Tag Archives: wordpress

Deploying a highly available WordPress site on Amazon Lightsail, Part 4: Increasing performance and scalability with a Lightsail load balancer

Post Syndicated from Betsy Chernoff original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/deploying-a-highly-available-wordpress-site-on-amazon-lightsail-part-4-increasing-performance-and-scalability-with-a-lightsail-load-balancer/

This post is contributed by Mike Coleman | Developer Advocate for Lightsail | Twitter: @mikegcoleman

This is the final post in a series about getting a highly available WordPress site up and running on Amazon Lightsail. For reference, the other blog posts are:

  1. Implementing a highly available Lightsail database with WordPress
  2. Using Amazon S3 with WordPress to securely deliver media files
  3. Increasing security and performance using Amazon CloudFront

In this post, you’ll learn how to stand up a Lightsail load balancer, create a snapshot of your WordPress server, deploy new instances from those snapshots, and place the instances behind your load balancer.

A load balancer accepts incoming web traffic and routes it to one or (usually) more servers. Having multiple servers allows you to scale the number of incoming requests your site can handle, as well as allowing your site to remain responsive if a web server fails. The following diagram shows the solution architecture, which features multiple front-end WordPress servers behind a Lightsail load balancer, a highly available Lightsail database, and uses S3 alongside CloudFront to deliver your media content securely.

Graphic showing the final HA architecture including 3 servers behind a load balancer, S3 alongside cloudfront, and a highly-available database

Prerequisites

This post assumes you built your WordPress site by following the previous posts in this series.

Configuring SSL requires a registered domain name and sufficient permissions to create DNS records for that domain.

You don’t need AWS or Lightsail to manage your domain, but this post uses Lightsail’s DNS management. For more information, see Creating a DNS zone to manage your domain’s DNS records in Amazon Lightsail.

Deploying the load balancer and configuring SSL

To deploy a Lightsail load balancer and configure it to support SSL, complete the following steps:

  1. Open the Lightsail console.
  2. From the menu, choose Networking.
  3. Choose Create Load Balancer.
  4. For Identify your load balancer, enter a name for your load balancer.

This post names the load balancer wp-lb.

  1. Choose Create Load Balancer.

The details page for your new load balancer opens. From here, add your initial WordPress server to the load balancer and configure SSL.

  1. For Target instances, choose your WordPress server.

The following screenshot indicates that this post chooses the server WordPress-1.

screenshot showing an instance being selected from the drop down

 

  1. Choose Attach.

It can take a few seconds for your instance to attach to the load balancer and the Health Check to report as Passed. See the following screenshot of the Health Check status.

 Picture of healh check status

  1. From the menu, choose Inbound traffic.
  2. Under Certificates, choose Create certificate.
  3. For PRIMARY DOMAIN, enter the domain name that you want to use to reach your WordPress site.

You can either accept the default certificate name Lightsail creates or change it to something you prefer. This post uses www.mikegcoleman.com.

  1. Choose Create.

The following screenshot shows the Create a certificate section.

Picture of the Create a Certificate section

Creating a CNAME record

As you did with CloudFront, you need to create a CNAME record as a way of validating that you have ownership of the domain for which you are creating a certificate.

  1. Copy the random characters and the subdomain from the name field.

The following screenshot shows the example record information.

screenshot showing the portion of the name value that needs to be copied

  1. Open a second copy of the Lightsail console in another tab or window.
  2. Choose Networking.
  3. Choose your domain name.
  4. Choose Add record.
  5. From the drop-down menu, choose CNAME record.

The following screenshot shows the drop-down menu options.

Screenshot showing CNAME record selected in the dropdown box

  1. For Subdomain, enter the random characters and subdomain you copied from the load balancer page.
  2. Return to the load balancer page.
  3. Copy the entire Value
  4. Return to the DNS page.
  5. For Maps to, enter the value string.
  6. Choose the green check box.

The following screenshot shows the CNAME record details.

Screenshot showing the completed cname record and green checkbox highlighted

  1. Return to the load balancer page and wait a few minutes before refreshing the page.

You should see a notification that the certificate is verified and ready to use. This process can take several minutes; continue refreshing the page every few minutes until the status updates. The following screenshot shows the notification message.

Screenshot showing the verification complete message for the load balancer ssl certificate

  1. In the HTTPS box, select your certificate from the drop-down menu.

The following screenshot shows the HTTPS box.

screenshot showing the newly validated certificate in the drop down box

  1. Copy the DNS name for your load balancer.

The following screenshot shows the example DNS name.

Screenshot showing the DNS name of the load balancer

  1. Return to the Lightsail DNS console and follow steps 13 through 23 as a guide in creating a CNAME record that maps your website address to the load balancer’s DNS name.

Use the subdomain you chose for your WordPress server (in this post, that’s www) and the DNS name you copied for the Maps to field.

The following screenshot shows the CNAME record details.

screenshot showing the completed cname record for the load balancer

Updating the wp-config file

The last step to configure SSL is updating the wp-config file to configure WordPress to deliver content over SSL.

  1. Start an SSH session with your WordPress server.
  2. Copy and paste the following code into the terminal window to create a temporary file that holds the configuration string that will be added to the WordPress configuration file.
cat <<EOT >> ssl_config.txt
if (\$_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_PROTO'] == 'https') \$_SERVER['HTTPS']='on';
EOT
  1. Copy and paste the following sed command into your terminal window to add the SSL line to the configuration file.
sed -i "/define( 'WP_DEBUG', false );/r ssl_config.txt" \
/home/bitnami/apps/wordpress/htdocs/wp-config.php
  1. The sed command changes the permissions on the configuration file, so you’ll need to reset them. See the following code:
sudo chown bitnami:daemon /home/bitnami/apps/wordpress/htdocs/wp-config.php

You also need to update two variables that WordPress uses to identify which address is used to access your site.

  1. Update the WP_SITEURL variable (be sure to specify https) by running the following command in the terminal window:
wp config set WP_SITEURL https://<your wordpress site domain name>

For example, this post uses the following code:

wp config set WP_SITEURL https://www.mikegcoleman.com

You should get a response that the variable updated.

  1. Update the WP_HOME variable (be sure to specify https) by issuing the following command in the terminal window:
wp config set WP_HOME https://<your wordpress site domain name>

For example, this post uses the following code:

wp config set WP_HOME https://www.mikegcoleman.com

You should get a response that the variable updated.

  1. Restart the WordPress server to read the new configuration with the following code:
sudo /opt/bitnami/ctlscript.sh restart

After the server has restarted, visit the DNS name for your WordPress site. The site should load and your browser should report the connection is secure.

You can now finish any customization of your WordPress site, such as adding additional plugins, setting the blog name, or changing the theme.

Scaling your WordPress servers

With your WordPress server fully configured, the last step is to create additional instances and place them behind the load balancer so that if one of your WordPress servers fails, your site is still reachable. An added benefit is that your site is more scalable because there are additional servers to handle incoming requests.

Complete the following steps:

  1. On the Lightsail console, choose the name of your WordPress server.
  2. Choose Snapshots.
  3. For Create instance snapshot, enter the name of your snapshot.

This post uses the name WordPress-version-1. See the following screenshot of your snapshot details.

Screenshot of the snapshot creation dialog

  1. Choose Create snapshot.

It can take a few minutes for the snapshot creation process to finish.

  1. Click the three-dot menu icon to the right of your snapshot name and choose Create new instance.

The following screenshot shows the Recent snapshots section.

Screenshot showing the location of the three dot menu

To provide the highest level of redundancy, deploy each of your WordPress servers into a different Availability Zone within the same region. By default, the first server was placed in zone A; place the subsequent servers in two different zones (B and C would be good choices). For more information, see Regions and Availability Zones.

  1. For Instance location, choose Change AWS Region and Availability Zone.
  2. Choose Change your Availability Zone.
  3. Choose an Availability Zone you have not used previously.

The following screenshot shows the Availability Zones to choose from.

screenshot showing availability zone b selected

  1. Give your instance a new name.

This post names the instance WordPress-2.

  1. Choose Create Instance.

You should have at least two WordPress server instances to provide a minimum degree of redundancy. To add more, create additional instances by following steps 1–10.

Return to the Lightsail console home page, and wait for your instances to report back Running.

Adding your instances to the load balancer

Now that you have your additional WordPress instances created, add them to the load balancer. This is the same process you followed previously to add the first instance:

  1. On the Lightsail console, choose Networking.
  2. Choose the load balancer you previously created.
  3. Choose Attach another.
  4. From the drop-down menu, select the name of your instance.

The following screenshot shows the available instances on the drop-down menu.

screenshot showing the WordPress instances in the load balancer drop down

  1. Choose Attach.
  2. Repeat steps 3–5 for any additional instances.

When the instances report back Passed, your site is fully up and running.

Conclusion

You have configured your site to provide a good degree of redundancy and performance, while delivering your content over secure connections. S3 and CloudFront allow your site to deliver static content over a secured connection, while the Lightsail load balancer and database make sure your site can keep serving your customers in the event of a failure.

If you haven’t got one already, head on over and create a free AWS account, and start building your own WordPress site – or whatever else might think of!

Deploying a highly available WordPress site on Amazon Lightsail, Part 1: Implementing a highly available Lightsail database with WordPress

Post Syndicated from Betsy Chernoff original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/deploying-a-highly-available-wordpress-site-on-amazon-lightsail-part-1-implementing-a-highly-available-lightsail-database-with-wordpress/

This post is contributed by Mike Coleman | Developer Advocate for Lightsail

This post walks you through what to consider when architecting a scalable, redundant WordPress site. It discusses how WordPress stores such elements as user accounts, posts, settings, media, and themes, and how to configure WordPress to work with a standalone database.

This walkthrough deploys a WordPress site on Amazon Lightsail. Lightsail is the easiest way to get started on AWS, and it might be the easiest (and least expensive) way to get started on WordPress. You can launch a new WordPress site in a few clicks with one of Lightsail’s blueprints, for a few dollars a month. This gives you a single Lightsail instance to host your WordPress site that’s perfect for a small personal blog.

However, you may need a more resilient site capable of scaling to meet increased demand and architected to provide a degree of redundancy. If you’re a novice cloud user, the idea of setting up a highly available WordPress implementation might seem daunting. But with Lightsail and other AWS services, it doesn’t need to be.

Subsequent posts in this series cover managing media files in a multi-server environment, using CloudFront to increase site security and performance, and scaling the WordPress front-end with a Lightsail load balancer.

What’s under the hood?

Even though you’re a WordPress user, you may not have thought about how WordPress is built. However, if you’re moving into managing your WordPress site, it’s essential to understand what’s under the hood. As a content management system (CMS), WordPress provides a lot of functionality; this post focuses on some of the more essential features in the context of how they relate to architecting your highly available WordPress site.

WordPress manages a variety of different data. There are user accounts, posts, media (such as images and videos), themes (code that customizes the look and feel of a given WordPress site), plugins (code that adds additional functionality to your site), and configuration settings.

Where WordPress stores your data varies depending on the type of data. At the most basic level, WordPress is a PHP application running on a web server and database. The web server is the instance that you create in Lightsail, and includes WordPress software and the MySQL database. The following diagram shows the Lightsail VPC architecture.

Lightsail's VPC Architecture

The database stores a big chunk of the data that WordPress needs; for example, all of the user account information and blog posts. However, the web server’s file system stores another portion of data; for example, a new image you upload to your WordPress server. Finally, with themes and plugins, both the database and the file system store information. For example, the database holds information on what plugins and which theme is currently active, but the file system stores the actual code for the themes and plugins.

To provide a highly available WordPress implementation, you need to provide redundancy not only for the database, but also the content that may live on the file system.

Prerequisites

This solution has the following prerequisites:

This post and the subsequent posts deal with setting up a new WordPress site. If you have an existing site, the processes to follow are similar, but you should consult the documentation for both Lightsail and WordPress. Also, be sure to back up your existing database as well as snapshot your existing WordPress instance.

Configuring the database

The standalone MySQL database you created is not yet configured to work with WordPress. You need to create the actual database and define the tables that WordPress needs. The easiest method is to export the table from the database on your WordPress instance and import it into your standalone MySQL database. To do so, complete the following steps:

  1. Connect to your WordPress instance by using your SSH client or the web-based SSH client in the Lightsail console. The screenshot below highlights the icon to click.

WordPress icon for connecting through SSH

  1. From the terminal prompt for your WordPress instance, set two environment variables (LSDB_USERNAME and LSDB_ENDPOINT) that contain the connection information for your standalone database.

You can find that information on the database’s management page from the Lightsail console. See the following screenshot of the Connection details page.

the Connection details page

  1. To set the environment variables, substitute the values for your instance into the following code example and input each line one at a time at the terminal prompt:

LSDB_USERNAME=UserName

LSDB_ENDPOINT=Endpoint

For example, your input should look similar to the following code:

LSDB_USERNAME=dbmasteruser

LSDB_ENDPOINT=ls.rds.amazonaws.com

  1. Retrieve the Bitnami application password for the database running on your WordPress instance.

This password is stored at /home/bitnami/bitnami_application_password.

Enter the following cat command in the terminal to display the value:

cat /home/bitnami/bitnami_application_password

  1. Copy and paste the following code into a text document and copy the password

cat /home/bitnami/bitnami_application_password

You need this password in the following steps.

  1. Enter the following command into the terminal window:

mysqldump \

 -u root \

--databases bitnami_wordpress \

--single-transaction \

--order-by-primary \

-p > dump.sql

This command creates a file (dump.sql) that defines the database and all the needed tables.

  1. When prompted for a password, enter the Bitnami application password you recorded previously.

The terminal window doesn’t show the password as you enter it.

Now that you have the right database structure exported, import that into your standalone database. You’ll do this by entering the contents of your dump file into the mysql command line.

  1. Enter the following command at the terminal prompt:

cat dump.sql | mysql \

--user $LSDB_USERNAME \

--host $LSDB_ENDPOINT \

-p

  1. When prompted for a password, enter the password for your Lightsail database.

The terminal window doesn’t show the password as you enter it.

  1. Enter the following mysql command in the instance terminal:

echo 'use bitnami_wordpress; show tables' | \

mysql \

--user $LSDB_USERNAME \

--host $LSDB_ENDPOINT \

-p

This command shows the structure of the WordPress database, and verifies that you created the database on your Lightsail instance successfully.

  1. When prompted for a password, enter the password for your standalone database.

You should receive the following output:

Tables_in_bitnami_wordpress

wp_commentmeta

wp_comments

wp_links

wp_options

wp_postmeta

wp_posts

wp_term_relationships

wp_term_taxonomy

wp_termmeta

wp_terms

wp_usermeta

wp_users

This test confirms that your standalone database is ready for you to use with your WordPress instance.

Configuring WordPress

Now that you have the standalone database configured, modify the WordPress configuration file (wp-config.php) to direct the WordPress instance to use the standalone database instead of the database on the instance.

The first step is to back up your existing configuration file. If you run into trouble, copy wp-config.php.bak over to wp-config.php to roll back any changes.

  1. Enter the following code:

cp /home/bitnami/apps/wordpress/htdocs/wp-config.php /home/bitnami/apps/wordpress/htdocs/wp-config.php.bak

You are using wp-cli to modify the wp-config file.

  1. Swap out the following values with those for your Lightsail database:

wp config set DB_USER UserName

wp config set DB_PASSWORD Password

wp config set DB_HOST Endpoint

The following screenshot shows the example database values.

example database values

For example:

wp config set DB_USER dbmasteruser

wp config set DB_PASSWORD ‘MySecurePassword!2019’

wp config set DB_HOST ls.rds.amazonaws.com

To avoid issues with any special characters the password may contain, make sure to wrap the password value in single quotes (‘).

  1. Enter the following command:

wp config list

The output should match the values on the database’s management page in the Lightsail console. This confirms that the changes went through.

  1. Restart WordPress by entering the following command:

sudo /opt/bitnami/ctlscript.sh restart

Conclusion

This post covered a lot of ground. Hopefully it educated and inspired you to sign up for a free AWS account and start building out a robust WordPress site. Subsequent posts in this series show how to deal with your uploaded media and scale the web front end with a Lightsail load balancer.

Fast WordPress Sites with Bluehost & Cloudflare Workers

Post Syndicated from Peter Dumanian original https://blog.cloudflare.com/fast-wordpress-sites-with-bluehost-cloudflare-workers/

Fast WordPress Sites with Bluehost & Cloudflare Workers

Fast WordPress Sites with Bluehost & Cloudflare Workers

WordPress is the most popular CMS (content management system) in the world, powering over a third of the top 10 million websites, according to W3Techs.

WordPress is an open source software project that many website service providers host for end customers to enable them to build WordPress sites and serve that content to visitors over the Internet.  For hosting providers, one of the opportunities and challenges is to host one version of WordPress on their infrastructure that is high performing for all their customers without modifying the WordPress code on a per customer basis.

Hosting providers are increasingly turning to Cloudflare’s Serverless Workers Platform to deliver high performance to their end customers by fixing performance issues at the edge while avoiding modifying code on an individual site basis.

One innovative WordPress hosting provider that Cloudflare has been working with to do this is Bluehost, a recommended web host by WordPress.org. In collaboration with Bluehost, Cloudflare’s Workers have been able to achieve a 40% performance improvement for those sites running Workers. Bluehost started with Cloudflare Workers code for Fast Google Fonts which in-lines the browser-specific font CSS and re-hosts the font files through the page origin. This removes the multiple calls to load the CSS and the font file from Google and improves WordPress site response time.  Bluehost then went further and added additional performance enhancements that rehosted commonly run third party scripts and caches dynamic HTML on the edge in conjunction with Bluehost’s own plugin infrastructure.

Bluehost will offer Cloudflare Workers in early 2020. Once implemented, customers will see faster response times, which could result in more website visitors sticking with the site while it renders. Additional benefits could include improved ad dollars from a higher number of impressions and ecommerce revenue from more shoppers.

“We were so impressed to see a 40% performance improvement for websites leveraging Workers, and can’t wait to offer this to our customers in 2020. Our team is excited to partner with Cloudflare and continue to innovate with Workers for added benefits for our customers,” said Suhaib Zaheer, General Manager for Bluehost.

Stay tuned for more performance improvements with Cloudflare Workers!

AWS Online Tech Talks – May and Early June 2018

Post Syndicated from Devin Watson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-may-and-early-june-2018/

AWS Online Tech Talks – May and Early June 2018  

Join us this month to learn about some of the exciting new services and solution best practices at AWS. We also have our first re:Invent 2018 webinar series, “How to re:Invent”. Sign up now to learn more, we look forward to seeing you.

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks featured this month:

Analytics & Big Data

May 21, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Integrating Amazon Elasticsearch with your DevOps Tooling – Learn how you can easily integrate Amazon Elasticsearch Service into your DevOps tooling and gain valuable insight from your log data.

May 23, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTData Warehousing and Data Lake Analytics, Together – Learn how to query data across your data warehouse and data lake without moving data.

May 24, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTData Transformation Patterns in AWS – Discover how to perform common data transformations on the AWS Data Lake.

Compute

May 29, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT – Creating and Managing a WordPress Website with Amazon Lightsail – Learn about Amazon Lightsail and how you can create, run and manage your WordPress websites with Amazon’s simple compute platform.

May 30, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTAccelerating Life Sciences with HPC on AWS – Learn how you can accelerate your Life Sciences research workloads by harnessing the power of high performance computing on AWS.

Containers

May 24, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT – Building Microservices with the 12 Factor App Pattern on AWS – Learn best practices for building containerized microservices on AWS, and how traditional software design patterns evolve in the context of containers.

Databases

May 21, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTHow to Migrate from Cassandra to Amazon DynamoDB – Get the benefits, best practices and guides on how to migrate your Cassandra databases to Amazon DynamoDB.

May 23, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT5 Hacks for Optimizing MySQL in the Cloud – Learn how to optimize your MySQL databases for high availability, performance, and disaster resilience using RDS.

DevOps

May 23, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT.NET Serverless Development on AWS – Learn how to build a modern serverless application in .NET Core 2.0.

Enterprise & Hybrid

May 22, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTHybrid Cloud Customer Use Cases on AWS – Learn how customers are leveraging AWS hybrid cloud capabilities to easily extend their datacenter capacity, deliver new services and applications, and ensure business continuity and disaster recovery.

IoT

May 31, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTUsing AWS IoT for Industrial Applications – Discover how you can quickly onboard your fleet of connected devices, keep them secure, and build predictive analytics with AWS IoT.

Machine Learning

May 22, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUsing Apache Spark with Amazon SageMaker – Discover how to use Apache Spark with Amazon SageMaker for training jobs and application integration.

May 24, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntroducing AWS DeepLens – Learn how AWS DeepLens provides a new way for developers to learn machine learning by pairing the physical device with a broad set of tutorials, examples, source code, and integration with familiar AWS services.

Management Tools

May 21, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTGaining Better Observability of Your VMs with Amazon CloudWatch – Learn how CloudWatch Agent makes it easy for customers like Rackspace to monitor their VMs.

Mobile

May 29, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT – Deep Dive on Amazon Pinpoint Segmentation and Endpoint Management – See how segmentation and endpoint management with Amazon Pinpoint can help you target the right audience.

Networking

May 31, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTMaking Private Connectivity the New Norm via AWS PrivateLink – See how PrivateLink enables service owners to offer private endpoints to customers outside their company.

Security, Identity, & Compliance

May 30, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT – Introducing AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority (CA) – Learn how AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) Private Certificate Authority (CA), a managed private CA service, helps you easily and securely manage the lifecycle of your private certificates.

June 1, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntroducing AWS Firewall Manager – Centrally configure and manage AWS WAF rules across your accounts and applications.

Serverless

May 22, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTBuilding API-Driven Microservices with Amazon API Gateway – Learn how to build a secure, scalable API for your application in our tech talk about API-driven microservices.

Storage

May 30, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTAccelerate Productivity by Computing at the Edge – Learn how AWS Snowball Edge support for compute instances helps accelerate data transfers, execute custom applications, and reduce overall storage costs.

June 1, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLearn to Build a Cloud-Scale Website Powered by Amazon EFS – Technical deep dive where you’ll learn tips and tricks for integrating WordPress, Drupal and Magento with Amazon EFS.

 

 

 

 

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/753687/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (libdatetime-timezone-perl, libmad, lucene-solr, tzdata, and wordpress), Fedora (drupal7, scummvm, scummvm-tools, and zsh), Mageia (boost, ghostscript, gsoap, java-1.8.0-openjdk, links, and php), openSUSE (pam_kwallet), and Slackware (python).

WordPress: Best Practices on AWS

Post Syndicated from Paul Lewis original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/wordpress-best-practices-on-aws/

As most of you already know, WordPress is a popular open-source blogging platform and content management system (CMS) based on PHP and MySQL. AWS customers deploy everything from simple blogs to high-traffic, complex websites.

We have recently updated the “WordPress: Best Practices on AWS” whitepaper to incorporate new AWS services and the latest best practices and thinking. In the updated whitepaper we cover creating a simple deployment with a single server, which is a great starting point for those new to WordPress, or those looking for a cost-efficient solution for development and test environments.

We also look at to separate out the various components of a typical WordPress website in order to improve performance, resiliency, and cost efficiency, culminating in a highly available, multi-server, scalable architecture like the one illustrated below.

The elastic deployment outlined in the whitepaper is very closely related to the reference architecture for deploying WordPress on AWS, which is available on GitHub.

About the Author

Paul is a Solutions Architect in the New Economies and Startup practice in the UK. He’s been tinkering with WordPress websites for almost 10 years, and has a special interest in container technologies.

Wanted: Senior Systems Administrator

Post Syndicated from Yev original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/wanted-senior-systems-administrator/

Wanted: Senior Systems Administrator

We’re looking for someone who enjoys solving difficult problems, running down elusive tech gremlins, and improving our environment one server at a time. If you enjoy being stretched, learning new skills, and want to look forward to seeing your co-workers every day, then we want you!

Backblaze is a small (in headcount) cloud storage (and backup!) company with a big mission, bringing feature-rich and accessible services to the masses, even if they don’t have unlimited VC funding (because we don’t either)! We believe in a fun and positive work environment where people can learn and grow, and where a sense of community is not just a buzzword from a company handbook (though you might probably find it in there).

What You’ll Be Doing

  • Mastering your craft, becoming a subject matter expert, and acting as an escalation point for areas of expertise (this means responding to pages in your areas of ownership as well)
  • Leading projects across a range of IT operations disciplines
  • Developing a thorough understanding of the environment and the skills necessary to troubleshoot all systems and services
  • Collaborating closely with other teams (Engineering, Infrastructure, etc.) to build out new systems and improve existing ones
  • Participating in on-call rotation when necessary
  • Petting the office dogs when appropriate

What You Should Have

  • 5+ years of work as a Systems Administrator (or equivalent college degree)
  • Expert knowledge of Linux systems administration (Debian preferred)
  • Ability to work under pressure in a fast-paced startup environment
  • A passion for build and improving all manner of systems and services
  • Excellent problem solving, investigative, and troubleshooting skills
  • Strong interpersonal communication skills
  • Local enough to commute to San Mateo office

Highly Desirable Skills

  • Experience working at a technology/software startup
  • Configuration management and automation software (Ansible preferred)
  • Familiarity with server and storage system hardware and configurations
  • Understanding of Java servlet containers (Tomcat preferred)
  • Skill in administration of different software suites and cloud-based integrations (G Suite, PagerDuty, etc.)
  • Comprehension of standard web services and packages (WordPress, Apache, etc.)

Some Backblaze Perks

  • Generous healthcare plans
  • Competitive compensation and 401k
  • All employees receive Option grants
  • Unlimited vacation days
  • Strong coffee
  • Fully stocked Micro kitchens
  • Weekly catered breakfast and lunches
  • Awesome people who work on awesome projects
  • Childcare bonus (human children only)
  • Get to bring your (well behaved) pets into the office
  • Backblaze is an Equal Opportunity Employer and we offer competitive salary and benefits, including our no policy vacation policy

If this sounds like you — follow these steps:

  1. Send an email to jobscontact@backblaze.com with the position in the subject line.
  2. Include your resume.
  3. Tell us a bit about your experience and why you’re excited to work with Backblaze.

The post Wanted: Senior Systems Administrator appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Give Your WordPress Blog a Voice With Our New Amazon Polly Plugin

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/give-your-wordpress-blog-a-voice-with-our-new-amazon-polly-plugin/

I first told you about Polly in late 2016 in my post Amazon Polly – Text to Speech in 47 Voices and 24 Languages. After that AWS re:Invent launch, we added support for Korean, five new voices, and made Polly available in all Regions in the aws partition. We also added whispering, speech marks, a timbre effect, and dynamic range compression.

New WordPress Plugin
Today we are launching a WordPress plugin that uses Polly to create high-quality audio versions of your blog posts. You can access the audio from within the post or in podcast form using a feature that we call Amazon Pollycast! Both options make your content more accessible and can help you to reach a wider audience. This plugin was a joint effort between the AWS team our friends at AWS Advanced Technology Partner WP Engine.

As you will see, the plugin is easy to install and configure. You can use it with installations of WordPress that you run on your own infrastructure or on AWS. Either way, you have access to all of Polly’s voices along with a wide variety of configuration options. The generated audio (an MP3 file for each post) can be stored alongside your WordPress content, or in Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), with optional support for content distribution via Amazon CloudFront.

Installing the Plugin
I did not have an existing WordPress-powered blog, so I begin by launching a Lightsail instance using the WordPress 4.8.1 blueprint:

Then I follow these directions to access my login credentials:

Credentials in hand, I log in to the WordPress Dashboard:

The plugin makes calls to AWS, and needs to have credentials in order to do so. I hop over to the IAM Console and created a new policy. The policy allows the plugin to access a carefully selected set of S3 and Polly functions (find the full policy in the README):

Then I create an IAM user (wp-polly-user). I enter the name and indicate that it will be used for Programmatic Access:

Then I attach the policy that I just created, and click on Review:

I review my settings (not shown) and then click on Create User. Then I copy the two values (Access Key ID and Secret Access Key) into a secure location. Possession of these keys allows the bearer to make calls to AWS so I take care not to leave them lying around.

Now I am ready to install the plugin! I go back to the WordPress Dashboard and click on Add New in the Plugins menu:

Then I click on Upload Plugin and locate the ZIP file that I downloaded from the WordPress Plugins site. After I find it I click on Install Now to proceed:

WordPress uploads and installs the plugin. Now I click on Activate Plugin to move ahead:

With the plugin installed, I click on Settings to set it up:

I enter my keys and click on Save Changes:

The General settings let me control the sample rate, voice, player position, the default setting for new posts, and the autoplay option. I can leave all of the settings as-is to get started:

The Cloud Storage settings let me store audio in S3 and to use CloudFront to distribute the audio:

The Amazon Pollycast settings give me control over the iTunes parameters that are included in the generated RSS feed:

Finally, the Bulk Update button lets me regenerate all of the audio files after I change any of the other settings:

With the plugin installed and configured, I can create a new post. As you can see, the plugin can be enabled and customized for each post:

I can see how much it will cost to convert to audio with a click:

When I click on Publish, the plugin breaks the text into multiple blocks on sentence boundaries, calls the Polly SynthesizeSpeech API for each block, and accumulates the resulting audio in a single MP3 file. The published blog post references the file using the <audio> tag. Here’s the post:

I can’t seem to use an <audio> tag in this post, but you can download and play the MP3 file yourself if you’d like.

The Pollycast feature generates an RSS file with links to an MP3 file for each post:

Pricing
The plugin will make calls to Amazon Polly each time the post is saved or updated. Pricing is based on the number of characters in the speech requests, as described on the Polly Pricing page. Also, the AWS Free Tier lets you process up to 5 million characters per month at no charge, for a period of one year that starts when you make your first call to Polly.

Going Further
The plugin is available on GitHub in source code form and we are looking forward to your pull requests! Here are a couple of ideas to get you started:

Voice Per Author – Allow selection of a distinct Polly voice for each author.

Quoted Text – For blogs that make frequent use of embedded quotes, use a distinct voice for the quotes.

Translation – Use Amazon Translate to translate the texts into another language, and then use Polly to generate audio in that language.

Other Blogging Engines – Build a similar plugin for your favorite blogging engine.

SSML Support – Figure out an interesting way to use Polly’s SSML tags to add additional character to the audio.

Let me know what you come up with!

Jeff;

 

Migrating Your Amazon ECS Containers to AWS Fargate

Post Syndicated from Tiffany Jernigan original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/migrating-your-amazon-ecs-containers-to-aws-fargate/

AWS Fargate is a new technology that works with Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) to run containers without having to manage servers or clusters. What does this mean? With Fargate, you no longer need to provision or manage a single virtual machine; you can just create tasks and run them directly!

Fargate uses the same API actions as ECS, so you can use the ECS console, the AWS CLI, or the ECS CLI. I recommend running through the first-run experience for Fargate even if you’re familiar with ECS. It creates all of the one-time setup requirements, such as the necessary IAM roles. If you’re using a CLI, make sure to upgrade to the latest version

In this blog, you will see how to migrate ECS containers from running on Amazon EC2 to Fargate.

Getting started

Note: Anything with code blocks is a change in the task definition file. Screen captures are from the console. Additionally, Fargate is currently available in the us-east-1 (N. Virginia) region.

Launch type

When you create tasks (grouping of containers) and clusters (grouping of tasks), you now have two launch type options: EC2 and Fargate. The default launch type, EC2, is ECS as you knew it before the announcement of Fargate. You need to specify Fargate as the launch type when running a Fargate task.

Even though Fargate abstracts away virtual machines, tasks still must be launched into a cluster. With Fargate, clusters are a logical infrastructure and permissions boundary that allow you to isolate and manage groups of tasks. ECS also supports heterogeneous clusters that are made up of tasks running on both EC2 and Fargate launch types.

The optional, new requiresCompatibilities parameter with FARGATE in the field ensures that your task definition only passes validation if you include Fargate-compatible parameters. Tasks can be flagged as compatible with EC2, Fargate, or both.

"requiresCompatibilities": [
    "FARGATE"
]

Networking

"networkMode": "awsvpc"

In November, we announced the addition of task networking with the network mode awsvpc. By default, ECS uses the bridge network mode. Fargate requires using the awsvpc network mode.

In bridge mode, all of your tasks running on the same instance share the instance’s elastic network interface, which is a virtual network interface, IP address, and security groups.

The awsvpc mode provides this networking support to your tasks natively. You now get the same VPC networking and security controls at the task level that were previously only available with EC2 instances. Each task gets its own elastic networking interface and IP address so that multiple applications or copies of a single application can run on the same port number without any conflicts.

The awsvpc mode also provides a separation of responsibility for tasks. You can get complete control of task placement within your own VPCs, subnets, and the security policies associated with them, even though the underlying infrastructure is managed by Fargate. Also, you can assign different security groups to each task, which gives you more fine-grained security. You can give an application only the permissions it needs.

"portMappings": [
    {
        "containerPort": "3000"
    }
 ]

What else has to change? First, you only specify a containerPort value, not a hostPort value, as there is no host to manage. Your container port is the port that you access on your elastic network interface IP address. Therefore, your container ports in a single task definition file need to be unique.

"environment": [
    {
        "name": "WORDPRESS_DB_HOST",
        "value": "127.0.0.1:3306"
    }
 ]

Additionally, links are not allowed as they are a property of the “bridge” network mode (and are now a legacy feature of Docker). Instead, containers share a network namespace and communicate with each other over the localhost interface. They can be referenced using the following:

localhost/127.0.0.1:<some_port_number>

CPU and memory

"memory": "1024",
 "cpu": "256"

"memory": "1gb",
 "cpu": ".25vcpu"

When launching a task with the EC2 launch type, task performance is influenced by the instance types that you select for your cluster combined with your task definition. If you pick larger instances, your applications make use of the extra resources if there is no contention.

In Fargate, you needed a way to get additional resource information so we created task-level resources. Task-level resources define the maximum amount of memory and cpu that your task can consume.

  • memory can be defined in MB with just the number, or in GB, for example, “1024” or “1gb”.
  • cpu can be defined as the number or in vCPUs, for example, “256” or “.25vcpu”.
    • vCPUs are virtual CPUs. You can look at the memory and vCPUs for instance types to get an idea of what you may have used before.

The memory and CPU options available with Fargate are:

CPUMemory
256 (.25 vCPU)0.5GB, 1GB, 2GB
512 (.5 vCPU)1GB, 2GB, 3GB, 4GB
1024 (1 vCPU)2GB, 3GB, 4GB, 5GB, 6GB, 7GB, 8GB
2048 (2 vCPU)Between 4GB and 16GB in 1GB increments
4096 (4 vCPU)Between 8GB and 30GB in 1GB increments

IAM roles

Because Fargate uses awsvpc mode, you need an Amazon ECS service-linked IAM role named AWSServiceRoleForECS. It provides Fargate with the needed permissions, such as the permission to attach an elastic network interface to your task. After you create your service-linked IAM role, you can delete the remaining roles in your services.

"executionRoleArn": "arn:aws:iam::<your_account_id>:role/ecsTaskExecutionRole"

With the EC2 launch type, an instance role gives the agent the ability to pull, publish, talk to ECS, and so on. With Fargate, the task execution IAM role is only needed if you’re pulling from Amazon ECR or publishing data to Amazon CloudWatch Logs.

The Fargate first-run experience tutorial in the console automatically creates these roles for you.

Volumes

Fargate currently supports non-persistent, empty data volumes for containers. When you define your container, you no longer use the host field and only specify a name.

Load balancers

For awsvpc mode, and therefore for Fargate, use the IP target type instead of the instance target type. You define this in the Amazon EC2 service when creating a load balancer.

If you’re using a Classic Load Balancer, change it to an Application Load Balancer or a Network Load Balancer.

Tip: If you are using an Application Load Balancer, make sure that your tasks are launched in the same VPC and Availability Zones as your load balancer.

Let’s migrate a task definition!

Here is an example NGINX task definition. This type of task definition is what you’re used to if you created one before Fargate was announced. It’s what you would run now with the EC2 launch type.

{
    "containerDefinitions": [
        {
            "name": "nginx",
            "image": "nginx",
            "memory": "512",
            "cpu": "100",
            "essential": true,
            "portMappings": [
                {
                    "hostPort": "80",
                    "containerPort": "80",
                    "protocol": "tcp"
                }
            ],
            "logConfiguration": {
                "logDriver": "awslogs",
                "options": {
                    "awslogs-group": "/ecs/",
                    "awslogs-region": "us-east-1",
                    "awslogs-stream-prefix": "ecs"
                }
            }
        }
    ],
    "family": "nginx-ec2"
}

OK, so now what do you need to do to change it to run with the Fargate launch type?

  • Add FARGATE for requiredCompatibilities (not required, but a good safety check for your task definition).
  • Use awsvpc as the network mode.
  • Just specify the containerPort (the hostPortvalue is the same).
  • Add a task executionRoleARN value to allow logging to CloudWatch.
  • Provide cpu and memory limits for the task.
{
    "requiresCompatibilities": [
        "FARGATE"
    ],
    "containerDefinitions": [
        {
            "name": "nginx",
            "image": "nginx",
            "memory": "512",
            "cpu": "100",
            "essential": true,
            "portMappings": [
                {
                    "containerPort": "80",
                    "protocol": "tcp"
                }
            ],
            "logConfiguration": {
                "logDriver": "awslogs",
                "options": {
                    "awslogs-group": "/ecs/",
                    "awslogs-region": "us-east-1",
                    "awslogs-stream-prefix": "ecs"
                }
            }
        }
    ],
    "networkMode": "awsvpc",
    "executionRoleArn": "arn:aws:iam::<your_account_id>:role/ecsTaskExecutionRole",
    "family": "nginx-fargate",
    "memory": "512",
    "cpu": "256"
}

Are there more examples?

Yep! Head to the AWS Samples GitHub repo. We have several sample task definitions you can try for both the EC2 and Fargate launch types. Contributions are very welcome too :).

 

tiffany jernigan
@tiffanyfayj

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/744619/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (bind9, wordpress, and xbmc), Fedora (awstats, docker, gifsicle, irssi, microcode_ctl, mupdf, nasm, osc, osc-source_validator, and php), Gentoo (newsbeuter, poppler, and rsync), Mageia (gifsicle), Red Hat (linux-firmware and microcode_ctl), Scientific Linux (linux-firmware and microcode_ctl), SUSE (kernel and openssl), and Ubuntu (bind9, eglibc, glibc, and transmission).

Scale Your Web Application — One Step at a Time

Post Syndicated from Saurabh Shrivastava original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/scale-your-web-application-one-step-at-a-time/

I often encounter people experiencing frustration as they attempt to scale their e-commerce or WordPress site—particularly around the cost and complexity related to scaling. When I talk to customers about their scaling plans, they often mention phrases such as horizontal scaling and microservices, but usually people aren’t sure about how to dive in and effectively scale their sites.

Now let’s talk about different scaling options. For instance if your current workload is in a traditional data center, you can leverage the cloud for your on-premises solution. This way you can scale to achieve greater efficiency with less cost. It’s not necessary to set up a whole powerhouse to light a few bulbs. If your workload is already in the cloud, you can use one of the available out-of-the-box options.

Designing your API in microservices and adding horizontal scaling might seem like the best choice, unless your web application is already running in an on-premises environment and you’ll need to quickly scale it because of unexpected large spikes in web traffic.

So how to handle this situation? Take things one step at a time when scaling and you may find horizontal scaling isn’t the right choice, after all.

For example, assume you have a tech news website where you did an early-look review of an upcoming—and highly-anticipated—smartphone launch, which went viral. The review, a blog post on your website, includes both video and pictures. Comments are enabled for the post and readers can also rate it. For example, if your website is hosted on a traditional Linux with a LAMP stack, you may find yourself with immediate scaling problems.

Let’s get more details on the current scenario and dig out more:

  • Where are images and videos stored?
  • How many read/write requests are received per second? Per minute?
  • What is the level of security required?
  • Are these synchronous or asynchronous requests?

We’ll also want to consider the following if your website has a transactional load like e-commerce or banking:

How is the website handling sessions?

  • Do you have any compliance requests—like the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS compliance) —if your website is using its own payment gateway?
  • How are you recording customer behavior data and fulfilling your analytics needs?
  • What are your loading balancing considerations (scaling, caching, session maintenance, etc.)?

So, if we take this one step at a time:

Step 1: Ease server load. We need to quickly handle spikes in traffic, generated by activity on the blog post, so let’s reduce server load by moving image and video to some third -party content delivery network (CDN). AWS provides Amazon CloudFront as a CDN solution, which is highly scalable with built-in security to verify origin access identity and handle any DDoS attacks. CloudFront can direct traffic to your on-premises or cloud-hosted server with its 113 Points of Presence (102 Edge Locations and 11 Regional Edge Caches) in 56 cities across 24 countries, which provides efficient caching.
Step 2: Reduce read load by adding more read replicas. MySQL provides a nice mirror replication for databases. Oracle has its own Oracle plug for replication and AWS RDS provide up to five read replicas, which can span across the region and even the Amazon database Amazon Aurora can have 15 read replicas with Amazon Aurora autoscaling support. If a workload is highly variable, you should consider Amazon Aurora Serverless database  to achieve high efficiency and reduced cost. While most mirror technologies do asynchronous replication, AWS RDS can provide synchronous multi-AZ replication, which is good for disaster recovery but not for scalability. Asynchronous replication to mirror instance means replication data can sometimes be stale if network bandwidth is low, so you need to plan and design your application accordingly.

I recommend that you always use a read replica for any reporting needs and try to move non-critical GET services to read replica and reduce the load on the master database. In this case, loading comments associated with a blog can be fetched from a read replica—as it can handle some delay—in case there is any issue with asynchronous reflection.

Step 3: Reduce write requests. This can be achieved by introducing queue to process the asynchronous message. Amazon Simple Queue Service (Amazon SQS) is a highly-scalable queue, which can handle any kind of work-message load. You can process data, like rating and review; or calculate Deal Quality Score (DQS) using batch processing via an SQS queue. If your workload is in AWS, I recommend using a job-observer pattern by setting up Auto Scaling to automatically increase or decrease the number of batch servers, using the number of SQS messages, with Amazon CloudWatch, as the trigger.  For on-premises workloads, you can use SQS SDK to create an Amazon SQS queue that holds messages until they’re processed by your stack. Or you can use Amazon SNS  to fan out your message processing in parallel for different purposes like adding a watermark in an image, generating a thumbnail, etc.

Step 4: Introduce a more robust caching engine. You can use Amazon Elastic Cache for Memcached or Redis to reduce write requests. Memcached and Redis have different use cases so if you can afford to lose and recover your cache from your database, use Memcached. If you are looking for more robust data persistence and complex data structure, use Redis. In AWS, these are managed services, which means AWS takes care of the workload for you and you can also deploy them in your on-premises instances or use a hybrid approach.

Step 5: Scale your server. If there are still issues, it’s time to scale your server.  For the greatest cost-effectiveness and unlimited scalability, I suggest always using horizontal scaling. However, use cases like database vertical scaling may be a better choice until you are good with sharding; or use Amazon Aurora Serverless for variable workloads. It will be wise to use Auto Scaling to manage your workload effectively for horizontal scaling. Also, to achieve that, you need to persist the session. Amazon DynamoDB can handle session persistence across instances.

If your server is on premises, consider creating a multisite architecture, which will help you achieve quick scalability as required and provide a good disaster recovery solution.  You can pick and choose individual services like Amazon Route 53, AWS CloudFormation, Amazon SQS, Amazon SNS, Amazon RDS, etc. depending on your needs.

Your multisite architecture will look like the following diagram:

In this architecture, you can run your regular workload on premises, and use your AWS workload as required for scalability and disaster recovery. Using Route 53, you can direct a precise percentage of users to an AWS workload.

If you decide to move all of your workloads to AWS, the recommended multi-AZ architecture would look like the following:

In this architecture, you are using a multi-AZ distributed workload for high availability. You can have a multi-region setup and use Route53 to distribute your workload between AWS Regions. CloudFront helps you to scale and distribute static content via an S3 bucket and DynamoDB, maintaining your application state so that Auto Scaling can apply horizontal scaling without loss of session data. At the database layer, RDS with multi-AZ standby provides high availability and read replica helps achieve scalability.

This is a high-level strategy to help you think through the scalability of your workload by using AWS even if your workload in on premises and not in the cloud…yet.

I highly recommend creating a hybrid, multisite model by placing your on-premises environment replica in the public cloud like AWS Cloud, and using Amazon Route53 DNS Service and Elastic Load Balancing to route traffic between on-premises and cloud environments. AWS now supports load balancing between AWS and on-premises environments to help you scale your cloud environment quickly, whenever required, and reduce it further by applying Amazon auto-scaling and placing a threshold on your on-premises traffic using Route 53.

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/741257/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (chromium-browser, evince, pdns-recursor, and simplesamlphp), Fedora (ceph, dhcp, erlang, exim, fedora-arm-installer, firefox, libvirt, openssh, pdns-recursor, rubygem-yard, thunderbird, wordpress, and xen), Red Hat (rh-mysql57-mysql), SUSE (kernel), and Ubuntu (openssl).

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/739318/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (firefox, flashplugin, lib32-flashplugin, and mediawiki), CentOS (kernel and php), Debian (firefox-esr, jackson-databind, and mediawiki), Fedora (apr, apr-util, chromium, compat-openssl10, firefox, ghostscript, hostapd, icu, ImageMagick, jackson-databind, krb5, lame, liblouis, nagios, nodejs, perl-Catalyst-Plugin-Static-Simple, php, php-PHPMailer, poppler, poppler-data, rubygem-ox, systemd, webkitgtk4, wget, wordpress, and xen), Mageia (flash-player-plugin, icu, jackson-databind, php, and roundcubemail), Oracle (kernel and php), Red Hat (openstack-aodh), SUSE (wget and xen), and Ubuntu (apport and webkit2gtk).

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/738890/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (graphicsmagick, imagemagick, mupdf, postgresql-common, ruby2.3, and wordpress), Fedora (tomcat), Gentoo (cacti, chromium, eGroupWare, hostapd, imagemagick, libXfont2, lxc, mariadb, vde, wget, and xorg-server), Mageia (flash-player-plugin and libjpeg), openSUSE (ansible, ImageMagick, java-1_8_0-openjdk, krb5, redis, shadow, virtualbox, and webkit2gtk3), Red Hat (rh-eclipse46-jackson-databind and rh-eclipse47-jackson-databind), SUSE (java-1_8_0-openjdk, mysql, openssl, and storm, storm-kit), and Ubuntu (perl).

B2 Cloud Storage Roundup

Post Syndicated from Andy Klein original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/b2-cloud-storage-roundup/

B2 Integrations
Over the past several months, B2 Cloud Storage has continued to grow like we planted magic beans. During that time we have added a B2 Java SDK, and certified integrations with GoodSync, Arq, Panic, UpdraftPlus, Morro Data, QNAP, Archiware, Restic, and more. In addition, B2 customers like Panna Cooking, Sermon Audio, and Fellowship Church are happy they chose B2 as their cloud storage provider. If any of that sounds interesting, read on.

The B2 Java SDK

While the Backblaze B2 API is well documented and straight-forward to implement, we were asked by a few of our Integration Partners if we had an SDK they could use. So we developed one as an open-course project on GitHub, where we hope interested parties will not only use our Java SDK, but make it better for everyone else.

There are different reasons one might use the Java SDK, but a couple of areas where the SDK can simplify the coding process are:

Expiring Authorization — B2 requires an application key for a given account be reissued once a day when using the API. If the application key expires while you are in the middle of transferring files or some other B2 activity (bucket list, etc.), the SDK can be used to detect and then update the application key on the fly. Your B2 related activities will continue without incident and without having to capture and code your own exception case.

Error Handling — There are different types of error codes B2 will return, from expired application keys to detecting malformed requests to command time-outs. The SDK can dramatically simplify the coding needed to capture and account for the various things that can happen.

While Backblaze has created the Java SDK, developers in the GitHub community have also created other SDKs for B2, for example, for PHP (https://github.com/cwhite92/b2-sdk-php,) and Go (https://github.com/kurin/blazer.) Let us know in the comments about other SDKs you’d like to see or perhaps start your own GitHub project. We will publish any updates in our next B2 roundup.

What You Can Do with Affordable and Available Cloud Storage

You’re probably aware that B2 is up to 75% less expensive than other similar cloud storage services like Amazon S3 and Microsoft Azure. Businesses and organizations are finding that projects that previously weren’t economically feasible with other Cloud Storage services are now not only possible, but a reality with B2. Here are a few recent examples:

SermonAudio logoSermonAudio wanted their media files to be readily available, but didn’t want to build and manage their own internal storage farm. Until B2, cloud storage was just too expensive to use. Now they use B2 to store their audio and video files, and also as the primary source of downloads and streaming requests from their subscribers.
Fellowship Church logoFellowship Church wanted to escape from the ever increasing amount of time they were spending saving their data to their LTO-based system. Using B2 saved countless hours of personnel time versus LTO, fit easily into their video processing workflow, and provided instant access at any time to their media library.
Panna logoPanna Cooking replaced their closet full of archive hard drives with a cost-efficient hybrid-storage solution combining 45Drives and Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage. Archived media files that used to take hours to locate are now readily available regardless of whether they reside in local storage or in the B2 Cloud.

B2 Integrations

Leading companies in backup, archive, and sync continue to add B2 Cloud Storage as a storage destination for their customers. These companies realize that by offering B2 as an option, they can dramatically lower the total cost of ownership for their customers — and that’s always a good thing.

If your favorite application is not integrated to B2, you can do something about it. One integration partner told us they received over 200 customer requests for a B2 integration. The partner got the message and the integration is currently in beta test.

Below are some of the partner integrations completed in the past few months. You can check the B2 Partner Integrations page for a complete list.

Archiware — Both P5 Archive and P5 Backup can now store data in the B2 Cloud making your offsite media files readily available while keeping your off-site storage costs predictable and affordable.

Arq — Combine Arq and B2 for amazingly affordable backup of external drives, network drives, NAS devices, Windows PCs, Windows Servers, and Macs to the cloud.

GoodSync — Automatically synchronize and back up all your photos, music, email, and other important files between all your desktops, laptops, servers, external drives, and sync, or back up to B2 Cloud Storage for off-site storage.

QNAP — QNAP Hybrid Backup Sync consolidates backup, restoration, and synchronization functions into a single QTS application to easily transfer your data to local, remote, and cloud storage.

Morro Data — Their CloudNAS solution stores files in the cloud, caches them locally as needed, and syncs files globally among other CloudNAS systems in an organization.

Restic – Restic is a fast, secure, multi-platform command line backup program. Files are uploaded to a B2 bucket as de-duplicated, encrypted chunks. Each backup is a snapshot of only the data that has changed, making restores of a specific date or time easy.

Transmit 5 by Panic — Transmit 5, the gold standard for macOS file transfer apps, now supports B2. Upload, download, and manage files on tons of servers with an easy, familiar, and powerful UI.

UpdraftPlus — WordPress developers and admins can now use the UpdraftPlus Premium WordPress plugin to affordably back up their data to the B2 Cloud.

Getting Started with B2 Cloud Storage

If you’re using B2 today, thank you. If you’d like to try B2, but don’t know where to start, here’s a guide to getting started with the B2 Web Interface — no programming or scripting is required. You get 10 gigabytes of free storage and 1 gigabyte a day in free downloads. Give it a try.

The post B2 Cloud Storage Roundup appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

WPSeku – Black-Box Remote WordPress Security Scanner

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2017/11/wpseku-black-box-remote-wordpress-security-scanner/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

WPSeku – Black-Box Remote WordPress Security Scanner

WPSeku is a black box WordPress Security scanner that can be used to scan remote WordPress installations to find security issues and vulnerabilities.

Features of WPSeku WordPress Security Scanner

WPSeku supports various types of scanning including:

  • Testing for XSS Vulnerabilities
  • Testing for SQL Injection Vulnerabilities
  • Testing for LFI Vulnerabilities
  • Bruteforce login via xmlrpc
  • Username Enumeration
  • Proxy Support
  • Method (GET/POST)
  • Custom Wordlists
  • Custom user-agent

It also uses the WPVulnDB Vulnerability Database API at https://wpvulndb.com/api.

Read the rest of WPSeku – Black-Box Remote WordPress Security Scanner now! Only available at Darknet.

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/738264/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (curl, lib32-curl, lib32-libcurl-compat, lib32-libcurl-gnutls, libcurl-compat, libcurl-gnutls, libmupdf, mupdf, mupdf-gl, mupdf-tools, and zathura-pdf-mupdf), CentOS (liblouis), Debian (graphicsmagick, imagemagick, irssi, openssl, openssl1.0, redis, and wordpress), Mageia (lucene, poppler, and x11-server), SUSE (libwpd and webkit2gtk3), and Ubuntu (liblouis).