Tag Archives: YouTubers

Build a Raspberry Pi Zero W Amazon price tracker

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-a-raspberry-pi-zero-w-amazon-price-tracker/

Have you ever missed out on a great deal on Amazon because you were completely unaware it existed? Are you interested in a specific item but waiting for it to go on sale? Here’s help: Devscover’s latest video shows you how to create an Amazon price tracker using Raspberry Pi Zero W and Python.

Build An Amazon Price Tracker With Python

Wayne from Devscover shows you how to code a Amazon Price Tracker with Python! Get started with your first Python project. Land a job at a big firm like Google, Facebook, Twitter or even the less well known but equally exciting big retail organisations or Government with Devscover tutorials and tips.

By following their video tutorial, you can set up a notification system on Raspberry Pi Zero W that emails you every time your chosen item’s price drops. Very nice.

Devscover’s tutorial is so detailed that it seems a waste to try and summarise it here. So instead, why not make yourself a cup of tea and sit down with the video? It’s worth the time investment: if you follow the instructions, you’ll end up with a great piece of tech that’ll save you money!

Remember, if you like what you see, subscribe to the Devscover YouTube channel and give them a thumbs-up for making wonderful Raspberry Pi content!

The post Build a Raspberry Pi Zero W Amazon price tracker appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Can you connect a Raspberry Pi to a GoPro Hero 6?

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/can-you-connect-a-raspberry-pi-to-a-gopro-hero-6/

A contractor is drilling in the office space above ours, and it sounds like we’re under attack by a swarm of very angry, Transformeresque bees. We can’t hear ourselves think. Although we can hear the drills.

Because of this disruption, I (Alex) am unable to focus on words. [Ed’s note: me too. We apologies for any typos.] So here you go. Have an interesting video from YouTuber Blitz City DIY.

Can you help Liz create a wireless monitor for her GoPro Hero 6 using VLC on a Raspberry Pi despite the latest changes to GoPro software?

DIY FYI: GoPro and Wi-Fi

I wanted to create a wireless monitor for my GoPro Hero 6 using VLC on a Raspberry Pi but immediately ran into issues concerning Wi-Fi on the newer GoPro models (basically the GoPro Hero 4 and up).

Reply in the comments of the video, or here if you don’t have a YouTube account. Meanwhile, I will slowly be losing my mind, cowering under my desk with my fingers in my ears.

The post Can you connect a Raspberry Pi to a GoPro Hero 6? appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

TechWiser’s giant Raspberry Pi AirPod speaker (and more)

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/techwisers-giant-raspberry-pi-airpod-speaker-and-more/

YouTube is a haven for awesome Raspberry Pi projects, and we often spend time scanning through the platform’s wares for hidden gems. One such hidden gem is this video from TechWiser, in which they showcase some of their favourite Raspberry Pi projects:

Cool Raspberry Pi 4 Projects We Use At TechWiser

Here are some of the best projects we use at TechWiser office.

From installing PiHole in the office, to upgrading a cupboard with RFID recognition for keyless entry, TechWiser has the whole ‘incorporating Raspberry Pi into everything’ thing down to a fine art.

But it’s not all just about practicality. Does anyone really need a giant Apple AirPod? No. But, does the idea of a giant Apple AirPod sound cool? You betcha!

And their YouTube button that flashes whenever they earn a new subscriber is rather lovely too. I wonder if they noticed it flash when Raspberry Pi subscribed to their channel?

TechWiser’s YouTube channel contains a plethora of Raspberry Pi and tech tutorials and reviews, and you should definitely check them out.

The post TechWiser’s giant Raspberry Pi AirPod speaker (and more) appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Connect your Raspberry Pi 4 to an iPad Pro

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/connect-your-raspberry-pi-4-to-an-ipad-pro/

Have you ever considered attaching your Raspberry Pi 4 to an Apple iPad Pro? How would you do it, and why would you want to? Here’s YouTuber Tech Craft to explain why Raspberry Pi 4 is their favourite iPad Pro accessory, and why you may want to consider using yours in the same way.

We’ve set the video to start at Tech Craft’s explanation.

My Favourite iPad Pro Accessory: The Raspberry Pi 4

The Raspberry Pi 4 is my favourite accessory to use with the iPad Pro. In this video, learn more about what the Pi can do, what gear you need to get running with one, how to connect it to your iPad and what you’ll find it useful for.

 

Having installed Raspbian on Raspberry Pi and configured the computer to use USB-C as an Ethernet connection (read Ben Hardill’s guide to find out how to do this), Tech Craft could select it as an Ethernet device in the iPad’s Settings menu.

So why would you want to connect your Raspberry Pi 4 to your iPad? For starters, using your iPad instead of a conventional HDMI monitor will free up desk space, and also allow you to edit your code on the move. And when you’ve connected the two devices like this, you don’t need a separate power lead for Raspberry Pi, because the iPad powers the computer. So this setup is perfect for train or plane journeys, or for that moment when your robot stops working at a Raspberry Jam, or for maker conventions.

You can also use Raspberry Pi as a bridge between your iPad and portable hard drive, for disk management.

Tech Craft uses the SSH client Blink to easily connect to their Raspberry Pi via its fixed IP address, and with Juno Connect, they connect to a running Jupyter instance on their Raspberry Pi to do data science work.

For more information on using Raspberry Pi with an iPad, make sure you watch the whole video. And, because you’re a lovely person, be sure to subscribe to Tech Craft for more videos, such as this one on how to connect wirelessly to your Raspberry Pi from any computer or tablet:

Mobile Raspberry Pi with ANY iPad. No USB-C needed.

Following on my from earlier video about pairing the Raspberry Pi 4 with the iPad Pro over USB-C, this video show how to pair any iPad (or iPhone, or Android tablet) with a Pi4 or a Pi3 over WiFi.

The post Connect your Raspberry Pi 4 to an iPad Pro appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

How to control multiple servo motors with Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/how-to-control-multiple-servo-motors-with-raspberry-pi/

In the latest Explaining Computers video, Christopher Barnatt explains how to use servo motors with Raspberry Pi. Using servos is a great introduction to the digital making side of computing; servos allow you to control the movement of all manner of project components with your Raspberry Pi and a motor controller attached to its GPIO pins.

Raspberry Pi Servo Motor Control

Control of SG90 servos in Python on a Raspberry Pi, including an explanation of PWM and how a servo differs from a motor. You can download the code from the video at: https://www.explainingcomputers.com/pi_servos_video.html The five-pack of SG90 servos used in this video was purchased on Amazon.co.uk here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07H9VC698/ref=nosim?tag=explainin-21 with a similar product on Amazon.com here: https://amzn.to/2QHshx3 (affiliate links).

Servos and your Raspberry Pi

Christopher picked up his SG90 servo motors online, where you’ll find a variety of servo options. What type of servo you need depends on the project you want to create, so be sure to consider the weight and size of what you plan to move, and the speed at which you need to move it.

As the motor controller connects via GPIO, you can even use the tiny £5 Raspberry Pi Zero to control your servo, which makes adding movement to your projects an option even when you’re under tight space constraints.

Find out more

For other detailed computing videos, be sure to subscribe to the Explaining Computers YouTube channel.

And for more Raspberry Pi projects, check out the Raspberry Pi projects page.

Raspberry Pi projects PSA

We’re always looking for people to join our incredible community of translators to help us translate our free resources, including the free projects found on our projects page.

If you speak English and another language and would like to give a portion of your time to making our resources available to more people across the globe, sign up as a translator today.

The post How to control multiple servo motors with Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Brass freeform circuit (Raspberry Pi) Instagram tracker

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/brass-freeform-circuit-raspberry-pi-instagram-tracker/

A few of our favourite online makers decided to take part in a makers’ Secret Santa, producing home-made gifts based on their skills. So, OBVIOUSLY, Estefannie used a Raspberry Pi. Thanks, Estefannie.

HOW I HACKED INSTAGRAM FOR MY SECRET SANTA

I got in a Maker Secret Santa this year so I decided to make a thing and hack Instagram for it. #YTMakersSecretSanta MAKERS SECRET SANTA! FOLLOW EVERYONE: Kids Invent Stuff https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-glo52BMvZH9PPUamjGIcw Colin Furze https://www.youtube.com/user/colinfurze The Hacksmithhttps://www.youtube.com/user/MstrJames Look Mum No Computer https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCafxR2HWJRmMfSdyZXvZMTw Sufficiently Advanced https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVS89U86PwqzNkK2qYNbk5A Subscribe to my channel if you’d like to be the first to know when I publish the next video 🙂 Let me know what other videos you would like to see.

In the video above, Estefannie uses a Raspberry Pi to hack Instagram to illuminate a handmade freeform circuit whenever Kids Invent Stuff gains a like on a post.

“But why not use the Instagram API?”, I hear you cry. Well, as Estefannie explains, she wanted the gift to be a surprise, and if she had used the Instagram API, she would have had to have asked them for their details in order to access it.

Watch to the end of the video to see the gift that Estefannie received from her Secret Santa, a certain Colin Furze. You can see his complete build video for the Cat-o-Matic below.

CAT-O-MATIC auto cat feeder/terrifier YTMakers Secret Santa

Fear not your cat feeding issues are sorted………..Furzestyle No cat was harmed in making of this but it did run off……….but came back and is fine. Thanks to the Kids Invent Stuff channel for organising this Secret Santa check them out here https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-glo52BMvZH9PPUamjGIcw And the other channels involved Estefannie Explains https://www.youtube.com/user/estefanniegg Sufficiently Advanced https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVS89U86PwqzNkK2qYNbk5A Look Mum No Computer https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCafxR2HWJRmMfSdyZXvZMTw The Hacksmiths https://www.youtube.com/user/MstrJames Check out the new FURZE Merch store.

The post Brass freeform circuit (Raspberry Pi) Instagram tracker appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

How to run a script at start-up on a Raspberry Pi using crontab

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/how-to-run-a-script-at-start-up-on-a-raspberry-pi-using-crontab/

Do you need to run a script whenever your Raspberry Pi turns on? Here’s Estefannie to explain how to edit crontab to do exactly that.

How to start a script at start-up on a Raspberry Pi // LEARN SOMETHING

Do you want your Raspberry Pi to automatically run your code when it is connected to power? Then you are in the right place. In this new #LEARNSOMETHING video I show you how to make you Raspberry Pi run your script automatically when it is connected to a power source.

Running script on startup

While there are many ways of asking your Raspberry Pi to run a script on start-up, crontab -e is definitely one of the easiest.

AND, as Estefannie explains (in part thanks to me bugging asking her to do so), if you create a run folder on your desktop, you can switch out the Python scripts you want to run at start-up whenever you like and will never have to edit crontab again!

Weeeeee!

Now go write some wonderful and inspiring festive scripts while I take a well-earned nap. I just got off a plane yet here I am, writing blog posts for y’all because I love you THAT DARN MUCH!

A fluffy cat

This is Teddy. Teddy is also in the video.

And don’t forget to like and subscribe for more Estefannie Explains it All goodness!

The post How to run a script at start-up on a Raspberry Pi using crontab appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Really, really awesome Raspberry Pi NeoPixel LED mirror

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/awesome-neopixel-led-mirror/

Check out Super Make Something’s awesome NeoPixel LED mirror: a 576 RGB LED display that converts images via the Raspberry Pi Camera Module and Raspberry Pi 3B+ into a pixelated light show.

Neopixel LED Mirror (Python, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, 3D Printing, Laser Cutting!) DIY How To

Time to pull out all the stops for the biggest Super Make Something project to date! Using 3D printing, laser cutting, a Raspberry Pi, computer vision, Python, and nearly 600 Neopixel LEDs, I build a low resolution LED mirror that displays your reflection on a massive 3 foot by 3 foot grid made from an array of 24 by 24 RGB LEDs!

Mechanical mirrors

If you’re into cool uses of tech, you may be aware of Daniel Rozin, the creative artist building mechanical mirrors out of wooden panels, trash, and…penguins, to name but a few of his wonderful builds.

A woman standing in front of a mechanical mirror made of toy penguins

Yup, this is a mechanical mirror made of toy penguins.

A digital mechanical mirror?

Inspired by Daniel Rozin’s work, Alex, the person behind Super Make Something, put an RGB LED spin on the concept, producing this stunning mirror that thoroughly impressed visitors at Cleveland Maker Faire last month.

“Inspired by Danny Rozin’s mechanical mirrors, this 3 foot by 3 foot mirror is powered by a Raspberry Pi, and uses Python and OpenCV computer vision libraries to process captured images in real time to light up 576 individual RGB LEDs!” Alex explains on Instagram. “Also onboard are nearly 600 3D-printed squares to diffuse the light from each NeoPixel, as well as 16 laser-cut panels to hold everything in place!”

The video above gives a brilliantly detailed explanation of how Alex made the, so we highly recommend giving it a watch if you’re feeling inspired to make your own.

Seriously, we really want to make one of these for Raspberry Pi Towers!

As always, be sure to subscribe to Super Make Something on YouTube and leave a comment on the video if, like us, you love the project. Most online makers are producing content such as this with very little return on their investment, so every like and subscriber really does make a difference.

The post Really, really awesome Raspberry Pi NeoPixel LED mirror appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Project anyone’s face onto your own with Raspberry Pi Zero

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/project-anyones-face-onto-your-own-with-raspberry-pi-zero/

Sean Hodgins is back with a new Halloween-themed project, this time using a pico projector and a Raspberry Pi Zero to display images and animations onto a mask.

It’s kinda creepy but very, very cool.

Face Changing Projection Mask – Be Anyone

Have a hard time deciding what to be on Halloween? Just be everything. Some links for the project below. Support my Free Open Source Projects by becoming joining the Patreon!

Face-changing projection mask

Sean designed his own PCB – classic Sean – to connect the header pins of a Raspberry Pi Zero to a pico projector. He used Photoshop to modify video and image files in order to correct the angle of projection onto the mask.

He then 3D-printed this low poly mask from Thingiverse, adapting the design to allow him to attach it to a welding mask headband he purchased online.

As Sean explains in the video, there are a lot of great ways you can use the mask. Our favourite suggestion is using a camera to take a photo of someone and project their own face back at them. This idea is reminiscent of the As We Are project in Columbus, Ohio, where visitors sit inside a 14-foot tall head as their face is displayed on screens covering the outside.

For more of Sean’s excellent Raspberry Pi projects, check out his YouTube channel, and be sure to show him some love by clicking the ol’ subscribe button.

The post Project anyone’s face onto your own with Raspberry Pi Zero appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Musically synced car windscreen wipers using Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/musically-synced-car-windscreen-wipers-using-raspberry-pi/

Hey there! I’ve just come back from a two-week vacation, Liz and Helen are both off sick, and I’m not 100% sure I remember how to do my job.

So, while I figure out how to social media and word write, here’s this absolutely wonderful video from Ian Charnas, showing how he hacked his car windscreen wipers to sync with his stereo.

FINALLY! Wipers Sync to Music

In this video, I modify my car so the windshield wipers sync to the beat of whatever music I’m listening to. You can own this idea!

Ian will be auctioning off the intellectual property rights to his dancing wipers on eBay, will all proceeds going to a charity supporting young makers.

The post Musically synced car windscreen wipers using Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Tinkernut’s Raspberry Pi video guide

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/tinkernuts-raspberry-pi-video-guide/

“If you’ve ever been curious about electronics or programming, then the Raspberry Pi is an excellent tool to have in your arsenal,” enthuses Tinkernut in his latest video, Raspberry Pi – All You Need To Know.

And we aren’t going to argue with that.

Raspberry Pi – All You Need To Know

If you keep your ear to the Tinkering community, I’m sure you’ve heard whispers (and shouts) of the Raspberry Pi. And if you wanted to get into making, tinkering, computing, or electronics, the Raspberry Pi is a great tool to have in your tool belt. But what is it?

“This Pi can knit a Hogwarts sweater while saving a cat from a tree,” he declares. “It can recite the Canterbury Tales while rebuilding an engine.” Tinkernut’s new explainer comes after a short hiatus from content creation, and it’s a cracking little intro to what Raspberry Pi is, what it can do, and which model is right for you.

“This little pincushion, right here”

Tinkernut, we’re glad you’re back. And thank you for making us your first subject in your new format.

If you like what you see, be sure to check out more Tinkernut videos, and subscribe.

The post Tinkernut’s Raspberry Pi video guide appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Build a Raspberry Pi music box with Sally Le Page

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-a-raspberry-pi-music-box-with-sally-le-page/

Connecting buttons to the GPIO pins of your Raspberry Pi instantly opens up your digital making to the world of clicky funtimes.

Sally Le Page

Our Music Box project teaches you how to connect several buttons to your Raspberry Pi and write code to make them trigger cool sound effects.

It’s fun. It’s easy. And we roped Sally Le Page into helping us show you how you can do it yourself, in your own home!

Here Sally is, and here’s the link to the updated online project for you to get stuck into.

Build a Raspberry Pi music box ft. Dr Sally Le Page

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspberry Pi from one of our Approved Resellers: http://rpf.io/ytproducts Find out more about the #RaspberryPi Foundation: Raspberry Pi http://rpf.io/ytrpi Code Club UK http://rpf.io/ytccuk Code Club International http://rpf.io/ytcci CoderDojo http://rpf.io/ytcd Check out our free online training courses: http://rpf.io/ytfl Find your local Raspberry Jam event: http://rpf.io/ytjam Work through our free online projects: http://rpf.io/ytprojects Do you have a question about your Raspberry Pi?

The post Build a Raspberry Pi music box with Sally Le Page appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

The world’s first Raspberry Pi-powered Twitter-activated jelly bean-pooping unicorn

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-powered-twitter-activated-jelly-bean-pooping-unicorn/

When eight-year-old Tru challenged the Kids Invent Stuff team to build a sparkly, pooping, rainbow unicorn electric vehicle, they did exactly that. And when Kids Invent Stuff, also known as Ruth and Shawn, got in contact with Estefannie Explains it All, their unicorn ended up getting an IoT upgrade…because obviously.

You tweet and the Unicorn poops candy! | Kids Invent Stuff

We bring kids’ inventions to life and this month we teamed up with fellow youtube Estefannie (from Estefannie Explains It All https://www.youtube.com/user/estefanniegg SHE IS EPIC!) to modify Tru’s incredible sweet pooping unicorn to be activated by the internet! Featuring the AMAZING Allen Pan https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVS89U86PwqzNkK2qYNbk5A (Thanks Allen for your filming and tweeting!)

Kids Invent Stuff

If you’re looking for an exciting, wholesome, wonderful YouTube channel suitable for the whole family, look no further than Kids Invent Stuff. Challenging kids to imagine wonderful inventions based on monthly themes, channel owners Ruth and Shawn then make these kids’ ideas a reality. Much like the Astro Pi Challenge, Kids Invent Stuff is one of those things we adults wish existed when we were kids. We’re not jealous, we’re just…OK, we’re definitely jealous.

ANYWAY, when eight-year-old Tru’s sparkly, pooping, rainbow unicorn won the channel’s ‘crazy new vehicle’ challenge, the team got to work, and the result is magical.

Riding an ELECTRIC POOPING UNICORN! | Kids Invent Stuff

We built 8-year-old Tru’s sparkly, pooping, rainbow unicorn electric vehicle and here’s what happened when we drove it for the first time and pooped out some jelly beans! A massive THANK YOU to our challenge sponsor The Big Bang Fair: https://www.thebigbangfair.co.uk The Big Bang Fair is the UK’s biggest celebration of STEM for young people!

But could a sparkly, pooping, rainbow unicorn electric vehicle ever be enough? Is anything ever enough if it’s not connected to the internet? Of course not. And that’s where Estefannie came in.

At Maker Central in Birmingham earlier this year, the two YouTube teams got together to realise their shared IoT dream.

They ran out of chairs for their panel, so Allen had to improvise

With the help of a Raspberry Pi Zero W connected to the relay built into the unicorn, the team were able to write code that combs through Twitter, looking for mentions of @mythicalpoops. A positive result triggers the Raspberry Pi to activate the relay, and the unicorn lifts its tail to shoot jelly beans at passers-by.

You can definitely tell this project was invented by an eight-year-old, and we love it!

IoT unicorn

As you can see in the video above, the IoT upgrades to the unicorn allow Twitter users to control when the mythical beast poops its jelly beans. There are rumours that the unicorn may be coming to live with us at Pi Towers, but if these turn out to be true, we’ll ensure that this function is turned off. So no tweeting the unicorn!

You know what to do

Be sure to subscribe to both Kids Invent Stuff and Estefannie Explains It All on YouTube. They’re excellent makers producing wonderful content, and we know you’ll love them.

How to milk a unicorn

The post The world’s first Raspberry Pi-powered Twitter-activated jelly bean-pooping unicorn appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi 4: 48 hours later

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-4-48-hours-later/

“We’ve never felt more betrayed and excited at the same time,” admitted YouTubers 8 Bits and a Byte when I told them Raspberry Pi 4 would be out in June, going against rumours of the release happening at some point in 2020. Fortunately, everything worked in our favour, and we were able to get our new product out ahead of schedule.

So, while we calm down from the hype of Monday, here’s some great third-party content for you to get your teeth into.

YouTubers

A select few online content creators were allowed to get their hands on Raspberry Pi 4 before its release date, and they published some rather wonderful videos on the big day.

Office favourite Explaining Computers provided viewers with a brilliant explanation of the ins and outs of Raspberry Pi 4, and even broke their usually Sunday-only release schedule to get the video out to fans for launch day. Thanks, Chris!

Raspberry Pi 4 Model B

Raspberry Pi 4B review, including the hardware specs of this new single board computer, and a demo running the latest version of Raspbian. With thanks to the Raspberry Pi Foundation for supplying the board featured in this video.

Blitz City DIY offered viewers a great benchmark test breakdown, delving deeper into the numbers and what they mean, to show the power increase compared to Raspberry Pi 3B+.

A Wild Raspberry Pi 4 Appears: Hardware Specs, Benchmarks & First Impressions

The Raspberry Pi 4 B has been released into the wild much earlier than anticipated. I was able to receive a review sample so here are the hardware specs, some benchmarks comparing it to the Pi 3 B and Pi 3 B+ and finally some first impressions.

Curious about how these creators were able to get their hands on Raspberry Pi 4 prior to its release? This is legitimately how Estefannie bagged herself the computer pre-launch. Honest.

HOW I GOT A RASPBERRY PI 4 BEFORE ITS RELEASE

I needed a new Raspberry Pi. FIND ME HERE: * http://www.estefannie.com * http://instagram.com/estefanniegg * http://www.twitter.com/estefanniegg * https://github.com/estefanniegg * https://facebook.com/estefanniegg

For their launch day video, Dane and Nicole, AKA 8 Bits and a Byte, built a pi-calculating pie that prints pies using a Raspberry Pi 4. Delicious.

The new Raspberry Pi 4 – Highlights & Celebration Project!

There’s a new Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi 4! We give you a quick overview and build a project to welcome the Raspberry Pi 4 to the world!

Alex from Low Spec Gamer took his Raspberry Pi 4 home with him after visiting the office to talk to Eben. Annoyingly, I was away on vacation and didn’t get to meet him 🙁

Raspberry Pi 4 Hands-on. I got an early unit!

Watch the best documentaries on Curiosity Stream: https://curiositystream.com/lowspecgamer #RaspberryPi4 #HandsOn #Preview A new Raspberry Pi joins the fray. I got an early Raspberry Pi 4 and decided to explore some of its differences with Eben Upton, founder of Raspberry Pi. All benchmarks run on an early version of the new raspbian.

The MagPi magazine managed to collar Raspberry Pi Trading’s COO James Adams for their video, filmed at the Raspberry Pi Store in Cambridge.

Introducing Raspberry Pi 4! + interview with a Raspberry Pi engineer

The brand new Raspberry Pi 4 is here! With up to 4GB of RAM, 4K HDMI video, Gigabit Ethernet, USB 3.0, and USB C, it is the ultimate Raspberry Pi. We talk to Raspberry Pi hardware lead James Adams about its amazing performance.

Some rather lovely articles

If you’re looking to read more about Raspberry Pi 4 and don’t know where to start, here are a few tasty treats to get you going:

Raspberry Pi 4 isn’t the only new thing to arrive this week. Raspbian Buster is now available for Raspberry Pi, and you can read more about it here.

Join the Raspberry Pi 4 conversation by using #RaspberryPi4 across all social platforms, and let us know what you plan to do with your new Raspberry Pi.

The post Raspberry Pi 4: 48 hours later appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

An in-flight entertainment system that isn’t terrible

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/an-in-flight-entertainment-system-that-isnt-terrible/

No Alex today; she’s tragically germ-ridden and sighing weakly beneath a heap of duvets on her sofa. But, in spite of it all, she’s managed to communicate that I should share Kyle‘s Raspberry Pi in-flight entertainment system with you.

I made my own IN-FLIGHT entertainment system! ft. Raspberry Pi

Corsair Ironclaw RGB Gaming Mouse: http://bit.ly/2vFwYw5 From poor A/V quality to lackluster content selection, in-flight entertainment centers are full of compromises. Let’s create our own using a Raspberry Pi 3 B+!

Kyle is far from impressed with the in-flight entertainment on most planes: the audio is terrible, the touchscreens are annoyingly temperamental, and the movie selection is often frustratingly limited. So, the night before a morning flight to visit family (congrats on becoming an uncle, Kyle! We trust you’ll use your powers only for good!), he hit upon the idea of building his own in-flight entertainment system, using stuff he already had lying around.

Yes, we know, he could just have taken a tablet with him. But we agree with him that his solution is way funner. It’s way more customisable too. Kyle’s current rushed prototype features a Raspberry Pi 3B+ neatly cable-tied into a drilled Altoids tin lid, which is fixed flush to the back of a 13.3-inch portable monitor with adhesive Velcro. He’s using VLC Media Player, which comes with Raspbian and supports a lot of media control functions straight out of the box; this made using his mouse and mini keyboard a fairly seamless experience. And a handy magnetic/suction bracket lets him put the screen in the back of the seat in front to the best possible use: as a mounting surface.

As Kyle says, “Is it ridiculous? I mean, yes, obviously it’s ridiculous, but would you ever consider doing something like this?”

The post An in-flight entertainment system that isn’t terrible appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

How do you define ‘maker’?

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/define-maker/

In our brand-new video, we ask some of our favourite content creators how they define the word ‘maker’, and what being a maker means to them.

How do you define ‘maker’?

We asked some of our favourite content creators how they define the word ‘maker’, and what being a maker means to them.

Joel Telling

Joel took the ultimate content creator plunge in early 2018, quitting his job at Adobe to follow his 3D printing passion full time.

Joel Telling – 3D Printing Nerd on Twitter

It was at this very hour 1 year ago TODAY I left the Adobe offices for the last time and began my career as a host and content creator. ONE YEAR HOLY COW! #highfive https://t.co/fQ6wBGY8Ch

You can find Joel on YouTube as 3D Printing Nerd, and he also makes appearances for Matter Hatters at various conventions — including Maker Faire New York, where we accosted him for this video.

Jackie Craft

Jackie Craft is a cosplay goddess. She has turned her passion for prop making and costume design into her career, and her creations are incredible. Seriously, look at how cool they are:

Jackie Craft Cosplay
Jackie Craft Cosplay
Jackie Craft Cosplay

You can find Jackie on Instagram, and at her website, where you can also buy costume patterns to recreate her designs.

Laura Kampf

Based in Cologne, Germany, Laura Kampf is best known for her dog, Smudo. Avid Smudo devotees may have noticed that Laura is a talented wood and metal worker with a penchant for turning unwanted scrap into fantastic and stylish creations. She also built her own tiny house, complete with an additional tiny house for Smudo.

Smudo´s Tiny Doghouse

Thank You Rockler for supporting this Project! visit them at www.rockler.com I had so much leftover material from my Tiny House Trailer that i figured i might as well build smudo his own Tiny Doghouse.

Yes, okay, we’re all about Smudo here at Raspberry Pi.

Bob Clagett

Bob Clagett likes to make stuff. All kinds of stuff, from wood, to metal, to electronics. His 2.3 million YouTube subscribers tune in for weekly tutorials, tips, and Josh, who occasionally makes appearances on screen, and otherwise helps Bob run I Like To Make Stuff behind the scenes.

Please note: our actual favourite member of the ILTMS team is Ginny Clagget, Queen of Hugs and Wonderfulness.

Jimmy DiResta

You know who he is. We know who he is. So here’s Jimmy cutting things in half with Ron Swanson Nick Offerman.

Making It – “Will It Saw?” with Nick Offerman and Jimmy DiResta (Digital Exclusive)

In the most exciting video you ever saw, Nick Offerman and Jimmy DiResta test the durability of a rollerblade, bongos, a baseball and a roll of salami.

What does it mean to you?

From woodwork and electronics, to crocheting and baking: makers come in all flavours. How do you define the word ‘maker’, and what does being a maker mean to you? Tell us on YouTube, or in the comments below.

The post How do you define ‘maker’? appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

The explosive inventions of Colin Furze

Post Syndicated from Ben Everard original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/colin-furze-hackspace-mag-15/

In January 2007, one plumber and a few friends in a pub set out to build a wall of death out of 850 pallets in a field in Lincolnshire. It’s something we’ve all done as children on a small scale, jumping over a cardboard box perhaps. But to scale it up to something 30ft in diameter and 17ft high, and ride around it on a moped at 25mph… that took a special kind of person. That took maker, inventor, YouTuber, and record-breaker extraordinaire Colin Furze.

Colin Furze

You’ve probably seen one or two of Colin Furze’s videos on YouTube. There’s the one where he shoots flames out of a scooter (gaining the attention of Her Majesty’s Lincolnshire Constabulary). There’s the one where he builds the world’s fastest mobility scooter, and the one where he sets off 5000 fireworks at once to celebrate getting three million YouTube subscribers. Maybe you know the one where he sets himself on fire, or the one with a spinning belt of knives to make chopping vegetables easier.

We had a chat with Colin, and sent a very brave photographer to his house to get some photos of him from a safe distance. If you don’t know him, strap in: over the coming pages you’re going to get an exclusive insight into the world of Britain’s most explosive maker.

How to be a better maker, the Furze way

“The thing that I find most exciting about what I do is that sometimes you have the initial test. You have an idea, you nip out to the shed – this could be after tea at night – and you bodge something together quite crudely. And you get that moment of realisation that it might actually work. I think that’s what I find the most enjoyable.”

“I’ve got to the point now where I’ve set my bar pretty high in terms of what people expect. Some projects, like the belt of knives, I knocked that up pretty quick because it was quite simple, but there were other things like the turbo jet scooter, I made sure things look good and they’re pretty well made, so they can take quite a while.”

“Some are a lot easier than others to make, and if you look through my videos in order, they tend to go from ones that are a bit more complicated to ones that are simple. You can never really predict what you’re going to get next; with some YouTube channels it’s much of the same thing if you know what I mean. When I upload a video, you’ve no idea what it’s going to be. I try to hop around a bit so it doesn’t become the same thing over and over again.”

Quality, not quantity

“I used to get a video up every week, or at least try for that, whereas now I’m going to kill myself if I try to match that. I’ve come to the conclusion that they’re ready when they’re ready. If there’s no video on a Thursday, the world’s not going to end. And it makes them a little bit more special when they do come out.”

“I’ve never worked in an office. I think I’d enjoy it for a week, then I’d drive everyone up the wall. I’d be too noisy I think. The only thing I miss from plumbing is the social aspect, because obviously I don’t see many people being in the shed, because I’m only just outside the back door of my house. I haven’t even got a commute. You can just be in there beavering away. I only ever have Rick in there with me when it’s a two-person job. And also it’s not like I’ve got two sheds so something can be being built in the background… a lot of people, when they get to six or seven million subscribers, employ loads of staff, the workshop gets bigger, everything expands, and you start to look at it and think ‘What is this now?’ This is not a guy in the shed at the side of his house trying to make impossible stuff; it’s a factory. Well, you’d expect big stuff to come out of a factory, wouldn’t you? Whereas when I make stuff in that little shed, there’s a little bit of extra interest in it because it’s something that most people could own, if they’ve got the space. So I’ve purposely kept it small and not got too big.”

“I like to go into something thinking ‘Let’s make the best job I can of this.’ Like the shredder that I’ve just made, all the housing and the aluminium surround, I wanted to get it as precise at possible. I used my optical punch and tried to get everything bang on. It all bolts together, and it looks like something that if I’d been shown it before, I’d have gone ‘No, I’m not sure I could make that.’”

Read more!

Read the rest of the exclusive 12-page Colin Furze special in HackSpace magazine issue 15, out today. Buy your copy now from the Raspberry Pi Press store, major newsagents in the UK, or Barnes & Noble, Fry’s, or Micro Center in the US. Or, download your free PDF copy from the HackSpace magazine website.

Front cover of HackSpace magazine issue 15

We’re also shipping to stores in Australia, Hong Kong, Canada, Singapore, Belgium, and Brazil, so be sure to ask your local newsagent whether they’ll be getting HackSpace magazine.

Subscribe now

Subscribe to HackSpace on a monthly, quarterly, or twelve-month basis to save money against newsstand prices.

Twelve-month print subscribers get a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express, loaded with inputs and sensors and ready for your next project. Tempted?

The post The explosive inventions of Colin Furze appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Is this the most ‘all-in-one’ a computer can possibly be?

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/electronic-grenade-computer-mouse/

Electronic Grenade’s Computer Mouse is the turducken of the tech world, stuffed so full of computing gubbins that you genuinely don’t need anything else. Don’t believe us? See for yourself:

The “Computer” Mouse: A DIY Project

The computer mouse is an entire laptop computer in mouse form that uses the raspberry pi zero W as its brain. I originally wanted to just put a raspberry pi into a mouse but I soon discovered that that large of a mouse didn’t exist.

See what we mean?

The Computer Mouse

Sure, your laptop may be considered an all-in-one computer, but if you’re not a fan of trackpads, you’ll still need a mouse to complete the experience. Electronic Grenade‘s Computer Mouse truly has everything — a mouse, a screen, a keyboard — and while the screen is tiny, it’s still enough to get started.

A GIF of the Computer Mouse in action

Electronic Grenade designed the device using Autodesk Fusion 360, housing a Raspberry Pi Zero W, the guts of two USB mice, a slideout Bluetooth keyboard, and a flip-up 1.5″ full-colour OLED display. For power, the mouse also plays host to a 500mAh battery, charged by an Adafruit Micro-LiPo charger.

It’s very cool. Very, very cool.

A GIF from the movie Storks

Homemade Raspberry Pi laptops

From cardboard pizza boxes to ornate, wooden creations, our community members love making Raspberry Pi laptops out of whatever they can get their hands on.


Steampunk Raspberry Pi laptop

Variations on a theme include projects such as Jeremy Lee’s wrist computer with onboard gyromouse, perfect for any Captain Jack cosplay; and Scripto, the Raspberry Pi word processor that processes words and nothing more.


Photo: a red-cased Scripto sits open on a white work surface. It is on, and Its screen is filled with text.

Electronic Grenade

If you’re a fan of retrofit Raspberry Pi projects, check out Electronic Grenade’s Xbox controller hack. And while you’re skimming through their YouTube channel (as you should), be sure to subscribe, and watch the videos of their other Raspberry Pi–based projects, such as this wooden Raspberry Pi 3 laptop. You can also help Electronic Grenade design and build more projects such as the Computer Mouse by supporting them on Patreon.

Notes

  • A turducken is a chicken stuffed into a duck, that is then in turn stuffed into a turkey, and it sounds all kinds of wrong. Do you know what doesn’t sound all kinds of wrong? Electronic Grenade’s Computer Mouse.
  • The ‘cool, cool, cool’ GIF is from the movie Storks. If you haven’t watched Storks yet, you really should: it’s very underrated and quite wonderful.
  • I meant this Captain Jack and not this Captain Jack.

The post Is this the most ‘all-in-one’ a computer can possibly be? appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

YouTube and Google Photos add-ons for your magic mirror

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/youtube-google-photos-magic-mirror-modules/

Bring YouTube videos, Google Photos, and more to your magic mirror, with third-party modules and the MagicMirror² open-source software platform.

NEW Raspberry Pi Magic Mirror Modules!

Today I walk you through two fun modules to add top your Raspberry Pi Magic Mirror! Music in this video was from Epidemic Sound! Green Screen Subscribe Button: Its Frida MAGIC MIRROR Magic Mirror Builder (Michael Teeuw): https://magicmirror.builders/ Magic Mirror Modules in this video: YouTube: https://forum.magicmirror.builders/topic/8481/mmm-iframe-ping Google Photos: https://forum.magicmirror.builders/topic/8437/mmm-googlephotos/18 USB Audio: ROCCAT – Juke Virtual 7.1 USB Stereo Gaming Soundcard Music in this video was from Epidemic Sound.

Magic mirror

Mention Raspberry Pi to the uninitiated, and they’ll probably ask if it’s “that green thing people use for game emulation and smart mirrors?”. The popularity of magic mirrors has grown massively over the past few years, thanks to how easy it’s become to find cheap displays and great online tutorials.An image of a Raspberry Pi Magic Mirror

While big-brand smart mirrors cost upwards of a bajillion dollars, a homemade magic mirror costs pennies in comparison. The basic homemade model consists of a screen (usually an old computer monitor or flatscreen TV), a piece of two-way mirrored acrylic or glass, a frame, and a Raspberry Pi. Once it’s set up, you have yourself both a mirror and a notification board complete with calendar events, memos, and more.

Introducing MagicMirror²!

MagicMirror² is an open source platform for smart mirrors. It provides an extensive API for module development and is easy to setup and use. For more information and downloads visit http://magicmirror.builders and the forum http://forum.magicmirror.builders 🙂

The software most people use for setting up their magic mirror is MagicMirror², a free, group-maintained open-source platform created by Michael Teeuw.

And you know what open-source means…

Third-party add-ons!

The modular nature of MagicMirror² lets third-party developers easily bring their own ideas to the platform. As Brian Cotter explains in the video above, he used AgP42’s MMM-iFrame-Ping and eouia’s MMM-GooglePhotos to integrate YouTube videos and photographs into his magic mirror.

A screenshot from Brian Cotter's Magic Mirror add-on YouTube video.

And of course that’s not all! Other magic mirror add-ons let you implement 3D gesture detection or display international currency values, Google Fit totals, and more. Find a whole host of such third-party add-ons in this GitHub wiki.

Brian Cotter

Looking for more Raspberry Pi videos from Brian? Check out his Raspberry Pi playlist and be sure, as always, to subscribe to his channel.

Inside My Raspberry Pi Magic Mirror!

Checkout this inside look of my Rasberry Pi Magic Mirror build! Magic Mirror Builder (Michael Teeuw): https://magicmirror.builders/ Two-Way Mirror: https://www.tapplastics.com/ Monitor: https://amzn.to/2EusyhQ Raspberry Pi: https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/… Music Credit: Ikson – Paradise New Here? Follow Me Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/techcoderun/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bfcotter Hi! My name is Brian Cotter and I live in New York City.

We’re forever grateful to all the content creators who make videos of their Raspberry Pi projects. If you have your own, be sure to let us know the link in the comments!

The post YouTube and Google Photos add-ons for your magic mirror appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Tinkernut’s Beginners’ Guide to SSH

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/tinkernuts-beginners-guide-to-ssh/

We often mention SSH (Secure Shell) when we talk about headless Raspberry Pi projects — projects that involve accessing a Pi remotely. If you’re a coding creative who doesn’t know what SSH involves, we’ve got you covered with our comprehensive online guide to using SSH with your Raspberry Pi.

SSH in terminal

You know who’s also got you covered? YouTube favourite Tinkernut, with his great beginners’ guide to SSH, what it is, why we use it, and how you can use it with your device:

Beginners Guide To SSH

Me: “I have a question about controlling another computer over the internet” You: “SSH” Me: “Don’t tell me to ‘shhh’, I’m asking you a question”. Ok, enough with the play on words. If you’ve ever wanted to securely control another computer over the internet, then you’ve probably heard of SSH.

SSHhhhhhhhhh

Between our guide and Tinkernut’s video, I don’t think I need to add anything else on the subject.

So here, have this GIF, and have yourself a lovely weekend!

The post Tinkernut’s Beginners’ Guide to SSH appeared first on Raspberry Pi.