Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi Zero/Zero W

Penguin Watch — Pi Zeros and Camera Modules in the Antarctic

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/penguin-watch/

Long-time readers will remember Penguin Lifelines, one of our very favourite projects from back in the mists of time (which is to say 2014 — we have short memories around here).

Penguins

Click on penguins for fun and conservation

Penguin Lifelines was a programme run by the Zoological Society of London, crowdsourcing the tracking of penguin colonies in Antarctica. It’s since evolved into something called Penguin Watch, now working with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS). It’s citizen science on a big scale: thousands of people from all over the world come together on the internet to…click on penguins. By counting the birds in their colonies, users help penguinologists measure changes in the birds’ behaviour and habitat, and in the larger ecosystem, thus assisting in their conservation.

The penguin people say this about Penguin Watch:

Some of these colonies are so difficult to get to that they haven’t been visited for 50 years! The images contain unprecedented detail, giving us the opportunity to gather new data on the number of penguins in the region. This information will help us understand how they are being affected by climate change, the potential impact of local fisheries, and how we can help conserve these incredible species.

Pis in the coldest, wildest place

And what are those special cameras? The static ones providing time-lapse images are Raspberry Pi Camera Modules, mounted on Raspberry Pi Zeros, and we’re really proud to see just how robust they’ve been in the face of Antarctic winters.

Alasdair Davies on Twitter

Success! The @arribada_i timelapse @Raspberry_Pi Zero cameras built for @penguin_watch survived the Antarctic winter! They captured these fantastic photos of a Gentoo penguin rookery for https://t.co/MEzxbqSyc1 #WorldPenguinDay 🐧@helenlynn @philipcolligan https://t.co/M0TK5NLT6G

These things are incredibly tough. They’re the same cameras that Alasdair and colleagues have been sticking on turtles, at depths of down to 500m; I can’t think of a better set of tests for robustness.

Want to get involved? Head over to Penguin Watch, and get clicking! We warn you, though — it’s a little addictive.

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Portable retro CRT game console: the one-thumb entertainment system

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/portable-retro-ctr-game-console-the-one-thumb-entertainment-system/

OTES is the one-thumb entertainment system that, unsurprisingly, requires only one thumb to play.

One-Thumb Entertainment System

Uploaded by gocivici on 2019-04-29.

Retro handheld gaming

Straight out the bat, I have to admit that had this existed in the 80s, it would have been all I played with. OTES oozes gaming nostalgia, and the constant clicking would have driven my mother mad, as did the tap tap tap of my Game Boy or NES controller.

Designed to play PICO8 games, with its developers eager to see more people create one-button controlled games for the console, OTES replaces the concept of game cartridges with individual SD cards, allowing for players to swap out games as they would have with a Nintendo Game Boy, SEGA Game Gear, Atari Lynx, and other stand-alone cartridge consoles.

Building OTES

As mentioned, OTES uses the PICO-8 environment at its core and runs on a Raspberry Pi Zero W with interchangeable SD cards. And as the games designed for the project only require one button, it makes for a fairly simple setup.

For the body, the project’s maker, govinci, sources an old JVC video camera in order to cannibalise the CRT viewfinder.

The most important thing first. You have to find an old camcorder which has a CRT viewfinder. It’s usually easy to tell if a camcorder has a CRT viewfinder since it’s a bulky part sticking off the side of the camcorder. I found this viewfinder on an old JVC camcorder which I bought from the flea market. To test the viewfinder I used a 9v battery to power up the camcorder. There was no image on the viewfinder but I got a static white noise which is enough to tell if the viewfinder works.

The CRT viewfinder (that’s it to the right of the battery) was then connected to the Raspberry Pi and power source, and nestled snugly into a 3D-printed body.

Close the case up, turn on the Pi, and boom: one working, single-button console game player with a very personal point of view.

Govinci says:

Currently, It has one game called ODEF (Ocean Defender) developed by me and my friends. (You can play it here.) And I hope there will be many others as people develop games that can be played with only one button on this platform.

You heard the man: go get developing. (I can think of plenty of circumstances where only needing one free finger to fit in a spot of gaming would be really, really convenient.) You can make your own console by following the build diary at Instructables. Let us know if you give it a whirl!

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Rousseau-inspired Raspberry Pi Zero LED piano visualiser

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/rousseau-raspberry-pi-zero-led-piano-visualiser/

Unlock your inner Rousseau with this gorgeous Raspberry Pi Zero LED piano visualiser.

Piano LED Visualizer

Inspired by Rousseau videos I tried to build my own Piano Visualizer. It is made with Raspberry Pi and WS2812B LED strip. Screen and buttons: Waveshare LCD TFT 1,44” 128x128px.

Pianist Rousseau

Fans of the popular YouTube pianist Rousseau would be forgiven for thinking the thumbnail above is of one of his videos. It’s actually of a Raspberry Pi build by Aleksander Evening, who posted this project on Reddit last week as an homage to Rousseau, who is one of his favourite YouTubers.

Building an LED piano visualiser

After connecting the LED strip to the Raspberry Pi Zero W, and setting up the Pi as a Bluetooth MIDI host, Aleksander was almost good to go. There was just one thing standing in his way…



He wanted to use the Synthesia software for visualisations, and, unmodified, this software doesn’t support the MIDI files Aleksander planned to incorporate. Luckily, he found the workaround:

As of today Synthesia doesn’t support MIDI via Bluetooth, it should be added in next update. There is official workaround: you have to replace dll file. You also have to enable light support in Synthesia. In Visualizer settings you have to change “input” to RPI Bluetooth. After that when learning new song next-to-play keys will be illuminated in corresponding colors, blue for left hand and green for right hand.

Phew!

Homemade Rousseau

The final piece is a gorgeous mix of LEDs, sound, and animation — worthy of the project’s inspiration.

Find more information, including parts, links to the code, and build instructions, on Aleksander’s GitHub repo. And as always, if you build your own, or if you’ve created a Raspberry Pi project in honour of your favourite musician, artist, or YouTuber, we’d love to see it in the comments below.

And now, a little something from Rousseau:

Ludovico Einaudi – Nuvole Bianche

Sheet music: https://mnot.es/2N01Gqt Click the 🔔bell to join the notification squad! ♫ Listen on Spotify: http://spoti.fi/2LdpqK7 ♫ MIDI: https://patreon.com/rousseau ♫ Facebook: http://bit.ly/rousseaufb ♫ Instagram: http://bit.ly/rousseauig ♫ Twitter: http://bit.ly/rousseautw ♫ Buy me a coffee: http://buymeacoff.ee/rousseau Hope you enjoy my performance of Nuvole Bianche by Ludovico Einaudi.

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Watch Game of Thrones with a Raspberry Pi-powered Drogon

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/watch-game-of-thrones-with-raspberry-pi-powered-drogon/

Channel your inner Targaryen by building this voice-activated, colour-changing, 3D-printed Drogon before watching the next episode of Game of Thrones.

Winter has come

This is a spoiler-free zone! I’ve already seen the new episode of season 8, but I won’t ruin anything, I promise.

Even if you’ve never watched an episode of Game of Thrones (if so, that’s fine, I don’t judge you), you’re probably aware that the final season has started.

And you might also know that the show has dragons in it — big, hulking, scaley dragons called Rhaegal, Viserion, and Drogon. They look a little something like this:Daenerys-Targaryen-game-of-thrones

Well, not anymore. They look like this now:

04_15_GameOfThrones_S07-920x584

Raspberry Pi voice-responsive dragon!

The creator of this project goes by the moniker Botmation. To begin with, they 3D printed modified a Drogon model they found on Thingiverse. Then, with Dremel in hand, they modified the print, to replace its eyes with RGB LEDs. Before drawing the LEDs through the hollowed-out body of the model, they soldered them to wires connected to a Raspberry Pi Zero W‘s GPIO pins.

Located in the tin beneath Drogon, the Pi Zero W is also equipped with a microphone and runs the Python code for the project. And thanks to Google’s Speech to Text API, Drogon’s eyes change colour whenever a GoT character repeats one of two keywords: white turns the eyes blue, while fire turns them red.

If you’d like more information about building your own interactive Drogon, here’s a handy video. At the end, Botmation asks viewers to help improve their code for a cleaner voice-activation experience.

3D printed Drogon with LED eyes for Game of Thrones

Going into the final season of Game of Thrones with your very own 3D printed Drogron dragon! The eyes are made of LEDs that changes between Red and Blue depending on what happens in the show. When you’re watching the show, Drogon will watch the show with you and listen for cues to change the eye color.

Drogon for the throne!

I’ve managed to bag two of the three dragons in the Pi Towers Game of Thrones fantasy league, so I reckon my chances of winning are pretty good thanks to all the points I’ll rack up by killing White Walker.

Wait — does killing a White Walker count as a kill, since they’re already dead?

Ah, crud.

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Hacking an Etch-A-Sketch with a Raspberry Pi and camera: Etch-A-Snap!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hacking-etch-a-sketch-raspberry-pi-camera-etch-a-snap/

Kids of the 1980s, rejoice: the age of the digital Etch-A-Sketch is now!

What is an Etch-A-Sketch

Introduced in 1960, the Etch-A-Sketch was invented by Frenchman André Cassagnes and manufactured by the Ohio Art Company.

The back of the Etch-A-Sketch screen is covered in very fine aluminium powder. Turning one of the two directional knobs runs a stylus across the back of the screen, displacing the powder and creating a dark grey line visible in the front side.

can it run DOOM?

yes

The Etch-A-Sketch was my favourite childhood toy. So you can imagine how excited I was to see the Etch-A-Snap project when I logged into Reddit this morning!

Digital Etch-A-Sketch

Yesterday, Martin Fitzpatrick shared on Reddit how he designed and built Etch-A-Snap, a Raspberry Pi Zero– and Camera Module–connected Etch-A-Sketch that (slowly) etches photographs using one continuous line.

Etch-A-Snap is (probably) the world’s first Etch-A-Sketch Camera. Powered by a Raspberry Pi Zero (or Zero W), it snaps photos just like any other camera, but outputs them by drawing to an Pocket Etch-A-Sketch screen. Quite slowly.

Unless someone can show us another Etch-A-Sketch camera like this, we’re happy to agree that this is a first!

Raspberry Pi–powered Etch-A-Sketch

Powered by four AA batteries and three 18650 LiPo cells, Etch-A-Snap houses the $5 Raspberry Pi Zero and two 5V stepper motors within a 3D-printed case mounted on the back of a pocket-sized Etch-A-Sketch.

Photos taken using the Raspberry Pi Camera Module are converted into 1-bit, 100px × 60px, black-and-white images using Pillow and OpenCV. Next, these smaller images are turned into plotter commands using networkx. Finally, the Raspberry Pi engages the two 5V stepper motors to move the Etch-A-Sketch control knobs, producing a sketch within 15 minutes to an hour, depending on the level of detail in the image.

Build your own Etch-A-Snap

On his website, Martin goes into some serious detail about Etch-A-Snap, perfect for anyone interested in building their own, or in figuring out how it all works. You’ll find an overview with videos, along with breakdowns of the build, processing, drawing, and plotter.

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The Junk Drum Machine

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/junk-drum-machine/

I do not really have any spare time. (Toddler, job, very demanding cat, lots of LEGO to tidy up.) If I did, I like to imagine that I’d come up with something like this to do with it.

junk drum machine

Want to see this collection of junk animate? Scroll down for video.

From someone calling themselves Banjowise (let me know what your real name is in the comments, please, so I can credit you properly here!), here is a pile of junk turned into a weirdly compelling drum machine.

Mechanically speaking, this isn’t too complicated: just a set of solenoids triggered by a Raspberry Pi. The real clever is in the beauteous, browser-based step sequencer Banjowise has built to program the solenoids to wallop things in beautiful rhythm. And in the beauteous, skip-sourced tchotchkes that Banjowise has found for them to wallop. Generously, they’ve made full instructions on making your own available on Instructables. Use any bits and bobs you can get your hands on if old piano hammers and crocodile castanets are not part of the detritus kicking around your house.

Warning: this video is weirdly compelling.

Automabeat – A Raspberry Pi Mechanical Robotic Junk Drum Machine

My Raspberry Pi based drum / percussion machine. Consisting of 8 12v solenoids, a relay, wooden spoons, a Fullers beer bottle, a crocodile maraca and a few other things. An Instructable on how to build your own is here: https://www.instructables.com/id/A-Raspberry-Pi-Powered-Junk-Drum-Machine/, or take a look at: http://www.banjowise.com/post/automabeat/

The sequencer is lovely: a gorgeously simple user interface that you can run on a tablet, your phone, or anything else with a browser (and it’s very easily adaptable to other projects). The web interface lets Python trigger the GPIO pins over web sockets. There’s a precompiled version available for people who’ve followed Banjowise’s comprehensive wiring instructions, but you can also get the source code from GitHub.

Sequencer UI

I think I’m getting good, but I can handle criticism.

We love it. Now please excuse me. I need a little while to search online for crocodile castanets.

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LED Matrix Cylinder — a blinkenlights tube

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/led-matrix-cylinder-a-blinkenlights-tube/

We see lots of addressable LED projects, but there was something weirdly charming and very pretty about this cylinder of squares. It’d make for a lovely interactive nightlight in a kids’ room, or for a grown-up lighting feature that you could also use as a news ticker or something that monitors your in-home IoT devices. Once you’ve built something like this, you’re only limited by your imagination — and it’s nice enough to display in your home.

This project is from makeTVee on Instructables. The cleverness is in the layout and the really meticulous execution: vertical strips of LEDs form a cylinder in a laser-cut frame, with a very thin layer of wood veneer glued around the whole thing to act as a diffuser. It’s simple, but really rather beautiful and very effective.

diffuser, diffusing

In the case to the side is the Raspberry Pi Zero that’s driving the whole thing. Here it is doing its thing:

LED matrix cylinder WS2812 Raspberry Pi Zero

LED matrix cylinder based on WS2812 LEDs and some laser cutter parts. https://hackaday.io/project/162035-led-matrix-cylinder https://www.instructables.com/id/LED-Matrix-Cylinder/ #WS2812 #LEDcylinder

makeTVee has built a Pygame-based simulator of the whole matrix so you can program it to do exactly what you want: scroll marquee text, make pretty patterns, twinkle at random, display images: the world’s your (pixellated) oyster. The code’s available at GitHub.

GUI for programming cylinder

Thanks, makeTVee — if you’d like to leave your real name below, we’ll credit you properly here!

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Laser-engraved Raspberry Pi hologram

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/laser-engraved-raspberry-pi-hologram/

Inspired by an old episode of Pimoroni’s Bilge Tank, and with easy access to the laser cutter at the Raspberry Pi Foundation office, I thought it would be fun to create a light-up multi-layered hologram using a Raspberry Pi and the Pimoroni Unicorn pHAT.

Raspberry Pi layered light

Read more –

Break it to make it

First, I broke down the Raspberry Pi logo into three separate images — the black outline, the green leaves, and the red berry.

RASPBERRY PI HOLOGRAM
RASPBERRY PI HOLOGRAM
RASPBERRY PI HOLOGRAM

Fun fact: did you know that Pimoroni’s Paul Beech designed this logo as part of the ‘design us a logo’ contest we ran all the way back in August 2011?

Once I had the three separate files, I laser-engraved them onto 4cm-wide pieces of 3mm-thick clear acrylic. As there are four lines of LEDs on the Unicorn pHAT, I cut the fourth piece to illuminate the background.

RASPBERRY PI HOLOGRAM

To keep the engraved acrylic pieces together, I cut out a pair of acrylic brackets (see above) with four 3mm indentations. Then, after a bit of fiddling with the Unicorn pHAT library, I was able to light the pHAT’s rows of LEDs in white, red, green, and white.

RASPBERRY PI HOLOGRAM

The final result looks pretty spectacular, especially in the dark, and you can build on this basic idea to create fun animations — especially if you use a HAT with more rows of LEDs.

Iterations

This is just a prototype. I plan on building a sturdier frame for the pieces that securely fits a Raspberry Pi Zero W and lets users replace layers easily. As with many projects, I’m sure this will grow and grow as each interaction inspires a new add-on.

How would you build upon this basic principle?

Oh…

…we also laser-engraved this Cadbury’s Creme Egg.

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Handheld text-based adventure gaming with Quest Smith

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/handheld-text-based-adventure-gaming-with-quest-smith/

Play text-based adventure games that print out in real time, with Quest Smith: the Raspberry Pi Zero W–driven handheld gaming device from Bekir Dağ.

Quest Smith

Quest Smith is a raspberry pi zero driven thermal printing text based game. In each level, it gives you options to choose so every game is different than the other one.

Text-based adventure games

Today I learned:

Around 1975, Will Crowther, a programmer and an amateur caver, wrote the first text adventure game, Adventure (originally called ADVENT because a filename could only be six characters long in the operating system he was using, and later named Colossal Cave Adventure).

But I’m sure you already knew that.

According to the internet, text-based games in their most simple form are video games that use text instead of graphics to let players progress. You read the description of your surroundings and choose from a set of options, or you type in your next step and hope the game understands what you’re talking about.

Colossal Cave Adventure

We have a conversation going in our team right now about whether the term ‘text-based games’ is solely used for video games of this nature, or whether choose your own adventure books also fall into the category of text-based games. Leave your thoughts in the comments.

Anyway…

Quest Smith!

After encountering a similar handheld gaming device in a Berlin games museum, Bekir Dağ decided to build his own using a Raspberry Pi Zero W.

Quest Smith text-based game

For Quest Smith’s body, Bekir Dağ designed a 3D print, and he provides the STL files for free on Thingiverse. And for the inner workings?

A Raspberry Pi Zero W fits snugly into the body alongside a thermal printer, a battery, and various tactile buttons. The battery is powered by a solar panel mounted on the outer shell, and all components are connected to a TP4056 board that allows the battery to power the Pi.

Quest Smith text-based game

The Quest Smith software is still somewhat of a work-in-progress. While users can build Quest Smith today and start playing, Bekir has put out the call for the community to submit their own parts of the story.

Each level requires two versions of the story, which makes the possiblities grow exponentially. So it will be very difficult for me to finish a single story by myself. For the player to reach level 9, we will need to have 1023 story parts to be written. If you can help me with that, it would be amazing!

To see more of Quest Smith’s build process, find the files to make your own device, and instructions on how to contribute toward the story, visit the Quest Smith Hackster.io page.

More text-based adventuring with Python

If you’re interested in writing your own text-based adventure game in Python, we’ve got a free online course available in which you can learn about object-oriented programming while creating a text-based game. And for a briefer intro, check out Wireframe magazine issue 6, where game developer Andrew Gillett explains how to make a simple Python text adventure.

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Automatic Calling System using Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/automatic-calling-system-using-raspberry-pi/

If like me, you’re awful at remembering birthdays, you need Piyush Charpe’s Automatic Birthday Calling System. It’s the Raspberry Pi device that calls on your behalf – aka Heaven for Introverts.

Building business relationships through niceness

Piyush’s father works as an insurance adviser, and, because he’s a lovely chap, he makes it his mission to wish all of his clients a happy birthday. Nice, right? I hardly remember the birthdays of my closest friends: and here’s Piyush’s father sending his kindest regards to everyone on his client list.

Way to make me feel like a bad friend, Papa Charpe!

So good are Charpe Sr’s customer service skills that he’s unexpectedly built himself an unmanageable amount of birthday wishes to send. So that’s where his son comes in with his idea for an automatic birthday calling system. Huzzah! Take my money, etc. etc.

Automated calling with a Raspberry Pi

Piyush used a Raspberry Pi Zero W, 4G GSM module and Google Firebase for the system, alongside an audio recording of his father wishing a happy birthday, and some help from a friend with experience building Android apps.

Raspberry Pi automatic birthday caller

Acquiring a client list from his father that included names, dates of birth and telephone number (our GDPR manager is weeping into her compliance documents as she reads this), Piyush added the information to Google Firebase, an online real-time database system.

Raspberry Pi automatic birthday caller

The accompanying Android app allows his father to add and remove clients from the list, and updates him on successfully-made calls; it’ll also let him know who he’ll need to follow up with if they were unavailable to receive their birthday greeting.

Raspberry Pi automatic birthday caller
Raspberry Pi automatic birthday caller
Raspberry Pi automatic birthday caller

The system updates at midnight, consolidating a list to be called at 10am the following day. And, at the end of the month, the system’s call history is deleted automatically after sending it in CSV format to his father.

The system has now been working 24/7 for eight months, and has been adopted by other business owners in the area.

You can read more about the project here.

Put down your phone!

What a lovely use of technology with great scope for expansion. Why stop at birthdays? Do I remember my parents’ anniversary? Of course not. And don’t get me started on updating my nearest and dearest on life events, changing address, etc. This system is genius! Introverts need never talk to another human being again! Rejoice!

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Monitoring insects at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/monitoring-insects-at-the-victoria-and-albert-museum/

A simple Raspberry Pi camera setup is helping staff at the Victoria and Albert Museum track and identify insects that are threatening priceless exhibits.

“Fiacre, I need an image of bug infestation at the V&A!”

The problem with bugs

Bugs: there’s no escaping them. Whether it’s ants in your kitchen or cockroaches in your post-apocalyptic fallout shelter, insects have a habit of inconveniently infesting edifices, intent on damaging beloved belongings.

And museums are as likely as anywhere to be hit by creepy-crawly visitors. Especially when many of their exhibits are old and deliciously dusty. Yum!

Tracking insects at the V&A

As Bhavesh Shah and Maris Ines Carvalho state on the V&A blog, monitoring insect activity has become common practice at their workplace. As part of the Integrated Pest Monitoring (IPM) strategy at the museum, they even have trained staff members who inspect traps and report back their findings.

“But what if we could develop a system that gives more insight into the behaviour of insects and then use this information to prevent future outbreaks?” ask Shah and Carvalho.

The team spent around £50 on a Raspberry Pi and a 160° camera, and used these and Claude Pageau’s PI-TIMOLO software project to build an insect monitoring system. The system is now integrated into the museum, tracking insects and recording their movements — even in low-light conditions.

Emma Ormond, Raspberry Pi Trading Office Manager and Doctor of Bugs, believes this to be a Bristletail or Silverfish.

“The initial results were promising. Temperature, humidity, and light sensors could also be added to find out, for example, what time of day insects are more active or if they favour particular environmental conditions.”

For more information on the project, visit the Victoria & Albert Museum blog. And for more information on the Victoria & Albert Museum, visit the Victoria & Albert Museum, London — it’s delightful. We highly recommend attending their Videogames: Design/Play/Disrupt exhibition, which is running until 24 February.

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Is this the most ‘all-in-one’ a computer can possibly be?

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/electronic-grenade-computer-mouse/

Electronic Grenade’s Computer Mouse is the turducken of the tech world, stuffed so full of computing gubbins that you genuinely don’t need anything else. Don’t believe us? See for yourself:

The “Computer” Mouse: A DIY Project

The computer mouse is an entire laptop computer in mouse form that uses the raspberry pi zero W as its brain. I originally wanted to just put a raspberry pi into a mouse but I soon discovered that that large of a mouse didn’t exist.

See what we mean?

The Computer Mouse

Sure, your laptop may be considered an all-in-one computer, but if you’re not a fan of trackpads, you’ll still need a mouse to complete the experience. Electronic Grenade‘s Computer Mouse truly has everything — a mouse, a screen, a keyboard — and while the screen is tiny, it’s still enough to get started.

A GIF of the Computer Mouse in action

Electronic Grenade designed the device using Autodesk Fusion 360, housing a Raspberry Pi Zero W, the guts of two USB mice, a slideout Bluetooth keyboard, and a flip-up 1.5″ full-colour OLED display. For power, the mouse also plays host to a 500mAh battery, charged by an Adafruit Micro-LiPo charger.

It’s very cool. Very, very cool.

A GIF from the movie Storks

Homemade Raspberry Pi laptops

From cardboard pizza boxes to ornate, wooden creations, our community members love making Raspberry Pi laptops out of whatever they can get their hands on.


Steampunk Raspberry Pi laptop

Variations on a theme include projects such as Jeremy Lee’s wrist computer with onboard gyromouse, perfect for any Captain Jack cosplay; and Scripto, the Raspberry Pi word processor that processes words and nothing more.


Photo: a red-cased Scripto sits open on a white work surface. It is on, and Its screen is filled with text.

Electronic Grenade

If you’re a fan of retrofit Raspberry Pi projects, check out Electronic Grenade’s Xbox controller hack. And while you’re skimming through their YouTube channel (as you should), be sure to subscribe, and watch the videos of their other Raspberry Pi–based projects, such as this wooden Raspberry Pi 3 laptop. You can also help Electronic Grenade design and build more projects such as the Computer Mouse by supporting them on Patreon.

Notes

  • A turducken is a chicken stuffed into a duck, that is then in turn stuffed into a turkey, and it sounds all kinds of wrong. Do you know what doesn’t sound all kinds of wrong? Electronic Grenade’s Computer Mouse.
  • The ‘cool, cool, cool’ GIF is from the movie Storks. If you haven’t watched Storks yet, you really should: it’s very underrated and quite wonderful.
  • I meant this Captain Jack and not this Captain Jack.

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Send audio messages to your loved ones

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/send-loved-ones-audio-messages/

Valentine’s Day is fast approaching, so why not make this adorable voice message device for your beloved?

Love Birds : a Box to Send and Receive Telegram Audio Message

How to make it: https://www.raspiaudio.com/lovebirds and https://www.instructables.com/id/Love-Birds-a-Box-to-Send-and-Receive-Telegram-Audi/ It’s a standalone device that receives send voice messages to your love, family or friend. Open the box, push the button while you are talking, release to send the audio message.

“Blah blah blah” means “I love you”

“OK, my phone can already do that, why should I bother?” project creator Olivier Ros asks himself in the introduction to his Instructables tutorial. And his response is simple. While you could use a phone, the magic of Love Birds is the intention behind the action. Mobile phones are where your life exists: your banking details, your work conversations, and more. It’s always on your person, probably in your hand right now. But with Love Birds, you have to make the effort to use the device to send that heartfelt message to the recipient.

Love Birds messaging device

He also says the device is easy to use even for those who are not technically inclined or have accessibility issues:

“Love Birds is easier to use than a phone: only one button. This cool for children, old people that don’t like smartphones, long-distance relationships, or just couples who want a private line of communication through a simple, dedicated object.”

Build a Love Bird (or two)

You’ll need one Raspberry Pi per Love Bird device; while Olivier’s version contains a Pi Zero W, a Raspberry Pi 2 or 3 will also do the trick.

You’ll also need a microphone and speakers. And, lucky for us, Raspiaudio offers a HAT that incorporates the two!

Raspiaudio HAT for Raspberry Pi

You can find similar boards from other Raspberry Pi accessory manufacturers, or use a standard USB microphone and speaker, readily available in stores and online.

Tweeting…so to speak

To make the notification birds dance, you also need a servo motor. The full code for the motors and everything else is available on GitHub. As an alternative to the motor, you could try flashing LEDs or playing a sound as a notification; we’re always interested in seeing how people add their own flair to open-source projects.

Telegram

You also need to sign up to Telegram in order to send your voice messages securely over the internet. Again, there are other services available, which you can use by editing the code accordingly.

Make your own

Find the full Instructables tutorial here, and visit the Raspiaudio website for more projects!

How will you be using a Raspberry Pi to celebrate Valentine’s Day?

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Reef-Pi: the ultimate Raspberry Pi fish tank management system

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/reef-pi-raspberry-pi-fish-tank-management-system/

If you’ve ever had a pet fish, even the saddest of fairground goldfish, you’ll appreciate how much work and attention they require. And to those who have never owned a fish: believe me, it’s more than you’d assume.

Reef-Pi

And the moment you upgrade from goldfish to brightly coloured, tropical beauties, and replace the standard silk reeds and gravel with live aquatic plants and soil, you suddenly have to factor in things like optimum temperature and chemical levels.

Reef-Pi

Reef-Pi

Thankfully, Adafruit Learning System author and loving fish parent Ranjib Dey has been working on a tutorial series called Reef-Pi, a collection of how-to guides that help you build the ultimate in Raspberry Pi reef aquarium management system.

Ranjib Dey on Twitter

@reef_pi at makerfaire #MFBA18

Reef-Pi monitors pH, chemical, and water levels, controls temperature, light, and power, and automates the management of these aspects so you don’t have to think about them. Phew!

And if you don’t fancy a massive coral-filled saltwater tank like Ranjib’s, you can use parts the Reef-Pi series for your own tank, whatever its setup, because many of the operations are similar or easy to adjust for your needs.

Jean Tannen

Any excuse to show off beautiful Jean to the world

Take, for example, my new Betta, Jean Tannen. While Jean’s tank is a much smaller size, and Jean its only resident (for now), I still need to keep an eye on the chemical balance of his water, the heat of his tank, and when his lights should be turned on or off. Even the most commonplace goldfish will appreciate many of the services Reef-Pi automates.

The Reef-Pi system uses a variety of components, including Raspberry Pi Zero and/or Raspberry Pi 3, and each stage of building the project is well-documented on the Adafruit Learning System. So if you’re looking to upgrade your tank, or have always fancied having pet fish but don’t want the hassle of tank management, give Reef-Pi a gander and see what you think.

We’re going to try it!

Sarah, our new Operations Manager, has been looking to upgrade her giant fish tank with a Raspberry Pi or two, so we’ll be sure to share her progress in the new year. If you decide to give Reef-Pi a try, or have already automated your tank with a Pi, let us know in the comments, or tag us on Twitter or Instagram!

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Dance magic, dance

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/dance-magic-dance/

 Firstly, I’d like to apologise for rickrolling you all yesterday. I would LIKE to, but I can’t — it was just too funny to witness.

But as I’m now somewhat more alive and mobile, here’s a proper blog post about proper things. And today’s proper thing is these awesome Raspberry Pi–powered dance costumes from students at a German secondary school:

In the final two years at German gymnasiums (the highest one of our secondary school types), every student has to do a (graded) practical group project. Our school is known for its superb dancing groups, which are formed of one third of the students (voluntarily!), so our computer science teacher suggested to make animated costumes for our big dancing project at the end of the school year. Around 15 students chose this project, firstly because the title sounded cool and secondly because of the nice teacher 😉.

Let me just say how lovely it is that students decided to take part in a task because of how nice the teacher is. If you’re a nice teacher, congratulations!

The students initially tried using Arduinos and LED strips for their costumes. After some failed attempts, they instead opted for a Raspberry Pi Zero WH and side-emitting fibre connected to single RGB LEDs — and the result is rather marvellous.

To power the LEDs, we then had to shift the voltage up from the 3.3V logic level to 12V. For this, we constructed a board to hold all the needed components. At its heart, there are three ULN2803A to provide enough transistors at the smallest possible space still allowing hand-soldering.

Using pulse-width modulation (PWM), the students were able to control the colour of their lights freely. The rest of the code was written during after-school meetups; an excerpt can be found here, along with a complete write-up of the project.

I’m now going to hand this blog post over to our copy editor, Janina, who is going to write up a translated version of the above in German. Janina, over to you…

[Ed. note: Nein, danke.]

The post Dance magic, dance appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Rescuing old cine film with Raspberry Pi Zero

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/rescuing-old-cine-film-raspberry-pi-zero/

When Electrical Engineer Alan Platt was given the task of converting old cine film to digital footage for his father-in-law’s 70th birthday, his first instinct was to look online.

converting cine film to digital footage with a Raspberry Pi Zero

“There are plenty of companies happy to convert old films”, he explains, “but they are all extremely expensive. In addition, you have to send your original films away by post, and there’s no way to guarantee that they’ll be safe in transit.”

Alan was given a box of Super 8 films covering 15 years of family holidays and memories. A huge responsibility, and an enormous challenge. Not content to let someone else do the hard work, Alan decided to convert the films himself — and learn how to program a Raspberry Pi at the same time.

converting cine film to digital footage with a Raspberry Pi Zero

Alan’s cine film digitising machine

The best-laid plans

Alan’s initial plan involved using his father-in-law’s cine projector as the base for the conversion process, but this soon proved impossible. There was no space in the projector to house both the film-playing mechanism, and the camera for the digitisation process. Further attempts to use the projector came to an end when, on powering it up for the first time, the 50-year-old machine produced a loud bang and a large cloud of smoke.

Undeterred, Alan examined the bust projector’s mechanism and decided to build his own. This began with a large eBay order: 3-D printed components from Germany, custom-shaped PTFE sheets from the UK, and optical lenses from China. For the skeleton of the machine, Alan’s box of Technic LEGO was dusted off and unpacked; an old TV was dug out of storage to interface with the Raspberry Pi Zero.

converting cine film to digital footage with a Raspberry Pi Zero

Experimentation: Technic LEGO, clamps, and Blu Tack hold the equipment together

The build commenced with several weeks of trial and error using scraps of cine film, a Camera Module, and a motor. With the Raspberry Pi Zero, Alan controlled the motion of the film through the machine, and took photos of each frame.

“At one point, setting the tension on the film required a helper to stand next to me, holding a sledgehammer connected to the pick-up reel. Moving the sledgehammer up or down varied the tension, and allowed me to work out what power of motor I would need to make the film run smoothly.”

He refined the hardware and software until the machine could produce reliable, focused, and stable images.

A slow process

Over a period of two months, the finished machine was used to convert all the cine films. The process involves loading a reel onto a Technic LEGO arm, feeding the film through the mechanism with tweezers, and winding the first section on to the pick-up reel. The Raspberry Pi controls a stepper motor and the Camera Module, advancing the film frame by frame and taking individual photos of each film cell. The film is backlit through a sheet of translucent PTFE serving as a diffuser; the Camera Module is focused by moving it up and down on its aluminium mounting.

converting cine film to digital footage with a Raspberry Pi Zero

Alan taught himself to program in Python while working on this project

Finally, Alan used Avidemux, a free video-editing program, to stitch all the images together into an MP4 digital film.

The verdict

“I’m incredibly proud of this machine”, Alan says. “It has taken more than a quarter of a million photos, digitised hundreds of meters of film — and taught me to program in Python. It demonstrates you don’t need to be an expert software engineer to make something really cool!”

And Alan’s father-in-law?

“He was thrilled! Being able to watch the films on his TV without having to set up the projector was fantastic. It was a great present!”

Here, exclusively for the Raspberry Pi blog, we present the first moments of footage to be digitised using Alan’s machine.

converting cine film to digital footage with a Raspberry Pi Zero

Gripping footage, filmed at Windsor Safari Park in 1983

Digital footage

Have you used a Raspberry Pi to digitise family memories? Do you have a box of Super 8 films in the attic, waiting for a machine like Alan’s?

Tell us about it in the comments!

Thanks again, Rachel

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Beer Cooler or: a Raspberry Pi Zero W walks into a bar…

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-beer-cooler/

You know how it is. You move into a house that used to be a pub, and you can’t bring yourself to do away with the bar. In fact, after several years of planning, you find yourself buying a hand pump on eBay, and a polypin of craft ale from the local microbrewery. Suddenly, you’re the landlord. The barkeep. Everyone’s best friend.

A GIF from the movie Shaun of the Dead - Raspberry Pi Beer Cooler

And yet …

There’s something not quite right about this setup. Something not quite perfect. You’re pulling pints and drinking your craft ale one day when you realise — the beer isn’t cold enough!

You need a beer cooler.

Cool customer

Electrical engineer Alan Platt found himself in this enviable position, and he decided to design his own draft ale fridge.

‘The original pub cellar had been filled in, so I couldn’t keep my beer underground and pipe it up to the handpump — it had to sit under the bar. I needed to build my own beer cooler, because there is only so much space under the bar, and a commercial fridge wouldn’t fit.”

Alan set about constructing a box for the beer using sheets of insulation board and elastic bands. He then installed two Peltier cooling pumps in the lid of the box, and routed a pipe up to the handpump for the beer. One trip to the microbrewery later, and the craft ale was chilling nicely.

The outside of Alan's beer cooler showing the cooling apparatus and insulation boards

Alan’s beer cooler

But there was a problem.

‘The Peltiers ran happily for an hour or two, but after that, they proved to be too effective. A layer of ice built up on the heat sink connected to the cold side of the Peltiers, jamming the fans, and allowing the beer to grow warm. They also made a horrible rattling sound, and disturbed everyone in the house.”

It seemed that the perfect pint was still out of reach.

Complex circuitry

Not to be defeated, Alan realised he would need a way to control the power to the Peltier units. Switching the power using a simple thermostat would cause damaging thermal shock in the Peltiers, so Alan turned to Raspberry Pi Zero W as his solution.

A photo of the inside of Alan’s beer cooler complete with Raspberry Pi and a heap of wiring (as described in the paragraph below)

Testing the completed control circuit

In order to fine-tune the cooling process, Alan decided to control the current running through the Peltier units. He used a hardware PWM output on a Raspberry Pi Zero W alongside a power MOSFET, an inductor, a capacitor, and a current measurement circuit to create a switched-mode variable current power supply. By measuring the temperature on the cold side of the Peltier units, and using a PID control loop to adjust the PWM output, Alan was able to maintain the cold side at just above freezing. He used a second PID control loop to keep the beer inside the fridge at a perfect cellar temperature of 8°C.

Aware that this cooling system was both overcomplicated and built from very high-power components, Alan designed multiple failsafes using hardware and software to ensure that the control unit would not spontaneously combust while attempting to cool the beer.

The perfect pint was within reach.

Consultation

And then Alan tried to explain the failure modes to his wife, in case he wasn’t in the house when the electronics overheated, or the failsafes kicked in.

“I wanted her to know what to do if the cooler failed”, Alan explains. “But this required her to check the beer fridge regularly. It’s on the floor, under the bar, and she didn’t seem keen.”

The project was about to get significantly more complicated.

What about an audible alarm?

It was an innocent suggestion, but the idea grew from a simple beeping alarm to a series of spoken alerts. What could be used to produce these alerts?

“I found myself programming a second Raspberry Pi Zero with a DAC HAT, audio amp, and speaker, just to communicate the status of the beer cooler. Originally, the spoken alert was to indicate a fault in the control circuits, but it seemed a waste to stop at a single message.”

A breadboard covered in wires - Raspberry Pi Beer Cooler

Prototype for the audio amplifier

After days of planning, programming, and searching for MP3 files online, the fridge can now inform Alan (and his wife) when it is switched on, when the Peltiers power up, when it reaches maximum power, when it is switched off, and when there is a fault.

The alert messages are all quotes from sci-fi shows and films: Han Solo claiming he has a bad feeling about this; Scotty telling Captain Kirk that the Enterprise is giving it all she’s got; and Kaylee telling Captain Reynolds that everything is shiny.

And the fault alert?

“If there’s a problem with the beer cooler, the Raspberry Pi declares ‘Danger, Will Robinson, danger.’ on a loop, until someone checks it and resets the controls. It’s annoying and effective!”

The perfect pint

The Raspberry Pi also acts as a web server, using the REMI library to display and change the temperatures, currents, and control parameters, so the beer temperature can be monitored and regulated from anywhere on the home WiFi network.

The final build next to a laptop displaying the beer cooler web interface for maintenance on the go

Control box and web interface

Alan’s beer cooler has been successfully tested, and several polypins of local craft ale have been drunk and enjoyed — and it’s only taken two Raspberry Pis; some high-current circuitry; two Peltier units; a pile of household insulation board; and Han Solo, Scotty, Kaylee, and the robot from Lost In Space to achieve the perfect pint.

Over-engineering

Use the comments to tell us about your own over-engineered projects and any excuses you’ve found for including an extra Raspberry Pi in your build!

And thank you to Rachel, aka ‘the wife’, for this wonderful blog post!

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Halloween voice-changer using Raspberry Pi Zero

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/halloween-voice-changer-using-raspberry-pi-zero/

Olivier Ros has put together a short and sweet tutorial for creating your own voice-changing mask for Halloween.

Voice changer with Raspberry Pi Zero for Halloween

How to make a voice changer with Raspberry Pi Zero for Halloween Buy MIC+ sound card on Amazon : goo.gl/VDFzu7 tutorial here: https://www.instructables.com/id/Halloween-Voice-Changer-With-Raspberry-Pi/ https://www.raspiaudio.com/halloween

Halloween — we love it!

Grab your ghostly fairy lights, hollow out your pumpkins, and hunt down your box of spooky knick-knacks — it’s Halloween season! And with every year that passes, we see more and more uses of the Raspberry Pi in haunting costumes and decorations.

Voice-changers

At the top of the list is an increase in the number of voice changers. And Olivier Ros’s recent project is a great example of an easy-to-build piece costumimg that’s possible thanks to the small footprint of the Raspberry Pi Zero.

An image of the Raspberry Pi Zero voice changer inside a scary mask

Playdough: so many uses, yet all we wanted to do as kids was eat it.

Oliver used a Pi Zero, though if you have the mask fit it into, you could use any 40-pin Pi and an audio DAC HAT such as this one. He also used Playdough to isolate the Zero and keep it in place, but some foam should do the trick too. Just see what you have lying around.

When I said this is an easy project, I meant it: Olivier has provided the complete code for you to install on a newly setup SD card, or to download via the terminal on your existing Raspbian configuration.

You can read through the entire build on his website, and see more of his projects over on his Instructables page.

More Halloween inspiration

If you’re looking to beef up your Halloween game this October, you should really include a Raspberry Pi in the mix. For example, our Halloween Pumpkin Light tutorial allows you to control the light show inside your carved fruit without the risk of fire. Yes, you read that correctly: a pumpkin is a fruit.

Halloween Pumpkin Light Effect

Use a Raspberry Pi and Pimoroni Blinkt! to create an realistic lighting effect for your Halloween Pumpkin.

For more inspiration and instructions, check out John Park’s Haunted Portrait, some of our favourite tweeted spooky projects from last year, and our list of some of the best Halloween projects online.

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A waterproof Raspberry Pi?! Five 3D-printable projects to try

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/waterproof-3d-printing-raspberry-pi/

Summer is coming to a close. The evenings grow darker. So pack away your flip flops, hang up your beach towel, and settle in for the colder months with these fun 3D-printable projects to make at home or in your local makerspace.

Fallout 4 desktop terminal

Power Up Props’ replica of the Fallout desktop terminals fits a 3.5″ screen and a Raspberry Pi 3B. Any Fallout fans out there will be pleased to know that you don’t need to raise your Science level to hack into this terminal — you’ll just need access to a 3D printer and these free files from My Mini Factory.

Fallout 4 terminal 3d-printable raspberry pi case

And while you’re waiting for this to print, check out Power Up Props’ wall-mounted terminal!

Fallout 4 – Working Terminal (Raspberry Pi Version) – Power Up Props

Howdy neighbors, grab some fusion cores and put on your power armor because today we’re making a working replica of the wall mounted computer “terminals” from the Fallout series, powered by a Raspberry Pi! Want one of your very own terminals?

Falcon Heavy night light

Remixing DAKINGINDANORF‘s low-poly Arduino-based design, this 3D-printable night light is a replica of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The replica uses a Raspberry Pi Zero and a Pimoroni Unicorn pHAT to create a rather lovely rocket launch effect. Perfect for the budding space explorer in your home!

Falcon Heavy night light

I 3D printed a SpaceX Falcon Heavy night light, with some nice effects like it’s actually launching. Useful? Hell no. Cool? Hell yes! Blogpost with files and code: https://www.dennisjanssen.be/tutorials/falcon-heavy-night-light/

You can download the files directly from Dennis Janssen’s website.

Swimming IoT satellite

We’re really excited about this design and already thinking about how we’ll use it for our own projects:

Floating Raspberry Pi case

Using an acrylic Christmas bauble and 3D-printed parts, you can set your Raspberry Pi Zero W free in local bodies of water — ideal for nature watching and citizen science experiments.

Art Deco clock and weather display

Channel your inner Jay Gatsby with this Art Deco-effect clock and weather display.

Art Deco Raspberry Pi Clock

Fitted with a Raspberry Pi Zero W and an Adafruit piTFT display, this build is ideally suited for any late-night cocktail parties you may have planned.

High-altitude rocket holder

Send four Raspberry Pi Zeros and Camera Modules into the skies with this holder design from Thingiverse user randysteck.

Raspberry Pi Zero rocket holder

The 3D-printable holder will keep your boards safe and sound while they simultaneously record photos or video of their airborne adventure.

More more more

What projects did we miss? Share your favourite 3D-printable designs for Raspberry Pis in the comments so we can see more builds from the internet’s very best community!

The post A waterproof Raspberry Pi?! Five 3D-printable projects to try appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Working model of the Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-model-trinity-buoy-wharf-lighthouse/

When Dave shared his Raspberry Pi Zero–powered model of the Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse on Reddit, we fell a little bit in love.

Lame_Dave's Raspberry Pi Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse

Hello from the Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse

Dave was getting married inside London’s only lighthouse, situated at Trinity Buoy Wharf across the water from the O2 Arena.

Lame_Dave's Raspberry Pi Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse

The Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse

The Trinity Buoy Wharf lighthouse sits at the confluence of the River Thames (the big ol’ river running through London) and Bow Creek, a tidal estuary of the River Lea (the river Adele sings about in her song River Lea*!). When the wharf was closed in 1988, the lighthouse was put out of commission.

Dave is wonderful, and so are his lighthouses

On Reddit, Dave goes by the username Lame_Dave, but considering how wonderful and thoughtful his project for his lighthouse wedding is, we hereby rename him Wonderful_Thoughtful_Dave. Don’t put yourself down, Dave. You’re brilliant!

“I knew I wanted to make something involving electronics and 3D printing,” explains Wonderful_Thoughtful_Dave in an imgur post. “So I decided to make working model lighthouses as the table centrepieces.”

Designing and building ten tabletop lighthouses

Dave designed the 3D model in Autodesk 123D, with a plethora of photographs of the lighthouse as reference points. And many hours later, he began 3D printing ten lighthouse shells using his Prusa MK2.5.



With Samsung 18650 batteries and a 18650 shield for power, Dave hooked up Raspberry Pi Zeros to 6×2 LCD displays, LEDs, and stepper motors. With these components, each lighthouse to gives off a rather lovely light while also showing table number and meal status to guests. Neat!

Lame_Dave's Raspberry Pi Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse

“Each lighthouse has a JSON file on the Pi that tells it what messages to display when, so each table is personalised.”

The final result is beautiful and would look at home anywhere from a model town to a toy shop, or indeed the entrance of the Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse itself.

We love how Dave put different maker skills to use here, from 3D design and printing, to constructing and coding. Hopefully, we’ll see more projects from him in the future!

Remaking classic landmarks

Here in the UK, people have a thing for iconic buildings. And at Pi Towers, we adore it when you recreate historic landmarks like this with the help of our humble board.

Why not try creating your own reimagining, such as the Project Arthur ISS tracker, a papercraft and Pi build that pays homage to Arthur, the first satellite dish at the Cornish Goonhilly Earth Satellite Station?

Arthur satellite dish Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse

Or come up with something completely new! We’d love to see, say, a working model of London’s Tower Bridge, or a light-up King’s College Chapel. Whatever landmark makes your day, why not build a scale model using your maker skills and electronics?

 

 

 

*Sadly, we are unable to share the song for copyright issues, so here is the Adele edition of Carpool Karaoke instead.

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