Tag Archives: kernel

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) released

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/736893/rss

The Ubuntu 17.10 release is out. “Under the hood, there have been updates to many core packages, including
a new 4.13-based kernel, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2, and much more.

Ubuntu Desktop has had a major overhaul, with the switch from Unity as
our default desktop to GNOME3 and gnome-shell. Along with that, there
are the usual incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK and
Qt, and updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice.”
See the
release notes
for more information.

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/736892/rss

Security updates have been issued by CentOS (wpa_supplicant), Debian (db, db4.7, db4.8, graphicsmagick, imagemagick, nss, and yadifa), Fedora (ImageMagick, rubygem-rmagick, and upx), Mageia (flash-player-plugin, libxfont, openvpn, ruby, webmin, and wireshark), openSUSE (cacti, git, and upx), Oracle (wpa_supplicant), Red Hat (kernel-rt, rh-nodejs4-nodejs-tough-cookie, rh-nodejs6-nodejs-tough-cookie, and wpa_supplicant), Scientific Linux (wpa_supplicant), and Slackware (libXres, wpa_supplicant, and xorg).

[$] Achieving DisplayPort compliance

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/736011/rss

At the X.Org Developers Conference, hosted by Google in Mountain View, CA
September 20-22, Manasi Navare gave a talk about her journey learning
about kernel graphics on the way to achieving DisplayPort (DP)
compliance for Intel graphics devices.
Making that work involved learning about DP, the kernel graphics subsystem,
and how to do
kernel development, as well. There were plenty of details to absorb,
including the relatively new atomic mode
setting support, the design of which was described in a twopart LWN
article.

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/736766/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (kernel, linux-hardened, and linux-zen), CentOS (wpa_supplicant), Debian (xorg-server), Fedora (selinux-policy), Gentoo (libarchive, nagios-core, ruby, and xen), openSUSE (wpa_supplicant), Oracle (wpa_supplicant), Red Hat (Red Hat Single Sign-On, rh-nodejs6-nodejs, rh-sso7-keycloak, and wpa_supplicant), Scientific Linux (wpa_supplicant), SUSE (git, wpa_supplicant, and xen), and Ubuntu (xorg-server, xorg-server-hwe-16.04, xorg-server-lts-xenial).

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/736647/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (flashplugin, hostapd, lib32-flashplugin, and wpa_supplicant), Debian (sdl-image1.2), Fedora (curl, openvswitch, weechat, and wpa_supplicant), openSUSE (GraphicsMagick, kernel, mbedtls, and wireshark), Red Hat (flash-plugin), and Ubuntu (wpa).

An enforcement clarification from the kernel community

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/736492/rss

The Linux Foundation’s Technical Advisory board, in response to concerns
about exploitative license enforcement around the kernel, has put together
this patch adding a document to the kernel
describing its view of license enforcement. This document has been signed
or acknowledged by a long list of kernel developers.
In particular, it seeks to
reduce the effect of the “GPLv2 death penalty” by stating that a violator’s
license to the software will be reinstated upon a timely return to
compliance. “We view legal action as a last resort, to be initiated
only when other community efforts have failed to resolve the problem.

Finally, once a non-compliance issue is resolved, we hope the user will feel
welcome to join us in our efforts on this project. Working together, we will
be stronger.”

See this
blog post from Greg Kroah-Hartman
for more information.

[$] unsafe_put_user() turns out to be unsafe

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/736348/rss

When a veteran kernel developer introduces a severe security hole into the
kernel, it can be instructive to look at how the vulnerability came about.
Among other things, it can point the finger at an API that lends itself
toward the creation of such problems. And, as it turns out, the knowledge
that the API is dangerous at the outset and marking it as such may not be
enough to prevent problems.

Security updates for Friday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/736317/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (botan, flyspray, go, go-pie, pcre2, thunderbird, and wireshark-cli), Fedora (chromium and mingw-poppler), Red Hat (Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite 6.4.6 and Red Hat JBoss BRMS 6.4.6), SUSE (git and kernel), and Ubuntu (libffi and xorg-server, xorg-server-hwe-16.04, xorg-server-lts-xenial).

[$] Continuous-integration testing for Intel graphics

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/735468/rss

Two separate talks, at two different venues, give us a look into the
kinds of testing that the Intel graphics team is
doing. Daniel Vetter had a
short presentation as part of the Testing and Fuzzing microconference at
the Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC). His colleague, Martin Peres, gave a
somewhat longer talk, complete with demos, at the X.Org Developers Conference
(XDC). The picture they paint is a pleasing one: there is lots of testing
going on there. But there are problems as well; that amount of testing
runs afoul of bugs elsewhere in the kernel, which makes the job
harder.

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/736063/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (lame, salt, and xorg-server), Debian (ffmpeg, imagemagick, libxfont, wordpress, and xen), Fedora (ImageMagick, rubygem-rmagick, and tor), Oracle (kernel), SUSE (kernel, SLES 12 Docker image, SLES 12-SP1 Docker image, and SLES 12-SP2 Docker image), and Ubuntu (curl, glance, horizon, kernel, keystone, libxfont, libxfont1, libxfont2, libxml2, linux, linux-aws, linux-gke, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-raspi2, linux-gcp, linux-hwe, linux-lts-xenial, nova, openvswitch, swift, and thunderbird).

[$] Cramming features into LTS kernel releases

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/735902/rss

While the 4.14 development cycle has not been the busiest ever (12,500
changesets merged as of this writing, slightly more than 4.13 at this stage
of the cycle), it has been seen as a rougher experience than its
predecessors.
There are all kinds of reasons why one cycle might be
smoother than another, but it is not unreasonable to wonder whether the
fact that 4.14 is a long-term support (LTS) release has affected how this
cycle has gone.
Indeed, when he released 4.14-rc3, Linus
Torvalds
complained that this cycle was more painful than most, and suggested that
the long-term support status may be a part of the problem.
A couple of recent pulls into the mainline highlight the
pressures that, increasingly, apply to LTS releases.

[$] An update on GnuPG

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/735840/rss

The GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG) is one of the
fundamental tools that allows a distributed group to
have trust in its communications. Werner Koch, lead developer of GnuPG,
spoke about it
at Kernel Recipes: what’s in the new 2.2 version, when older versions
will reach their end of life, and how development will proceed going forward.
He also spoke at some length on the issue of best-practice key management
and how GnuPG is evolving to assist. Subscribers can click below for a
report on the talk by guest author Tom Yates.

[$] Improving the kernel timers API

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/735887/rss

The kernel’s timer interface has been around for a long time, and its API
shows it. Beyond a lack of conformance with current in-kernel interface
patterns, the timer API is not as efficient as it could be and stands in
the way of ongoing kernel-hardening
efforts. A late addition to the 4.14 kernel paves the way toward a
wholesale change of this API to address these problems.

Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board election call for nominations

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/735907/rss

The next election for members of the Linux Foundation’s Technical Advisory
Board will be held on October 25 at the Kernel Summit in Prague. The
call has gone out for candidates to fill the five available seats.
The Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board (TAB) serves as the
interface between the kernel development community and the Foundation.
The TAB advises the Foundation on kernel-related matters, helps member
companies learn to work with the community, and works to resolve
community-related problems before they get out of hand. The board has
ten members, one of whom sits on the LF board of directors.