All posts by Alex Bate

Watching VinylVideo with a Raspberry Pi A+

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/vinylvideo-with-raspberry-pi/

Play back video and sound on your television using your turntable and the VinylVideo converter, as demonstrated by YouTuber TechMoan.

VinylVideo – Playing video from a 45rpm record

With a VinylVideo convertor you can play video from a vinyl record played on a standard record player. Curiosity, tech-demo or art?

A brief history of VinylVideo

When demand for vinyl dipped in the early nineties, Austrian artist Gebhard Sengmüller introduced the world to his latest creation: VinylVideo. With VinylVideo you can play audio and visuals from an LP vinyl record using a standard turntable and a converter box plugged into a television set.

Gebhard Sengmüller original VinylVideo

While the project saw some interest throughout the nineties and early noughties, in the end only 20 conversion sets were ever produced.

However, when fellow YouTuber Randy Riddle (great name) got in touch with UK-based tech enthusiast TechMoan to tell him about a VinylVideo revival device becoming available, TechMoan had no choice but to invest.

Where the Pi comes in

After getting the VinylVideo converter box to work with an old Sony CRT unit, TechMoan decided to take apart the box to better understand how it works

You’ll notice a familiar logo at the top right there. Yes, it’s using a Raspberry Pi, a model A+ to be precise, to do the video decoding and output. It makes sense in a low-volume operation — use something that’s ready-made rather than getting a custom-made board done that you probably have to buy in batches of a thousand from China.

There’s very little else inside the sturdy steel casing, but what TechMoan’s investigation shows is that the Pi is connected to a custom-made phono preamp via USB and runs software written specifically for the VinylVideo conversion and playback.

Using Raspberry Pi for VinylVideo playback

For more information on the original project, visit the extremely dated VinylVideo website. And for more on the new product, you can visit the revival converter’s website.

Be sure to subscribe to TechMoan’s YouTube channel for more videos, and see how you can support him on Patreon.

And a huge thank you to David Ferguson for the heads-up! You can watch David talk about his own Raspberry Pi project, PiBakery, on our YouTube channel.

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How to mod your Etch A Sketch, or Toy Story in real life

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/mod-etch-a-sketch-toy-story/

We’d like to file this under ‘things we wish we’d had when we were younger’. Who else is envious of the kids of today and all the cool things they can make with our old classic toys?

Etch A Sketch Robot – Elephant

Read about how this works on my blog! http://sunnybala.com/2018/09/10/python-etch-a-sketch.html

To a wave of upvotes and comments, Sunny Balasubramanian shared their Etch A Sketch project on Reddit, including all the information and code you need to build your own. Thanks, Sunny!

Dismantling the toys of our childhoods

The physical set up of the automated Etch A Sketch is pretty simple: motors attached to couplers replace the original plastic nobs, and a connected Raspberry Pi 3 controls the motors as directed by the code.

Etch a Sketch modded with a Raspberry Pi

For stability, Sunny attached a wooden block to the plastic housing that keeps the motors in place.

Coding new life into an Etch A Sketch

Sunny explains:

There’s a few different ways to go about this portion of the project. When I started out, I googled to see if anyone had done things like this before. A few projects popped up. They seemed to approach the drawing in one of two ways. I wanted to do it in a fully automated way where the only input is a picture and the output is a cleanly drawn image.

The code Sunny ended up using first takes an image and simplifies it into a line drawing using Canny edge detection. It then turns each pixel to a node and draws a path between the nodes, connecting them one by one. So that the Etch A Sketch draws the picture, the Raspberry Pi then directs the motors to follow the connections and create uncannily precise sketches.

Raspberry Pi Etch-a-sketch
Raspberry Pi Etch-a-sketch

Head to Sunny’s website for more information about their project, and download the full code from GitHub.

Two down, more to go…

With this automated Etch A Sketch, and this talking Fisher Price Chatter Telephone, the Raspberry Pi community is well on the way to recreating the entire Toy Story cast, and we are fully on board with that!

A GIF of Toy Story characters

So what’s next? A remote-controlled Slinky? A falling with style flying Buzz Lightyear? What would you build?

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You wouldn’t download a car…

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/you-wouldnt-download-car-telsa-hack/

You wouldn’t download a car…but is that just because none of us know how to? And OF COURSE none of us know how to: it’s a really hard thing to do!

Raspberry Pi Tesla

Dramatic reenactment using a Mini because, c’mon, as if I can afford a Tesla!

Nikola Tesla was in love with a pigeon 😍🐦

True story. He was also the true father of the electrical age (sorry, not sorry, Edison) and looked so much like David Bowie that here’s David Bowie playing Nikola Tesla:

David Bowie as Nicola Tesla — Raspberry Pi Tesla

Not even pigeon love

Which is the perfect segue, as here’s a Tesla playing David Bowie, and here’s also where our story truly begins…

Some people dislike Tesla (the car manufacturer, not the scientist) but we love them

But some people also dislike going to the dentist, so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. (I also love going to the dentist.)

I’m pretty sure the reason some people have issues with Tesla is that electric cars still seem like a form of magic we’re not quite comfortable with.

Whatever people’s reason for holding a grudge against Tesla, recent findings at a university in Belgium this week have left the tech community aflutter: the academics announced that, with the aid of a “$35 computer”, they can clone your Tesla car key and steal. Your. Car.

If you haven’t guessed yet, we’re the ones behind the $35 computer. (Hi!)

Says WIRED: A team of researchers at the KU Leuven University in Belgium on Monday plan to present a paper at the Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems conference in Amsterdam, revealing a technique for defeating the encryption used in the wireless key fobs of Tesla’s Model S luxury sedans. With about $600 in radio and computing equipment, they can wirelessly read signals from a nearby Tesla owner’s fob. Less than two seconds of computation yields the fob’s cryptographic key, allowing them to steal the associated car without a trace.

When I said that the tech community was all aflutter, what I meant was, on the whole, we find this hack somewhat entertaining but aren’t all that shocked by it. Not because we hate Tesla, but because these things happen. Technology is ever evolving, and that $600 worth of kit can do a thing to another thing isn’t all that unbelievable.

Sweet Cyber Jones on Twitter

The keys to my new Tesla https://t.co/jNViEZBxrB

The academics showed an example of the hack using “just” a couple of radios, a Raspberry Pi, some batteries, and your basic, off-the-shelf “pre-computed table of keys on a portable hard drive”. And through the magic of electric car IoT technology, Tesla instantly released a series of fixes to allow existing Tesla users to protect their cars against the attack, which is all kinds of cool.

Alex, why are you making such light of this?!

Because The Fast and the Furious isn’t real. And I highly doubt there’s a criminal enterprise out there that’s capable of building the same technology as well-funded university researchers.

Yes, this study from KU Leuven University is interesting. And yes, we all had a good laugh at the expense of Tesla and Elon Musk, but we don’t need academics to provide material for that. And I genuinely love Tesla and the work Elon is doing. True love.

Instead, we should be seeing this as a reminder that data encryption and online security are things we all need to take seriously in this digital world. So stop connecting your phone to whatever free WiFi network you can find, stop using PASSWORD123 for all your online accounts, and spend a little more time learning how you can better protect yourself and your family from nasty people on the internet.

And leave Britney Tesla alone!

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The European Astro Pi Challenge is back for 2018/2019

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/european-astro-pi-challenge-launch-2018-2019/

Ever wanted to run your own experiment in space? Then you’re in luck! ESA Education, in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, is pleased to announce the launch of the 2018/2019 European Astro Pi Challenge!

Astro Pi returns for a new 2018/19 challenge!

Ever wanted to run your own experiment in space? Then you’re in luck! ESA Education, in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, is pleased to announce the launch of the 2018/2019 European Astro Pi Challenge!

In this challenge, we offer students and young people the amazing opportunity to conduct scientific investigations in space by writing computer programs that run on Astro Pis — special Raspberry Pi computers aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst and CSA astronaut David Saint-Jacques are the Challenge’s ambassadors. They will accompany our Astro Pi’s on the ISS and oversee your programs while these run and collect scientific data.

Two missions are part of the Astro Pi Challenge: Mission Zero and Mission Space Lab.

Mission Space Lab opens today!

If you are 19 or younger and live in an ESA Member or Associate Member State*, we invite you to form a team with at least one friend of yours and apply to the Astro Pi Challenge’s Mission Space Lab by sending us your experiment idea by the end of October. We can’t wait to see your ideas!

Astro Pi Mission Space Lab logo

Mission Space Lab gives you the chance to have your scientific experiment run on the ISS. Your challenge is to design and code an experiment using the environmental sensors and cameras of the Astro Pi computers, called Ed and Izzy, aboard the ISS.

You can choose between two themes for your experiment: Life in space and Life on Earth. If you pick the ‘Life on Earth’ theme, you’ll use the Astro Pi computer Izzy, fitted with a near-infrared camera facing out of an ISS window, to study the Earth. For ‘Life in space’, you’ll use the Astro Pi computer Ed, which is equipped with a camera for light sensing, and investigate life inside the Columbus module of the ISS. The best experiments will be deployed on the ISS, and you’ll have the opportunity to analyse your experimental data to write a report with your results. The ten teams who send us the best reports will become the Astro Pi Mission Space Lab 2018/2019 winners!

There are four phases to Mission Space Lab:

  • Phase 1 – Design (until end of October 2018)
    • Come up with an idea for your experiment
  • Phase 2 – Create (November 2018 to March 2019)
    • Code your program and test your experiment on Earth
  • Phase 3 – Deploy (April 2019)
    • Your program is deployed on the ISS
  • Phase 4 – Analyse (May 2019)
    • Use the data from your experiment to write your report

In the first phase, Design, you just need an idea for an experiment. You won’t need to do any coding yet, but you should think about how you might write the program for your experiment to make sure your goal is achievable. Have a look at our Astro Pi Mission Space Lab guidelines for everything you need to know to take part the challenge. Your deadline to register and submit your idea via the Astro Pi website is 29 October 2018.

We will select teams and notify them of their acceptance to Phase 2 of Mission Space Lab by mid-November 2018.

Mission Zero — open soon

Mission Zero, the simpler level of the Astro Pi Challenge, also offers you the chance to have something you’ve coded run on the ISS, in the form of a simple program that displays a message to the astronauts on-board. For this mission, you don’t need special equipment and you can be a complete beginner at coding; if your entry follows a few simple rules, it’s guaranteed to run in space!

Astro Pi Mission Zero logo

If you are 14 or younger and live in an ESA Member or Associate Member State*, we would like you to take part in Mission Zero. You can submit your program from 29 October 2018 onward. For more details, head to the Mission Zero page.

Find out more about the Astro Pi Challenge

What is Astro Pi?!

Announcing the 2018-19 European Astro Pi challenge in partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA). It’s open to students from all 22 ESA member countries, including associate members Canada and Slovenia. In Mission Zero, students aged up to 14 write a simple Python program that will display a message on the International Space Station for 30 seconds.

*ESA Member States in 2018:

Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom.

ESA Associate States in 2018: Canada, Slovenia

In the framework of the current collaboration agreement between ESA and the Republic of Malta, teams from Malta can also participate in the European Astro Pi Challenge. ESA will also accept entries from primary or secondary schools located outside an ESA Member or Associate State only if such schools are officially authorised and/or certified by the official Education authorities of an ESA Member or Associate State (for instance, French school outside Europe officially recognised by the French Ministry of Education or delegated authority).

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Cabin Cloud: bump-free travel on the night bus

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/cabin-cloud-bump-free-travel-night-bus/

Planes, trains, and automobiles — we all have our preference. And at one company in California, the team is trying to smooth bus travel to broaden commuters’ options for a blissful night’s sleep.

Cabin bus Raspberry Pi Wired

Leaving on a jet plane

Not everyone wants to fly. While many enjoy the feel of take-off and landing and the high speed at which they can travel from A to B, others see planes as worrisome tin cans of doom, suspended in the air by unreliable magic. I consider myself mostly the former, with a hint of the latter for balance.

In truth, I’d rather catch a train, where the smooth ride sends me into blissful sleep, only occasionally interrupted by a snap of “Damn, did I miss my stop?!”.

But trains are limited to where their tracks lead, which is why so many people still opt to travel by bus. But who can sleep on a bus when the roads are dotted with potholes and cracks? I can’t, and neither can many of the 10000 passengers of the Cabin bus, an overnight service running between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Cabin bus travel

To address complaints about the road conditions affecting costumers’ sleep, the Cabin team decided to challenge gravity using a Raspberry Pi and the electric motor from a hoverboard in their new venture Cabin Cloud.

Introducing the first active suspension system designed specifically with passenger sleep in mind. Combining patent-pending software and hardware, our technology mutes ‘road turbulence’ and dramatically reduces vibration, so you can get a good night’s sleep while on a moving vehicle.

“We can isolate a passenger’s body, and input frequencies that help people relax and fall asleep,” explains Cabin CTO Tom Currier. “We have a set of sensors that are measuring the acceleration of the vehicle, and also the bed, to compute in real time what we should be cancelling out.”

Cabin bus Raspberry Pi Wired

The sensors are accelerometers, two per bed, that measure the bumps from the road and adjust the bed accordingly — up to 1000 times a second. The Cabin Cloud beds only adjust for motion up and down: the team isn’t too concerned about back-and-forth movements due to breaking too hard or turning corners, since Cabin busses predominantly travel on wide, open highways.

Delve a little deeper

Check out this article from Wired for more about the project, and about how similar tech is implemented in trucks for long-haul drivers, and in aeroplanes for turbulence-free travel. You can also sign up for the Cabin Cloud newsletter here.

But the big question about Cabin Cloud is…

Does it have Bluetooth?

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Guess the weight, win a thing!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-office-rubber-band-ball/

Today marks the four-year anniversary of Nicola Early joining the Raspberry Pi team. Nicola works as Administrator at Pi Towers and is responsible for so many things that I dare not try to list them all. But among all her tasks, the most important one is the care and maintenance of the office rubber band ball.

Pi Towers Raspberry Pi Rubber Band Ball

The rubber band ball chronicles

Every working day for the last four years, whenever the postman delivers the packs of letters, Nicola has had at least one new rubber band to collect. And so over time, the ball has grown and grown and grown.

Nicola is very protective of the ball, so if you come to her desk in search for a rubber band, you’ll have to withstand her glare as she reluctantly removes one from her expanding collection.

Pi Towers Raspberry Pi Rubber Band Ball

If we are to consider that, in the UK, there are about 261 working days in a year, and Nicola has been working at Pi Towers for four years, it’s fair to estimate the ball consists of at least 1044 bands.

So our question for you is this:

How much does the ball weigh?

Submit your guess in the comments below*, or in the tweet, Facebook post, or Instagram post for this blog, and the closest guess will win a Raspberry Pi T-shirt and, if we can manage it without her noticing, a band from the very ball in question.

Pi Towers Raspberry Pi Rubber Band Ball

To take part, you need to submit your guess in grams by midnight next Monday 17 September. Multiple guesses on the same platform from the same account will be ignored — so behave.

*Members of the Raspberry Pi team may not take part, as there are scales on Nicola’s desk, and I don’t trust any of you.

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Build a Raspberry Pi pocket projector…how awesome is that?!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-raspberry-pi-pocket-projector/

YouTuber MickMake has been working hard on producing a Raspberry Pi pocket projector with the Raspberry Pi Zero W. We’re excited. We know you’re excited. So enough of us talking, here’s Mick with more!

#210 Build a Pi Zero W pocket projector! // Project

2 for 10 PCBs (48 hour quick turn around): https://jlcpcb.com/?ref=mickmake Make a pocket projector based on the DLP2000EVM and Raspberry Pi Zero W! Nice!

Sharing is caring

YouTuber Novaspirit Tech released a new video yesterday, reviewing MickMake’s Raspberry Pi Zero W pocket projector, and the longer the video ran on, the more we found ourselves wanting our own!

Thank you, Novaspirit Tech, for reminding us to subscribe to MickMake. And thank you, MickMake, for this awesome project!

The Pi Zero W pocket projector of your dreams

In his project video, Mick goes into great detail about the tech required for the project, along with information on the PCB he’s created to make it simpler and easier for other makers to build their own version.

raspberry pi pocket pi projector mickmakes

The overall build consists of the $10 Raspberry Pi Zero W, a DLP2000 board, and MickMake’s homemade $4 PCB, which allows you to press-fit the projector together into a very tidy unit with the same footprint as a Raspberry Pi 3B+ — perfectly pocket-sized.

Specs and things

While the projected images obviously aren’t as clear as those of high-end projectors, MickMake’s projector is definitely good enough to replace a cheap desktop display, or to help you show off your projects on the go at events such as Raspberry JamsCoolest Projects, and Maker Faire. And due to its low power consumption, the entire unit can run off the kind of rechargeable battery pack you may already be carrying around for your mobile phone. Nice!

In his review video, NovaSpirit Tech goes through more of the projector’s playback and spec details, and also does a series of clarity tests in various lights. So why read about it when you can watch it? Here you go:

Pi Projector by MickMake | The Raspberry Pi Zero Pocket Projector

this is a small footprint low power consumption raspberry pi zero powered projector using DLP2000 by mickmake ○○○ LINKS ○○○ MickMake PiProjector Video ► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFciR-U7yhc MickMake Channel ► https://youtube.com/mickmake DLP2000 digikey ► https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/texas-instruments/DLPDLCR2000EVM/296-47119-ND/7598640 raspberry pi zero ► https://amzn.to/2Q8h1Hz ○○○ SHOP ○○○ Novaspirit Shop ► https://goo.gl/gptPNf Amazon Store ► http://amzn.to/2AYs3dI ○○○ SUPPORT ○○○ patreon ► https://goo.gl/xpgbzB ○○○ SOCIAL ○○○ novaspirit tv ► https://goo.gl/uokXYr twitter ► https://twitter.com/novaspirittech discord chat ► https://discord.gg/v8dAnFV FB Group Novaspirit ► https://www.facebook.com/groups/novas…

Custom PCBs

We see more and more makers designing their own custom PCBs to make everyone’s life that little bit easier.

Raspberry Pi pocket pi projector mickmakes

If you’ve created a custom PCB for your Raspberry Pi project, feel free to use the comments section as free advertising space for one day only! You’re welcome.

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Hang out with Raspberry Pi this month in California, New York, and Boston

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-california-new-york-boston/

This month sees two wonderful events where you can meet the Raspberry Pi team, both taking place on the weekend of September 22 and 23 in the USA.

And for more impromptu fun, you can also hang out with our Social Media Editor and fellow Pi enthusiasts on the East Coast on September 24–28.

Coolest Projects North America

In the Discovery Cube Orange County in Santa Ana, California, team members of the Raspberry Pi Foundation North America, CoderDojo, and Code Club will be celebrating the next generation of young makers at Coolest Projects North America.

Coolest Projects is a world-leading showcase that empowers and inspires the next generation of digital creators, innovators, changemakers, and entrepreneurs. This year, for the first time, we are bringing Coolest Projects to North America for a spectacular event!

While project submissions for the event are now closed, you can still get the last FREE tickets to attend this showcase on Sunday, September 23.

To get your free tickets, click here. And for more information on the event, visit the Coolest Projects North America homepage.

World Maker Faire New York

For those on the east side of the continent at World Maker Faire New York, we’ll have representation in the form of Alex, our Social Media Editor.

The East Coast’s largest celebration of invention, creativity, and curiosity showcases the very best of the global Maker Movement. Get immersed in hundreds of projects and multiple stages focused on making for social good, health, technology, electronics, 3D printing & fabrication, food, robotics, art and more!

Alex will be adorned in Raspberry Pi stickers while exploring the cornucopia of incredible projects on show. She’ll be joined by Raspberry Pi’s videographer Brian, and they’ll gather footage of Raspberry Pis being used across the event for videos like this one from last year’s World Maker Faire:

Raspberry Pi Coffee Robot || Mugsy || Maker Faire NY ’17

Labelled ‘the world’s first hackable, customisable, dead simple, robotic coffee maker’, and powered by a Raspberry Pi, Mugsy allows you to take control of every aspect of the coffee-making process: from grind size and water temperature, to brew and bloom time.

So if you’re planning to attend World Maker Faire, either as a registered exhibitor or an attendee showing off your most recent project, we want to know! Share your project in the comments so we can find you at the event.

A week of New York and Boston meetups

Lastly, since she’ll be in New York, Alex will be out and about after MFNY, meeting up with members of the Raspberry Pi community. If you’d be game for a Raspberry Pi-cnic in Central Park, Coffee and Pi in a cafe, or any other semi-impromptu meetup in the city, let us know the best days for you between Monday, September 24 to Thursday, September 27! Alex will organise some fun gatherings in the Big Apple.

You can also join her in Boston, Massachusetts, on Friday, September 28, where Alex will again be looking to meet up with makers and Pi enthusiasts — let us know if you’re game!

This is weird

Does anyone else think it’s weird that I’ve been referring to myself in the third person throughout this post?

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The Goodbye Machine. NSFW…ish? See what you think

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-goodbye-machine/

Tired of saying goodbye? Show people how you really feel with 8 Bits and a Byte‘s Goodbye Machine.

Spoiler alert: no one wants to be at the receiving end of the red button.

The Goodbye Machine: automate your goodbyes

The Goodbye Machine, a machine to automate goodbyes using a Raspberry Pi, two servo’s, two massive buttons and a speaker. Shoe box not included. All our projects in one place: http://8bitsandabyte.com/ Keep posted on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/8bitsandabyte/ Follow us on Twitter! @NicoleHorward Music: Allen, L. & Kurstin, G. (2009). Fuck You.

Not all amazing projects require line upon line of code, hour upon hour of build time, or sheer masses of components. Sometimes even the simplest of buttons will do, as Carrie Anne explains in issue 1 of Hello World.

Goodbye to you

With their Goodbye Machine, Brussels-based YouTube makers 8 Bits and a Byte found a simple, entertaining solution to their “inability to say goodbye” using two servos, two buttons, a Raspberry Pi 3, and some lollipop sticks. Oh, and British musical royalty, James Blunt and Lily Allen.

Raspberry Pi Goodbye machine

When the positive green button is pressed, a hand appears, waving goodbye to the dulcet tones of James Blunt singing Goodbye My Lover. So darling.

However, press the negative red button and your departing acquaintance will be flipped the bird, as Lily Allen sings F*ck You.

Goodbye machine Raspberry Pi

It’s a very simple network of wires and code. Each button is given a task and when pressed, the task is completed. Anyone can learn this easy set of code, and create incredible projects as a result. And no, not all projects have to be so insulting… but we’re a little sadistic here at Pi Towers, and this sort of humour fits us perfectly.

For more information on building your own Goodbye Machine, visit the hackster.io project page.

Button it!

If you’d like to learn more about using buttons in digital making projects, these free resources from our projects site should get you started:

GPIO music box – wire up buttons to your Raspberry Pi’s GPIO pins and then use them to play sounds with a simple Python application.

Whoopi cushion – make a whoopee cushion powered by a Raspberry Pi.

Push button stop motion – make a stop-motion animation using a Raspberry Pi and a Camera Module to take pictures, controlled by a push-button.

Goodbye, so long, farewell

Since watching the video above for the first time, I’ve been unable to get Goodbye My Lover out of my head. If, like me, you’re suffering from a James Blunt earworm, here are some other goodbye-themed songs to listen to:

Spice Girls – Goodbye

Vote for your favourite girl group here: https://www.udiscovermusic.com/stories/best-girl-groups/ Listen to more from the Spice Girls: http://spicegirls.lnk.to/Essentials Listen to some of the Spice Girls’ biggest hits here: http://playlists.udiscovermusic.com/playlist/spice-girls-best-of Follow the Spice Girls https://twitter.com/OfficialMelB/ https://twitter.com/MelanieCmusic https://twitter.com/EmmaBunton https://twitter.com/victoriabeckham https://twitter.com/gerihalliwell https://www.thespicegirls.com/ Music video by Spice Girls performing Goodbye.

The Beatles – Hello, Goodbye

The Beatles 1 Video Collection is Out Now. Get your copy here: http://thebeatles1.lnk.to/DeluxeBluRay When The Beatles began recording what would become their third single to be released in 1967, its working title was ‘Hello, Hello’. The single sat at No.1 in both the UK and America for the first three weeks of 1968.

Michelle Branch – Goodbye To You (Video)

© 2006 WMG Goodbye To You (Video)

Good Riddance (Time Of Your Life) [Official Music Video]

“Good Riddance” by Green Day from ‘Nimrod,’ available now. Directed by Mark Kohr. Watch the best Green Day official videos here: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5150F38E402FACE8 http://www.greenday.com/ http://www.facebook.com/GreenDay http://twitter.com/greenday http://www.youtube.com/user/greenday (subscribe) http://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/green-day/id954266

Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (Remastered 2014)

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group International Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (Remastered 2014) · Elton John Goodbye Yellow Brick Road ℗ ℗ 2014 This Record Company Ltd.

The Hoosiers – Goodbye Mr A (Official Video)

The Hoosiers – Goodbye Mr A (Official Video) Listen on Spotify – http://smarturl.it/HoosiersBestOf_sp Get on iTunes – http://smarturl.it/Trickto_iTunes Amazon – http://smarturl.it/Trickto_Amazon Follow The Hoosiers Website – https://www.thehoosiers.com/ Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/thehoosiers Twitter – https://twitter.com/thehoosiersuk Instagram – https://instagram.com/thehoosiersuk Spotify – https://open.spotify.com/artist/4LlDtNr8qFwhrT8eL2wzH4 Soundcloud – https://soundcloud.com/thehoosiers Lyrics Goodbye Mr. A There’s a hole in

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off Soundtrack – Danke Schoen – Wayne Newton

No Description

 

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PiPod: the Raspberry Pi Zero portable music player

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/pipod-pi-zero-music-player/

We’ve seen many Raspberry Pi-powered music players over the years. But rarely are they as portable (and snazzy) as the PiPod by Hackaday user Bram.

PiPod Raspberry Pi music player

Portable music

My biggest regret in life? Convinced I wouldn’t need my 160GB iPod Classic anymore thanks to Spotify, I sold it to CEX for a painfully low price. But not only was I mistaken as to how handy it would have been to hold on to, the money I made doesn’t seem to justify parting ways with such an iconic piece of technology no longer available to purchase anew.

Which is why the PiPod project from Netherlands-based Hackaday user ‘Bram’ caught my attention instantly.

The PiPod

I made this music player because I wasn’t satisfied with the current playback methods that are available. The music streaming services available started to feel like radio stations with the same music repeating, they are also depended on an online internet connection while there might be offline functionality it is still limited by the available storage on your phone.

We hear ya, Bram.

With his mind set on creating a music player of their own to overcome the limitations on offer without having to pay hundreds of Euros for high-end portable devices, Bram got to work.

The PiPod, now in its third iteration, offers users a range of functionality and can be made fairly cheaply using Bram’s custom PCB.

PiPod Raspberry Pi music player

For the display, Bram uses a 2.2″ TFT screen connected to a Raspberry Pi Zero. As can be seen above, the screen offers all the information you could ever require of your media player despite the low 320 by 240 resolution.

For music playback, the PCB also includes the PCM5102A a 24-bit I2S DAC that offers a high-quality audio output accessible via a 3.5mm jack. And for power, Bram has done his homework, incorporating a series of components to protect the device from overcurrent, thermal overload and various other power-related concerns.

PiPod Raspberry Pi music player

The music interface itself uses VLC for backend playback and PyGame at the frontend, and all information and code for the project can be found on the Hackaday project page, including the 3D-printable files for the rather snazzy casing and its fantastic dock.

PiPod Raspberry Pi music player

Such snazziness

We’re sure Bram’s PiPod isn’t the only portable music device with a Pi inside. What have we missed? Share yours with us in the comments or on social media so we may bathe in their glory and give them the attention they deserve.

 

The post PiPod: the Raspberry Pi Zero portable music player appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Beautiful and inspiring plinky-plonky conductivity

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/bare-conductive-installation-hwan-yun/

Recently shared by Bare Conductive, Hwan Yun‘s interactive installation, Intuition, uses a Raspberry Pi and Bare Conductive tech to transport you to the calm wonder of Icelandic nature.

Intuition (2017)

Interactive sound installation electric paint on paper Listhús Gallery

Incorporation Bare Conductive

Bare Conductive’s water-based Electric Paint allows users to incorporate safe conductivity into their projects. With the use of a Raspberry Pi 3 and the brand’s Touch Board and Pi Cap, this conductivity can be upgraded to take distance, as well as touch, into consideration.

bare conductive Hwan Yun Raspberry Pi

Intuition

For his installation, Hwan created several patterns on paper using Electric Paint, with six patterns connected to the Touch Board and a further six to the Pi Cap.

This irregularity allows users to experiment, further exploring the sounds of nature that inspired the installation.

bare conductive Hwan Yun Raspberry Pi

The sounds themselves are less actual recordings and more a tribute to the way in which Hwan believes the picturesque beauty of the island communicates within itself.

Getting done with #interactive #soundinstallation for #contemporaryart #exhibition. Using #bareconductive

7 Likes, 1 Comments – HWANYUN (@_hwanyun_) on Instagram: “Getting done with #interactive #soundinstallation for #contemporaryart #exhibition. Using…”

Follow Hwan

If you’d like to see more installations from Hwan Yun, including behind-the-scenes posts from the creation of Intuition, be sure to follow him on Instagram. You can also learn more about his past and future projects on his website.

Bare Conductive

Bare Conductive products are available through many of our Approved Resellers, as well as the Bare Conductive website. As mentioned, their Conductive paint is not only water-based but also non-toxic, making it an ideal addition to any maker cupboard. For more inspiration when using Bare Conductive products, check out their Make page.

Low-tech cardboard robot buggy

And for more Bare Conductive products and Raspberry Pi makery, check out this low-tech Raspberry Pi robot by Clément Didier, previously covered on our blog.

The post Beautiful and inspiring plinky-plonky conductivity appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Helen’s hoglet: an adorable adventure

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/helens-hoglet-an-adorable-adventure/

Today is a bank holiday here in England, as well as for lucky people in Wales and Northern Ireland. Pi Towers UK is running on a skeleton crew of Babbage Bear, several automated Raspberry Pis, and Noel Fielding, who lives behind the red door we never open.

So, as a gift for you all while we’re busy doing bank holiday things, here’s a video that Helen Lynn just recorded of one of the baby hedgehogs who live in her garden.

Helen’s hoglet

Uploaded by Raspberry Pi on 2018-08-24.

You’re welcome. See you tomorrow!

The post Helen’s hoglet: an adorable adventure appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Build a social media follower counter

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-social-media-follower-counter/

In this tutorial from HackSpace magazine issue 9, Paul Freeman-Powell shows you how to keep track of your social media followers, and encourage subscribers, by building a live follower counter. Get your copy of HackSpace magazine in stores now, or download it as a free PDF here.

Issues 10 of HackSpace magazine is available online and in stores from tomorrow!

The finished build with all components connected, working, and installed in the frame ready for hanging on the wall

If you run a local business like an electronics shop or a café, or if you just want to grow your online following and influence, this project is a fun way to help you keep track of your progress. A counter could also help contribute to growing your following if you hang it on the wall and actively ask your customers to like/follow you to see the numbers go up!

You’ve probably seen those social media follower counters that feature mechanical splitflap displays. In this project we’ll build a counter powered by RGB LEDs that scrolls through four social profiles, using APIs to pull the number of followers for each account. I’m using YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram; you can, of course, tailor the project to your needs.

This project involves a bit of electronics, a bit of software coding, and a bit of woodwork, as well as some fairly advanced display work as we transfer a small portion of the Raspberry Pi’s HDMI output onto the LED matrices.

Let’s get social

First, you need to get your Raspberry Pi all set up and talking to the social networks that you’re going to display. Usually, it’s advisable to install Raspbian without any graphical user interface (GUI) for most electronics projects, but in this case you’ll be actively using that GUI, so make sure you start with a fresh and up-to-date installation of full-fat Raspbian.

phpMyAdmin gives you an easy web interface to allow you to access and edit the device’s settings – for example, speed and direction of scrolling, API credentials, and the social network accounts to monitor

You start by turning your humble little Raspberry Pi into your very own mini web server, which will gather your credentials, talk to the social networks, and display the follower counts. To do this, you need to install a LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) stack. Start by installing the Apache web server by opening a Terminal and typing:

sudo apt-get install apache2 -y

Then, open the web browser on your Pi and type http://localhost — you will see a default page telling you that Apache is working. The page on our little ‘website’ will use code written in the PHP language, so install that by returning to your Terminal and typing:

sudo apt-get install php -y

Once that’s complete, restart Apache:

sudo service apache2 restart

Next, you’ll install the database to store your credentials, settings, and the handles of the social accounts to track. This is done with the following command in your Terminal:

sudo apt-get install mysql-server php-mysql -y

To set a root password for your database, type the following command and follow the on-screen instructions:

sudo mysql_secure_installation

Restart Apache again. Then, for easier management of the database, I recommend installing phpMyAdmin:

sudo apt-get install phpMyAdmin -y

At this point, it’s a good idea to connect your Pi to a WiFi network, unless you’re going to be running a network cable to it. Either way, it’s useful to have SSH enabled and to know its IP address so we can access it remotely. Type the following to access Pi settings and enable SSH:

sudo raspi-config

To determine your Pi’s IP address (which will likely be something like 192.168.0.xxx), type either of the following two commands:

ifconfig # this gives you lots of extra info
hostname -I # this gives you less info, but all we need in this case

Now that SSH is enabled and you know the LAN IP address of the Pi, you can use PuTTY to connect to it from another computer for the rest of your work. The keyboard, mouse, and monitor can now be unplugged from the Raspberry Pi.

Social media monitor

To set up the database, type http://XXX/ phpmyadmin (where XXX is your Pi’s IP address) and log in as root with the password you set previously. Head to the User Accounts section and create a new user called socialCounter.

You can now download the first bit of code for this project by running this in your Terminal window:

cd /var/www/html

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install git -y

sudo git clone https://github.com/paulfp/social- media-counter.git

Next, open up the db.php script and edit it to include the password you set when creating the socialCounter user:

cd ./social-media-counter

sudo nano db.php

The database, including tables and settings, is contained in the socialCounter.sql file; this can be imported either via the Terminal or via phpMyAdmin, then open up the credentials table. To retrieve the subscriber count, YouTube requires a Google API key, so go to console.cloud.google.com and create a new Project (call it anything you like). From the left-hand menu, select ‘APIs & Services’, followed by ‘Library’ and search for the YouTube Data API and enable it. Then go to the ‘Credentials’ tab and create an API key that you can then paste into the ‘googleApiKey’ database field.

Facebook requires you to create an app at developers.facebook.com, after which you can paste the details into the facebookAppId and facebookSecret fields. Unfortunately, due to recent scandals surrounding clandestine misuse of personal data on Facebook, you’ll need to submit your app for review and approval before it will work.

The ‘social_accounts’ table is where you enter the user names for the social networks you want to monitor, so replace those with your own and then open a new tab and navigate to http://XXX/socialmedia-counter. You should now see a black page with a tiny carousel showing the social media icons plus follower counts next to each one. The reason it’s so small is because it’s a 64×16 pixel portion of the screen that we’ll be displaying on our 64×16 LED boards.

GPIO pins to LED display

Now that you have your social network follower counts being grabbed and displayed, it’s time to get that to display on our screens. The first step is to wire them up with the DuPont jumper cables from the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO pins to the connection on the first board. This is quite fiddly, but there’s an excellent guide and diagram on GitHub within Henner Zeller’s library that we’ll be using later, so head to hsmag.cc/PLyRcK and refer to wiring.md.

The Raspberry Pi connects to the RGB LED screens with 14 jumper cables, and the screens are daisy-chained together with a ribbon cable

The second screen is daisy-chained to the first one with the ribbon cable, and the power connector that comes with the screens will plug into both panels. Once you’re done, your setup should look just like the picture on this page.

To display the Pi’s HDMI output on the LED screens, install Adafruit’s rpi-fb-matrix library (which in turn uses Henner Zeller’s library to address the panels) by typing the following commands:

sudo apt-get install -y build-essential libconfig++-dev

cd ~

git clone --recursive https://github.com/ adafruit/rpi-fb-matrix.git

cd rpi-fb-matrix

Next, you must define your wiring as regular. Type the following to edit the Makefile:

nano Makefile

Look for the HARDWARE_DESC= property and ensure the line looks like this: export HARDWARE_DESC=regular before saving and exiting nano. You’re now ready to compile the code, so type this and then sit back and watch the output:

make clean all

Once that’s done, there are a few more settings to change in the matrix configuration file, so open that up:

nano matrix.cfg

You need to make several changes in here, depending on your setup:

  • Change display_width to 64 and display_height to 16
  • Set panel_width to 32 and panel_height to 16
  • Set chain_length to 2
  • Set parallel_count to 1

The panel array should look like this:

panels = ( 
  ( { order = 1; rotate = 0; }, { order = 0; rotate = 0; } )
)

Uncomment the crop_origin = (0, 0) line to tell the tool that we don’t want to squish the entire display onto our screens, just an equivalent portion starting right in the top left of the display. Press CTRL+X, then Y, then ENTER to save and exit.

It ain’t pretty…but it’s out of sight. The Raspberry Pi plus the power supply for the screens fit nice and neatly behind the screens. I left each end open to allow airflow

Finally, before you can test the output, there are some other important settings you need to change first, so open up the Raspberry Pi’s boot configuration as follows:

sudo nano /boot/config.txt

First, disable the on-board sound (as it uses hardware that the screens rely on) by looking for the line that says dtparam=audio=on and changing it to off. Also, uncomment the line that says hdmi_force_hotplug=1, to ensure that an HDMI signal is still generated even with no HDMI monitor plugged in. Save and then reboot your Raspberry Pi.

Now run the program using the config you just set:

cd ~/rpi-fb-matrix

sudo ./rpi-fb-matrix matrix.cfg

You should now see the top 64×16 pixels of your Pi’s display represented on your RGB LED panels! This probably consists of the Raspberry Pi icon and the rest of the top portion of the display bar.

No screensaver!

At this point it’s important to ensure that there’s no screensaver or screen blanking enabled on the Pi, as you want this to display all the time. To disable screen blanking, first install the xscreensaver tool:

sudo apt-get install xscreensaver

That will add a screensaver option to the Pi’s GUI menus, allowing you to disable it completely. Finally, you need to tell the Raspberry Pi to do two things each time it loads:

  • Run the rpi-fb-matrix program (like we did manually just now)
  • Open the web browser in fullscreen (‘kiosk’ mode), pointed to the Social Counter web page

To do so, edit the Pi’s autostart configuration file:

sudo nano ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart

Insert the following two lines at the end:

@sudo /home/pi/rpi-fb-matrix/rpi-fb-matrix /home/ pi/rpi-fb-matrix/matrix.cfg\

@chromium-browser --kiosk http://localhost/ social-media-counter

Et voilà!

Disconnect any keyboard, monitor, or mouse from the Pi and reboot it one more time. Once it’s started up again, you should have a fully working display cycling through each enabled social network, showing up-to-date follower counts for each.

It’s now time to make a surround to hold all the components together and allow you to wall-mount your display. The styling you go for is up to you — you could even go all out and design and 3D print a custom package.

The finished product, in pride of place on the wall of our office. Now I just need some more subscribers…!

For my surround, I went for the more rustic and homemade look, and used some spare bits of wood from an internal door frame lining. This worked really well due to the pre-cut recess. With a plywood back, you can screw everything together so that the wood holds the screens tightly enough to not require any extra fitting or gluing, making for easier future maintenance. To improve the look and readability of the display (as well as soften the light and reduce the brightness), you can use a reflective diffuser from an old broken LED TV if you can lay your hands on one from eBay or a TV repair shop, or just any other bit of translucent material. I found that two layers stapled on worked and looked great. Add some hooks to the back and — Bob’s your uncle — a finished, wall-mounted display!

Phew — that was quite an advanced build, but you now have a sophisticated display that can be used for any number of things and should delight your customers whilst helping to build your social following as well. Don’t forget to tweet us a picture of yours!

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Rock, paper, scissors, lizard, Spock, fire, water balloon!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/rock-paper-scissors-lizard-spock-fire-water-balloon/

Use a Raspberry Pi and a Pi Camera Module to build your own machine learning–powered rock paper scissors game!

Rock-Paper-Scissors game using computer vision and machine learning on Raspberry Pi

A Rock-Paper-Scissors game using computer vision and machine learning on the Raspberry Pi. Project GitHub page: https://github.com/DrGFreeman/rps-cv PROJECT ORIGIN: This project results from a challenge my son gave me when I was teaching him the basics of computer programming making a simple text based Rock-Paper-Scissors game in Python.

Virtual rock paper scissors

Here’s why you should always leave comments on our blog: this project from Julien de la Bruère-Terreault instantly had our attention when he shared it on our recent Android Things post.

Julien and his son were building a text-based version of rock paper scissors in Python when his son asked him: “Could you make a rock paper scissors game that uses the camera to detect hand gestures?” Obviously, Julien really had no choice but to accept the challenge.

“The game uses a Raspberry Pi computer and Raspberry Pi Camera Module installed on a 3D-printed support with LED strips to achieve consistent images,” Julien explains in the tutorial for the build. “The pictures taken by the camera are processed and fed to an image classifier that determines whether the gesture corresponds to ‘Rock’, ‘Paper’, or ‘Scissors’ gestures.”

How does it work?

Physically, the build uses a Pi 3 Model B and a Camera Module V2 alongside 3D-printed parts. The parts are all green, since a consistent colour allows easy subtraction of background from the captured images. You can download the files for the setup from Thingiverse.

rock paper scissors raspberry pi

To illustrate how the software works, Julien has created a rather delightful pipeline demonstrating where computer vision and machine learning come in.

rock paper scissors using raspberry pi

The way the software works means the game doesn’t need to be limited to the standard three hand signs. If you wanted to, you could add other signs such as ‘lizard’ and ‘Spock’! Or ‘fire’ and ‘water balloon’. Or any other alterations made to the game in your pop culture favourites.

rock paper scissors lizard spock

Check out Julien’s full tutorial to build your own AI-powered rock paper scissors game here on Julien’s GitHub. Massive kudos to Julien for spending a year learning the skills required to make it happen. And a massive thank you to Julien’s son for inspiring him! This is why it’s great to do coding and digital making with kids — they have the best project ideas!

Sharing is caring

If you’ve built your own project using Raspberry Pi, please share it with us in the comments below, or via social media. As you can tell from today’s blog post, we love to see them and share them with the whole community!

The post Rock, paper, scissors, lizard, Spock, fire, water balloon! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Debian turns 25

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/debian-turns-25/

Want to feel old? Debian, the popular free Unix-like operating system based on the Linux kernel and GNU userland, is turning 25. Composed entirely of free software, Debian is maintained and packaged entirely by volunteers. Announced to the world by Ian Murdock 25 years ago this week, the first internal release, Debian 0.01, took place in September 1993, followed in June 1996 by a first stable version, Debian 1.1 (code name ‘Bo’).

The following two decades have seen eight further major releases, the most recent being Debian 9.0 (code name ‘Stretch’), released in June 2017.

Raspbian

Raspberry Pi owes a considerable debt to the Debian project. Our operating system images are built on top of Raspbian Stretch, which is a community-led rebuild of Debian Stretch, optimised for the specific ARM cores used in our products.

The Raspberry Pi desktop environment

In addition to the core Debian system, we bundle a variety of useful non-Debian software. Some packages, like Simon’s UI mods, and the Chromium web browser, are free as in speech. Others, like Wolfram Mathematica and Minecraft, are free as in beer.

Our most recent release adds more usability features, including a post-install wizard to simplify the setup process for new users.

Download Raspbian today!

If you’ve yet to try Raspbian on your Raspberry Pi, you can download it here. This tutorial from The MagPi demonstrates how to write an image onto a fresh SD card:

Use Etcher to install operating systems onto an SD card

Lucy Hattersley shows you how to install Raspberry Pi operating systems such as Raspbian onto an SD card, using the excellent Etcher. For more tutorials, check out The MagPi at http://magpi.cc ! Don’t want to miss an issue? Subscribe, and get every issue delivered straight to your door.

And those of you who are already using Raspbian, be sure to check you have the most up-to-date version by following this easy video tutorial:

Updating Raspbian on your Raspberry Pi || Raspberry Pi Foundation

How to update to the latest version of Raspbian on your Raspberry Pi. Download Raspbian here: https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspbian/ More informatio…

Don’t have a Raspberry Pi? Don’t worry: we also make a version of our operating system, based on x86 Debian, that will run on your PC or Mac! With an x86-based computer running our Debian Stretch OS, you can also use the PiServer tool to control a fleet of Raspberry Pis without SD cards.

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The Android Things flower that smiles with you

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/android-things-expression-flower/

Smile, and the world smiles with you — or, in this case, a laser-cut flower running Android Things on a Raspberry Pi does.

Android Things flower Raspberry Pi Smile recognition Expression Flower

Expression Flower

The aim of the Expression Flower is to “challenge the perception of what robotics can be while exploring the possibility for a whimsical experience that is engaging, natural, and fun.”

Tl;dr: cute interactive flower. No Skynet.

Android Things

The flower is powered by Google’s IoT platform Android Things, running on a Raspberry Pi, and it has a camera mounted in the centre. It identifies facial expressions using the ML Kit machine learning package, also from Google. The software categorises expressions, and responds with a specific action: smile at the flower, and it will open up its petals with a colourful light show; wink at it, and its petals will close up bashfully.

Android Things flower Raspberry Pi Smile recognition Expression Flower

The build is made of laser-cut and 3D-printed parts, alongside off-the-shelf components. The entire build protocol, including video, parts, and code, is available on hackster.io, so all makers can give Expression Flower a go.

Android Things flower Raspberry Pi Smile recognition Expression Flower

Seriously, this may be the easiest-to-follow tutorial we’ve ever seen. So many videos. So much helpful information. It’s pure perfection!

Machine learning and Android Things

For more Raspberry Pi–based machine learning projects, see:

Adrian Rosebeck deep learning pokemon pokedex
Raspberry Pi Santa/Not Santa detector

And for more Android Things projects, we highly recommend:

Demonstation of Joe Birch's BrailleBox
Android Things Candy Dispenser Raspberry Pi
Lantern Raspberry Pi powered augmented reality projector lamp

Aaaand, for getting started with all things Android on your Raspberry Pi, check out issue 71 of The MagPi!

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Some of the best bicycle projects for #CycleToWorkDay

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/bicycle-projects-cycletoworkday/

Avid followers of our Raspberry Pi Twitter account may be aware of just how bike-loving the residents of Pi Towers are. From the weekend cyclists to Cambridge-London-Cambridge racers, the flat land around our office calls us to jump on a bike and explore the fenlands.

#CycleToWorkDay

In celebration of #CycleToWorkDay, we’ve brought together a collection of some of our favourite bike-themed Raspberry Pi projects, perfect for those of you who enjoy a bike ride — or a pint!

Bicycle-powered beer dispenser

The Glaswegian company Bright Signals was tasked with a tasty project: create something for Menabrea that ties in with the Giro d’Italia cycle race passing close to the beer brewery in Biella, Northern Italy.

Menabrea Beer Bike Raspberry Pi #CycleToWorkDay

The result? This pedal- and Pi-powered beer dispenser that went on a 4-week celebratory tour ending in Glasgow.

You can learn more about this project here.

A rather dandy Pi-assisted Draisine

For a minute in the 1800s, before the introduction of pedal power, the balance bike, or Draisine, was the fun new way of getting from A to B.

Draisine 200.0

Uploaded by ecomentode on 2017-06-08.

A team at Saarland University, Germany, headed by Prof. Holger Hermanns modernised the Draisine, bringing this old vehicle up to date with power assistance thanks to the Raspberry Pi.

Read more about this Draisine here.

Raspberry Pi–powered cycle helmet

Jen Fox’s Raspberry Pi safety helmet prototype uses an accelerometer and a Raspberry Pi Zero to monitor impact force, notifying the cyclist whether or not the impact of their fall deserves medical attention.

Make an Impact Force Monitor!

Check out my latest Hacker in Residence project for SparkFun Electronics: the Helmet Guardian! It’s a Pi Zero powered impact force monitor that turns on an LED if your head/body experiences a potentially dangerous impact. Install in your sports helmets, bicycle, or car to keep track of impact and inform you when it’s time to visit the doctor.

While you should always seek medical attention if you have a bike accident, the notification LED on the helmet is a great way of reminding stubborn cyclists that their accident was more than just a tumble.

Learn more about Jen’s build here!

Matt’s smart bike light

This one comes up in conversation A LOT at Pi Towers. Matt Richardson’s smart bike light project uses a Raspberry Pi and hall effect sensor to determine the speed you’re cycling at; a project displays your speed in front of the bike.

Raspberry Pi Dynamic Bike Headlight Prototype and Test

Here’s the first prototype of the Dynamic Bike Headlight. I managed to get it out onto the street to try it out, too! My previous video about it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzRAcZq0imM View other videos on the vlog: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOPvnSRDf2EuIYj18l7iBdgt-27ZnOAdP&feature=view_all Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=mrichardson23 Visit my site: http://mattrichardson.com/

For those who know Matt Richardson, we hope you appreciated this blast-from-the-past, beardless Matt. In fact, we know you did.

Find out more about this bike light here.

The Bicrophonic Sonic Bike

British sound artist Kaffe Matthews has created a new type of cycling experience. The cyclist divides a virtual map into zones, and the Bicrophonic Sonic Bike plays back music to the rider based on which zone they are in, courtesy of an on-board Raspberry Pi with GPS dongle and speakers.

What is Bicrophonics?

Bicrophonics is about the mobility of sound, experienced and shared within a moving space, free of headphones and free of the internet. Music made by the journey you take, played with the space that you move through. The Bicrophonic Research Institute (BRI) http://sonicbikes.net

As you can see from the video, the sound played can range from the calming peace of the countryside to the rather loud, disturbing buzz of the city.

Learn more about the tech behind the project here.

Hacked Kindle bike computer

David Schneider’s bike computer displays speed, distance, time and more on a Kindle he hacked with the help of a Raspberry Pi.

DIY: Build A Better Bike Computer

A Raspberry Pi and Kindle make vital information about your bicycle journey readable. Read more: http://spectrum.ieee.org/video/geek-life/hands-on/video-build-a-better-bike-computer

The experimental browser on the Kindle displays a web page hosted on the Raspberry Pi. And the glare-free E Ink display makes the screen easy to view regardless of light conditions — perfect for sunny weekend bike rides.

Find out more here.

Any others?

Have you hacked your cycling experience with a Raspberry Pi? Do you have a pedal-powered project in the works? Or would you simple like to boast about your bike and cycling achievements? Let’s get the cycle conversation going in the comments below. I’ll start!

The post Some of the best bicycle projects for #CycleToWorkDay appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Getting started with your Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/getting-started-raspberry-pi/

Here on the Raspberry Pi blog, we often share impressive builds made by community members who have advanced making and coding skills. But what about those of you who are just getting started?

Getting started with Raspberry Pi

For you, we’ve been working hard to update and polish our Getting started resources, including a brand-new video to help you get to grips with your new Pi.

Getting started with Raspberry Pi

Whether you’re new to electronics and the Raspberry Pi, or a seasoned pro looking to share your knowledge and skills with others, sit back and watch us walk you through the basics of setting up our powerful little computer.

How to set up your Raspberry Pi || Getting started with #RaspberryPi

Learn how to set up your Raspberry Pi for the first time, from plugging in peripherals to loading Raspbian.

We’ve tried to make this video as easy to follow as possible, with only the essential explanations and steps.

getting started with raspberry pi

As with everything we produce, we want this video to be accessible to the entire world, so if you can translate its text into another language, please follow this link to submit your translation directly through YouTube. You can also add translations to our other YouTube videos here! As a thank you, we’ll display your username in the video descriptions to acknowledge your contributions.

New setup guides and resources

Alongside our shiny new homepage, we’ve also updated our Help section to reflect our newest tech and demonstrate the easiest way for beginners to start their Raspberry Pi journey. We’re now providing a first-time setup guide, and also a walk-through for using your Raspberry Pi that shows you all sort of things you can do with it. And with guides to our official add-on devices and a troubleshooting section, our updated Help page is your one-stop shop for getting the most out of your Pi.

getting started with raspberry pi

For parents and teachers, we offer guides on introducing Raspberry Pi and digital making to your children and students. And for those of you who are visual learners, we’ve curated a collection of our videos to help you get making.

As with our videos, we’re looking for people whose first language isn’t English to help us translate our resources. If you’re able to donate some of your time to support this cause, please sign up here.

The forums

We’re very proud of our forum community. Since the birth of the Raspberry Pi, our forums have been the place to go for additional support, conversation, and project bragging.

Raspberry Pi forums

If your question isn’t answered on our Help page, there’s no better place to go than the forums. Nine times out of ten, your question will already have been asked and answered there! And if not, then our friendly forum community will be happy to share their wealth of knowledge and help you out.

Events and clubs

Raspberry Pi and digital making enthusiasts come together across the world at various events and clubs, including Raspberry Jams, Code Club and CoderDojo, and Coolest Projects. These events are perfect for learning more about how people use Raspberry Pi and other technologies for digital making — as a hobby and as a tool for education.

getting started with raspberry pi

Keep up to date

To keep track of all the goings-on of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, be sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, and sign up to our Raspberry Pi Weekly newsletter and the monthly Raspberry Pi LEARN education newsletter.

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The affordable Raspberry Pi night vision goggles of your dreams

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-zero-night-vision-goggles/

I just searched online for night vision goggles, and the prices seem to vary between £600 and £27000. That’s a little bit higher than my budget of ‘as cheap as humanly possible’, but lucky for me (and you!), Redditor Mtnbikerdunn has created a set of Raspberry Pi Zero–powered night vision goggles that come in at around $100. Nice. Finally my Silence of the Lambs cosplay is complete!

Silence of the Lambs night vision GIF

Dreamspiration

“They came to be in a dream.” begins Redditor mtnbikerdunn in his r/raspberrry_pi post. “I woke up to my idea whiteboard full of notes and diagrams drawn by a half-asleep version of myself”

night vision goggles raspberry pi zero

A view through the night vision goggles

A Raspberry Pi Zero and…

mtnbikerdunn goes on to explain how the few pieces of tech required to build the goggles came in at less than $100/£78. The results are impressive!

It’s basically a first-person viewdrone headset with a Raspberry Pi Zero mounted within, some infrared LED lights, an infrared camera, and a few 18650 Lithium-ion batteries to power it all. Charges with a standard micro USB cable and doesn’t require anything to get it running except an on/off switch.

The headset in this project is the Yuneec SkyView FPV HDMI, used by drone pilots to gain a first-person view while flying. And since the headset has HDMI connectivity, mtnbikerdunn was able to hook it up directly to the Pi Zero. The camera is a third-party Raspberry Pi fisheye camera, while the rest of the tech consists of the standard gubbins any maker should have lying around, such as a micro SD card, a $5 Raspberry Pi Zero, and a button.

night vision goggles Raspberry Pi Zero

The power pack contains two 18650 Lithium-ion batteries, providing the goggles with roughly three hours of runtime. To make the charge last longer, mtnbikerdunn stripped down Raspbian Stretch Lite, removing any unnecessary programs that could run in the background and eat up juice.

night vision goggles Raspberry Pi Zero

Dream big

All that’s left is for me to sit and hope that mtnbikerdunn has a dream about how to make a working TARDIS using a Pi Zero, and then I’ll be the talk of the town at next year’s London Film and Comic Con!

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There’s Waldo! Finding the elusive traveller using AI

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/theres-waldo-wheres-wally/

Let me start by stating that here in the UK, we call Waldo Wally. And as I’m writing this post at my desk at Pi Towers, Cambridge, I have taken the decision to refer to the red and white-clad fellow as Wally moving forward.

Just so you know.

There’s Waldo is a robot that finds Waldo

There’s Waldo is a robot built to find Waldo and point at him. The robot arm is controlled by a Raspberry Pi using the PYARM Python library for the UARM Metal. Once initialized the arm is instructed to extend and take a photo of the canvas below.

The magical mind of Matt Reed

Both in his work and personal time, Matt Reed is a maker. In a nutshell, he has the job we all want — Creative Technologist — and gets to spend his working hours building interesting marketing projects for companies such as Redbull and Pi Towers favourite, Oreo. And lucky for us, he uses a Raspberry Pi in many of his projects — hurray!

Where’s Waldo Wally

With There’s Waldo, Matt has trained the AutoML Vision app, Google’s new image content analysis AI service, to recognise Wally in a series of images. With an AI model trained to recognise the features of the elusive traveller, a webcam attached to a Raspberry Pi 3B snaps a photo and the AI algorithm scans all faces, finding familiarities.

Matt Reed on Twitter

model is predicting WAAAYYY better than expected as this webcam image here wasn’t even part the training set. You can run from #ai but apparently can’t hide from #GoogleCloud

Once a match for Wally’s face is found with 95% or higher confidence, a robotic arm, controlled by the Pyarm Python library, points a comically small, plastic hand at where it believes Wally to be.

Deep learning and model training

We’ve started to discover more and more deep learning projects using Raspberry Pi — and with the recent release of TensorFlow 1.9 for the Pi, we’re sure this will soon become an even more common occurrence.

Adrian Rosebeck deep learning pokemon pokedex

For more projects using deep learning and the Raspberry Pi, check out Adrian Rosebrock’s deep learning Pokédex, and his Santa Detector.

And for more projects from Matt Reed and the redpepper team, you can follow Matt’s Twitter, visit his website, and check out his community profile in The MagPi.

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