Tag Archives: kernel

The D-Bus Broker project

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/731755/rss

The D-Bus Broker Project is an effort to rethink the D-Bus message bus and
produce an implementation that addresses many of its longstanding problems;
this project has now made its first public release. “Its aim is to
provide high performance and reliability, while keeping compatibility to
the D-Bus reference implementation. It is exclusively written for linux
systems, and makes use of many modern features provided by recent linux
kernel releases.
” See this
post
for an introduction to the project, or the GitHub page for
source. This is a purely user-space implementation.

[$] Two more approaches to persistent-memory writes

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/731706/rss

The persistent-memory arrays we’re told we’ll all be able to get someday
promise high-speed, byte-addressable storage in massive quantities. The
Linux kernel community has been working to support this
technology fully for a few years now, but there is one problem lacking a proper
solution: allowing direct writes to persistent memory that is managed by a
filesystem. None of the proposed solutions have yet made
it into the mainline, but that hasn’t stopped developers from trying; now
two new patch sets addressing this issue are under consideration.

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/731678/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (extplorer and libraw), Fedora (mingw-libsoup, python-tablib, ruby, and subversion), Mageia (avidemux, clamav, nasm, php-pear-CAS, and shutter), Oracle (xmlsec1), Red Hat (openssl tomcat), Scientific Linux (authconfig, bash, curl, evince, firefox, freeradius, gdm gnome-session, ghostscript, git, glibc, gnutls, groovy, GStreamer, gtk-vnc, httpd, java-1.7.0-openjdk, kernel, libreoffice, libsoup, libtasn1, log4j, mariadb, mercurial, NetworkManager, openldap, openssh, pidgin, pki-core, postgresql, python, qemu-kvm, samba, spice, subversion, tcpdump, tigervnc fltk, tomcat, X.org, and xmlsec1), SUSE (git), and Ubuntu (augeas, cvs, and texlive-base).

NetDev 2.2 registration is now open

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/731573/rss

The registration for the NetDev 2.2 networking conference is now open. It will be held in Seoul, Korea November 8-10. As usual, it will be preceded by the invitation-only Netconf for core kernel networking hackers. “Netdev 2.2 is a community-driven conference geared towards Linux netheads. Linux kernel networking and user space utilization of the interfaces to the Linux kernel networking subsystem are the focus. If you are using Linux as a boot system for proprietary networking, then this conference _may not be for you_.” LWN covered these conferences in 2016 and earlier this year; with luck, we will cover these upcoming conferences as well.

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/731567/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (newsbeuter), Debian (augeas, curl, ioquake3, libxml2, newsbeuter, and strongswan), Fedora (bodhi, chicken, chromium, cryptlib, cups-filters, cyrus-imapd, glibc, mingw-openjpeg2, mingw-postgresql, qpdf, and torbrowser-launcher), Gentoo (bzip2, evilvte, ghostscript-gpl, Ked Password Manager, and rar), Mageia (curl, cvs, fossil, jetty, kernel, kernel-linus, kernel-tmb, libmspack, mariadb, mercurial, potrace, ruby, and taglib), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (xmlsec1), and Ubuntu (graphite2 and strongswan).

The end of Gentoo’s hardened kernel

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/731477/rss

Gentoo has long provided a hardened kernel package, but that is
coming to an end
. “As you may know the core of
sys-kernel/hardened-sources has been the grsecurity patches. Recently the
grsecurity developers have decided to limit access to these patches. As a
result, the Gentoo Hardened team is unable to ensure a regular patching
schedule and therefore the security of the users of these kernel
sources. Thus, we will be masking hardened-sources on the 27th of August
and will proceed to remove them from the package repository by the end of
September.

Kernel prepatch 4.13-rc6

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/731475/rss

The 4.13-rc6 kernel prepatch is out.
So everything still looks on target for a normal release schedule,
which would imply rc7 next weekend, and then the final 4.13 the week
after that.

Unless something happens, of course. Tomorrow is the solar eclipse,
and maybe it brings doom and gloom even beyond the expected Oregon
trafficalypse. You never know.”

[$] Power-efficient workqueues

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/731052/rss

Power-efficient workqueues were first introduced in the
3.11 kernel release; since then, fifty or so
subsystems and drivers have been updated to use them. These workqueues
can be especially useful on handheld devices (like tablets and
smartphones), where power is at a premium.
ARM platforms with power-efficient workqueues enabled on Ubuntu and
Android have shown significant improvements in energy consumption (up to
15% for some use cases).

Security updates for Friday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/731405/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (kernel and libmspack), Fedora (groovy18 and nasm), openSUSE (curl, java-1_8_0-openjdk, libplist, shutter, and thunderbird), Oracle (git, groovy, kernel, and mercurial), Red Hat (rh-git29-git), SUSE (openvswitch), and Ubuntu (c-ares, clamav, firefox, libmspack, and openjdk-7).

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/731309/rss

Security updates have been issued by CentOS (git), Debian (firefox-esr and mariadb-10.0), Gentoo (bind and tnef), Mageia (kauth, kdelibs4, poppler, subversion, and vim), openSUSE (fossil, git, libheimdal, libxml2, minicom, nodejs4, nodejs6, openjpeg2, openldap2, potrace, subversion, and taglib), Oracle (git and kernel), Red Hat (git, groovy, httpd24-httpd, and mercurial), Scientific Linux (git), and SUSE (freeradius-server, ImageMagick, and subversion).

[$] A canary for timer-expiration functions

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/731082/rss

A bug that allows an attacker to overwrite a function pointer in the kernel
opens up a relatively
easy way to compromise the kernel—doubly so, if an attacker simply
needs to wait for the kernel use the compromised pointer. There are various
techniques that can be used to protect kernel function pointers that are
set at either compile or initialization time, but there are some pointers
that are routinely set as the kernel runs; timer completion functions are a
good example. An RFC patch posted to the kernel-hardening mailing list
would add a way to detect that those function pointers have been changed
in an unexpected way and to stop the kernel from executing that code.

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/731167/rss

Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox, httpd, and java-1.7.0-openjdk), Fedora (cups-filters, potrace, and qpdf), Mageia (libsoup and mingw32-nsis), openSUSE (kernel), Oracle (httpd, kernel, spice, and subversion), Red Hat (httpd, java-1.7.1-ibm, and subversion), Scientific Linux (httpd), Slackware (xorg), SUSE (java-1_8_0-openjdk), and Ubuntu (firefox, linux, linux-aws, linux-gke, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-lts-xenial, postgresql-9.3, postgresql-9.5, postgresql-9.6, and ubufox).

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/731035/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (audiofile, git, jdk7-openjdk, libytnef, mercurial, spice, strongswan, subversion, and xorg-server), Debian (gajim, krb5, and libraw), Fedora (kernel, postgresql, sscep, subversion, and varnish), Mageia (firefox, phpldapadmin, and x11-server), Red Hat (kernel and spice), SUSE (subversion), and Ubuntu (libgd2).

[$] Another attempt at speculative page-fault handling

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/730531/rss

While the best way to avoid performance problems associated with page
faults is usually to avoid faulting altogether, that is not always an
option. Thus, it is important that the kernel handle page faults with a
minimum of overhead. One particular pain point in current kernels comes
about in multi-threaded workloads that are all incurring faults in the
same address space. Speculative page-fault handling is an old idea for
improving the scalability of such workloads that may finally be approaching
a point where it can be considered for inclusion.

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/730910/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (botan1.10, cvs, firefox-esr, iortcw, libgd2, libgxps, supervisor, and zabbix), Fedora (curl, firefox, git, jackson-databind, libgxps, libsoup, openjpeg2, potrace, python-dbusmock, spatialite-tools, and sqlite), Mageia (cacti, ffmpeg, git, heimdal, jackson-databind, kernel-linus, kernel-tmb, krb5, php-phpmailer, ruby-rubyzip, and supervisor), openSUSE (firefox, librsvg, libsoup, ncurses, and tcmu-runner), Oracle (firefox), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-ibm), Slackware (git, libsoup, mercurial, and subversion), and SUSE (kernel).