " +  JSON.stringify(result));

			// Check the response for valid results
			// The response will be a JSON payload with statusCode and body properties. ie:
			// {
			//		"statusCode": 200,
			//		"body": 51
			// }
			if(result.body == 9){	
				lambdaResult = "Succeeded";
				console.log ("Validation testing succeeded!");
			}
			else{
				lambdaResult = "Failed";
				console.log ("Validation testing failed!");
			}

			// Complete the PreTraffic Hook by sending CodeDeploy the validation status
			var params = {
				deploymentId: deploymentId,
				lifecycleEventHookExecutionId: lifecycleEventHookExecutionId,
				status: lambdaResult // status can be 'Succeeded' or 'Failed'
			};
			
			// Pass AWS CodeDeploy the prepared validation test results.
			codedeploy.putLifecycleEventHookExecutionStatus(params, function(err, data) {
				if (err) {
					// Validation failed.
					console.log('CodeDeploy Status update failed');
					console.log(err, err.stack);
					callback("CodeDeploy Status update failed");
				} else {
					// Validation succeeded.
					console.log('Codedeploy status updated successfully');
					callback(null, 'Codedeploy status updated successfully');
				}
			});
		}  
	});
}

The hook is hardcoded to check that the number of S3 buckets returned is 9.

Review the key parts of the SAM template that defines preTrafficHook:

  • The Policies attribute specifies additional policy statements that SAM adds onto the automatically generated IAM role for this function. The first statement provides permissions to call the CodeDeploy PutLifecycleEventHookExecutionStatus API action. The second statement provides permissions to invoke the specific version of the returnS3Buckets function to test
  • This function has traffic shifting features disabled by setting the DeploymentPreference option to false.
  • The FunctionName attribute explicitly tells CloudFormation what to name the function. Otherwise, CloudFormation creates the function with the default naming convention: [stackName]-[FunctionName]-[uniqueID].  Name the function with the “CodeDeployHook_” prefix because the CodeDeployServiceRole role only allows InvokeFunction on functions named with that prefix.
  • Set the Timeout attribute to allow enough time to complete your validation tests.
  • Use an environment variable to inject the ARN of the newest deployed version of the returnS3Buckets function. The ARN allows the function to know the specific version to invoke and perform validation testing on.

Deploy the function

Your SAM template is all set and the code is written—you’re ready to deploy the function for the first time. Here’s how to do it via the SAM CLI. Replace “sam” with “cloudformation” to use CloudFormation instead.

First, package the function. This command returns a CloudFormation importable file, packaged.yaml.

sam package –template-file template.yaml –s3-bucket mybucket –output-template-file packaged.yaml

Now deploy everything:

sam deploy –template-file packaged.yaml –stack-name mySafeDeployStack –capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM

At this point, both Lambda functions have been deployed within the CloudFormation stack mySafeDeployStack. The returnS3Buckets has been deployed as Version 1:

SAM automatically created a few things, including the CodeDeploy application, with the deployment pattern that you specified (Linear10PercentEvery1Minute). There is currently one deployment group, with no action, because no deployments have occurred. SAM also created the IAM service role that this CodeDeploy application uses:

There is a single managed policy attached to this role, which allows CodeDeploy to invoke any Lambda function that begins with “CodeDeployHook_”.

An API has been set up called safeDeployStack. It targets your Lambda function with the /test resource using the GET method. When you test the endpoint, API Gateway executes the returnS3Buckets function and it returns the number of S3 buckets that you own. In this case, it’s 51.

Publish a new Lambda function version

Now implement the requirements change, which is to make returnS3Buckets count only buckets that begin with the letter “a”. The code now looks like the following (see returnS3BucketsNew.js in GitHub):

'use strict';

var AWS = require('aws-sdk');
var s3 = new AWS.S3();

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
	console.log("I am here! " + context.functionName  +  ":"  +  context.functionVersion);

	s3.listBuckets(function (err, data){
		if(err){
			console.log(err, err.stack);
			callback(null, {
				statusCode: 500,
				body: "Failed!"
			});
		}
		else{
			var allBuckets = data.Buckets;

			console.log("Total buckets: " + allBuckets.length);
			//callback(null, allBuckets.length);

			//  New Code begins here
			var counter=0;
			for(var i  in allBuckets){
				if(allBuckets[i].Name[0] === "a")
					counter++;
			}
			console.log("Total buckets starting with a: " + counter);

			callback(null, {
				statusCode: 200,
				body: counter
			});
			
		}
	});	
}

Repackage and redeploy with the same two commands as earlier:

sam package –template-file template.yaml –s3-bucket mybucket –output-template-file packaged.yaml
	
sam deploy –template-file packaged.yaml –stack-name mySafeDeployStack –capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM

CloudFormation understands that this is a stack update instead of an entirely new stack. You can see that reflected in the CloudFormation console:

During the update, CloudFormation deploys the new Lambda function as version 2 and adds it to the “live” alias. There is no traffic routing there yet. CodeDeploy now takes over to begin the safe deployment process.

The first thing CodeDeploy does is invoke the preTrafficHook function. Verify that this happened by reviewing the Lambda logs and metrics:

The function should progress successfully, invoke Version 2 of returnS3Buckets, and finally invoke the CodeDeploy API with a success code. After this occurs, CodeDeploy begins the predefined rollout strategy. Open the CodeDeploy console to review the deployment progress (Linear10PercentEvery1Minute):

Verify the traffic shift

During the deployment, verify that the traffic shift has started to occur by running the test periodically. As the deployment shifts towards the new version, a larger percentage of the responses return 9 instead of 51. These numbers match the S3 buckets.

A minute later, you see 10% more traffic shifting to the new version. The whole process takes 10 minutes to complete. After completion, open the Lambda console and verify that the “live” alias now points to version 2:

After 10 minutes, the deployment is complete and CodeDeploy signals success to CloudFormation and completes the stack update.

Check the results

If you invoke the function alias manually, you see the results of the new implementation.

aws lambda invoke –function [lambda arn to live alias] out.txt

You can also execute the prod stage of your API and verify the results by issuing an HTTP GET to the invoke URL:

Summary

This post has shown you how you can safely automate your Lambda deployments using the Lambda traffic shifting feature. You used the Serverless Application Model (SAM) to define your Lambda functions and configured CodeDeploy to manage your deployment patterns. Finally, you used CloudFormation to automate the deployment and updates to your function and PreTraffic hook.

Now that you know all about this new feature, you’re ready to begin automating Lambda deployments with confidence that things will work as designed. I look forward to hearing about what you’ve built with the AWS Serverless Platform.