All posts by Alex Bate

The NSFW Roomba that screams when it bumps into stuff

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-nsfw-roomba-that-screams-when-it-bumps-into-stuff/

Hide yo’ kids, hide yo’ wife — today’s project is NSF(some)W, or for your kids. LOTS OF SWEARS. You have been warned. We’re not embedding the video here so you can decide for yourself whether or not to watch it — click on the image below to watch a sweary robot on YouTube.

Sweary Roomba

Michael Reeves is best known for such… educational Raspberry Pi projects as:

He’s back, this time with yet another NSFW (depending on your W) project that triggers the sensors in a Roomba smart vacuum to scream in pain whenever it bumps into an object.

Because why not?

How it’s made

We have no clue. So very done with fans asking for the project to be made — “I hate every single one of you!” — Michael refuses to say how he did it. But we know this much is true: the build uses optical sensors, relays, a radio receiver, and a Raspberry Pi. How do I know this? Because he showed us:

Roomba innards

But as for the rest? We leave it up to you, our plucky community of tinkerers, to figure it out. Share your guesses in the comments.

More Michael Reeves

Michael is one of our Pi Towers guilty pleasures and if, like us, you want to watch more of his antics, you should subscribe to him on YouTube.

The post The NSFW Roomba that screams when it bumps into stuff appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Play musical chairs with Marvel’s Avengers

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/play-musical-chairs-marvels-avengers/

You read that title correctly.

I played musical chairs against the Avengers in AR

Planning on teaching a 12 week class on mixed reality development starting in June. Apply if interested – http://bit.ly/3016EdH

Playing with the Avengers

Abhishek Singh recently shared his latest Unity creation on Reddit. And when Simon, Righteous Keeper of the Swag at Pi Towers, shared it with us on Slack because it uses a Raspberry Pi, we all went a little doolally.

As Abhishek explains in the video, the game uses a Raspberry Pi to control sensors and lights, bridging the gap between augmented reality and the physical world.

“The physical world communicates with the virtual world through these buttons. So, when I sit down on a physical chair, and press down on it, the virtual characters know that this chair is occupied,” he explains, highlighting that the chairs’ sensors are attached to a Raspberry Pi. To save the physical-world player from accidentally sitting on Thanos’s lap, LEDs, also attached to the Pi, turn on when a chair is occupied in the virtual world.

Turning the losing Avenger to dust? Priceless 👌

Why do you recognise Abhishek Singh?

You might be thinking, “Where do I recognise Abhishek Singh from?” I was asking myself this for a solid hour — until I remembered Peeqo, his robot that only communicates through GIF reactions. And Instagif NextStep, his instant camera that prints GIFs!

First GIFs, and now musical chairs with the Avengers? Abhishek, it’s as if you’ve understood the very soul of the folks who work at Pi Towers, and for that, well…

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Raspberry Pi Press: what’s on our newsstand?

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-press-newsstand/

Raspberry Pi Press, the publishing branch of Raspberry Pi Trading, produces a great many magazines and books every month. And in keeping with our mission to make computing and digital making as accessible as possible to everyone across the globe, we make the vast majority of our publications available as free PDFs from the day we release new print versions.

We recently welcomed Custom PC to the Press family and we’ve just published the new-look Custom PC 190. So this is a perfect time to showcase the full catalogue of Raspberry Pi Press publications, to help you get the most out of what we have on offer.

The MagPi magazine

The MagPi was originally created by a group of Raspberry Pi enthusiasts from the Raspberry Pi forum who wanted to make a magazine that the whole community could enjoy. Packed full of Pi-based projects and tutorials, and Pi-themed news and reviews, The MagPi now sits proudly upon the shelves of Raspberry Pi Press as the official Raspberry Pi magazine.

The MagPi magazine issue 81

Visit The MagPi magazine online, and be sure to follow them on Twitter and subscribe to their YouTube channel.

HackSpace magazine

The maker movement is growing and growing as ever more people take to sheds and makerspaces to hone their skills in woodworking, blacksmithing, crafting, and other creative techniques. HackSpace magazine brings together the incredible builds of makers across the world with how-to guides, tips and advice — and some utterly gorgeous photography.

Visit the HackSpace magazine website, and follow their Twitter account and Instagram account.

Wireframe magazine

“Lifting the lid on video games”, Wireframe is a gaming magazine with a difference. Released bi-weekly, Wireframe reveals to readers the inner workings of the video game industry. Have you ever wanted to create your own video game? Wireframe also walks you through how you can do it, in their ‘The Toolbox’ section, which features tutorials from some of the best devs in the business.

Follow Wireframe magazine on Twitter, and learn more on their website.

Hello World magazine

Hello World is our free magazine for educators who teach computing and digital making, and we produce it in association with Computing at Schools and the BCS Academy of Computing. Full of lesson plans and features from teachers in the field, Hello World is a unique resource for everyone looking to bring computing into the classroom, and for anyone interested in computing and digital making education.

Hello World issue 8

Educators in the UK can subscribe to have Hello World delivered for free to their door; if you’re based somewhere else, you can download the magazine for free from the day of publication, or purchase it via the Raspberry Pi Press online store. Follow Hello World on Twitter and visit the website for more.

Custom PC magazine

New to Raspberry Pi Press, Custom PC is the UK’s best-selling magazine for PC hardware, overclocking, gaming, and modding. With monthly in-depth reviews, special features, and step-by-step guides, Custom PC is the go-to resource for turning your computer up to 11.

Visit the shiny new Custom PC website, and be sure to follow them on Twitter.

Books

Magazines aren’t our only jam: Raspberry Pi Press also publishes a wide variety of books, from introductions to topics like the C programming language and Minecraft on your Pi, to our brand-new Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Guide and the Code Club Book of Scratch.

An Introduction to C and GUI programming by Simon Long


We also bridge the gap between our publications with one-off book/magazine hybrids, such as HackSpace magazine’s Book of Making and Wearable Tech Projects, and The MagPi’s Raspberry Pi Projects Book series.



Getting your copies

If you’d like to support our educational mission at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, you can subscribe to our magazines, and you can purchase copies of all our publications via the Raspberry Pi Press website, from many high street newsagents, or from the Raspberry Pi Store in Cambridge. And most of our publications are available as free PDFs so you can get your hands on our magazines and books instantly.

Whichever of our publications you choose to read, and however you choose to read them, we’d love to hear what you think of our Raspberry Pi Press offerings, and we hope you enjoy them all.

The post Raspberry Pi Press: what’s on our newsstand? appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Video call with a Raspberry Pi and Google Duo

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/video-call-with-a-raspberry-pi-and-google-duo/

Use Google Duo and a Raspberry Pi to build a video doorbell for your home so you can always be there to answer your door, even when you’re not actually there to answer your door.

“Martin Mander builds a good build,” I reply to Liz Upton as she shares this project, Martin’s latest one, with me on Slack. We’re pretty familiar with his work here at Raspberry Pi! Previously, we’ve shared his Google AIY retrofit intercom, upcycled 1970s TV with built-in Raspberry Pi TV HAT, and Batinator. We love the extra step that Martin always takes to ensure the final result of each project is clean-cut and gorgeous-looking, with not even a hint of hot glue in sight.

Raspberry Pi video doorbell

“I’ve always fancied making a video doorbell using a Raspberry Pi,” explains Martin in the introduction to his project on Hackster.io. “[B]ut until recently I couldn’t find an easy way to make video calls that would both work in a project and be straightforward for others to recreate.”

By ‘recently’, he means February of this year, when Google released their Duo video chat application for web browsers.

With a Raspberry Pi 3B+ and a webcam in hand, Martin tested the new release, and lo and behold, he was able to video-call his wife with relative ease via Chromium, Raspbian‘s default browser.

“The webcam I tested had a built-in microphone, and even on the first thrown-together test call, the quality was great. This was a very exciting moment, unlocking the potential of the video doorbell project as well as many other possibilities.”

By accident, Martin also discovered that you can run Google Duo out of the browser, even on the Raspberry Pi. This allowed him to strip away all the unnecessary “Chromium furniture”.

But, if this was to be a video doorbell, how was he to tell the Raspberry Pi to call his mobile phone when the doorbell was activated?

“If Duo were a full app, then command line options might be available, for example to launch the app and immediately call a specific contact. In the absence of this (for now?) I needed to find a way to automatically start a call with a GPIO button press.”

To accomplish this, Martin decided to use PyUserInput, a community-built cross-platform module for Python. “The idea was to set up a script to wait for a button press, then move the mouse to the Contacts textbox, type the name of the contact, press Enter and click Video Call“, Martin explains. And after some trial and error — and calls to the wrong person — his project was a working success.

To complete the build, Martin fitted the doorbell components into a 1980s intercom (see his previous intercom build), wired them through to a base unit inside the home, and then housed it all within an old Sony cassette player.

The final result? A functional video doorbell that is both gorgeous and practical. You can find out more about the project on the Hackster.io project page.

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Possibilities of the Raspberry Pi — from Code Club to Coolest Projects USA

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/possibilities-of-the-raspberry-pi-from-code-club-to-coolest-projects-usa/

Yolanda Payne is a veteran teacher and Raspberry Pi Certified Educator. After discovering a love for computers at an early age (through RadioShack Tandy), Yolanda pursued degrees in Instructional/Educational Technology at Mississippi State University, the University of Florida, and the University of Georgia. She has worked as an instructional designer, webmaster, and teacher, and she loves integrating technology into her lessons. Here’s Yolanda’s story:

My journey to becoming a Raspberry Pi Certified Educator started when an esteemed mentor, Juan Valentin, tweeted about the awesome experience he had while attending Picademy. Having never heard of Picademy or the Raspberry Pi, I decided to check out the website and instantly became intrigued. I applied for a Raspberry Pi STEM kit from the Civil Air Patrol and received a Raspberry Pi and a ton of accessories. My curiosity would not be satisfied until I learned just what I could do with the box of goodies. So I decided to apply to Picademy and was offered a spot after being waitlisted. Thus my obsession with the possibilities of the Raspberry Pi began.

Code Club allows me to provide a variety of lessons, tailored to my students’ interests and skill levels, without me having to be an expert

While at Picademy, I learned about Code Club. Code Club allows me to provide a variety of lessons tailored to my learners’ interests and skill levels, without me having to be an expert in all of the lessons. My students are 6th- to 8th-graders, and there are novice coders as well as intermediate and advanced coders in the group. We work through lessons together, and I get to be a student with them.

I have found a myriad of resources to support their dreams of making

Although I may not have all the answers to their questions, I’m willing to work to secure whatever supplies they need for their project making. Whether through DonorsChoose, grants, student fundraising, or my personal contributions, I have found a myriad of resources to support their dreams of making.

Raspberry Pi group photo!

My district has invested in a one-to-one computer initiative for students, and I am happy to help students become creators of technology and not just consumers. Having worked with Code Club through the Raspberry Pi Foundation, my students and I realize just how achievable this dream can be. I’m able to enhance my Pi skills by teaching a summer hacking camp at our local university, and next year, we have goals to host a Pi Jam! Thankfully, my principal is very supportive of our endeavours.

Students at Coolest Projects USA 2018

This year, a few of my students and my son were able to participate in Coolest Projects USA 2018 to show off their projects, including a home surveillance camera, a RetroPie arcade game, a Smart Mirror, and a photo booth and dash cam. They dedicated a lot of time and effort to bring these projects to life, often on their own and beyond the hours of our Code Club. This adventure has inspired them, and they are already recruiting other students to join them next year! The possibilities of the Raspberry Pi constantly rejuvenates my curiosity and enhances the creativity that I get to bring to my teaching — both inside and outside the classroom.

Learn more

Learn more about the free programmes and resources Yolanda has used on her computer science education journey, such as Picademy, Code Club, and Coolest Projects, by visiting the Education section of our website.

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Raspberry Pi captures a Soyuz in space!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-captures-soyuz-in-space/

So this happened. And we are buzzing!

You’re most likely aware of the Astro Pi Challenge. In case you’re not, it’s a wonderfully exciting programme organised by the European Space Agency (ESA) and us at Raspberry Pi. Astro Pi challenges European young people to write scientific experiments in code, and the best experiments run aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on two Astro Pi units: Raspberry Pi 1 B+ and Sense HATs encased in flight-grade aluminium spacesuits.

It’s very cool. So, so cool. As adults, we’re all extremely jealous that we’re unable to take part. We all love space and, to be honest, we all want to be astronauts. Astronauts are the coolest.

So imagine our excitement at Pi Towers when ESA shared this photo on Friday:

This is a Soyuz vehicle on its way to dock with the International Space Station. And while Soyuz vehicles ferry between earth and the ISS all the time, what’s so special about this occasion is that this very photo was captured using a Raspberry Pi 1 B+ and a Raspberry Pi Camera Module, together known as Izzy, one of the Astro Pi units!

So if anyone ever asks you whether the Raspberry Pi Camera Module is any good, just show them this photo. We don’t think you’ll need to provide any further evidence after that.

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Make a retro console with RetroPie and a Raspberry Pi — part 2

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/retro-console-with-retropie-raspberry-pi-2/

Here’s part two of Lucy Hattersley’s wonderful retro games console tutorial. Part 1 of the tutorial lives here, for those of you who missed it.

Choose the network locale

RetroPie boots into EmulationStation, which is your starter interface. It’s currently displaying just the one option, RetroPie, which is used to set up the emulation options. As you add games to RetroPie, other systems will appear in EmulationStation.

With RetroPie selected, press the A button on the gamepad to open the configuration window. Use the D-pad to move down the options and select WiFi. You will see a warning message: ‘You don’t currently have your WiFi country set…’. Press the D-pad left to choose Yes, and press A. The interface will open raspi-config. At this point, it’s handy to switch to the keyboard and use that instead.

Choose 4 Localisation Options, and press the right arrow key on the keyboard to highlight Select, then press Enter.

Now choose 4 Change Wi-fi Country and pick your country from the list. We used GB Britain (UK). Highlight OK and press Enter to select it.

Now move right twice to choose Finish and press Enter. This will reboot the system.

Connect to wireless LAN

If you have a Raspberry Pi with an Ethernet connection, you can use an Ethernet cable to connect directly to your router/modem or network.

More likely, you’ll connect the Raspberry Pi to a wireless LAN network so you can access it when it’s beneath your television.

Head back into RetroPie from EmulationStation and down to the WiFi setting; choose Connect to WiFi network.

The window will display a list of nearby wireless LAN networks. Choose your network and use the keyboard to enter the wireless LAN password. Press Enter when you’re done. Choose the Exit option to return to the RetroPie interface.

Configuration tools

Now choose RetroPie Setup and then Configuration Tools. Here, in the Choose an option window, you’ll find a range of useful tools. As we’re using a USB gamepad, we don’t need the Bluetooth settings, but it’s worth noting they’re here.

We want to turn on Samba so we can share files from our computer directly to RetroPie. Choose Samba and Install RetroPie Samba shares, then select OK.

Now choose Cancel to back up to the Choose an option window, and then Back to return to the RetroPie-Setup script.

Run the setup script

Choose Update RetroPie-Setup script and press Enter. After the script has updated, press Enter again and you’ll be back at the Notice: window. Press Enter and choose Basic install; press Enter, choose Yes, and press Enter again to begin the setup and run the configuration script.

When the script has finished, choose Perform a reboot and Yes.

Turn on Samba in Windows

We’re going to use Samba to copy a ROM file (a video game image) from our computer to RetroPie.

Samba used to be installed by default in Windows, but it has recently become an optional installation. In Windows 10, click on the Search bar and type ‘Control Panel’. Click on Control Panel in the search results.

Now click Programs and Turn Windows features on or off. Scroll down to find SMB 1.0/CIFS File Sharing Support and click the + expand icon to reveal its options. Place a check in the box marked SMB 1.0/CIFS Client. Click OK. This will enable Samba client support on your Windows 10 PC so it can access the Raspberry Pi.

We’ve got more information on how Samba works on The MagPi’s website.

Get the game

On your Windows PC or Mac, open a web browser, and visit the Blade Buster website. This is a homebrew video game designed by High Level Challenge for old NES systems. The developer’s website is in Japanese — just click BLADE BUSTER Download to save the ROM file to your Downloads folder.

Open a File Explorer (or Finder) window and locate the BB_20120301.zip file in your Downloads folder. Don’t unzip the file.

Click on Network and you’ll see a RETROPIE share. Open it and locate the roms folder. Double-click roms and you’ll see folders for many classic systems. Drag and drop the BB_20120301.zip file and place it inside the nes folder.

Play the game

Press the Start button on your gamepad to bring up the Main Menu. Choose Quit and Restart EmulationStation. You’ll now see a Nintendo Entertainment System option with 1 Games Available below it. Click it and you’ll see BB_20120301 — this is Blade Buster. Press A to start the game. Have fun shooting aliens. Press Start and Analog (or whatever you’ve set as your hotkey) together when you’re finished; this will take you back to the game selection in EmulationStation.

If you’ve been setting up RetroPie on your monitor, now is the time to move it across to your main television. The RetroPie console will boot automatically and connect to the network, and then you can move ROM files over to it from your PC or Mac. At this point, you may notice black borders around the screen; if so, see the Fix the borders tip.

Enjoy your gaming system!

More top tips from Lucy

Change the resolution

Some games were designed for a much lower resolution, and scaling them up can look blocky on modern televisions. If you’d prefer to alter the resolution, choose ‘RetroPie setup’. Open raspi-config, Advanced Options, and Resolution. Here you’ll find a range of other resolution options to choose from.

Fix the borders

These are caused by overscan. Choose RetroPie from EmulationStation and raspi-config. Now select Advanced Options > Overscan and select No on the ‘Would you like to enable compensation for displays with overscan?’ window. Choose OK and then Finish. Choose Yes on the Reboot Now window. When the system has rebooted, you will see the borders are gone.

The MagPi magazine issue 81

This article is from the latest issue of The MagPi magazine, which is out today and can be purchased online, at the Raspberry Pi Store, or from many newsagents and bookshops, such as WHSmith and Barnes & Noble.

The MagPi magazine issue 81

You can also download issue 81 for free from The MagPi website, where you’ll also find information on subscription options, and the complete MagPi catalogue, including Essentials guides and books, all available to download for free.

the MagPi subscription

The post Make a retro console with RetroPie and a Raspberry Pi — part 2 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Meet us at Maker Faire Bay Area 2019

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/maker-faire-bay-area-2019/

We’ll be attending Maker Faire Bay Area this month and we’d love to see as many of you there as we can, so be sure to swing by the Raspberry Pi stand and say hi!

Our North America team will be on-hand and hands-on all weekend to show you the wonders of the Raspberry Pi, with some great tech experiments for you to try. Do you like outer space? Of course, why wouldn’t you? So come try out the Sense HAT, our multi-sensor add-on board that we created especially for our two Astro Pi units aboard the International Space Station!

We’ll also have stickers, leaflets, and a vast array of information to share about the Raspberry Pi, our clubs and programmes, and how you can get more involved in the Raspberry Pi community.

And that’s not all!

Onstage talks!

Matt Richardson, Executive Director of the Raspberry Pi Foundation North America and all-round incredible person, will be making an appearance on the Make: Electronics by Digi-Key stage at 3pm Saturday 18 May to talk about Making Art with Raspberry Pi.

Matt Richardson

Hi, Matt!

And I’m presenting too! On the Sunday, I’ll be on the DIY Content Creators Stage at 12:30pm with special guests Joel “3D Printing Nerd” Telling and Estefannie Explains it All for a live recording of my podcast to discuss the importance of community for makers and brands.

There will also be a whole host of incredible creations by makers from across the globe, and a wide variety of talks and presentations throughout the weekend. So if you’re a fan of creative contraptions and beastly builds, you’ll be blown away at this year’s Maker Faire.

Showcasing your projects

If you’re planning to attend Maker Faire to showcase your project, we want to hear from you. Leave a comment below with information on your build so we can come and find you on the day. Our trusty videographer Fiacre and I will be scouting for our next favourite Raspberry Pi make, and we’ll also have Andrew with us, who is eager to fill the pages of HackSpace magazine with any cool, creative wonders we find — Pi-related or otherwise!

Discounted tickets!

Maker Fair Bay Area 2019 will be running at the San Mateo County Event Center from Friday 17 to Sunday 19 May.

If you’re in the area and would like to attend Maker Fair Bay Area, make use of  our 15% community discount on tickets. Wooh!

For more information on Maker Faire, check out the Maker Faire website, or follow Maker Faire on Twitter.

See you there!

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Portable retro CRT game console: the one-thumb entertainment system

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/portable-retro-ctr-game-console-the-one-thumb-entertainment-system/

OTES is the one-thumb entertainment system that, unsurprisingly, requires only one thumb to play.

One-Thumb Entertainment System

Uploaded by gocivici on 2019-04-29.

Retro handheld gaming

Straight out the bat, I have to admit that had this existed in the 80s, it would have been all I played with. OTES oozes gaming nostalgia, and the constant clicking would have driven my mother mad, as did the tap tap tap of my Game Boy or NES controller.

Designed to play PICO8 games, with its developers eager to see more people create one-button controlled games for the console, OTES replaces the concept of game cartridges with individual SD cards, allowing for players to swap out games as they would have with a Nintendo Game Boy, SEGA Game Gear, Atari Lynx, and other stand-alone cartridge consoles.

Building OTES

As mentioned, OTES uses the PICO-8 environment at its core and runs on a Raspberry Pi Zero W with interchangeable SD cards. And as the games designed for the project only require one button, it makes for a fairly simple setup.

For the body, the project’s maker, govinci, sources an old JVC video camera in order to cannibalise the CRT viewfinder.

The most important thing first. You have to find an old camcorder which has a CRT viewfinder. It’s usually easy to tell if a camcorder has a CRT viewfinder since it’s a bulky part sticking off the side of the camcorder. I found this viewfinder on an old JVC camcorder which I bought from the flea market. To test the viewfinder I used a 9v battery to power up the camcorder. There was no image on the viewfinder but I got a static white noise which is enough to tell if the viewfinder works.

The CRT viewfinder (that’s it to the right of the battery) was then connected to the Raspberry Pi and power source, and nestled snugly into a 3D-printed body.

Close the case up, turn on the Pi, and boom: one working, single-button console game player with a very personal point of view.

Govinci says:

Currently, It has one game called ODEF (Ocean Defender) developed by me and my friends. (You can play it here.) And I hope there will be many others as people develop games that can be played with only one button on this platform.

You heard the man: go get developing. (I can think of plenty of circumstances where only needing one free finger to fit in a spot of gaming would be really, really convenient.) You can make your own console by following the build diary at Instructables. Let us know if you give it a whirl!

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Intelli-T Raspberry Pi sensor alarm | The MagPi issue 81

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/intelli-t-raspberry-pi-sensor-alarm-the-magpi-issue-81/

Never knowingly run out of tea-bags again with this ingenious system, using a Raspberry Pi and Arduino to create a weight sensor and alarm.

The Intelli-T Raspberry Pi sensor alarm

Faced with the, almost unthinkable, problem of no tea-bags in the house, Robin Mitchell was inspired to contrive an invention that would eliminate the possibility of that scenario ever happening again, and the Intelli-T Raspberry Pi Sensor Alarm was born. As he explains, “One of the biggest problems that faces many British homes, as well as my own, is having a stable supply of tea… an issue with knowing how many tea-bags are available in the house. Hence, an intelligent tea-bag container was needed!”

Simplici-tea

Simple in its design, the project consists of only a few elements, as Robin tells us: “The first element is the weight sensor itself, which weighs the tea-bag container. This weight sensor is connected to a standard HX711 ADC, which is then read by an Arduino. The Arduino then sends the weight data to the Raspberry Pi, which can keep track of how many bags there are, and play interesting facts about tea when a tea-bag is removed.”

The Intelli-T Raspberry Pi sensor alarm

Clever, but as with many inventions, not entirely straightforward to construct, with the weight sensor providing the main issue, as Robin elaborates: “The problem with weight sensors is that they require plenty of fine-tuning and can be very noisy. While this is not a problem for heavier items, trying to accurately weigh tea-bags is a nightmare. On reflection, it would have been better to use a much smaller weight sensor, so that the weight of the individual tea-bags is larger with respect to the minimum weight that the sensor can register (this would improve the accuracy).”

Brewing ideas

Undeterred, Robin successfully completed his tea-bag detection system, and feels that this kind of weight-sensing system could easily be used in other projects. “One area that could benefit from a similar system would be industrial systems that need to count parts such as resistors, transistors, capacitors, and even potentiometers. Of course, part counting can also be useful for the everyday hobbyist who wants to keep check of their component stock, and someone like myself who stocks many thousands of parts needs to keep an accurate check on inventory regularly (as I own a small electronics business).”

There certainly appears to be some scope here for future projects but, as for tea-bag detection, Robin thinks he has taken that particular piece of work as far as he can. “The project was great fun, but since I no longer drink bagged tea (lemon tea rules!), I don’t have a use for it any more.”

Not that Robin is short of ideas for other projects. “Each day of my life is all about creating projects around many platforms, with the Raspberry Pi included. Only recently, I designed a simple IoT monitoring station for an IoT sensor that can be affixed to a drill, and the vibration data streamed to the Raspberry Pi via a local network. All I can say is that the Raspberry Pi is a fantastic platform for prototyping and project building!”

The MagPi magazine issue 81

This article is from the latest issue of The MagPi magazine, which is out today and can be purchased online, at the Raspberry Pi Store, or from many independent bookshops, such as WHSmith and Barnes & Noble.

The MagPi magazine issue 81

You can also download issue 81 for free from The MagPi website, where you’ll also find information on subscription options, and the complete MagPi catalogue, including Essentials guides and books, all available to download for free.

the MagPi subscription

The post Intelli-T Raspberry Pi sensor alarm | The MagPi issue 81 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Build a SatNOGS ground station with a Raspberry Pi 3B+ | HackSpace magazine #18

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-a-satnogs-ground-station-raspberry-pi-3b-hackspace-magazine-18/

The big feature on outer space in issue 18 of HackSpace magazine, available from today, shows you how to build your own satellite and launch it into orbit.

No, we’re not kidding, this is an actual thing you can do.

And to track the satellite you’ve launched, or another satellite you’re interested in, here’s how to build your own SatNOGS ground station with a Raspberry Pi 3B+.

Building a Raspberry Pi ground station

Once you’ve built and launched your small satellite, you’ll want to listen to all the glorious telemetry and data it‘s sending back as it hurtles around the Earth. Or perhaps you aspire to have a satellite up there, but in the meantime you want to listen to some other objects? What you need is a ground station, but a single ground station has one slight flaw. Most of the time a satellite will not be overhead of a single ground station; in fact, it may only pass over a ground station once every few days, massively reducing the amount of information or data we can receive. So we need a network of ground stations. The SatNOGS network solves this by creating a global network of stations that can work together to increase coverage.

SatNOGS is an open-source project that has numerous designs for satellite ground stations, but whichever design you pick, you can join the network that links them all via the web.

A station owner can use the website to browse for future passes of a satellite, and then click a button to schedule for their station to turn on, tune to frequency, and record the pass, sometimes even rotating the antenna on the station to track the satellite. Not only can a station owner schedule an observation on their own station, but they can schedule observations on any station on the global network.

As we can see from this map of data being collected of a recent SSTV broadcast from the ISS (sends single-frame images transmitted via audio from the ISS), the SatNOGS network has near-global coverage, rivalling most professional institutions in the world.

Simple setup

The simplest form of a SatNOGS station is one that doesn’t move or track and is made from a static antenna, a Raspberry Pi, and a cheap software-defined radio (SDR) dongle. The SDR dongle has become ubiquitous in maker circles as it is an affordable entry item into the world of receiving signals via SDR. Looking at our ingredients in the image below, let’s explore them a little more before we get started.

While a permanent station may do better connected by Ethernet cable, using the Raspberry Pi’s built-in wireless LAN functionality means we can run this simply with only a power cable. While many have used the cheapest Realtek SDR dongles with success, some people have found the slightly more refined versions can be more stable – a current recommendation is the RTL-SDR V3, which has a better casing for thermal dissipation, and slightly upgraded components. The RTL-SDR V3 is available here.

The classic antenna recommended for a static SatNOGS setup shown above is a ‘turnstile’ antenna; commercial models are available, such as the Wimo TA-1, but people have designed and built lots of different static antennas for different frequencies and with small budgets – check out the tutorial Make a Slim Jim antenna on page 112 (in HackSpace issue 18, links below).

In order to set up a ground station, one of the first tasks we need to do is set up an account on network.satnogs.org. Registering on the site then gives us a dashboard where we can begin to set up a station. Click to add a station — we then need to supply it with some basic details as per the image below: a name for the station, a location in latitude and longitude (Google is your friend here!), and the elevation of the station above sea-level.

You need to decide what frequency your station is going to cover; the most common ranges are UHF and VHF, which would require different antennas, but either range has a huge number of objects you can schedule to observe. Many people opt for VHF, as this includes the frequency range for a lot of the different transmissions from the ISS, so we are going to choose VHF as well. You also need to add a minimum elevation value — this is the minimum angle that a satellite must be in terms of height for your station to see it — if you aren’t sure, either ask for help on the forums, or leave it for now at the default 10 degrees.

Having filled in the boxes to create the station (leave the ‘this is in testing’ box ticked for now), you should now see a ground station entry has been made on your account, as above. You will see (even though it isn’t set up yet) a list populating underneath the entry with ‘Pass Predictions’, which are things you could schedule to observe once you are up and running. Before we leave the website, we need to make a note of the number assigned to the ground station, and also our own personal API key — which we can find in our dashboard by clicking the API key button. These two pieces of information are what will ultimately connect our ground station hardware to the website account.

The next task is to sort out the Raspberry Pi. You can find the current custom SatNOGS image here.

Flash this to your microSD card as you would for a regular Raspberry Pi setup — the free app Etcher, for example, is a simple tool that allows you to flash an image to a card.

Once done, boot the Raspberry Pi, and you can either SSH into the Pi, or connect a keyboard and monitor and interact with the setup that way. The first things we need to do are not SatNOGS-specific, but are the usual things we do when setting up a Raspberry Pi. We need to set up a different password by running the sudo raspi‐config command. Once you’ve set a password and expanded the file system, it’s also useful to set the time zone to UTC, as this is used throughout the SatNOGS network. If you want to run this test station wirelessly, then you need to configure your network connection at this point. If you are connecting via an Ethernet cable, then you don’t need to do anything else. Apply the changes and reboot (then see ‘Final setup’ box above in HackSpace issue 18, links below).

Now, if we go back to our dashboard on the SatNOGS website (perhaps wait a few minutes and click Refresh), we should see that the station is now online, as above. We should see an orange spot on the network map showing our proud station in testing. Being in testing means that only you can schedule observations on the station, but when you are ready, you can change settings to take it out of testing and then it is fully on the network.

On the hunt

Power down one last time and connect the RTL-SDR dongle and the antenna, then reboot — you are now ready to hunt satellites! Scheduling observations is as simple as selecting passes from the list and clicking Schedule. There may be drop-down choices for different transmitters to listen for on the same satellite, and other choices, but essentially you click Calculate to create the observation and then Schedule for the job to be created and sent to the queue for your station. There are hundreds of satellites to try to observe, so don’t worry if you don’t understand what any of them are — in the pass predictions list, if you click the name of a satellite you will get a pop-up with information about it. For a more detailed walkthrough of scheduling an observation on the SatNOGS network, check out this blog post.

After the time of the pass, return to the observation page and, hopefully, you should see some signals. Don’t worry if your first few observations aren’t successful: try at least a dozen observations before making any changes, as there are many possible reasons for a signal not getting picked up; indeed, the satellite may not even have been transmitting. If you have received a signal, you should ‘vet’ the observation as good; this is particularly important if you have scheduled on someone else’s station – etiquette says we should check and vet our own observations. Check out the Slim Jim antenna (see page 112 of HackSpace magazine issue 18, links below) for a link to a successful observation you can listen to.

Happy satellite hunting!

Finally, it’s a great idea to join the Libre Space Foundation community forum (or IRC), as it hosts the SatNOGS community channels, and there is a wealth of expertise and help available there from a very welcoming community. If you build a station, go and share your achievement on the forum — everyone will be pleased to see it.

Get HackSpace magazine issue 18 — out today

HackSpace magazine issue 18 is out today, and available online, or from many high-street retailers such as WHSmith and Sainsbury’s in the UK, and Barnes & Nobel in the US.

You can also download issue 18 for free, today as a PDF, so there really is no reason not to give HackSpace a spin.

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Rousseau-inspired Raspberry Pi Zero LED piano visualiser

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/rousseau-raspberry-pi-zero-led-piano-visualiser/

Unlock your inner Rousseau with this gorgeous Raspberry Pi Zero LED piano visualiser.

Piano LED Visualizer

Inspired by Rousseau videos I tried to build my own Piano Visualizer. It is made with Raspberry Pi and WS2812B LED strip. Screen and buttons: Waveshare LCD TFT 1,44” 128x128px.

Pianist Rousseau

Fans of the popular YouTube pianist Rousseau would be forgiven for thinking the thumbnail above is of one of his videos. It’s actually of a Raspberry Pi build by Aleksander Evening, who posted this project on Reddit last week as an homage to Rousseau, who is one of his favourite YouTubers.

Building an LED piano visualiser

After connecting the LED strip to the Raspberry Pi Zero W, and setting up the Pi as a Bluetooth MIDI host, Aleksander was almost good to go. There was just one thing standing in his way…



He wanted to use the Synthesia software for visualisations, and, unmodified, this software doesn’t support the MIDI files Aleksander planned to incorporate. Luckily, he found the workaround:

As of today Synthesia doesn’t support MIDI via Bluetooth, it should be added in next update. There is official workaround: you have to replace dll file. You also have to enable light support in Synthesia. In Visualizer settings you have to change “input” to RPI Bluetooth. After that when learning new song next-to-play keys will be illuminated in corresponding colors, blue for left hand and green for right hand.

Phew!

Homemade Rousseau

The final piece is a gorgeous mix of LEDs, sound, and animation — worthy of the project’s inspiration.

Find more information, including parts, links to the code, and build instructions, on Aleksander’s GitHub repo. And as always, if you build your own, or if you’ve created a Raspberry Pi project in honour of your favourite musician, artist, or YouTuber, we’d love to see it in the comments below.

And now, a little something from Rousseau:

Ludovico Einaudi – Nuvole Bianche

Sheet music: https://mnot.es/2N01Gqt Click the 🔔bell to join the notification squad! ♫ Listen on Spotify: http://spoti.fi/2LdpqK7 ♫ MIDI: https://patreon.com/rousseau ♫ Facebook: http://bit.ly/rousseaufb ♫ Instagram: http://bit.ly/rousseauig ♫ Twitter: http://bit.ly/rousseautw ♫ Buy me a coffee: http://buymeacoff.ee/rousseau Hope you enjoy my performance of Nuvole Bianche by Ludovico Einaudi.

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Beowulf Clusters, node visualisation and more with Pi VizuWall

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/beowulf-clusters-node-visualisation-pi-vizuwall/

Pi VizuWall is a multi-Raspberry Pi MPI computing system with a difference. And the difference is servo motors!

Pi VizWall at Maker Faire Miami

We can thank Estefannie for this gem. While attending Maker Faire Miami earlier this month, she shared a video of Pi VizWall on her Instagram Stories. And it didn’t take long for me to ask for an introduction to the project’s owner, Matt Trask.

I sent Matt a series of questions in relation to the project so I could write a blog post, but Matt’s replies were so wonderfully detailed that it seems foolish to try and reword them.

So here are the contents of Matt’s email replies, in their entirety, for you all to enjoy.

Parallel computing system

The project is a parallel computing system built according to the Beowulf cluster architecture, the same as most of the world’s largest and fastest supercomputers. It runs a system called MPI (Message Passing Interface) that breaks a program up into smaller pieces that can be sent over the network to other nodes for execution.

A Beowulf cluster at Michigan Tech

Beowulf clusters and MPI were invented in 1994 by a pair of NASA contractors, and they totally disrupted the high-performance computer industry by driving the cost of parallel computing way down. By now, twenty-five years later, the Beowulf cluster architecture is found in approximately 88% of the world’s largest parallel computing systems.

Going back to university

I’m currently an undergraduate student at Florida Atlantic University, completing a neglected Bachelor’s Degree from 1983. In the interim, I have had a wonderful career as a Computer Engineer, working with every generation of Personal Computer technology. My main research that I do at the University is focused on a new architecture for parallel clusters that uses traditional Beowulf hardware (enterprise-class servers with InfiniBand as the interconnect fabric) but modifies the Linux operating system in order to combine the resources (RAM, processor cores) from all the nodes in the cluster and make them appear as a single system that is the sum of all the resources. This is also known as a ‘virtual mainframe’.

The Ninja Gap

In the world of parallel supercomputers (branded ‘high-performance computing, or HPC), system manufacturers are motivated to sell their HPC products to industry, but industry has pushed back due to what they call the “Ninja Gap”. MPI programming is hard. It is usually not learned until the programmer is in grad school at the earliest, and given that it takes a couple of years to achieve mastery of any particular discipline, most of the proficient MPI programmers are PhDs. And this, is the Ninja Gap — industry understands that the academic system cannot and will not be able to generate enough ‘ninjas’ to meet the needs of industry if industry were to adopt HPC technology.

Studying Message Passing Interface

As part of my research into parallel computing systems, I have studied the process of learning to program with MPI and have found that almost all current practitioners are self-taught, coming from disciplines other than computer science. Actual undergraduate CS programs rarely offer MPI programming. Thus my motivation for building a low-cost cluster system with Raspberry Pis, in order to drive down the entry-level costs.

This parallel computing system, with a cost of under $1000, could be deployed at any college or community college rather than just at elite research institutions, as is done [for parallel computing systems] today.

Moving parts

The system is entirely open source, using only standard Raspberry Pi 3B+ boards and Raspbian Linux. The version of MPI that is used is called MPICH, another open-source technology that is readily available.

Perhaps one of the more interesting features of the cluster is that each of the Pi boards is mounted on a clear acrylic plate that is attached to a hinging mechanism. Each node is capable of moving through about 90 degrees under software control because a small electric servo motor is embedded in the hinging mechanism. The acrylic parts are laser-cut, and the hinge parts have been 3D printed for this prototype.

Raspbian Linux, like every other Linux version, contains information about CPU utilization as part of the kernel’s internal data. This performance data is available through the /proc filesystem at runtime, allowing a relatively simple program to maintain percent-busy averages over time. This data is used to position the node via its servo, with a fully idle node laying down against the backboard and a full busy node rotating up to ninety degrees.

Visualizing node activity

The purpose of this motion-related activity is to permit the user to visualize the operation of the cluster while executing a parallel program, showing the level of activity at each node via proportional motion. Thus the name Pi VizuWall.

Other than the twelve Pi 3s, I used 12 Tower Pro micro servos (SG90 Digital) and assorted laser-cut acrylic and 3D-printed parts (AI and STL files available on request), as well as a 14-port Ethernet switch for interconnects and two 12A 6-port USB power supplies along with Ethernet cable and USB cables for power.

The future of Pi VizuWall

The original plan for this project was to make a 4ft × 8ft cluster with 300 Raspberry Pis wired as a Beowulf cluster running MPICH. When I proposed this project to my Lab Directors at the university, they balked at the estimated cost of $20–25K and suggested a scaled-down prototype first. We have learned a number of lessons while building this prototype that should serve us well when we move on to building the bigger one. The first lesson is to use CNC’d aluminum for the motor housings instead of 3D-printed plastic — we’ve seen some minor distortion of the printed plastic from the heat generated in the servos. But mainly, this will permit us to have finer resolution when creating the splines that engage with the shaft of the servo motor, solving the problem of occasional slippage under load that we have seen with this version.

The other major challenge was power distribution. We look forward to using the Pi’s PoE capabilities in the next version to simplify power distribution. We also anticipate evaluating whether the Pi’s wireless LAN capability is suitable for carrying the MPI message traffic, given that the wired Ethernet has greater bandwidth. If the wireless bandwidth is sufficient, we will potentially use Pi Zero W computers instead of Pi 3s, doubling the number of nodes we can install on a 4×8’ backboard.

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Watch Game of Thrones with a Raspberry Pi-powered Drogon

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/watch-game-of-thrones-with-raspberry-pi-powered-drogon/

Channel your inner Targaryen by building this voice-activated, colour-changing, 3D-printed Drogon before watching the next episode of Game of Thrones.

Winter has come

This is a spoiler-free zone! I’ve already seen the new episode of season 8, but I won’t ruin anything, I promise.

Even if you’ve never watched an episode of Game of Thrones (if so, that’s fine, I don’t judge you), you’re probably aware that the final season has started.

And you might also know that the show has dragons in it — big, hulking, scaley dragons called Rhaegal, Viserion, and Drogon. They look a little something like this:Daenerys-Targaryen-game-of-thrones

Well, not anymore. They look like this now:

04_15_GameOfThrones_S07-920x584

Raspberry Pi voice-responsive dragon!

The creator of this project goes by the moniker Botmation. To begin with, they 3D printed modified a Drogon model they found on Thingiverse. Then, with Dremel in hand, they modified the print, to replace its eyes with RGB LEDs. Before drawing the LEDs through the hollowed-out body of the model, they soldered them to wires connected to a Raspberry Pi Zero W‘s GPIO pins.

Located in the tin beneath Drogon, the Pi Zero W is also equipped with a microphone and runs the Python code for the project. And thanks to Google’s Speech to Text API, Drogon’s eyes change colour whenever a GoT character repeats one of two keywords: white turns the eyes blue, while fire turns them red.

If you’d like more information about building your own interactive Drogon, here’s a handy video. At the end, Botmation asks viewers to help improve their code for a cleaner voice-activation experience.

3D printed Drogon with LED eyes for Game of Thrones

Going into the final season of Game of Thrones with your very own 3D printed Drogron dragon! The eyes are made of LEDs that changes between Red and Blue depending on what happens in the show. When you’re watching the show, Drogon will watch the show with you and listen for cues to change the eye color.

Drogon for the throne!

I’ve managed to bag two of the three dragons in the Pi Towers Game of Thrones fantasy league, so I reckon my chances of winning are pretty good thanks to all the points I’ll rack up by killing White Walker.

Wait — does killing a White Walker count as a kill, since they’re already dead?

Ah, crud.

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Raspberry Pi-controlled brass bell for ultimate the wake-up call

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-controlled-brass-bell-for-ultimate-the-wake-up-call/

Not one for rising with the sun, and getting more and more skilled at throwing their watch across the room to snooze their alarm, Reddit user ravenspired decided to hook up a physical bell to a Raspberry Pi and servo motor to create the ultimate morning wake-up call.

DIY RASPBERRY PI BELL RINGING ALARM CLOCK!

This has to be the harshest thing to wake up to EVER!

Wake up, Boo

“I have difficulty waking up in the morning” admits ravenspired, who goes by the name Darks Pi on YouTube. “My watch isn’t doing its job.”

Therefore, ravenspired attached a bell to a servo motor, and the servo motor to a Raspberry Pi. Then they wrote Python code in Raspbian’s free IDE software Thonny that rings the bell when it’s time to get up.

“A while loop searches for what time it is and checks it against my alarm time. When the alarm is active, it sends commands to the servo to move.”

Ouch!

While I’d be concerned about how securely attached the heavy brass bell above my head is, this is still a fun project, and an inventive way to address a common problem.

And it’s a lot less painful than this…

The Wake-up Machine TAKE #2

I built an alarm clock that slapped me in the face with a rubber arm to wake me up.I built an alarm clock that wakes me up in the morning by slapping me in the face with a rubber arm.

Have you created a completely over-engineered solution for a common problem? Then we want to see it!

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Bind MIDI inputs to LED lights using a Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/midi-controlled-led-lights-raspberry-pi/

Blinky lights and music created using a Raspberry Pi? Count us in! When Aaron Chambers shared his latest project, Py-Lights, on Reddit, we were quick to ask for more information. And here it is:

Controlling lights with MIDI commands

Tentatively titled Py-Lights, Aaron’s project allows users to assign light patterns to MIDI actions, creating a rather lovely blinky light display.

For his example, Aaron connected a MIDI keyboard to a strip of RGB LEDs via a Raspberry Pi that ran his custom Python code.

Aaron explains on Reddit:

The program I made lets me bind “actions” (strobe white, flash blue, disable all colors, etc.) to any input and any input type (hold, knob, trigger, etc.). And each action type has a set of parameters that I bind to the input. For example, I have a knob that changes a strobe’s intensity, and another knob that changes its speed.

The program updates each action, pulls its resulting color, and adds them together, then sends that to the LEDs. I’m using rtmidi for reading the midi device and pigpio for handling the LED output.

Aaron has updated the Py-Lights GitHub repo for the project to include a handy readme file and a more stable build.

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Hacking an Etch-A-Sketch with a Raspberry Pi and camera: Etch-A-Snap!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hacking-etch-a-sketch-raspberry-pi-camera-etch-a-snap/

Kids of the 1980s, rejoice: the age of the digital Etch-A-Sketch is now!

What is an Etch-A-Sketch

Introduced in 1960, the Etch-A-Sketch was invented by Frenchman André Cassagnes and manufactured by the Ohio Art Company.

The back of the Etch-A-Sketch screen is covered in very fine aluminium powder. Turning one of the two directional knobs runs a stylus across the back of the screen, displacing the powder and creating a dark grey line visible in the front side.

can it run DOOM?

yes

The Etch-A-Sketch was my favourite childhood toy. So you can imagine how excited I was to see the Etch-A-Snap project when I logged into Reddit this morning!

Digital Etch-A-Sketch

Yesterday, Martin Fitzpatrick shared on Reddit how he designed and built Etch-A-Snap, a Raspberry Pi Zero– and Camera Module–connected Etch-A-Sketch that (slowly) etches photographs using one continuous line.

Etch-A-Snap is (probably) the world’s first Etch-A-Sketch Camera. Powered by a Raspberry Pi Zero (or Zero W), it snaps photos just like any other camera, but outputs them by drawing to an Pocket Etch-A-Sketch screen. Quite slowly.

Unless someone can show us another Etch-A-Sketch camera like this, we’re happy to agree that this is a first!

Raspberry Pi–powered Etch-A-Sketch

Powered by four AA batteries and three 18650 LiPo cells, Etch-A-Snap houses the $5 Raspberry Pi Zero and two 5V stepper motors within a 3D-printed case mounted on the back of a pocket-sized Etch-A-Sketch.

Photos taken using the Raspberry Pi Camera Module are converted into 1-bit, 100px × 60px, black-and-white images using Pillow and OpenCV. Next, these smaller images are turned into plotter commands using networkx. Finally, the Raspberry Pi engages the two 5V stepper motors to move the Etch-A-Sketch control knobs, producing a sketch within 15 minutes to an hour, depending on the level of detail in the image.

Build your own Etch-A-Snap

On his website, Martin goes into some serious detail about Etch-A-Snap, perfect for anyone interested in building their own, or in figuring out how it all works. You’ll find an overview with videos, along with breakdowns of the build, processing, drawing, and plotter.

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Door Pi Plus — door security system for the elderly

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/door-pi-plus-door-security-system-elderly/

13-year-old Freddie from Monmouthshire has gained national attention for his incredible award-winning invention Door Pi Plus.

Freddie – Door Plus Pi

No Description

Door security system

Freddie spent more than twelve months building a door security system for the elderly, inspired by the desire to help his great-aunt feel more secure at home.

The invention keeps the door locked until the camera recognises a face of a family member and makes it possible to open the lock. Freddie used a Raspberry Pi to enable facial recognition technology in his impressive project.

“I’ve been building this project on and off for a year now,” says Freddie. “I started coding at my primary school Code Club, but now I mainly code at home.”

Coolest Projects UK

Freddie took part in this year’s Coolest Projects UK, entering the Hardware category of the world-leading showcase for young innovators who make stuff with technology.

Mark Feltham on Twitter

The amazing Freddie explaing his security system for dementia sufferers at #coolestprojects @Raspberry_Pi facial recognition, PIR and RFID hooked up to lock through relays, coded in #python. He’s 13… #blownaway

Martin O’Hanlon of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and a judge at Coolest Projects UK, commented “I was blown away by the Door Pi Plus. The motivation to create something which would help others was clear, but the technical aspects of the project also really stood out, integrating lots of different technologies and making skills.

“The project used multiple Raspberry Pis to control an RFID reader, electronic door lock mechanism, cameras, motion sensors, and audio playback. The whole system sent messages to Freddie to ensure that his great-aunt would be safe and that she could get help if she needed it.“

Freddie won his Coolest Projects category to much acclaim, and went on to win the award for Junior Engineer of the Year at the Big Bang Fair and the Siemens Digital Skills Award!

Inspired by his experience making, he is now encouraging other young people to learn to code and start to make their own creations.

“Coding is cool because you can invent cool things to help you and other people around you. I do think more kids should code because lots of the job in the future are probably going to involved coding.”

Coolest Projects International

Freddie will participate in Coolest Projects International next, for which he won a special bursary as part of his award for winning the UK event’s Hardware category.

Not one to shy away from a challenge, Freddie decided to build a new project for the event! It’s called Safe Kids, and it’s a speed camera and ANPR system, to be installed outside primary schools.

He will be showcasing his new creation at Coolest Projects International in the RDS, Dublin on 5 May, alongside hundreds of young coders from around the globe.

Want to share your creation with the world too?

Then register your project idea for Coolest Projects International before the 14 April deadline, and get building for the event.

Participants of all ages and skill levels, and projects using all types of technology and hardware are encouraged!

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Build a security camera with Raspberry Pi and OpenCV

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-security-camera-opencv/

Tired of opening the refrigerator only to find that your favourite snack is missing? Get video evidence of sneaky fridge thieves sent to your phone, with Adrian Rosebeck’s Raspberry Pi security camera project.

Building a Raspberry Pi security camera with OpenCV

Learn how to build a IoT + Raspberry Pi security camera using OpenCV and computer vision. Send TXT/MMS message notifications, images, and video clips when the security camera is triggered. Full tutorial (including code) here: https://www.pyimagesearch.com/2019/03/25/building-a-raspberry-pi-security-camera-with-opencv

Protecting hummus

Adrian loves hummus. And, as you can see from my author bio, so do I. So it wasn’t hard for me to relate to Adrian’s story about his college roommates often stealing his cherished chickpea dip.

Garlic dessert

“Of course, back then I wasn’t as familiar with computer vision and OpenCV as I am now,” he explains on his blog. “Had I known what I do at present, I would have built a Raspberry Pi security camera to capture the hummus heist in action!”

Raspberry Pi security camera

So, in homage to his time as an undergrad, Adrian decided to finally build that security camera for his fridge, despite now only needing to protect his hummus from his wife. And to build it, he opted to use OpenCV, a Raspberry Pi, and a Raspberry Pi Camera Module.

Adrian’s camera is an IoT project: it not only captures footage but also uses Twillo to send that footage, via a cloud service (AWS), to a smartphone.

Because the content of your fridge lives in the dark when you’re not inspecting it, the code for capturing video footage detects light and dark, and records everything that occurs between the fridge door opening and closing. “You could also deploy this inside a mailbox that opens/closes,” suggests Adrian.

Get the code and more

Adrian provides all the code for the project on his blog, pyimagesearch, with a full explanation of why each piece of code is used — thanks, Adrian!

For more from Adrian, check out his brilliant deep learning projects: a fully functional Pokémon Pokédex and Santa Detector.

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Build a Raspberry Pi robot buggy

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-a-raspberry-pi-robot-buggy/

Need a project for the week? We’ve got one for you. Learn to build a Raspberry Pi robot buggy and control it via voice, smart device or homemade controller with our free online resources.

Build your robot buggy

To build a basic Raspberry Pi-powered robot buggy, you’ll need to start with a Raspberry Pi. For our free tutorial, the team uses a Raspberry Pi 3B+, though you should be good with most models.

You’ll also need some wheels, 12v DC motors, and a motor controller board, along with a few other peripherals such as jumper wires and batteries.

Our project resource will talk you through the whole set up, from setting up your tech and assembling your buggy, to writing code that will allow you to control your buggy with Python.

Control your robot buggy

Our follow-up resource will then show you how to set up your Android smartphone or Google AIY kit as a remote control for your robot. Or, for the more homebrew approach, you can find out how to build your own controller using a breadboard and tactile buttons.

Make your robot buggy do cool things

And, lastly, you can show off your coding skills, and the wonder of your new robot by programming it to do some pretty neat tricks, such as line following. Our last tutorial in the Buggy Robot trio will show you how to use sensors and write a line-following algorithm.

Do you want your robot to do more? Of course you do. Check out our How to build a competition-ready Raspberry Pi robot guide for more.

Pi Wars 2019

The William Gates Building in Cambridge will this weekend be home to Pi Wars, the “two-day family-friendly event in which teams compete for prestige and prizes on non-destructive challenge courses”. As the name suggests, all robots competing in the Pi Wars events have Raspberry Pi innards, and we love seeing the crazy creations made by members of the community.

If you can make it to the event, tickets are available here – a lot of us will be there, both as spectators and as judges (we’re not really allowed to participate, bums bums). And if you can’t, follow #PiWars on Twitter for updates throughout the event.

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