All posts by Alex Bate

Sustainable clothing with Rapanui and Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/sustainable-clothing-with-rapanui-and-raspberry-pi/

New to the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge: T-shirts made using Raspberry Pis in Rapanui’s sustainable factory.

Oli Wilkin – our Glorious Retail Guru, to give him his formal title – has been hard at work this year bringing the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge, to life. Open since February, the store continues to evolve as it introduces our credit card-sized computer to a high-street audience. Oli and the store team are always talking to customers, exploring new ideas, and making changes. Here’s Oli on the latest development: Rapanui clothing, made sustainably with the help of Raspberry Pis.

Rapanui 2

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspberry Pi from one of our Approved Resellers: http://rpf.io/ytproducts Find out more about the #RaspberryPi Foundation: Raspberry Pi http://rpf.io/ytrpi Code Club UK http://rpf.io/ytccuk Code Club International http://rpf.io/ytcci CoderDojo http://rpf.io/ytcd Check out our free online training courses: http://rpf.io/ytfl Find your local Raspberry Jam event: http://rpf.io/ytjam Work through our free online projects: http://rpf.io/ytprojects Do you have a question about your Raspberry Pi?

Rapanui

Brothers Mart and Rob started bespoke clothing company Rapanui in a garden shed on the Isle of Wight, with an initial investment of £200 (about $257 US). Ten years later, Rapanui has grown to a fully fledged factory providing over 100 jobs. Their vision to create a sustainable clothing brand has seen them increase Rapanui’s offering from T-shirts to a much wider range of clothing, including jumpers, socks, and jackets. Another reason we like them a lot is that the factory uses over 100 Raspberry Pis with a wide variety of functions.

Rapanui’s early early days weres not without their challenges. Mart and Rob found early on that every improvement in sustainability came with a price tag. They realised that they could use technology to help keep costs down without cutting corners:

Along the way, we needed a real low-cost option for us to be able to get computing in and around the place. Someone said,
“Oh, you should check out Raspberry Pi.”
“What’s that?”
“It’s a computer, and costs twenty quid or something, and it’s the size of a credit card.”
“OK – that can’t be true!”

We got one, and it just blew our mind, because there’s no limit to what we could do with it.
– Mart

The Raspberry Pis are supporting things like productivity improvements, order tracking, workload prioritisation, and smart lighting. All employees are encouraged to try coding when they start working for Rapanui, and they’re empowered to change their workplace to make it smarter and more efficient.



As Mart explains,

In the world today, there’s a lot of issues around environment and sustainability, which feel like compromises – you want to do your bit, but it costs more. What this kind of technology allows us to do is make things cost less because you can create these massive efficiencies through technology, and that’s what enables you to be able to afford the things that you want to do with sustainability, without having to compromise on price.

Circular economy

All of the organic cotton that Rapanui uses is fully traced from India to the Isle of Wight, where it is turned into amazing quality branded items for their customers. Once a garment has come to the end of its life, a customer can simply scan the QR code on the inside label, and this QR code generates a Freepost address. This allows the customer to send their item back to Rapanui for a webshop credit, thus creating a circular economy.

Raspberry Pi + Rapanui

All of this makes us very pleased to be working with Rapanui to print the T-shirts you buy in the Raspberry Pi store.

Rapanui – from workshop to store

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspberry Pi from one of our Approved Resellers: http://rpf.io/ytproducts Find out more about the #RaspberryPi Foundation: Raspberry Pi http://rpf.io/ytrpi Code Club UK http://rpf.io/ytccuk Code Club International http://rpf.io/ytcci CoderDojo http://rpf.io/ytcd Check out our free online training courses: http://rpf.io/ytfl Find your local Raspberry Jam event: http://rpf.io/ytjam Work through our free online projects: http://rpf.io/ytprojects Do you have a question about your Raspberry Pi?

We have started with our Raspberry Pi 4 T-shirt, and others will follow. Our hope is that all our T-shirts will be fully sustainable and better for you, our customers.

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Listen to World War II radio recordings with a Raspberry Pi Zero

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/listen-to-world-war-ii-radio-recordings-with-a-raspberry-pi-zero/

With the 50th anniversary of the D-Day landings very much in the news this year, Adam Clark found himself interested in all things relating to that era. So it wasn’t long before he found himself on the Internet Archive listening to some of the amazing recordings of radio broadcasts from that time. In this month’s HackSpace magazine, Adam details how he built his WW2 radio-broadcast time machine using a Raspberry Pi Zero W, and provides you with the code to build your own.

As good as the recordings on the Internet Archive were, it felt as if something was missing by listening to them on a modern laptop, so I wanted something to play them back on that was more evocative of that time, and would perhaps capture the feeling of listening to them on a radio set.

I also wanted to make the collection portable and to make the interface for selecting and playing the tracks as easy as possible – this wasn’t going to be screen-based!

Another important consideration was to house the project in something that would not look out of place in the living room, and not to give away the fact that it was being powered by modern tech.

So I came up with the idea of using an original radio as the project case, and to use as many of the original knobs and dials as possible. I also had the idea to repurpose the frequency dial to select individual years of the war and to play broadcasts from whichever year was selected.

Of course, the Raspberry Pi was immediately the first option to run all this, and ideally, I wanted to use a Raspberry Pi Zero to keep the costs down and perhaps to allow expansion in the future outside of being a standalone playback device.

Right off the bat, I knew that I would have a couple of obstacles to overcome as the Raspberry Pi Zero doesn’t have an easy way to play audio out, and I also wanted to have analogue inputs for the controls. So the first thing was to get some audio playing to see if this was possible.

Audio playback

The first obstacle was to find a satisfactory way to playback audio. In the past, I have had some success using PWM pins, but this needs a low-pass filter as well as an amplifier, and the quality of audio was never as good as I’d hoped for.

The other alternative is to use one of the many HATs available, but these come at a price as they are normally aimed at more serious quality of audio. I wanted to keep the cost down, so these were excluded as an option. The other option was to use a mono I2S 3W amplifier breakout board – MAX98357A from Adafruit – which is extremely simple to use.

As the BBC didn’t start broadcasting stereo commercially until the late 1950s, this was also very apt for the radio (which only has one speaker).
Connecting up this board is very easy – it just requires three GPIO pins, power, and the speaker. For this, I just soldered some female jumper leads to the breakout board and connected them to the header pins of the Raspberry Pi Zero. There are detailed instructions on the Adafruit website for this which basically entails running their install script.

I’d now got a nice playback device that would easily play the MP3 files downloaded from archive.org and so the next task was to find a suitable second-hand radio set.

Preparing the case

After a lot of searching on auction sites, I eventually found a radio that was going to be suitable: wasn’t too large, was constructed from wood, and looked old enough to convince the casual observer. I had to settle for something that actually came from the early 1950s, but it drew on design influences from earlier years and wasn’t too large as a lot of the real period ones tended to be (and it was only £15). This is a fun project, so a bit of leeway was fine by me in this respect.

When the radio arrived, my first thought as a tinkerer was perhaps I should get the valves running, but a quick piece of research turned up that I’d probably have to replace all the resistors and capacitors and all the old wiring and then hope that the valves still worked. Then discovering that the design used a live chassis running at 240 V soon convinced me that I should get back on track and replace everything.

With a few bolts and screws removed, I soon had an empty case.

I then stripped out all the interior components and set about restoring the case and dial glass, seeing what I could use by way of the volume and power controls. Sadly, there didn’t seem to be any way to hook into the old controls, so I needed to design a new chassis to mount all the components, which I did in Tinkercad, an online 3D CAD package. The design was then downloaded and printed on my 3D printer.

It took a couple of iterations, and during this phase, I wondered if I could use the original speaker. It turned out to be absolutely great, and the audio took on a new quality and brought even more authenticity to the project.

The case itself was pretty worn and faded, and the varnish had cracked, so I decided to strip it back. The surface was actually veneer, but you can still sand this. After a few applications of Nitromors to remove the varnish, it was sanded to remove the scratches and finished off with fine sanding.

The wood around the speaker grille was pretty cracked and had started to delaminate. I carefully removed the speaker grille cloth, and fixed these with a few dabs of wood glue, then used some Tamiya brown paint to colour the edges of the wood to blend it back in with the rest of the case. I was going to buy replacement cloth, but it’s fairly pricey – I had discovered a trick of soaking the cloth overnight in neat washing-up liquid and cold water, and it managed to lift the years of grime out and give it a new lease of life.

At this point, I should have just varnished or used Danish oil on the case, but bitten by the restoration bug I thought I would have a go at French polishing. This gave me a huge amount of respect for anyone that can do this properly. It’s messy, time-consuming, and a lot of work. I ended up having to do several coats, and with all the polishing involved, this was probably one of the most time-consuming tasks, plus I ended up with some pretty stained fingers as a result.

The rest of the case was pretty easy to clean, and the brass dial pointer polished up nice and shiny with some Silvo polish. The cloth was glued back in place, and the next step was to sort out the dial and glass.

Frequency, volume, glass, and knobs

Unfortunately, the original glass was cracked, so a replacement part was cut from some Makrolon sheet, also known as Lexan. I prefer this to acrylic as it’s much easier to cut and far less likely to crack when drilling it. It’s used as machine guards as well and can even be bent if necessary.

With the dial, I scanned it into the PC and then in PaintShop I replaced the existing frequency scale with a range of years running from 1939 to 1945, as the aim was for anyone using the radio to just dial the year they wanted to listen to. The program will then read the value of the potentiometer, and randomly select a file to play from that year.

It was also around about now that I had to come up with some means of having the volume control the sound and an interface for the frequency dial. Again there are always several options to consider, and I originally toyed with using a couple of rotary encoders and using one of these with the built-in push button as the power switch, but eventually decided to just use some potentiometers. Now I just had to come up with an easy way to read the analogue value of the pots and get that into the program.

There are quite a few good analogue-to-digital boards and HATs available, but with simplicity in mind, I chose to use an MCP3002 chip as it was only about £2. This is a two-channel analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) and outputs the data as a 10-bit value onto the SPI bus. This sounds easy when you say it, but it proved to be one of the trickier technical tasks as none of the code around for the four-channel MCP3008 seemed to work for the MCP3002, nor did many of the examples that were around for the MCP3002 – I think I went through about a dozen examples. At long last, I did find some code examples that worked, and with a bit of modification, I had a simple way of reading the values from the two potentiometers. You can download the original code by Stéphane Guerreau from GitHub. To use this on your Raspberry Pi, you’ll also need to run up raspi-config and switch on the SPI interface. Then it is simply a case of hooking up the MCP3002 and connecting the pots between the 3v3 line and ground and reading the voltage level from the wiper of the pots. When coding this, I just opted for some simple if-then statements in cap-Python to determine where the dial was pointing, and just tweaked the values in the code until I got each year to be picked out.

Power supply and control

One of the challenges when using a Raspberry Pi in headless mode is that it likes to be shut down in an orderly fashion rather than just having the power cut. There are lots of examples that show how you can hook up a push button to a GPIO pin and initiate a shutdown script, but to get the Raspberry Pi to power back up you need to physically reset the power. To overcome this piece of the puzzle, I use a Pimoroni OnOff SHIM which cleverly lets you press a button to start up, and then press and hold it for a second to start a shutdown. It’s costly in comparison to the price of a Raspberry Pi Zero, but I’ve not found a more convenient option. The power itself is supplied by using an old power bank that I had which is ample enough to power the radio long enough to be shown off, and can be powered by USB connector if longer-term use is required.

To illuminate the dial, I connected a small LED in series with a 270R resistor to the 3v3 rail so that it would come on as soon as the Raspberry Pi received power, and this lets you easily see when it’s on without waiting for the Raspberry Pi to start up.

The code






If you’re interested in the code Adam used to build his time machine, especially if you’re considering making your own, you’ll find it all in this month’s HackSpace magazine. Download the latest issue for free here, subscribe for more issues here, or visit your local newsagent or the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge to pick up the magazine in physical, real-life, in-your-hands print.

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Real-life DOR-15 bowler hat from Disney’s Meet the Robinsons

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/real-life-dor-15-bowler-hat-from-disneys-meet-the-robinsons/

Why wear a boring bowler hat when you can add technology to make one of Disney’s most evil pieces of apparel?

Meet the Robinsons

Meet the Robinsons is one of Disney’s most underrated movies. Thank you for coming to my TED talk.

What’s not to love? Experimental, futuristic technology, a misunderstood villain, lessons of love and forgiveness aplenty, and a talking T-Rex!

For me, one of the stand-out characters of Meet the Robinsons is DOR-15, a best-of-intentions experiment gone horribly wrong. Designed as a helper hat, DOR-15 instead takes over the mind of whoever is wearing it, hellbent on world domination.

Real-life DOR-15

Built using a Raspberry Pi and the MATRIX Voice development board, the real-life DOR-15, from Team MATRIX Labs, may not be ready to take over the world, but it’s still really cool.

With a plethora of built-in audio sensors, the MATRIX Voice directs DOR-15 towards whoever is making sound, while a series of servos wiggle 3D‑printed legs for added creepy.

This project uses ODAS (Open embeddeD Audition System) and some custom code to move a servo motor in the direction of the most concentrated incoming sound in a 180 degree radius. This enables the hat to face a person calling to it.

The added wiggly spider legs come courtesy of this guide by the delightful Jorvon Moss, whom HackSpace readers will remember from issue 21.

In their complete Hackster walkthrough, Team Matrix Lab talk you through how to build your own DOR-15, including all the files needed to 3D‑print the legs.

Realising animated characters and props

So, what fictional wonder would you bring to life? Your own working TARDIS? Winifred’s spellbook? Mary Poppins’ handbag? Let us know in the comments below.

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Securely tailor your TV viewing with BBC Box and Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/securely-tailor-your-tv-viewing-with-bbc-box-and-raspberry-pi/

Thanks to BBC Box, you might be able to enjoy personalised services without giving up all your data. Sean McManus reports:

One day, you could watch TV shows that are tailored to your interests, thanks to BBC Box. It pulls together personal data from different sources in a household device, and gives you control over which apps may access it.

“If we were to create a device like BBC Box and put it out there, it would allow us to create personalised services without holding personal data,” says Max Leonard.

TV shows could be edited on the device to match the user’s interests, without those interests being disclosed to the BBC. One user might see more tech news and less sport news, for example.

BBC Box was partly inspired by a change in the law that gives us all the right to reuse data that companies hold on us. “You can pull out data dumps, but it’s difficult to do anything with them unless you’re a data scientist,” explains Max. “We’re trying to create technologies to enable people to do interesting things with their data, and allow organisations to create services based on that data on your behalf.”

Building the box

BBC Box is based on Raspberry Pi 3B+, the most powerful model available when this project began. “Raspberry Pi is an amazing prototyping platform,” says Max. “Relatively powerful, inexpensive, with GPIO, and able to run a proper OS. Most importantly, it can fit inside a small box!”

That prototype box is a thing of beauty, a hexagonal tube made of cedar wood. “We created a set of principles for experience and interaction with BBC Box and themes of strength, protection, and ownership came out very strongly,” says Jasmine Cox. “We looked at shapes in nature and architecture that were evocative of these themes (beehives, castles, triangles) and played with how they could be a housing for Raspberry Pi.”

The core software for collating and managing access to data is called Databox. Alpine Linux was chosen because it’s “lightweight, speedy but most importantly secure”, in Max’s words. To get around problems making GPIO access work on Alpine Linux, an Arduino Nano is used to control the LEDs. Storage is a 64GB microSD card, and apps run inside Docker containers, which helps to isolate them from each other.

Combining data securely

The BBC has piloted two apps based on BBC Box. One collects your preferred type of TV programme from BBC iPlayer and your preferred music genre from Spotify. That unique combination of data can be used to recommend events you might like from Skiddle’s database.

Another application helps two users to plan a holiday together. It takes their individual preferences and shows them the destinations they both want to visit, with information about them brought in from government and commercial sources. The app protects user privacy, because neither user has to reveal places they’d rather not visit to the other user, or the reason why.

The team is now testing these concepts with users and exploring future technology options for BBC Box.

The MagPi magazine

This article was lovingly yoinked from the latest issue of The MagPi magazine. You can read issue 87 today, for free, right now, by visiting The MagPi website.

You can also purchase issue 87 from the Raspberry Pi Press website with free worldwide delivery, from the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge, and from newsagents and supermarkets across the UK.

 

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Secret Santa ideas for the Raspberry Pi fan in your office

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/secret-santa-ideas-for-the-raspberry-pi-fan-in-your-office/

Today’s blog post started as a deflated “What do I buy my Secret Santa person?” appeal from a friend last night. My answer is this, a nice and early Secret Santa idea guide for anyone stuck with someone for whom they have no idea what to buy.

All the gifts listed below cost £10 or less, and they’re all available from the Raspberry Pi store in Cambridge, UK. Many of them are also available to buy online, but if you’re able to visit our store, you definitely should – we have a couple of in-store exclusives on offer too.

Gifts for £5 or less

If your Secret Santa limit is set at £5, as many seem to be, we’ve a few ideas that will fit nicely within your budget.

Raspberry Pi Zero

We’ll start with the obvious: Raspberry Pi Zero, our tiny computer that packs a punch without leaving a dent in your finances. At bang on £5, anyone of the electronics/techie persuasion will be delighted to receive this at the office Christmas party.

Raspberry Pi pin badge and sticker pack

Help your Secret Santa pick show their love for Raspberry Pi with a Raspberry Pi pin (£3) or sticker pack (£4). They’ll be as on-brand as Pete Lomas (and that’s saying something).

CamJam Edukit #1

The CamJam Edukit #1 is jam-packed with all the bits you need to get started with digital making, and it’s supported by free downloadable worksheets. It’s a fantastic gift for anyone who’d enjoy learning electronics or expanding their coding know-how. At £5, you can’t go wrong.

Essentials Guides

At £3.99 each, the Essentials Guides cover a range of topics, including Learning to code with C, Hacking and making in Minecraft, and Making games in Python. Our in-store offer will score you three guides for £10, which brings us nicely to…

Gifts up to £10

A £10 budget? Check you out!

Raspberry Pi Zero W

With added wireless LAN and Bluetooth connectivity, Raspberry Pi Zero W will cost you £9.50, leaving you 50p to buy yourself some sweets for a job well done.

Babbage Bear and friends

Babbage Bear, for many the face of Raspberry Pi, is the perfect gift for all ages. He’ll cost you £9, as will any of his Adafruit friends.

Mugs and travel cups

What do you buy for the Raspberry Pi fan who has everything? A store-exclusive travel cup. At £8 each, our branded drinkware is rather swell, even if we do say so ourselves.

HackSpace: Wearable tech projects (and other books)

Ranging in price from £3.99 to around £15, our Raspberry Pi Press books and magazines are a great gift for anyone looking to learn more about making, electronics, or video gaming.

Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Guide

If you’ve heard your Secret Santa match mention that they like tinkering and making in their spare time, but you don’t think they’ve tried Raspberry Pi yet, this is the book for them. Updated to include the new Raspberry Pi 4 and upgrades to Scratch 3, our Beginner’s Guide will help them get started with this fabulous addition to their toolkit.

If you’re feeling generous…

These gifts are a little more than £10, and worth every penny. They’d make the perfect gift for anyone who loves making and Raspberry Pi.

Bearable badge kits


The Bearable badges are cute, light-activated LED badges that require no soldering or external computers. Instead, the kit uses conductive thread and sensors, making it a wonderful maker project for anyone, whether or not they’ve done any electronics before. Choose between an adorable sleepy fox and a lovable little bear, both at £15.

3D Xmas Tree

Available both as a pre-soldered kit (£15) and as a solder-yourself kit (£12), the 3D Xmas Tree is the ultimate festive HAT for Raspberry Pi. Once it’s assembled, you can use pre-written code to light it up, or code your own light show.

Still not sure?

The Raspberry Pi Store now offers gift cards, giving your giftee the chance to pick their own present. Add whatever value you’d like from a minimum of £5, and watch them grin with glee as they begin to plan their next project.

Plus, our wonderful Jack has designed these rather lovely Christmas tote bags, available exclusively in store and as a limited run!

But wait, there’s more!

We’ll be publishing our traditional Raspberry Pi gift guide soon. It’ll include all the tech and cool maker stuff your nearest and dearest will love to receive this holiday season, with links to buy online. If you think there’s something we shouldn’t miss, let us know in the comments below.

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Raspberry Pi snail habitats for Mrs Nation’s class

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-snail-habitats-for-mrs-nations-class/

These Raspberry Pis take hourly photographs of snails in plastic container habitats, sharing them to the Snail Habitat website.

Snails

While some might find them kind of icky, I am in love with snails (less so with their homeless cousin, the slug), so this snail habitat project from Mrs Nation’s class is right up my alley.

Snail Habitats



This project was done in a classroom with 22 students. We broke the kids out into groups and created 5 snail habitats. It would be a great project to do school-wide too, where you create 1 snail habitat per class. This would allow the entire school to get involved and monitor each other’s habitats.

Each snail habitat in Mrs Nation’s class is monitored by a Raspberry Pi and camera module, and Misty Lackie has written specific code to take a photo every hour, uploading the image to the dedicated Snail Habitat website. This allows the class to check in on their mollusc friends without disturbing their environment.

“I would love to see others habitats,” Misty states on the project’s GitHub repo, “so if you create one, please share it and I would be happy to publish it on snailhabitat.com.”

Snail facts according to Emma, our resident Bug Doctor

  • The World Snail Racing Championships take place in Norfolk every year. Emma’s friend took a snail there once, but it didn’t win.
  • Roman snails, while common in the UK, aren’t native to the country. They were brought to the country by the Romans. Emma is 99% sure this fact is correct.
  • Garlic snails, when agitated, emit a garlic scent. Helen likes the idea of self-seasoning escargots. Alex is less than convinced.
  • Snails have no backbone, making them awful wingmen during late-night pub brawls and confrontations.
  • This GIF may be fake:

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New book (with added computer): Get Started with Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/new-book-get-started-with-raspberry-pi/

The Raspberry Pi Press is really excited to announce the release of Get Started with Raspberry Pi. This isn’t just a book about a computer: it’s a book with a computer.

Ideal for beginners, this official guide and starter kit contains everything you need to get started with Raspberry Pi.

Inside you’ll find a Raspberry Pi 3A+, the official case, and a 16GB microSD memory card – preloaded with NOOBS, containing the Raspbian operating system. The accompanying 116-page book is packed with beginner’s guides to help you master your new Raspberry Pi!

  • Set up your new Raspberry Pi 3A+ for the first time.
  • Discover amazing software built for creative learning.
  • Learn how to program in Scratch and Python.
  • Control electronics: buttons, lights, and sensors.

A brilliant Christmas gift idea, it’s available now in the Raspberry Pi Press store. As always, we have also released the guide as a free PDF – minus the 3A+, case and SD card, of course!

Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Guide 3rd Edition

And that’s not all! We have also created a new edition of our popular Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Guide book.

As well as covering Raspberry Pi 4, this 252-page book features programming and physical computing projects updated for Scratch 3, which is available in the latest version of Raspbian.

It’s available now in the Raspberry Pi Press Store, with free worldwide delivery. And, as always, you can also download a free PDF version.

Free downloads: why?

Curious minds should make note that Raspberry Pi Press releases free downloadable PDFs of all publications on launch day. Why? Because, in line with our mission statement, we want to put the power of computing and digital making into the hands of people all over the world, and that includes the wealth of information we publish as part of Raspberry Pi Press.

We publish new issues of Wireframe magazine every two weeks, new issues of HackSpace magazine and The MagPi magazine every month, and project books such as The Book of Making, Wearable Tech Projects, and An Introduction to C & GUI Programming throughout the year.

If you’d like to own a physical copy of any of our publications, we offer free international shipping across our product range. You’ll also find many of our magazines in top UK supermarkets and newsagents, and in Barnes and Noble in the US.

 

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Project anyone’s face onto your own with Raspberry Pi Zero

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/project-anyones-face-onto-your-own-with-raspberry-pi-zero/

Sean Hodgins is back with a new Halloween-themed project, this time using a pico projector and a Raspberry Pi Zero to display images and animations onto a mask.

It’s kinda creepy but very, very cool.

Face Changing Projection Mask – Be Anyone

Have a hard time deciding what to be on Halloween? Just be everything. Some links for the project below. Support my Free Open Source Projects by becoming joining the Patreon!

Face-changing projection mask

Sean designed his own PCB – classic Sean – to connect the header pins of a Raspberry Pi Zero to a pico projector. He used Photoshop to modify video and image files in order to correct the angle of projection onto the mask.

He then 3D-printed this low poly mask from Thingiverse, adapting the design to allow him to attach it to a welding mask headband he purchased online.

As Sean explains in the video, there are a lot of great ways you can use the mask. Our favourite suggestion is using a camera to take a photo of someone and project their own face back at them. This idea is reminiscent of the As We Are project in Columbus, Ohio, where visitors sit inside a 14-foot tall head as their face is displayed on screens covering the outside.

For more of Sean’s excellent Raspberry Pi projects, check out his YouTube channel, and be sure to show him some love by clicking the ol’ subscribe button.

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Build a Raspberry Pi chartplotter for your boat

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-a-raspberry-pi-chartplotter-for-your-boat/

Earlier this year, James Conger built a chartplotter for his boat using a Raspberry Pi. Here he is with a detailed explanation of how everything works:

Building your own Chartplotter with a Raspberry Pi and OpenCPN

Provides an overview of the hardware and software needed to put together a home-made Chartplotter with its own GPS and AIS receiver. Cost for this project was about $350 US in 2019.

The entire build cost approximately $350. It incorporates a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, dAISy AIS receiver HAT, USB GPS module, and touchscreen display, all hooked up to his boat.



Perfect for navigating the often foggy San Francisco Bay, the chartplotter allows James to track the position, speed, and direction of major vessels in the area, superimposed over high-quality NOAA nautical charts.

Raspberry Pi at sea

For more nautically themed Raspberry Pi projects, check out Rekka Bellum and Devine Lu Linvega’s stunning Barometer and Ufuk Arslan’s battery-saving IoT boat hack.

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Rob’s Raspberry Pi Dungeons and Dragons table

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/robs-raspberry-pi-dungeons-and-dragons-table/

Rob made an interactive Dungeons and Dragons table using a Raspberry Pi and an old TV. He thought it best to remind me, just in case I had forgotten. I hadn’t forgotten. Honest. Here’s a photo of it.

The table connects to Roll20 via Chromium, displaying the quest maps while the GM edits and reveals the layout using their laptop. Yes, they could just plug their laptop directly into the monitor, but using the Raspberry Pi as a bridge means there aren’t any awkward wires in the way, and the GM can sit anywhere they want around the table.

Rob wrote up an entire project how-to for The MagPi magazine. Go forth and read it!

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The grilled cheese-making robot of your dreams

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-grilled-cheese-making-robot-of-your-dreams/

Ummm…YES PLEASE!

Cheeseborg: The Grilled Cheese Robot!

More cool stuff at http://www.tabb.me and http://www.evankhill.com Cheeseborg has one purpose: to create the best grilled cheese it possibly can! Cheeseborg is fully automated, voice activated, and easy to move. With Google Assistant SDK integration, Cheeseborg can even be used as a part of your smart home.

Does it use a Raspberry Pi, please?

Sometimes we’ll see a project online and find ourselves hoping and praying that it uses a Raspberry Pi, just so we have a reason to share it with you all.

That’s how it was when I saw Cheeseborg, the grilled cheese robot, earlier this week. “Please, please, please…” I prayed to the robot gods, as I chowed down on a grilled cheese at my desk (true story), and, by the grace of all that is good in this world, my plea was answered.

Cheeseborg: the grilled cheese robot

Cheeseborg uses both an Arduino Mega and a Raspberry Pi 3 in its quest to be the best ever automated chef in the world. The Arduino handles the mechanics, while our deliciously green wonder board runs the Google Assistant SDK, allowing you to make grilled cheese via voice command.

Saying “Google, make me a grilled cheese” will set in motion a series of events leading to the production of a perfectly pressed sammie, ideal for soup dunking or solo snacking.

The robot uses a vacuum lifter to pick up a slice of bread, dropping it onto an acrylic tray before repeating the process with a slice of cheese and then a second slice of bread. Then the whole thing is pushed into a panini press that has been liberally coated in butter spray (not shown for video aesthetics), and the sandwich is toasted, producing delicious ooey-gooey numminess out the other side.

Pareidolia much?

Here at Raspberry Pi, we give the Cheeseborg five slices out of five, and look forward to one day meeting Cheeseborg for real, so we can try out its scrummy wares.

ooooey-gooey numminess

You can find out more about Cheeseborg here.

Toastie or grilled cheese


Yes, there’s a difference: but which do you prefer? What makes them different? And what’s your favourite filling for this crispy, cheesy delight?

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Raspberry Pi retro gaming on Reddit

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-retro-gaming-on-reddit/

Reddit was alive with the sound of retro gaming this weekend.

First out to bat is this lovely minimalist, wall-mounted design built by u/sturnus-vulgaris, who states:

I had planned on making a bar top arcade, but after I built the control panel, I kind of liked the simplicity. I mounted a frame of standard 2×4s cut with a miter saw. Might trim out in black eventually (I have several panels I already purchased), but I do like the look of wood.

Next up, a build with Lego bricks, because who doesn’t love Lego bricks?

Just completed my mini arcade cabinet that consists of approximately 1,000 [Lego bricks], a Raspberry Pi, a SNES style controller, Amazon Basics computer speakers, and a 3.5″ HDMI display.

u/RealMagicman03 shared the build here, so be sure to give them an upvote and leave a comment if, like us, you love Raspberry Pi projects that involve Lego bricks.

And lastly, this wonderful use of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+, proving yet again how versatile the form factor can be.

CM3+Lite cartridge for GPi case. I made this cartridge for fun at first, and it works as all I expected. Now I can play more games l like on this lovely portable stuff. And CM3+ is as powerful as RPi3B+, I really like it.

Creator u/martinx72 goes into far more detail in their post, so be sure to check it out.

What other projects did you see this weekend? Share your links with us in the comments below.

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We love a good pen plotter

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/we-love-a-good-pen-plotter/

BrachioGraph touts itself as the cheapest, simplest possible pen plotter, so, obviously, we were keen to find out more. Because, if there’s one thing we like about our community, it’s your ability to recreate large, expensive pieces of tech with a few cheap components and, of course, a Raspberry Pi.

So, does BrachioGraph have what it takes? Let’s find out.

Raspberry Pi pen plotter

The project ingredients list calls for two sticks or pieces of stiff card and, right off the bat, we’re already impressed with the household item ingenuity that had gone into building BrachioGraph. It’s always fun to see Popsicle sticks used in tech projects, and we reckon that a couple of emery boards would also do the job  although a robot with add-on nail files sounds a little too Simone Giertz, if you ask us. Simone, if you’re reading this…

You’ll also need a pencil or ballpoint pen, a peg, three servomotors, and a $5 Raspberry Pi Zero. That’s it. They weren’t joking when they said this plotter was simple.

The plotter runs on a Python script, and all the code for the project has been supplied for free. You can find it all on the BrachioGraph website, here.

We’ll be trying out the plotter for ourselves here at Pi Towers, and we’d love to see if any of you give it a go, so let us know in the comments.

 

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Musically synced car windscreen wipers using Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/musically-synced-car-windscreen-wipers-using-raspberry-pi/

Hey there! I’ve just come back from a two-week vacation, Liz and Helen are both off sick, and I’m not 100% sure I remember how to do my job.

So, while I figure out how to social media and word write, here’s this absolutely wonderful video from Ian Charnas, showing how he hacked his car windscreen wipers to sync with his stereo.

FINALLY! Wipers Sync to Music

In this video, I modify my car so the windshield wipers sync to the beat of whatever music I’m listening to. You can own this idea!

Ian will be auctioning off the intellectual property rights to his dancing wipers on eBay, will all proceeds going to a charity supporting young makers.

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Fantastic Star Wars-themed Raspberry Pi projects

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/fantastic-star-wars-themed-raspberry-pi-projects/

The weekend’s nearly here and the weather’s not looking too fantastic around these parts – we’re going to need some project ideas. Here’s a fun roundup of some of my favourite Star Wars-themed makes from the archive that I reckon you’ll really like.

Because, well, who doesn’t like Star Wars, right? Tell us which is your favourite in the comments.

Make your own custom LEDs using hot glue!

Grab a glue gun and your favourite Star Wars-themed ice cube trays to create your own custom LEDs, perfect for upping the wow factor of your next Raspberry Pi project. Learn how.

Build your own Star Wars droid

She may just have won a billion awards for Fleabag, but Phoebe Waller-Bridge is also known to some as the voice of L3-37, the salty droid companion of Lando Calrissian in Solo: A Star Wars Story.

Thanks to Patrick PatchBOTS Stefanski, you can build your own. Find out more.

Solo Star Wars Story L3-37 droid PatchBOTS

Darth Beats: Star Wars LEGO gets a musical upgrade

LEGO + Star Wars + Raspberry Pi? Yes please! Upgrade your favourite Star Wars merch to play music via the Pimoroni Speaker pHAT, thanks to Dan Aldred.

Darth Beats dremel

Star Wars Minecraft

There’s a reason Martin O’Hanlon is part of the Raspberry Pi Foundation team. This recreation of Star Wars Episode IV may or may not have been it – you decide.

Build your own Death Star… sort of

LED rings spinning at 300rpm around a Raspberry Pi? Yes please. Not only is this project an impressive feat of engineering, but it’s also super pretty! Find out more, young Padawan.

POV Globe Death Star

Do. Or do not. There is no Pi (sorry)

Are there any Star Wars-related Raspberry Pi projects we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below!

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View Stonehenge in real time via Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/view-stonehenge-in-real-time-via-raspberry-pi/

You can see how the skies above Stonehenge affect the iconic stones via a web browser thanks to a Raspberry Pi computer.

Stonehenge

Stonehenge is Britain’s greatest monument and it currently attracts more than 1.5 million visitors each year. It’s possible to walk around the iconic stone circle and visit the Neolithic houses outside the visitor centre. Yet, worries about potential damage have forced preservationists to limit access.

With that in mind, Eric Winbolt, Interim Head of Digital/Innovation at English Heritage, had a brainwave. “We decided to give people an idea of what it’s like to see the sunrise and sunset within the circle, and allow them to enjoy the skies over Stonehenge in real time without actually stepping inside,” he explains.

This could have been achieved by permanently positioning a camera within the stone circle, but this was ruled out for fear of being too intrusive. Instead, Eric and developers from The Bespoke Pixel agency snapped a single panoramic shot of the circle’s interior using a large 8K high-res, 360-degree camera when the shadows and light were quite neutral.

“We then took the sky out of the image with the aim of capturing an approximation of the view without impacting on the actual stones themselves,” Eric says.

Stone me

By taking a separate hemispherical snapshot of the sky from a nearby position and merging it with the master photograph of the stones, the team discovered they could create a near real-time effect for online visitors. They used an off-the-shelf, upwards-pointing, 220-degree fish-eye lens camera connected to a Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ computer, taking images once every four minutes.

This Raspberry Pi was also fitted with a Pimoroni Enviro pHAT containing atmospheric, air pressure, and light sensors. Captured light values from the sky image were then used to alter the colour values of the master image of the stones so that the light on Stonehenge, as seen via the web, reflected the ambient light of the sky.

What can you see?

“What it does is give a view of the stones as it looks right now, or at least within a few minutes,” says Eric. “It also means the effect doesn’t look like two images simply Photoshopped together.”

Indeed, coder Mark Griffiths says the magic all runs from Node.js. “It uses a Python shell to get the sensor data and integrates with Amazon’s AWS and an IoT messaging service called DweetPro to tie all the events together,” he adds.

There was also a lot of experimentation. “We used the HAT via the I2C connectors so that we could mount it away from the main board to get better temperature readings,” says Mark, “We also tried a number of experiments with different cameras, lenses, and connections and it became clear that just connecting the camera via USB didnít allow access to the full functionality and resolutions.”

Mark reverse-engineered the camera’s WiFi connection and binary protocol to work out how to communicate with it via Raspberry Pi so that full-quality images could be taken and downloaded. “We also found the camera’s WiFi connection would time out after several days,” reveals Mark, “so we had to use a relay board connected via the GPIO pins.”
With such issues resolved, the team then created an easy-to-use online interface that lets users click boxes and see the view over the past 24 hours. They also added a computer model to depict the night sky.

“Visitors can go to the website day and night and allow the tool to pan around Stonehenge or pause it and pan manually, viewing the stones as they would be at the time of visiting,” Eric says. “It can look especially good on a smart television. It’s very relaxing.”

View the stones in realtime right now by visiting the English Heritage website.

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Tinkernut’s Raspberry Pi video guide

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/tinkernuts-raspberry-pi-video-guide/

“If you’ve ever been curious about electronics or programming, then the Raspberry Pi is an excellent tool to have in your arsenal,” enthuses Tinkernut in his latest video, Raspberry Pi – All You Need To Know.

And we aren’t going to argue with that.

Raspberry Pi – All You Need To Know

If you keep your ear to the Tinkering community, I’m sure you’ve heard whispers (and shouts) of the Raspberry Pi. And if you wanted to get into making, tinkering, computing, or electronics, the Raspberry Pi is a great tool to have in your tool belt. But what is it?

“This Pi can knit a Hogwarts sweater while saving a cat from a tree,” he declares. “It can recite the Canterbury Tales while rebuilding an engine.” Tinkernut’s new explainer comes after a short hiatus from content creation, and it’s a cracking little intro to what Raspberry Pi is, what it can do, and which model is right for you.

“This little pincushion, right here”

Tinkernut, we’re glad you’re back. And thank you for making us your first subject in your new format.

If you like what you see, be sure to check out more Tinkernut videos, and subscribe.

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Another snazzy Raspberry Pi wallpaper for your phone and computer

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/another-snazzy-raspberry-pi-wallpaper-for-your-phone-and-computer/

After the success of our last snazzy wallpaper for your computer and smartphone, Fiacre is back with another visual delight.

Click one of the images below to visit the appropriate download page!



Standard rules apply: these images are for personal use only and are not to be manipulated, printed, turned into t-shirts, glazed onto mugs or sold.

Let us know in the comments if you decide to use the wallpaper, or tag a photo with #SnazzyRPi on Twitter and Instagram.

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Using data to help a school garden

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/using-data-to-help-a-school-garden/

Chris Aviles, aka the teacher we all wish we’d had when we were at school, discusses how his school is in New Jersey is directly linking data with life itself…

Over to you, Chris.

Every year, our students take federal or state-mandated testing, but what significant changes have we made to their education with the results of these tests? We have never collected more data about our students and society in general. The problem is most people and institutions do a poor job interpreting data and using it to make meaningful change. This problem was something I wanted to tackle in FH Grows.

FH Grows is the name of my seventh-grade class, and is a student-run agriculture business at Knollwood Middle School in Fair Haven, New Jersey. In FH Grows, we sell our produce both online and through our student-run farmers markets. Any produce we don’t sell is donated to our local soup kitchen. To get the most out of our school gardens, students have built sensors and monitors using Raspberry Pis. These sensors collect data which then allows me to help students learn to better interpret data themselves and turn it into action.

Turning data into action

In the greenhouse, our gardens, and alternative growing stations (hydroponics, aquaponics, aeroponics) we have sensors that log the temperature, humidity, and other important data points that we want to know about our garden. This data is then streamed in real time, online at FHGrows.com. When students come into the classroom, one of the first things we look at is the current, live data on the site and find out what is going on in our gardens. Over the course of the semester, students are taught about the ideal growing conditions of our garden. When looking at the data, if we see that the conditions in our gardens aren’t ideal, we get to work.

If we see that the greenhouse is too hot, over 85 degrees, students will go and open the greenhouse door. We check the temperature a little bit later, and if it’s still too hot, students will go turn on the fan. But how many fans do you turn on? After experimenting, we know that each fan lowers the greenhouse temperature between 7-10 degrees Fahrenheit. Opening the door and turning on both fans can bring a greenhouse than can push close to 100 degrees in late May or early June down to a manageable 80 degrees.

Turning data into action can allow for some creativity as well. Over-watering plants can be a real problem. We found that our plants were turning yellow because we were watering them every day when we didn’t need to. How could we solve this problem and become more efficient at watering? Students built a Raspberry Pi that used a moisture sensor to find out when a plant needed to be watered. We used a plant with the moisture sensor in the soil as our control plant. We figured that if we watered the control plant at the same time we watered all our other plants, when the control plant was dry (gave a negative moisture signal) the rest of the plants in the greenhouse would need to be watered as well.

Chris Aviles Innovation Lab Raspberry Pi Certified Educator

This method of determining when to water our plants worked well. We rarely ever saw our plants turn yellow from overwatering. Here is where the creativity came in. Since we received a signal from the Raspberry Pi when the soil was not wet enough, we played around with what we could do with that signal. We displayed it on the dashboard along with our other data, but we also decided to make the signal send as an email from the plant. When I showed students how this worked, they decided to write the message from the plant in the first person. Every week or so, we received an email from Carl the Control Plant asking us to come out and water him!

 

If students don’t honour Carl’s request for water, use data to know when to cool our greenhouse, or had not done the fan experiments to see how much cooler they make the greenhouse, all our plants, like the basil we sell to the pizza places in town, would die. This is the beauty of combining data literacy with a school garden: failure to interpret data then act based on their interpretation has real consequences: our produce could die. When it takes 60-120 days to grow the average vegetable, the loss of plants is a significant event. We lose all the time and energy that went into growing those plants as well as lose all the revenue they would have brought in for us. Further, I love the urgency that combining data and the school garden creates because many students have learned the valuable life lesson that not making a decision is making a decision. If students freeze or do nothing when confronted with the data about the garden, that too has consequences.

Using data to spot trends and make predictions

The other major way we use data in FH Grows is to spot trends and make predictions. Different to using data to create the ideal growing conditions in our garden every day, the sensors that we use also provide a way for us to use information about the past to predict the future. FH Grows has about two years’ worth of weather data from our Raspberry Pi weather station (there are guides online if you wish to build a weather station of your own). Using weather data year over year, we can start to determine important events like when it is best to plant our veggies in our garden.

For example, one of the most useful data points on the Raspberry Pi weather station is the ground temperature sensor. Last semester, we wanted to squeeze in a cool weather grow in our garden. This post-winter grow can be done between March and June if you time it right. Getting an extra growing cycle from our garden is incredibly valuable, not only to FH Grows as business (since we would be growing more produce to turn around and sell) but as a way to get an additional learning cycle out of the garden.

So, using two seasons’ worth of ground temperature data, we set out to predict when the ground in our garden would be cool enough to do this cool veggie grow. Students looked at the data we had from our weather station and compared it to different websites that predicted the last frost of the season in our area. We found that the ground right outside our door warmed up two weeks earlier than the more general prediction given by websites. With this information we were able to get a full cool crop grow at a time where our garden used to lay dormant.

We also used our Raspberry Pi to help us predict whether or not it was going to rain over the weekend. Using a Raspberry Pi connected to Weather Underground and previous years’ data, if we believed it would not rain over the weekend we would water our gardens on Friday. If it looked like rain over the weekend, we let Mother Nature water our garden for us. Our prediction using the Pi and previous data was more accurate for our immediate area than compared to the more general weather reports you would get on the radio or an app, since those considered a much larger area when making their prediction.

It seems like we are going to be collecting even more data in the future, not less. It is important that we get our students comfortable working with data. The school garden supported by Raspberry Pi’s amazing ability to collect data is a boon for any teacher who wants to help students learn how to interpret data and turn it into action.
 

Hello World issue 10

Issue 10 of Hello World magazine is out today, and it’s free. 100% free.

Click here to download the PDF right now. Right this second. If you want to be a love, click here to subscribe, again for free. Subscribers will receive an email when the latest issue is out, and we won’t use your details for anything nasty.

If you’re an educator in the UK, click here and you’ll receive the printed version of Hello World direct to your door. And, guess what? Yup, that’s free too!

What I’m trying to say here is that there is a group of hard-working, passionate educators who take the time to write incredible content for Hello World, for free, and you would be doing them (and us, and your students, kids and/or friends) a solid by reading it 🙂

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Raspberry Pi interactive wind chimes

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/interactive-wind-chimes/

Grab yourself a Raspberry Pi, a Makey Makey, and some copper pipes: it’s interactive wind chime time!

Perpetual Chimes

Perpetual Chimes is a set of augmented wind chimes that offer an escapist experience where your collaboration composes the soundscape. Since there is no wind indoors, the chimes require audience interaction to gently tap or waft them and encourage/nurture the hidden sounds within – triggering sounds as the chimes strike one another.

Normal wind chimes pale in comparison

I don’t like wind chimes. There, I said it. I also don’t like the ticking of the second hand of analogue clocks, and I think these two dislikes might be related. There’s probably a name for this type of dislike, but I’ll leave the Googling to you.

Sound designer Frazer Merrick’s interactive wind chimes may actually be the only wind chimes I can stand. And this is due, I believe, to the wonderful sounds they create when they touch, much more wonderful than regular wind chime sounds. And, obviously, because these wind chimes incorporate a Raspberry Pi 3.

Perpetual Chimes is a set of augmented wind chimes that offer an escapist experience where your collaboration composes the soundscape. Since there is no wind indoors, the chimes require audience interaction to gently tap or waft them and encourage/nurture the hidden sounds within — triggering sounds as the chimes strike one another. Since the chimes make little acoustic noise, essentially they’re broken until you collaborate with them.

Follow the Instructables tutorial to create your own!

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