Tag Archives: deep dive

Join Us for AWS Security Week February 20–23 in San Francisco!

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/join-us-for-aws-security-week-february-20-23-in-san-francisco/

AWS Pop-up Loft image

Join us for AWS Security Week, February 20–23 at the AWS Pop-up Loft in San Francisco, where you can participate in four days of themed content that will help you secure your workloads on AWS. Each day will highlight a different security and compliance topic, and will include an overview session, a customer or partner speaker, a deep dive into the day’s topic, and a hands-on lab or demos of relevant AWS or partner services.

Tuesday (February 20) will kick off the week with a day devoted to identity and governance. On Wednesday, we will dig into secure configuration and automation, including a discussion about upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) requirements. On Thursday, we will cover threat detection and remediation, which will include an Amazon GuardDuty lab. And on Friday, we will discuss incident response on AWS.

Sessions, demos, and labs about each of these topics will be led by seasoned security professionals from AWS, who will help you understand not just the basics, but also the nuances of building applications in the AWS Cloud in a robust and secure manner. AWS subject-matter experts will be available for “Ask the Experts” sessions during breaks.

Register today!

– Craig

AWS Online Tech Talks – January 2018

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-january-2018/

Happy New Year! Kick of 2018 right by expanding your AWS knowledge with a great batch of new Tech Talks. We’re covering some of the biggest launches from re:Invent including Amazon Neptune, Amazon Rekognition Video, AWS Fargate, AWS Cloud9, Amazon Kinesis Video Streams, AWS PrivateLink, AWS Single-Sign On and more!

January 2018– Schedule

Noted below are the upcoming scheduled live, online technical sessions being held during the month of January. Make sure to register ahead of time so you won’t miss out on these free talks conducted by AWS subject matter experts.

Webinars featured this month are:

Monday January 22

Analytics & Big Data
11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Analyze your Data Lake, Fast @ Any Scale  Lvl 300

Database
01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT Deep Dive on Amazon Neptune Lvl 200

Tuesday, January 23

Artificial Intelligence
9:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT  How to get the most out of Amazon Rekognition Video, a deep learning based video analysis service Lvl 300

Containers

11:00 AM – 11:45 AM Introducing AWS Fargate Lvl 200

Serverless
01:00 PM – 02:00 PM PT Overview of Serverless Application Deployment Patterns Lvl 400

Wednesday, January 24

DevOps
09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Introducing AWS Cloud9  Lvl 200

Analytics & Big Data
11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Deep Dive: Amazon Kinesis Video Streams
Lvl 300
Database
01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT Introducing Amazon Aurora with PostgreSQL Compatibility Lvl 200

Thursday, January 25

Artificial Intelligence
09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Introducing Amazon SageMaker Lvl 200

Mobile
11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Ionic and React Hybrid Web/Native Mobile Applications with Mobile Hub Lvl 200

IoT
01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT Connected Product Development: Secure Cloud & Local Connectivity for Microcontroller-based Devices Lvl 200

Monday, January 29

Enterprise
11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Enterprise Solutions Best Practices 100 Achieving Business Value with AWS Lvl 100

Compute
01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT Introduction to Amazon Lightsail Lvl 200

Tuesday, January 30

Security, Identity & Compliance
09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Introducing Managed Rules for AWS WAF Lvl 200

Storage
11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT  Improving Backup & DR – AWS Storage Gateway Lvl 300

Compute
01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT  Introducing the New Simplified Access Model for EC2 Spot Instances Lvl 200

Wednesday, January 31

Networking
09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT  Deep Dive on AWS PrivateLink Lvl 300

Enterprise
11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Preparing Your Team for a Cloud Transformation Lvl 200

Compute
01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT  The Nitro Project: Next-Generation EC2 Infrastructure Lvl 300

Thursday, February 1

Security, Identity & Compliance
09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT  Deep Dive on AWS Single Sign-On Lvl 300

Storage
11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT How to Build a Data Lake in Amazon S3 & Amazon Glacier Lvl 300

The deep learning Santa/Not Santa detector

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/deep-learning-santa-detector/

Did you see Mommy kissing Santa Claus? Or was it simply an imposter? The Not Santa detector is here to help solve the mystery once and for all.

Building a “Not Santa” detector on the Raspberry Pi using deep learning, Keras, and Python

The video is a demo of my “Not Santa” detector that I deployed to the Raspberry Pi. I trained the detector using deep learning, Keras, and Python. You can find the full source code and tutorial here: https://www.pyimagesearch.com/2017/12/18/keras-deep-learning-raspberry-pi/

Ho-ho-how does it work?

Note: Adrian Rosebrock is not Santa. But he does a good enough impression of the jolly old fellow that his disguise can fool a Raspberry Pi into thinking otherwise.

Raspberry Pi 'Not Santa' detector

We jest, but has anyone seen Adrian and Santa in the same room together?
Image c/o Adrian Rosebrock

But how is the Raspberry Pi able to detect the Santa-ness or Not-Santa-ness of people who walk into the frame?

Two words: deep learning

If you’re not sure what deep learning is, you’re not alone. It’s a hefty topic, and one that Adrian has written a book about, so I grilled him for a bluffers’ guide. In his words, deep learning is:

…a subfield of machine learning, which is, in turn a subfield of artificial intelligence (AI). While AI embodies a large, diverse set of techniques and algorithms related to automatic reasoning (inference, planning, heuristics, etc), the machine learning subfields are specifically interested in pattern recognition and learning from data.

Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are a class of machine learning algorithms that can learn from data. We have been using ANNs successfully for over 60 years, but something special happened in the past 5 years — (1) we’ve been able to accumulate massive datasets, orders of magnitude larger than previous datasets, and (2) we have access to specialized hardware to train networks faster (i.e., GPUs).

Given these large datasets and specialized hardware, deeper neural networks can be trained, leading to the term “deep learning”.

So now we have a bird’s-eye view of deep learning, how does the detector detect?

Cameras and twinkly lights

Adrian used a model he had trained on two datasets to detect whether or not an image contains Santa. He deployed the Not Santa detector code to a Raspberry Pi, then attached a camera, speakers, and The Pi Hut’s 3D Xmas Tree.

Raspberry Pi 'Not Santa' detector

Components for Santa detection
Image c/o Adrian Rosebrock

The camera captures footage of Santa in the wild, while the Christmas tree add-on provides a twinkly notification, accompanied by a resonant ho, ho, ho from the speakers.

A deeper deep dive into deep learning

A full breakdown of the project and the workings of the Not Santa detector can be found on Adrian’s blog, PyImageSearch, which includes links to other deep learning and image classification tutorials using TensorFlow and Keras. It’s an excellent place to start if you’d like to understand more about deep learning.

Build your own Santa detector

Santa might catch on to Adrian’s clever detector and start avoiding the camera, and for that eventuality, we have our own Santa detector. It uses motion detection to notify you of his presence (and your presents!).

Raspberry Pi Santa detector

Check out our Santa Detector resource here and use a passive infrared sensor, Raspberry Pi, and Scratch to catch the big man in action.

The post The deep learning Santa/Not Santa detector appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

The re:Invent 2017 Containers After-party Guide

Post Syndicated from Tiffany Jernigan original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/the-reinvent-2017-containers-after-party-guide/

Feeling uncontainable? re:Invent 2017 might be over, but the containers party doesn’t have to stop. Here are some ways you can keep learning about containers on AWS.

Learn about containers in Austin and New York

Come join AWS this week at KubeCon in Austin, Texas! We’ll be sharing best practices for running Kubernetes on AWS and talking about Amazon ECS, AWS Fargate, and Amazon EKS. Want to take Amazon EKS for a test drive? Sign up for the preview.

We’ll also be talking Containers at the NYC Pop-up Loft during AWS Compute Evolved: Containers Day on December 13th. Register to attend.

Join an upcoming webinar

Didn’t get to attend re:Invent or want to hear a recap? Join our upcoming webinar, What You Missed at re:Invent 2017, on December 11th from 12:00 PM – 12:40 PM PT (3:00 PM – 3:40 PM ET). Register to attend.

Start (or finish) a workshop

All of the containers workshops given at re:Invent are available online. Get comfortable, fire up your browser, and start building!

re:Watch your favorite talks

All of the keynote and breakouts from re:Invent are available to watch on our YouTube playlist. Slides can be found as they are uploaded on the AWS Slideshare. Just slip into your pajamas, make some popcorn, and start watching!

Learn more about what’s new

Andy Jassy announced two big updates to the container landscape at re:Invent, AWS Fargate and Amazon EKS. Here are some resources to help you learn more about all the new features and products we announced, why we built them, and how they work.

AWS Fargate

AWS Fargate is a technology that allows you to run containers without having to manage servers or clusters.

Amazon Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (Amazon EKS)

Amazon Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (Amazon EKS) is a managed service that makes it easy for you to run Kubernetes on AWS without needing to configure and operate your own Kubernetes clusters.

We hope you had a great re:Invent and look forward to seeing what you build on AWS in 2018!

– The AWS Containers Team

AWS Media Services – Process, Store, and Monetize Cloud-Based Video

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-media-services-process-store-and-monetize-cloud-based-video/

Do you remember what web video was like in the early days? Standalone players, video no larger than a postage stamp, slow & cantankerous connections, overloaded servers, and the ever-present buffering messages were the norm less than two decades ago.

Today, thanks to technological progress and a broad array of standards, things are a lot better. Video consumers are now in control. They use devices of all shapes, sizes, and vintages to enjoy live and recorded content that is broadcast, streamed, or sent over-the-top (OTT, as they say), and expect immediate access to content that captures and then holds their attention. Meeting these expectations presents a challenge for content creators and distributors. Instead of generating video in a one-size-fits-all format, they (or their media servers) must be prepared to produce video that spans a broad range of sizes, formats, and bit rates, taking care to be ready to deal with planned or unplanned surges in demand. In the face of all of this complexity, they must backstop their content with a monetization model that supports the content and the infrastructure to deliver it.

New AWS Media Services
Today we are launching an array of broadcast-quality media services, each designed to address one or more aspects of the challenge that I outlined above. You can use them together to build a complete end-to-end video solution or you can use one or more in building-block style. In true AWS fashion, you can spend more time innovating and less time setting up and running infrastructure, leaving you ready to focus on creating, delivering, and monetizing your content. The services are all elastic, allowing you to ramp up processing power, connections, and storage and giving you the ability to handle million-user (and beyond) spikes with ease.

Here are the services (all accessible from a set of interactive consoles as well as through a comprehensive set of APIs):

AWS Elemental MediaConvert – File-based transcoding for OTT, broadcast, or archiving, with support for a long list of formats and codecs. Features include multi-channel audio, graphic overlays, closed captioning, and several DRM options.

AWS Elemental MediaLive – Live encoding to deliver video streams in real time to both televisions and multiscreen devices. Allows you to deploy highly reliable live channels in minutes, with full control over encoding parameters. It supports ad insertion, multi-channel audio, graphic overlays, and closed captioning.

AWS Elemental MediaPackage – Video origination and just-in-time packaging. Starting from a single input, produces output for multiple devices representing a long list of current and legacy formats. Supports multiple monetization models, time-shifted live streaming, ad insertion, DRM, and blackout management.

AWS Elemental MediaStore – Media-optimized storage that enables high performance and low latency applications such as live streaming, while taking advantage of the scale and durability of Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3).

AWS Elemental MediaTailor – Monetization service that supports ad serving and server-side ad insertion, a broad range of devices, transcoding, and accurate reporting of server-side and client-side ad insertion.

Instead of listing out all of the features in the sections below, I’ve simply included as many screen shots as possible with the expectation that this will give you a better sense of the rich set of features, parameters, and settings that you get with this set of services.

AWS Elemental MediaConvert
MediaConvert allows you to transcode content that is stored in files. You can process individual files or entire media libraries, or anything in-between. You simply create a conversion job that specifies the content and the desired outputs, and submit it to MediaConvert. There’s no software to install or patch and the service scales to meet your needs without affecting turnaround time or performance.

The MediaConvert Console lets you manage Output presets, Job templates, Queues, and Jobs:

You can use a built-in system preset or you can make one of your own. You have full control over the settings when you make your own:

Jobs templates are named, and produce one or more output groups. You can add a new group to a template with a click:

When everything is ready to go, you create a job and make some final selections, then click on Create:

Each account starts with a default queue for jobs, where incoming work is processed in parallel using all processing resources available to the account. Adding queues does not add processing resources, but does cause them to be apportioned across queues. You can temporarily pause one queue in order to devote more resources to the others. You can submit jobs to paused queues and you can also cancel any that have yet to start.

Pricing for this service is based on the amount of video that you process and the features that you use.

AWS Elemental MediaLive
This service is for live encoding, and can be run 24×7. MediaLive channels are deployed on redundant resources distributed in two physically separated Availability Zones in order to provide the reliability expected by our customers in the broadcast industry. You can specify your inputs and define your channels in the MediaLive Console:

After you create an Input, you create a Channel and attach it to the Input:

You have full control over the settings for each channel:

 

AWS Elemental MediaPackage
This service lets you deliver video to many devices from a single source. It focuses on protection and just-in-time packaging, giving you the ability to provide your users with the desired content on the device of their choice. You simply create a channel to get started:

Then you add one or more endpoints. Once again, plenty of options and full control, including a startover window and a time delay:

You find the input URL, user name, and password for your channel and route your live video stream to it for packaging:

AWS Elemental MediaStore
MediaStore offers the performance, consistency, and latency required for live and on-demand media delivery. Objects are written and read into a new “temporal” tier of object storage for a limited amount of time, then move silently into S3 for long-lived durability. You simply create a storage container to group your media content:

The container is available within a minute or so:

Like S3 buckets, MediaStore containers have access policies and no limits on the number of objects or storage capacity.

MediaStore helps you to take full advantage of S3 by managing the object key names so as to maximize storage and retrieval throughput, in accord with the Request Rate and Performance Considerations.

AWS Elemental MediaTailor
This service takes care of server-side ad insertion while providing a broadcast-quality viewer experience by transcoding ad assets on the fly. Your customer’s video player asks MediaTailor for a playlist. MediaTailor, in turn, calls your Ad Decision Server and returns a playlist that references the origin server for your original video and the ads recommended by the Ad Decision Server. The video player makes all of its requests to a single endpoint in order to ensure that client-side ad-blocking is ineffective. You simply create a MediaTailor Configuration:

Context information is passed to the Ad Decision Server in the URL:

Despite the length of this post I have barely scratched the surface of the AWS Media Services. Once AWS re:Invent is in the rear view mirror I hope to do a deep dive and show you how to use each of these services.

Available Now
The entire set of AWS Media Services is available now and you can start using them today! Pricing varies by service, but is built around a pay-as-you-go model.

Jeff;

Staying Busy Between Code Pushes

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/11/16/staying-busy-between-code-pushes/

Staying Busy Between Code Pushes.

Maintaining a regular cadence of pushing out releases, adding new features, implementing bug fixes and staying on top of support requests is important for any software to thrive; but especially important for open source software due to its rapid pace. It’s easy to lose yourself in code and forget that events are happening all the time – in every corner of the world, where we can learn, share knowledge, and meet like-minded individuals to build better software, together. There are so many amazing events we’d like to participate in, but there simply isn’t enough time (or budget) to fit them all in. Here’s what we’ve been up to recently; between code pushes.

Recent Events

Øredev Conference | Malmö, Sweden: Øredev is one of the biggest developer conferences in Scandinavia, and Grafana Labs jumped at the chance to be a part of it. In early November, Grafana Labs Principal Developer, Carl Bergquist, gave a great talk on “Monitoring for Everyone”, which discussed the concepts of monitoring and why everyone should care, different ways to monitor your systems, extending your monitoring to containers and microservices, and finally what to monitor and alert on. Watch the video of his talk below.

InfluxDays | San Francisco, CA: Dan Cech, our Director of Platform Services, spoke at InfluxDays in San Francisco on Nov 14, and Grafana Labs sponsored the event. InfluxDB is a popular data source for Grafana, so we wanted to connect to the InfluxDB community and show them how to get the most out of their data. Dan discussed building dashboards, choosing the best panels for your data, setting up alerting in Grafana and a few sneak peeks of the upcoming Grafana 5.0. The video of his talk is forthcoming, but Dan has made his presentation available.

PromCon | Munich, Germany: PromCon is the Prometheus-focused event of the year. In August, Carl Bergquist, had the opportunity to speak at PromCon and take a deep dive into Grafana and Prometheus. Many attendees at PromCon were already familiar with Grafana, since it’s the default dashboard tool for Prometheus, but Carl had a trove of tricks and optimizations to share. He also went over some major changes and what we’re currently working on.

CNCF Meetup | New York, NY: Grafana Co-founder and CEO, Raj Dutt, particpated in a panel discussion with the folks of Packet and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. The discussion focused on the success stories, failures, rationales and in-the-trenches challenges when running cloud native in private or non “public cloud” datacenters (bare metal, colocation, private clouds, special hardware or networking setups, compliance and security-focused deployments).

Percona Live | Dublin: Daniel Lee traveled to Dublin, Ireland this fall to present at the database conference Percona Live. There he showed the new native MySQL support, along with a number of upcoming features in Grafana 5.0. His presentation is available to download.

Big Monitoring Meetup | St. Petersburg, Russian Federation: Alexander Zobnin, our developer located in Russia, is the primary maintainer of our popular Zabbix plugin. He attended the Big Monitoring Meetup to discuss monitoring, Grafana dashboards and democratizing metrics.

Why observability matters – now and in the future | Webinar: Our own Carl Bergquist and Neil Gehani, Director of Product at Weaveworks, to discover best practices on how to get started with monitoring both your application and infrastructure. Start capturing metrics that matter, aggregate and visualize them in a useful way that allows for identifying bottlenecks and proactively preventing incidents. View Carl’s presentation.

Upcoming Events

We’re going to maintain this momentum with a number of upcoming events, and hope you can join us.

KubeCon | Austin, TX – Dec. 6-8, 2017: We’re sponsoring KubeCon 2017! This is the must-attend conference for cloud native computing professionals. KubeCon + CloudNativeCon brings together leading contributors in:

  • Cloud native applications and computing
  • Containers
  • Microservices
  • Central orchestration processing
  • And more.

Buy Tickets

How to Use Open Source Projects for Performance Monitoring | Webinar
Nov. 29, 1pm EST:
Check out how you can use popular open source projects, for performance monitoring of your Infrastructure, Application, and Cloud faster, easier, and to scale. In this webinar, Daniel Lee from Grafana Labs, and Chris Churilo from InfluxData, will provide you with step by step instruction from download & configure, to collecting metrics and building dashboards and alerts.

RSVP

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and the CFP is now open. There is no need to register; all are welcome. If you’re interested in speaking at FOSDEM, submit your talk now!

GrafanaCon EU

Last, but certainly not least, the next GrafanaCon is right around the corner. GrafanaCon EU (to be held in Amsterdam, Netherlands, March 1-2. 2018),is a two-day event with talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding ecosystem. In addition to the latest features and functionality of Grafana, you can expect to see and hear from members of the monitoring community like Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch Kubernetes, and more. Head to grafanacon.org to see the latest speakers confirmed. We have speakers from Automattic, Bloomberg, CERN, Fastly, Tinder and more!

Conclusion

The Grafana Labs team is spread across the globe. Having a “post-geographic” company structure give us the opportunity to take part in events wherever they may be held in the world. As our team continues to grow, we hope to take part in even more events, and hope you can find the time to join us.

Under the Hood: Task Networking for Amazon ECS

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/under-the-hood-task-networking-for-amazon-ecs/

This post courtsey of ECS Sr. Software Dev Engineer Anirudh Aithal.

Today, AWS announced Task Networking for Amazon ECS, which enables elastic network interfaces to be attached to containers.

In this post, I take a closer look at how this new container-native “awsvpc” network mode is implemented using container networking interface plugins on ECS managed instances (referred to as container instances).

This post is a deep dive into how task networking works with Amazon ECS. If you want to learn more about how you can start using task networking for your containerized applications, see Introducing Cloud Native Networking for Amazon ECS Containers. Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts the Container Networking Interface (CNI) project, which consists of a specification and libraries for writing plugins to configure network interfaces in Linux containers. For more about cloud native computing in AWS, see Adrian Cockcroft’s post on Cloud Native Computing.

Container instance setup

Before I discuss the details of enabling task networking on container instances, look at how a typical instance looks in ECS.

The diagram above shows a typical container instance. The ECS agent, which itself is running as a container, is responsible for:

  • Registering the EC2 instance with the ECS backend
  • Ensuring that task state changes communicated to it by the ECS backend are enacted on the container instance
  • Interacting with the Docker daemon to create, start, stop, and monitor
  • Relaying container state and task state transitions to the ECS backend

Because the ECS agent is just acting as the supervisor for containers under its management, it offloads the problem of setting up networking for containers to either the Docker daemon (for containers configured with one of Docker’s default networking modes) or a set of CNI plugins (for containers in task with networking mode set to awsvpc).

In either case, network stacks of containers are configured via network namespaces. As per the ip-netns(8) manual, “A network namespace is logically another copy of the network stack, with its own routes, firewall rules, and network devices.” The network namespace construct makes the partitioning of network stack between processes and containers running on a host possible.

Network namespaces and CNI plugins

CNI plugins are executable files that comply with the CNI specification and configure the network connectivity of containers. The CNI project defines a specification for the plugins and provides a library for interacting with plugins, thus providing a consistent, reliable, and simple interface with which to interact with the plugins.

You specify the container or its network namespace and invoke the plugin with the ADD command to add network interfaces to a container, and then the DEL command to tear them down. For example, the reference bridge plugin adds all containers on the same host into a bridge that resides in the host network namespace.

This plugin model fits in nicely with the ECS agent’s “minimal intrusion in the container lifecycle” model, as the agent doesn’t need to concern itself with the details of the network setup for containers. It’s also an extensible model, which allows the agent to switch to a different set of plugins if the need arises in future. Finally, the ECS agent doesn’t need to monitor the liveliness of these plugins as they are only invoked when required.

Invoking CNI plugins from the ECS agent

When ECS attaches an elastic network interface to the instance and sends the message to the agent to provision the elastic network interface for containers in a task, the elastic network interface (as with any network device) shows up in the global default network namespace of the host. The ECS agent invokes a chain of CNI plugins to ensure that the elastic network interface is configured appropriately in the container’s network namespace. You can review these plugins in the amazon-ecs-cni-plugins GitHub repo.

The first plugin invoked in this chain is the ecs-eni plugin, which ensures that the elastic network interface is attached to container’s network namespace and configured with the VPC-allocated IP addresses and the default route to use the subnet gateway. The container also needs to make HTTP requests to the credentials endpoint (hosted by the ECS agent) for getting IAM role credentials. This is handled by the ecs-bridge and ecs-ipam plugins, which are invoked next. The CNI library provides mechanisms to interpret the results from the execution of these plugins, which results in an efficient error handling in the agent. The following diagram illustrates the different steps in this process:

To avoid the race condition between configuring the network stack and commands being invoked in application containers, the ECS agent creates an additional “pause” container for each task before starting the containers in the task definition. It then sets up the network namespace of the pause container by executing the previously mentioned CNI plugins. It also starts the rest of the containers in the task so that they share their network stack of the pause container. This means that all containers in a task are addressable by the IP addresses of the elastic network interface, and they can communicate with each other over the localhost interface.

In this example setup, you have two containers in a task behind an elastic network interface. The following commands show that they have a similar view of the network stack and can talk to each other over the localhost interface.

List the last three containers running on the host (you launched a task with two containers and the ECS agent launched the additional container to configure the network namespace):

$ docker ps -n 3 --format "{{.ID}}\t{{.Names}}\t{{.Command}}\t{{.Status}}"
7d7b7fbc30b9	ecs-front-envoy-5-envoy-sds-ecs-ce8bd9eca6dd81a8d101	"/bin/sh -c '/usr/..."	Up 3 days
dfdcb2acfc91	ecs-front-envoy-5-front-envoy-faeae686adf9c1d91000	"/bin/sh -c '/usr/..."	Up 3 days
f731f6dbb81c	ecs-front-envoy-5-internalecspause-a8e6e19e909fa9c9e901	"./pause"	Up 3 days

List interfaces for these containers and make sure that they are the same:

$ for id in `docker ps -n 3 -q`; do pid=`docker inspect $id -f '{{.State.Pid}}'`; echo container $id; sudo nsenter -t $pid -n ip link show; done
container 7d7b7fbc30b9
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
3: [email protected]: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP mode DEFAULT group default
    link/ether 0a:58:a9:fe:ac:0c brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 0
27: eth12: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 9001 qdisc mq state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 02:5a:a1:1a:43:42 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

container dfdcb2acfc91
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
3: [email protected]: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP mode DEFAULT group default
    link/ether 0a:58:a9:fe:ac:0c brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 0
27: eth12: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 9001 qdisc mq state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 02:5a:a1:1a:43:42 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

container f731f6dbb81c
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
3: [email protected]: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP mode DEFAULT group default
    link/ether 0a:58:a9:fe:ac:0c brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 0
27: eth12: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 9001 qdisc mq state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 02:5a:a1:1a:43:42 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

Conclusion

All of this work means that you can use the new awsvpc networking mode and benefit from native networking support for your containers. You can learn more about using awsvpc mode in Introducing Cloud Native Networking for Amazon ECS Containers or the ECS documentation.

I appreciate your feedback in the comments section. You can also reach me on GitHub in either the ECS CNI Plugins or the ECS Agent repositories.

AWS Online Tech Talks – November 2017

Post Syndicated from Sara Rodas original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-november-2017/

Leaves are crunching under my boots, Halloween is tomorrow, and pumpkin is having its annual moment in the sun – it’s fall everybody! And just in time to celebrate, we have whipped up a fresh batch of pumpkin spice Tech Talks. Grab your planner (Outlook calendar) and pencil these puppies in. This month we are covering re:Invent, serverless, and everything in between.

November 2017 – Schedule

Noted below are the upcoming scheduled live, online technical sessions being held during the month of November. Make sure to register ahead of time so you won’t miss out on these free talks conducted by AWS subject matter experts.

Webinars featured this month are:

Monday, November 6

Compute

9:00 – 9:40 AM PDT: Set it and Forget it: Auto Scaling Target Tracking Policies

Tuesday, November 7

Big Data

9:00 – 9:40 AM PDT: Real-time Application Monitoring with Amazon Kinesis and Amazon CloudWatch

Compute

10:30 – 11:10 AM PDT: Simplify Microsoft Windows Server Management with Amazon Lightsail

Mobile

12:00 – 12:40 PM PDT: Deep Dive on Amazon SES What’s New

Wednesday, November 8

Databases

10:30 – 11:10 AM PDT: Migrating Your Oracle Database to PostgreSQL

Compute

12:00 – 12:40 PM PDT: Run Your CI/CD Pipeline at Scale for a Fraction of the Cost

Thursday, November 9

Databases

10:30 – 11:10 AM PDT: Migrating Your Oracle Database to PostgreSQL

Containers

9:00 – 9:40 AM PDT: Managing Container Images with Amazon ECR

Big Data

12:00 – 12:40 PM PDT: Amazon Elasticsearch Service Security Deep Dive

Monday, November 13

re:Invent

10:30 – 11:10 AM PDT: AWS re:Invent 2017: Know Before You Go

5:00 – 5:40 PM PDT: AWS re:Invent 2017: Know Before You Go

Tuesday, November 14

AI

9:00 – 9:40 AM PDT: Sentiment Analysis Using Apache MXNet and Gluon

10:30 – 11:10 AM PDT: Bringing Characters to Life with Amazon Polly Text-to-Speech

IoT

12:00 – 12:40 PM PDT: Essential Capabilities of an IoT Cloud Platform

Enterprise

2:00 – 2:40 PM PDT: Everything you wanted to know about licensing Windows workloads on AWS, but were afraid to ask

Wednesday, November 15

Security & Identity

9:00 – 9:40 AM PDT: How to Integrate AWS Directory Service with Office365

Storage

10:30 – 11:10 AM PDT: Disaster Recovery Options with AWS

Hands on Lab

12:30 – 2:00 PM PDT: Hands on Lab: Windows Workloads

Thursday, November 16

Serverless

9:00 – 9:40 AM PDT: Building Serverless Websites with [email protected]

Hands on Lab

12:30 – 2:00 PM PDT: Hands on Lab: Deploy .NET Code to AWS from Visual Studio

– Sara

Getting Ready for AWS re:Invent 2017

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/getting-ready-for-aws-reinvent-2017/

With just 40 days remaining before AWS re:Invent begins, my colleagues and I want to share some tips that will help you to make the most of your time in Las Vegas. As always, our focus is on training and education, mixed in with some after-hours fun and recreation for balance.

Locations, Locations, Locations
The re:Invent Campus will span the length of the Las Vegas strip, with events taking place at the MGM Grand, Aria, Mirage, Venetian, Palazzo, the Sands Expo Hall, the Linq Lot, and the Encore. Each venue will host tracks devoted to specific topics:

MGM Grand – Business Apps, Enterprise, Security, Compliance, Identity, Windows.

Aria – Analytics & Big Data, Alexa, Container, IoT, AI & Machine Learning, and Serverless.

Mirage – Bootcamps, Certifications & Certification Exams.

Venetian / Palazzo / Sands Expo Hall – Architecture, AWS Marketplace & Service Catalog, Compute, Content Delivery, Database, DevOps, Mobile, Networking, and Storage.

Linq Lot – Alexa Hackathons, Gameday, Jam Sessions, re:Play Party, Speaker Meet & Greets.

EncoreBookable meeting space.

If your interests span more than one topic, plan to take advantage of the re:Invent shuttles that will be making the rounds between the venues.

Lots of Content
The re:Invent Session Catalog is now live and you should start to choose the sessions of interest to you now.

With more than 1100 sessions on the agenda, planning is essential! Some of the most popular “deep dive” sessions will be run more than once and others will be streamed to overflow rooms at other venues. We’ve analyzed a lot of data, run some simulations, and are doing our best to provide you with multiple opportunities to build an action-packed schedule.

We’re just about ready to let you reserve seats for your sessions (follow me and/or @awscloud on Twitter for a heads-up). Based on feedback from earlier years, we have fine-tuned our seat reservation model. This year, 75% of the seats for each session will be reserved and the other 25% are for walk-up attendees. We’ll start to admit walk-in attendees 10 minutes before the start of the session.

Las Vegas never sleeps and neither should you! This year we have a host of late-night sessions, workshops, chalk talks, and hands-on labs to keep you busy after dark.

To learn more about our plans for sessions and content, watch the Get Ready for re:Invent 2017 Content Overview video.

Have Fun
After you’ve had enough training and learning for the day, plan to attend the Pub Crawl, the re:Play party, the Tatonka Challenge (two locations this year), our Hands-On LEGO Activities, and the Harley Ride. Stay fit with our 4K Run, Spinning Challenge, Fitness Bootcamps, and Broomball (a longstanding Amazon tradition).

See You in Vegas
As always, I am looking forward to meeting as many AWS users and blog readers as possible. Never hesitate to stop me and to say hello!

Jeff;

 

 

VMware Cloud on AWS – Now Available

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/vmware-cloud-on-aws-now-available/

Last year I told you about the work that we are doing with our friends at VMware to build the VMware Cloud on AWS. As I shared at the time, this is a native, fully-managed offering that runs the VMware SDDC stack directly on bare-metal AWS infrastructure that maintains the elasticity and security customers have come to expect. This allows you to benefit from the scalability and resiliency of AWS, along with the networking and system-level hardware features that are fundamental parts of our security-first architecture.

VMware Cloud on AWS allows you take advantage of what you already know and own. Your existing skills, your investment in training, your operational practices, and your investment in software licenses remain relevant and applicable when you move to the public cloud. As part of that move you can forget about building & running data centers, modernizing hardware, and scaling to meet transient or short-term demand. You can also take advantage of a long list of AWS compute, database, analytics, IoT, AI, security, mobile, deployment and application services.

Initial Availability
After incorporating feedback from many customers and partners in our Early Access beta program, today at VMworld, VMware and Amazon announced the initial availability of VMware Cloud on AWS. This service is initially available in the US West (Oregon) region through VMware and members of the VMware Partner Network. It is designed to support popular use cases such as data center extension, application development & testing, and application migration.

This offering is sold, delivered, supported, and billed by VMware. It supports custom-sized VMs, runs any OS that is supported by VMware, and makes use of single-tenant bare-metal AWS infrastructure so that you can bring your Windows Server licenses to the cloud. Each SDDC (Software-Defined Data Center) consists of 4 to 16 instances, each with 36 cores, 512 GB of memory, and 15.2 TB of NVMe storage. Clusters currently run in a single AWS Availability Zone (AZ) with support in the works for clusters that span AZs. You can spin up an entire VMware SDDC in a couple of hours, and scale host capacity up and down in minutes.

The NSX networking platform (powered by the AWS Elastic Networking Adapter running at up to 25 Gbps) supports multicast traffic, separate networks for management and compute, and IPSec VPN tunnels to on-premises firewalls, routers, and so forth.

Here’s an overview to show you how all of the parts fit together:

The VMware and third-party management tools (vCenter Server, PowerCLI, the vRealize Suite, and code that calls the vSphere API) that you use today will work just fine when you build a hybrid VMware environment that combines your existing on-premises resources and those that you launch in AWS. This hybrid environment will use a new VMware Hybrid Linked Mode to create a single, unified view of your on-premises and cloud resources. You can use familiar VMware tools to manage your applications, without having to purchase any new or custom hardware, rewrite applications, or modify your operating model.

Your applications and your code can access the full range of AWS services (the database, analytical, and AI services are a good place to start). Use for these services is billed separately and you’ll need to create an AWS account.

Learn More at VMworld
If you are attending VMworld in Las Vegas, please be sure to check out some of the 90+ AWS sessions:

Also, be sure to stop by booth #300 and say hello to my colleagues from the AWS team.

In the Works
Our teams have come a long way since last year, but things are just getting revved up!

VMware and AWS are continuing to invest to enable support for new capabilities and use cases, such as application migration, data center expansion, and application test and development. Work is under way to add additional AWS regions, support more use cases such as disaster recovery and data center consolidation, add certifications, and enable even deeper integration with AWS services.

Jeff;

 

AWS Online Tech Talks – August 2017

Post Syndicated from Sara Rodas original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-august-2017/

Welcome to mid-August, everyone–the season of beach days, family road trips, and an inbox full of “out of office” emails from your coworkers. Just in case spending time indoors has you feeling a bit blue, we’ve got a piping hot batch of AWS Online Tech Talks for you to check out. Kick up your feet, grab a glass of ice cold lemonade, and dive into our latest Tech Talks on Compute and DevOps.

August 2017 – Schedule

Noted below are the upcoming scheduled live, online technical sessions being held during the month of August. Make sure to register ahead of time so you won’t miss out on these free talks conducted by AWS subject matter experts.

Webinars featured this month are:

Thursday, August 17 – Compute

9:00 – 9:40 AM PDT: Deep Dive on [email protected].

Monday, August 28 – DevOps

10:30 – 11:10 AM PDT: Building a Python Serverless Applications with AWS Chalice.

12:00 – 12:40 PM PDT: How to Deploy .NET Code to AWS from Within Visual Studio.

The AWS Online Tech Talks series covers a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. These sessions feature live demonstrations & customer examples led by AWS engineers and Solution Architects. Check out the AWS YouTube channel for more on-demand webinars on AWS technologies.

– Sara (Hello everyone, I’m a co-op from Northeastern University joining the team until December.)