Tag Archives: UK

NotPetya Ransomeware Wreaking Havoc

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/0IfKiBP5jIo/

The latest splash has been made by the Petya or NotPetya Ransomware that exploded in Ukraine and is infecting companies all over the World. It’s getting some people in deep trouble as there’s no way to recover the files once encrypted. The malware seems to be trying to hide it’s intent as it doesn’t really […]

The post NotPetya Ransomeware…

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk

The Code Club International movement

Post Syndicated from Katherine Leadbetter original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/code-club-international/

Over the past few years, Code Club has made strides toward world domination! There are now more than 10,000 Code Clubs running in 125 countries. More than 140,000 kids have taken part in our clubs in places as diverse as the northernmost tip of Canada and the favelas of Rio de Janeiro.

In the first video from our Code Club International network, we find out about Code Clubs around the world from the people supporting these communities.

Global communities

Code Club currently has official local partners in twelve countries. Our passionate and motivated partner organisations are responsible for championing their countries’ Code Clubs. In March we brought the partners together for the first time, and they shared what it means to be part of the Code Club community:

You can help Code Club make a difference around the world

We invited our international Code Club partners to join us in London and discuss why we think Code Club is so special. Whether you’re a seasoned pro, a budding educator, or simply want to give back to your local community, there’s a place for you among our incredible Code Club volunteers.

Of course, Code Clubs aren’t restricted to countries with official partner communities – they can be started anywhere in the world! Code Clubs are up and running in a number of unexpected places, from Kosovo to Kazakhstan.

Code Club International

Code Club partners gathered together at the International Meetup

The geographical spread of Code Clubs means we hear of clubs overcoming a range of different challenges. One club in Zambia, run by volunteer Mwiza Simbeye, started as a way to get kids off the streets of Lusaka and teach them useful skills. Many children attending had hardly used a computer before writing their first line of code at the club. And it’s making a difference! As Mwiza told us, ‘you only need to see the light shine in the eyes of [Code Club] participants to see how much they enjoy these sessions.’

Code Club International

Student Joyce codes in Scratch at her Code Club in Nunavut, Canada

In the Nunavut region of Canada, Talia Metuq was first introduced to coding at a Code Club. In an area comprised of 25 Inuit communities that are inaccessible via roads and currently combating severe social and economic deprivation, computer science was not on the school timetable. Code Club, along with club volunteer Ryan Oliver, is starting to change that. After graduating from Code Club, Talia went on to study 3D modelling in Vancouver. She has now returned to Nunavut and is helping inspire more children to pursue digital making.

Start a Code Club

Code Clubs are volunteer-led extra-curricular coding clubs for children age 9 to 13. Children that attend learn to code games, animations, and websites using the projects we provide. Working with volunteers and with other children in their club, they grow their digital skillset.

You can run a Code Club anywhere if you have a venue, volunteers, and kids ready to learn coding. Help us achieve our goal of having a Code Club in every community in the world!

To find out how to start a Code Club outside of the UK, you can visit the Code Club International website. If you are in the UK, head to the Code Club UK website for more information.

Code Club International

Help the Code Club International community grow

On the Code Club site, we currently have projects in 28 languages, allowing more young people than ever to learn programming in their native language. But that’s not enough! We are always on the lookout for volunteers to translate projects and resources. If you are proficient in translating from English and would like to help, please visit the website to find out more.

We are also looking for official local partners in Italy and Germany to join our international network – if you know of, or are a part of an enthusiastic non-profit organisation who might be interested to join us, you can learn more here.

The post The Code Club International movement appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

FACT Threatens Users of ‘Pirate’ Kodi Add-Ons

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/fact-threatens-users-of-pirate-kodi-add-ons-170628/

In the UK there’s a war going on against streaming pirates. At least, that’s what the local anti-piracy body FACT would like the public to know.

The popular media streaming platform Kodi is at the center of the controversy. While Kodi is perfectly legal, many people use it in conjunction with third party add-ons that offer pirated content.

FACT hopes to curb this trend. The group has already taken action against sellers of Kodi devices pre-loaded with these add-ons and they’re keeping a keen eye on developers of illicit add-ons too.

However, according to FACT, the ‘crackdown’ doesn’t stop there. Users of pirate add-ons are also at risk, they claim.

“And then we’ll also be looking at, at some point, the end user. The reason for end users to come into this is that they are committing criminal offences,” FACT’s chief executive Kieron Sharp told the Independent.

While people who stream pirated content are generally hard to track, since they don’t broadcast their IP-address to the public, FACT says that customer data could be obtained directly from sellers of fully-loaded Kodi boxes.

“When we’re working with the police against a company that’s selling IPTV boxes or illicit streaming devices on a large scale, they have records of who they’ve sold them to,” Sharp noted.

While the current legal efforts are focused on the supply side, including these sellers, the end users may also be targeted in the future.

“We have a number of cases coming before the courts in terms of those people who have been providing, selling and distributing illicit streaming devices. It’s something for the very near future, when we’ll consider whether we go any further than that, in terms of customers.”

The comments above make it clear that FACT wants users of these pirate devices to feel vulnerable and exposed. But threatening talk is much easier than action.

It will be very hard to get someone convicted, simply because they bought a device that can access both legal and illegal content. A receipt doesn’t prove intent, and even if it did, it’s pretty much impossible to prove that a person streamed specific pirated content.

But let’s say FACT was able to prove that someone bought a fully-loaded Kodi box and streamed content without permission. How would that result in a conviction? Contrary to claims in the mainstream press, watching a pirated stream isn’t an offense covered by the new Digital Economy Act.

In theory, there could be other ways, but given the complexity of the situation, one would think that FACT would be better off spending its efforts elsewhere.

If FACT was indeed interested in going after individuals then they could easily target people who use torrents. These people broadcast their IP-addresses to the public, which makes them easy to identify. In addition, you can see what they are uploading, and they would also be liable under the Digital Economy Act.

However, after FACT’s decades-long association with the MPAA ended, its main partner in the demonization of Kodi-enabled devices is now the Premier League, who are far more concerned about piracy of live broadcasts (streaming) than content made available after the fact via torrents.

So, given the challenges of having a meaningful criminal prosecution of an end-user as suggested, that leaves us with the probability of FACT sowing fear, uncertainty, and doubt. In other words, scaring the public to deter them from buying or using a fully-loaded Kodi box.

This would also fit in with FACT’s recent claims that some pirate devices are a fire hazard. While it’s kind of FACT to be concerned about the well-being of pirates, as an anti-piracy organization their warnings also serve as a deterrent.

This strategy could pay off to a degree but there’s also some risk involved. Every day new “Kodi” related articles appear in the UK tabloid press, many of them with comments from FACT. Some of these may scare prospective users, but the same headlines also make these boxes known to a much wider public.

In fact, in what is quite a serious backfire, some recent pieces published by the popular Trinity Mirror group (which include FACT comments) actually provide a nice list of pirate addons that are still operational following recent crackdowns.

So are we just sowing fear now or educating a whole new audience?

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

mkosi — A Tool for Generating OS Images

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/mkosi-a-tool-for-generating-os-images.html

Introducing mkosi

After blogging about
casync
I realized I never blogged about the
mkosi tool that combines nicely
with it. mkosi has been around for a while already, and its time to
make it a bit better known. mkosi stands for Make Operating System
Image
, and is a tool for precisely that: generating an OS tree or
image that can be booted.

Yes, there are many tools like mkosi, and a number of them are quite
well known and popular. But mkosi has a number of features that I
think make it interesting for a variety of use-cases that other tools
don’t cover that well.

What is mkosi?

What are those use-cases, and what does mkosi precisely set apart?
mkosi is definitely a tool with a focus on developer’s needs for
building OS images, for testing and debugging, but also for generating
production images with cryptographic protection. A typical use-case
would be to add a mkosi.default file to an existing project (for
example, one written in C or Python), and thus making it easy to
generate an OS image for it. mkosi will put together the image with
development headers and tools, compile your code in it, run your test
suite, then throw away the image again, and build a new one, this time
without development headers and tools, and install your build
artifacts in it. This final image is then “production-ready”, and only
contains your built program and the minimal set of packages you
configured otherwise. Such an image could then be deployed with
casync (or any other tool of course) to be delivered to your set of
servers, or IoT devices or whatever you are building.

mkosi is supposed to be legacy-free: the focus is clearly on
today’s technology, not yesteryear’s. Specifically this means that
we’ll generate GPT partition tables, not MBR/DOS ones. When you tell
mkosi to generate a bootable image for you, it will make it bootable
on EFI, not on legacy BIOS. The GPT images generated follow
specifications such as the Discoverable Partitions
Specification
,
so that /etc/fstab can remain unpopulated and tools such as
systemd-nspawn can automatically dissect the image and boot from
them.

So, let’s have a look on the specific images it can generate:

  1. Raw GPT disk image, with ext4 as root
  2. Raw GPT disk image, with btrfs as root
  3. Raw GPT disk image, with a read-only squashfs as root
  4. A plain directory on disk containing the OS tree directly (this is useful for creating generic container images)
  5. A btrfs subvolume on disk, similar to the plain directory
  6. A tarball of a plain directory

When any of the GPT choices above are selected, a couple of additional
options are available:

  1. A swap partition may be added in
  2. The system may be made bootable on EFI systems
  3. Separate partitions for /home and /srv may be added in
  4. The root, /home and /srv partitions may be optionally encrypted with LUKS
  5. The root partition may be protected using dm-verity, thus making offline attacks on the generated system hard
  6. If the image is made bootable, the dm-verity root hash is automatically added to the kernel command line, and the kernel together with its initial RAM disk and the kernel command line is optionally cryptographically signed for UEFI SecureBoot

Note that mkosi is distribution-agnostic. It currently can build
images based on the following Linux distributions:

  1. Fedora
  2. Debian
  3. Ubuntu
  4. ArchLinux
  5. openSUSE

Note though that not all distributions are supported at the same
feature level currently. Also, as mkosi is based on dnf
--installroot
, debootstrap, pacstrap and zypper, and those
packages are not packaged universally on all distributions, you might
not be able to build images for all those distributions on arbitrary
host distributions. For example, Fedora doesn’t package zypper,
hence you cannot build an openSUSE image easily on Fedora, but you can
still build Fedora (obviously…), Debian, Ubuntu and ArchLinux images
on it just fine.

The GPT images are put together in a way that they aren’t just
compatible with UEFI systems, but also with VM and container managers
(that is, at least the smart ones, i.e. VM managers that know UEFI,
and container managers that grok GPT disk images) to a large
degree. In fact, the idea is that you can use mkosi to build a
single GPT image that may be used to:

  1. Boot on bare-metal boxes
  2. Boot in a VM
  3. Boot in a systemd-nspawn container
  4. Directly run a systemd service off, using systemd’s RootImage= unit file setting

Note that in all four cases the dm-verity data is automatically used
if available to ensure the image is not tempered with (yes, you read
that right, systemd-nspawn and systemd’s RootImage= setting
automatically do dm-verity these days if the image has it.)

Mode of Operation

The simplest usage of mkosi is by simply invoking it without
parameters (as root):

# mkosi

Without any configuration this will create a GPT disk image for you,
will call it image.raw and drop it in the current directory. The
distribution used will be the same one as your host runs.

Of course in most cases you want more control about how the image is
put together, i.e. select package sets, select the distribution, size
partitions and so on. Most of that you can actually specify on the
command line, but it is recommended to instead create a couple of
mkosi.$SOMETHING files and directories in some directory. Then,
simply change to that directory and run mkosi without any further
arguments. The tool will then look in the current working directory
for these files and directories and make use of them (similar to how
make looks for a Makefile…). Every single file/directory is
optional, but if they exist they are honored. Here’s a list of the
files/directories mkosi currently looks for:

  1. mkosi.default — This is the main configuration file, here you
    can configure what kind of image you want, which distribution, which
    packages and so on.

  2. mkosi.extra/ — If this directory exists, then mkosi will copy
    everything inside it into the images built. You can place arbitrary
    directory hierarchies in here, and they’ll be copied over whatever is
    already in the image, after it was put together by the distribution’s
    package manager. This is the best way to drop additional static files
    into the image, or override distribution-supplied ones.

  3. mkosi.build — This executable file is supposed to be a build
    script. When it exists, mkosi will build two images, one after the
    other in the mode already mentioned above: the first version is the
    build image, and may include various build-time dependencies such as
    a compiler or development headers. The build script is also copied
    into it, and then run inside it. The script should then build
    whatever shall be built and place the result in $DESTDIR (don’t
    worry, popular build tools such as Automake or Meson all honor
    $DESTDIR anyway, so there’s not much to do here explicitly). It may
    also run a test suite, or anything else you like. After the script
    finished, the build image is removed again, and a second image (the
    final image) is built. This time, no development packages are
    included, and the build script is not copied into the image again —
    however, the build artifacts from the first run (i.e. those placed in
    $DESTDIR) are copied into the image.

  4. mkosi.postinst — If this executable script exists, it is invoked
    inside the image (inside a systemd-nspawn invocation) and can
    adjust the image as it likes at a very late point in the image
    preparation. If mkosi.build exists, i.e. the dual-phased
    development build process used, then this script will be invoked
    twice: once inside the build image and once inside the final
    image. The first parameter passed to the script clarifies which phase
    it is run in.

  5. mkosi.nspawn — If this file exists, it should contain a
    container configuration file for systemd-nspawn (see
    systemd.nspawn(5)
    for details), which shall be shipped along with the final image and
    shall be included in the check-sum calculations (see below).

  6. mkosi.cache/ — If this directory exists, it is used as package
    cache directory for the builds. This directory is effectively bind
    mounted into the image at build time, in order to speed up building
    images. The package installers of the various distributions will
    place their package files here, so that subsequent runs can reuse
    them.

  7. mkosi.passphrase — If this file exists, it should contain a
    pass-phrase to use for the LUKS encryption (if that’s enabled for the
    image built). This file should not be readable to other users.

  8. mkosi.secure-boot.crt and mkosi.secure-boot.key should be an
    X.509 key pair to use for signing the kernel and initrd for UEFI
    SecureBoot, if that’s enabled.

How to use it

So, let’s come back to our most trivial example, without any of the
mkosi.$SOMETHING files around:

# mkosi

As mentioned, this will create a build file image.raw in the current
directory. How do we use it? Of course, we could dd it onto some USB
stick and boot it on a bare-metal device. However, it’s much simpler
to first run it in a container for testing:

# systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

And there you go: the image should boot up, and just work for you.

Now, let’s make things more interesting. Let’s still not use any of
the mkosi.$SOMETHING files around:

# mkosi -t raw_btrfs --bootable -o foobar.raw
# systemd-nspawn -bi foobar.raw

This is similar as the above, but we made three changes: it’s no
longer GPT + ext4, but GPT + btrfs. Moreover, the system is made
bootable on UEFI systems, and finally, the output is now called
foobar.raw.

Because this system is bootable on UEFI systems, we can run it in KVM:

qemu-kvm -m 512 -smp 2 -bios /usr/share/edk2/ovmf/OVMF_CODE.fd -drive format=raw,file=foobar.raw

This will look very similar to the systemd-nspawn invocation, except
that this uses full VM virtualization rather than container
virtualization. (Note that the way to run a UEFI qemu/kvm instance
appears to change all the time and is different on the various
distributions. It’s quite annoying, and I can’t really tell you what
the right qemu command line is to make this work on your system.)

Of course, it’s not all raw GPT disk images with mkosi. Let’s try
a plain directory image:

# mkosi -d fedora -t directory -o quux
# systemd-nspawn -bD quux

Of course, if you generate the image as plain directory you can’t boot
it on bare-metal just like that, nor run it in a VM.

A more complex command line is the following:

# mkosi -d fedora -t raw_squashfs --checksum --xz --package=openssh-clients --package=emacs

In this mode we explicitly pick Fedora as the distribution to use, ask
mkosi to generate a compressed GPT image with a root squashfs,
compress the result with xz, and generate a SHA256SUMS file with
the hashes of the generated artifacts. The package will contain the
SSH client as well as everybody’s favorite editor.

Now, let’s make use of the various mkosi.$SOMETHING files. Let’s
say we are working on some Automake-based project and want to make it
easy to generate a disk image off the development tree with the
version you are hacking on. Create a configuration file:

# cat > mkosi.default <<EOF
[Distribution]
Distribution=fedora
Release=24

[Output]
Format=raw_btrfs
Bootable=yes

[Packages]
# The packages to appear in both the build and the final image
Packages=openssh-clients httpd
# The packages to appear in the build image, but absent from the final image
BuildPackages=make gcc libcurl-devel
EOF

And let’s add a build script:

# cat > mkosi.build <<EOF
#!/bin/sh
cd $SRCDIR
./autogen.sh
./configure --prefix=/usr
make -j `nproc`
make install
EOF
# chmod +x mkosi.build

And with all that in place we can now build our project into a disk image, simply by typing:

# mkosi

Let’s try it out:

# systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

Of course, if you do this you’ll notice that building an image like
this can be quite slow. And slow build times are actively hurtful to
your productivity as a developer. Hence let’s make things a bit
faster. First, let’s make use of a package cache shared between runs:

# mkdir mkosi.chache

Building images now should already be substantially faster (and
generate less network traffic) as the packages will now be downloaded
only once and reused. However, you’ll notice that unpacking all those
packages and the rest of the work is still quite slow. But mkosi can
help you with that. Simply use mkosi‘s incremental build feature. In
this mode mkosi will make a copy of the build and final images
immediately before dropping in your build sources or artifacts, so
that building an image becomes a lot quicker: instead of always
starting totally from scratch a build will now reuse everything it can
reuse from a previous run, and immediately begin with building your
sources rather than the build image to build your sources in. To
enable the incremental build feature use -i:

# mkosi -i

Note that if you use this option, the package list is not updated
anymore from your distribution’s servers, as the cached copy is made
after all packages are installed, and hence until you actually delete
the cached copy the distribution’s network servers aren’t contacted
again and no RPMs or DEBs are downloaded. This means the distribution
you use becomes “frozen in time” this way. (Which might be a bad
thing, but also a good thing, as it makes things kinda reproducible.)

Of course, if you run mkosi a couple of times you’ll notice that it
won’t overwrite the generated image when it already exists. You can
either delete the file yourself first (rm image.raw) or let mkosi
do it for you right before building a new image, with mkosi -f. You
can also tell mkosi to not only remove any such pre-existing images,
but also remove any cached copies of the incremental feature, by using
-f twice.

I wrote mkosi originally in order to test systemd, and quickly
generate a disk image of various distributions with the most current
systemd version from git, without all that affecting my host system. I
regularly use mkosi for that today, in incremental mode. The two
commands I use most in that context are:

# mkosi -if && systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

And sometimes:

# mkosi -iff && systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

The latter I use only if I want to regenerate everything based on the
very newest set of RPMs provided by Fedora, instead of a cached
snapshot of it.

BTW, the mkosi files for systemd are included in the systemd git
tree:
mkosi.default
and
mkosi.build. This
way, any developer who wants to quickly test something with current
systemd git, or wants to prepare a patch based on it and test it can
check out the systemd repository and simply run mkosi in it and a
few minutes later he has a bootable image he can test in
systemd-nspawn or KVM. casync has similar files:
mkosi.default,
mkosi.build.

Random Interesting Features

  1. As mentioned already, mkosi will generate dm-verity enabled
    disk images if you ask for it. For that use the --verity switch on
    the command line or Verity= setting in mkosi.default. Of course,
    dm-verity implies that the root volume is read-only. In this mode
    the top-level dm-verity hash will be placed along-side the output
    disk image in a file named the same way, but with the .roothash
    suffix. If the image is to be created bootable, the root hash is also
    included on the kernel command line in the roothash= parameter,
    which current systemd versions can use to both find and activate the
    root partition in a dm-verity protected way. BTW: it’s a good idea
    to combine this dm-verity mode with the raw_squashfs image mode,
    to generate a genuinely protected, compressed image suitable for
    running in your IoT device.

  2. As indicated above, mkosi can automatically create a check-sum
    file SHA256SUMS for you (--checksum) covering all the files it
    outputs (which could be the image file itself, a matching .nspawn
    file using the mkosi.nspawn file mentioned above, as well as the
    .roothash file for the dm-verity root hash.) It can then
    optionally sign this with gpg (--sign). Note that systemd‘s
    machinectl pull-tar and machinectl pull-raw command can download
    these files and the SHA256SUMS file automatically and verify things
    on download. With other words: what mkosi outputs is perfectly
    ready for downloads using these two systemd commands.

  3. As mentioned, mkosi is big on supporting UEFI SecureBoot. To
    make use of that, place your X.509 key pair in two files
    mkosi.secureboot.crt and mkosi.secureboot.key, and set
    SecureBoot= or --secure-boot. If so, mkosi will sign the
    kernel/initrd/kernel command line combination during the build. Of
    course, if you use this mode, you should also use
    Verity=/--verity=, otherwise the setup makes only partial
    sense. Note that mkosi will not help you with actually enrolling
    the keys you use in your UEFI BIOS.

  4. mkosi has minimal support for GIT checkouts: when it recognizes
    it is run in a git checkout and you use the mkosi.build script
    stuff, the source tree will be copied into the build image, but will
    all files excluded by .gitignore removed.

  5. There’s support for encryption in place. Use --encrypt= or
    Encrypt=. Note that the UEFI ESP is never encrypted though, and the
    root partition only if explicitly requested. The /home and /srv
    partitions are unconditionally encrypted if that’s enabled.

  6. Images may be built with all documentation removed.

  7. The password for the root user and additional kernel command line
    arguments may be configured for the image to generate.

Minimum Requirements

Current mkosi requires Python 3.5, and has a number of dependencies,
listed in the
README. Most
notably you need a somewhat recent systemd version to make use of its
full feature set: systemd 233. Older versions are already packaged for
various distributions, but much of what I describe above is only
available in the most recent release mkosi 3.

The UEFI SecureBoot support requires sbsign which currently isn’t
available in Fedora, but there’s a
COPR
.

Future

It is my intention to continue turning mkosi into a tool suitable
for:

  1. Testing and debugging projects
  2. Building images for secure devices
  3. Building portable service images
  4. Building images for secure VMs and containers

One of the biggest goals I have for the future is to teach mkosi and
systemd/sd-boot native support for A/B IoT style partition
setups. The idea is that the combination of systemd, casync and
mkosi provides generic building blocks for building secure,
auto-updating devices in a generic way from, even though all pieces
may be used individually, too.

FAQ

  1. Why are you reinventing the wheel again? This is exactly like
    $SOMEOTHERPROJECT!
    — Well, to my knowledge there’s no tool that
    integrates this nicely with your project’s development tree, and can
    do dm-verity and UEFI SecureBoot and all that stuff for you. So
    nope, I don’t think this exactly like $SOMEOTHERPROJECT, thank you
    very much.

  2. What about creating MBR/DOS partition images? — That’s really
    out of focus to me. This is an exercise in figuring out how generic
    OSes and devices in the future should be built and an attempt to
    commoditize OS image building. And no, the future doesn’t speak MBR,
    sorry. That said, I’d be quite interested in adding support for
    booting on Raspberry Pi, possibly using a hybrid approach, i.e. using
    a GPT disk label, but arranging things in a way that the Raspberry Pi
    boot protocol (which is built around DOS partition tables), can still
    work.

  3. Is this portable? — Well, depends what you mean by
    portable. No, this tool runs on Linux only, and as it uses
    systemd-nspawn during the build process it doesn’t run on
    non-systemd systems either. But then again, you should be able to
    create images for any architecture you like with it, but of course if
    you want the image bootable on bare-metal systems only systems doing
    UEFI are supported (but systemd-nspawn should still work fine on
    them).

  4. Where can I get this stuff? — Try
    GitHub. And some distributions
    carry packaged versions, but I think none of them the current v3
    yet.

  5. Is this a systemd project? — Yes, it’s hosted under the
    systemd GitHub umbrella. And yes,
    during run-time systemd-nspawn in a current version is required. But
    no, the code-bases are separate otherwise, already because systemd
    is a C project, and mkosi Python.

  6. Requiring systemd 233 is a pretty steep requirement, no?
    Yes, but the feature we need kind of matters (systemd-nspawn‘s
    --overlay= switch), and again, this isn’t supposed to be a tool for
    legacy systems.

  7. Can I run the resulting images in LXC or Docker? — Humm, I am
    not an LXC nor Docker guy. If you select directory or subvolume
    as image type, LXC should be able to boot the generated images just
    fine, but I didn’t try. Last time I looked, Docker doesn’t permit
    running proper init systems as PID 1 inside the container, as they
    define their own run-time without intention to emulate a proper
    system. Hence, no I don’t think it will work, at least not with an
    unpatched Docker version. That said, again, don’t ask me questions
    about Docker, it’s not precisely my area of expertise, and quite
    frankly I am not a fan. To my knowledge neither LXC nor Docker are
    able to run containers directly off GPT disk images, hence the
    various raw_xyz image types are definitely not compatible with
    either. That means if you want to generate a single raw disk image
    that can be booted unmodified both in a container and on bare-metal,
    then systemd-nspawn is the container manager to go for
    (specifically, its -i/--image= switch).

Should you care? Is this a tool for you?

Well, that’s up to you really.

If you hack on some complex project and need a quick way to compile
and run your project on a specific current Linux distribution, then
mkosi is an excellent way to do that. Simply drop the mkosi.default
and mkosi.build files in your git tree and everything will be
easy. (And of course, as indicated above: if the project you are
hacking on happens to be called systemd or casync be aware that
those files are already part of the git tree — you can just use them.)

If you hack on some embedded or IoT device, then mkosi is a great
choice too, as it will make it reasonably easy to generate secure
images that are protected against offline modification, by using
dm-verity and UEFI SecureBoot.

If you are an administrator and need a nice way to build images for a
VM or systemd-nspawn container, or a portable service then mkosi
is an excellent choice too.

If you care about legacy computers, old distributions, non-systemd
init systems, old VM managers, Docker, … then no, mkosi is not for
you, but there are plenty of well-established alternatives around that
cover that nicely.

And never forget: mkosi is an Open Source project. We are happy to
accept your patches and other contributions.

Oh, and one unrelated last thing: don’t forget to submit your talk
proposal

and/or buy a ticket for
All Systems Go! 2017 in Berlin — the
conference where things like systemd, casync and mkosi are
discussed, along with a variety of other Linux userspace projects used
for building systems.

T411, France’s Most-Visited Torrent Site, Has Been Shut Down

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/t411-frances-most-visited-torrent-site-has-disappeared-170627/

As the number one torrent site among French speakers and one of the most popular sites in France, T411’s rise to stardom is the product of more than a decade of twists and turns.

After a prolonged battle against 31 Canadian media organizations including the CRIA, the administrator of a torrent site known as QuebecTorrent closed its doors in 2008 after the handing down of a permanent injunction.

“I just wanna say thanks to all the people who supported the cause and me all along,” admin Sebastian Doditz told TorrentFreak at the time.

Initially, it was believed that the 109,000 members of the site would be left homeless but shortly after another torrent site appeared. Called Torrent411 with the slogan The Torrent Yellow Pages (411 is Canada’s version), it launched with around 109,000 members – the number that QuebecTorrent closed with.

No surprise then that all QuebecTorrent user accounts had been transferred to T411, including ratios and even some content categories that were previously excluded due to copyright holder disputes.

“Welcome to one and all!” a notice on the site read. “It is with great pleasure that we launch the Torrent411.com site today. All the team of Torrent411.com wishes you the most cordial of welcomes! Here you will find all the torrents imaginable which will be for you for thousands of hours to come! Filled with surprises that await you!”

Even following its resurrection, pressure on the site continued to build. In 2011, it was forced to move to T411.me, to avoid problems with its .com domain, but against the odds, it continued to grow.

As shown in the image to the right (courtesy OpenTrackers), in 2013 the site had more than 5.3 million members, 336,000 torrents, and 4.7m seeders. That made it a significant site indeed.

In early 2015, the site decided to move again, from .me to .io, following action to have the site blocked in France.

But later in the year, there was yet more trouble when the site found itself reported to the United States Trade Representative, identified as a “rogue site” by the RIAA.

With a number of copyright holders on its back, it’s clear that T411’s troubles weren’t going away anytime soon, but now there’s a crisis from which the site is unlikely to recover.

On Sunday, T411 simply stopped responding on its latest T411.al domain. No warning and no useful messages have been forthcoming from its operators. For a site of this scale and resilience, that’s not something one expects.

Message greeting site visitors

Even though the site itself has been down, there have been some very basic signs of life. For example, the site’s Wiki remained operational which indicates the T411.al domain is at least partially intact, at least for now. But for those hoping for good news, none will be forthcoming.

Moments ago, French journalist Tristan Brossat‏ confirmed that T411 has been shut down in a joint operation between French and Swedish police.

He reports that “the brains” behind the site (reportedly two Ukrainians) have been arrested. Servers hosted at a Swedish company have been seized.

Anti-piracy activity against France-connected torrent sites has been high during recent months. Last November, torrent icon What.cd shutdown following action by French authorities.

Soon after, the cybercrime unit of the French military police targeted the country’s largest pirate site, Zone-Telechargement (1,2).

Update: A source familiar with developments informs TF that a one of those arrested in Sweden was a developer. In France, he reports that moderators have been arrested.

Update2: The arrests in Sweden took place in the Huddinge Municipality in Stockholm County, east central Sweden. The men are said to be around 30-years-old and are suspected of copyright infringement and money laundering offenses.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Winpayloads – Undetectable Windows Payload Generation

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/y3Szx2PyNH4/

Winpayloads is a tool to provide undetectable Windows payload generation with some extras running on Python 2.7. It provides persistence, privilege escalation, shellcode invocation and much more. Features UACBypass – PowerShellEmpire PowerUp – PowerShellEmpire Invoke-Shellcode Invoke-Mimikatz Invoke-EventVwrBypass Persistence – Adds payload…

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TheFatRat – Massive Exploitation Tool

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/A3ozOmH4BDE/

TheFatRat is an easy-to-use Exploitation Tool that can help you to generate backdoors and post exploitation attacks like browser attack DLL files. This tool compiles malware with popular payloads and then the compiled malware can be executed on Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. The malware that is created with this tool also has […]

The…

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Three Men Sentenced Following £2.5m Internet Piracy Case

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/three-men-sentenced-following-2-5m-internet-piracy-case-170622/

While legal action against low-level individual file-sharers is extremely rare in the UK, the country continues to pose a risk for those engaged in larger-scale infringement.

That is largely due to the activities of the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit and private anti-piracy outfits such as the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT). Investigations are often a joint effort which can take many years to complete, but the outcomes can often involve criminal sentences.

That was the profile of another Internet piracy case that concluded in London this week. It involved three men from the UK, Eric Brooks, 43, from Bolton, Mark Valentine, 44, from Manchester, and Craig Lloyd, 33, from Wolverhampton.

The case began when FACT became aware of potentially infringing activity back in February 2011. The anti-piracy group then investigated for more than a year before handing the case to police in March 2012.

On July 4, 2012, officers from City of London Police arrested Eric Brooks’ at his home in Bolton following a joint raid with FACT. Computer equipment was seized containing evidence that Brooks had been running a Netherlands-based server hosting more than £100,000 worth of pirated films, music, games, software and ebooks.

According to police, a spreadsheet on Brooks’ computer revealed he had hundreds of paying customers, all recruited from online forums. Using PayPal or utilizing bank transfers, each paid money to access the server. Police mentioned no group or site names in information released this week.

“Enquiries with PayPal later revealed that [Brooks] had made in excess of £500,000 in the last eight years from his criminal business and had in turn defrauded the film and TV industry alone of more than £2.5 million,” police said.

“As his criminal enterprise affected not only the film and TV but the wider entertainment industry including music, games, books and software it is thought that he cost the wider industry an amount much higher than £2.5 million.”

On the same day police arrested Brooks, Mark Valentine’s home in Manchester had a similar unwelcome visit. A day later, Craig Lloyd’s home in Wolverhampton become the third target for police.

Computer equipment was seized from both addresses which revealed that the pair had been paying for access to Brooks’ servers in order to service their own customers.

“They too had used PayPal as a means of taking payment and had earned thousands of pounds from their criminal actions; Valentine gaining £34,000 and Lloyd making over £70,000,” police revealed.

But after raiding the trio in 2012, it took more than four years to charge the men. In a feature common to many FACT cases, all three were charged with Conspiracy to Defraud rather than copyright infringement offenses. All three men pleaded guilty before trial.

On Monday, the men were sentenced at Inner London Crown Court. Brooks was sentenced to 24 months in prison, suspended for 12 months and ordered to complete 140 hours of unpaid work.

Valentine and Lloyd were each given 18 months in prison, suspended for 12 months. Each was ordered to complete 80 hours unpaid work.

Detective Constable Chris Glover, who led the investigation for the City of London Police, welcomed the sentencing.

“The success of this investigation is a result of co-ordinated joint working between the City of London Police and FACT. Brooks, Valentine and Lloyd all thought that they were operating under the radar and doing something which they thought was beyond the controls of law enforcement,” Glover said.

“Brooks, Valentine and Lloyd will now have time in prison to reflect on their actions and the result should act as deterrent for anyone else who is enticed by abusing the internet to the detriment of the entertainment industry.”

While even suspended sentences are a serious matter, none of the men will see the inside of a cell if they meet the conditions of their sentence for the next 12 months. For a case lasting four years involving such large sums of money, that is probably a disappointing result for FACT and the police.

Nevertheless, the men won’t be allowed to enjoy the financial proceeds of their piracy, if indeed any money is left. City of London Police say the trio will be subject to a future confiscation hearing to seize any proceeds of crime.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

South Korean Webhost Nayana Pays USD1 Million Ransom

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/jTy5T4S7TZQ/

So far this Nayana payout is the biggest ransomware payment I’ve seen reported, there’s probably some bigger ones been paid but kept undercover. Certainly a good deal for the bad actors in this play, and well using an outdated Kernel along with PHP and Apache versions from 2006 you can’t feel too sorry for Nayana. […]

The post South Korean…

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In the Works – AWS Region in Hong Kong

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/in-the-works-aws-region-in-hong-kong/

Last year we launched new AWS Regions in Canada, India, Korea, the UK (London), and the United States (Ohio), and announced that new regions are coming to France (Paris), China (Ningxia), and Sweden (Stockholm).

Coming to Hong Kong in 2018
Today, I am happy to be able to tell you that we are planning to open up an AWS Region in Hong Kong, in 2018. Hong Kong is a leading international financial center, well known for its service oriented economy. It is rated highly on innovation and for ease of doing business. As an evangelist, I get to visit many great cities in the world, and was lucky to have spent some time in Hong Kong back in 2014 and met a number of awesome customers there. Many of these customers have given us feedback that they wanted a local AWS Region.

This will be the eighth AWS Region in Asia Pacific joining six other Regions there — Singapore, Tokyo, Sydney, Beijing, Seoul, and Mumbai, and an additional Region in China (Ningxia) expected to launch in the coming months. Together, these Regions will provide our customers with a total of 19 Availability Zones (AZs) and allow them to architect highly fault tolerant applications.

Today, our infrastructure comprises 43 Availability Zones across 16 geographic regions worldwide, with another three AWS Regions (and eight Availability Zones) in France, China, and Sweden coming online throughout 2017 and 2018, (see the AWS Global Infrastructure page for more info).

We are looking forward to serving new and existing customers in Hong Kong and working with partners across Asia-Pacific. Of course, the new region will also be open to existing AWS customers who would like to process and store data in Hong Kong. Public sector organizations such as government agencies, educational institutions, and nonprofits in Hong Kong will be able to use this region to store sensitive data locally (the AWS in the Public Sector page has plenty of success stories drawn from our worldwide customer base).

If you are a customer or a partner and have specific questions about this Region, you can contact our Hong Kong team.

Help Wanted
If you are interested in learning more about AWS positions in Hong Kong, please visit the Amazon Jobs site and set the location to Hong Kong.

Jeff;

 

pyrasite – Inject Code Into Running Python Processes

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/3M0qvPvkkas/

pyrasite is a Python-based toolkit to inject code into running Python processes. pyrasite works with Python 2.4 and newer. Injection works between versions as well, so you can run Pyrasite under Python 3 and inject into 2, and vice versa. Usage [crayon-5947fd3c82613308190200/] You can download pyrasite here: pyrasite-2.0.zip Or read more…

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The Pirate Bay Isn’t Affected By Adverse Court Rulings – Everyone Else Is

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/the-pirate-bay-isnt-affected-by-adverse-court-rulings-everyone-else-is-170618/

For more than a decade The Pirate Bay has been the world’s most controversial site. Delivering huge quantities of copyrighted content to the masses, the platform is revered and reviled across the copyright spectrum.

Its reputation is one of a defiant Internet swashbuckler, but due to changes in how the site has been run in more recent times, its current philosophy is more difficult to gauge. What has never been in doubt, however, is the site’s original intent to be as provocative as possible.

Through endless publicity stunts, some real, some just for the ‘lulz’, The Pirate Bay managed to attract a massive audience, all while incurring the wrath of every major copyright holder in the world.

Make no mistake, they all queued up to strike back, but every subsequent rightsholder action was met by a Pirate Bay middle finger, two fingers, or chin flick, depending on the mood of the day. This only served to further delight the masses, who happily spread the word while keeping their torrents flowing.

This vicious circle of being targeted by the entertainment industries, mocking them, and then reaping the traffic benefits, developed into the cheapest long-term marketing campaign the Internet had ever seen. But nothing is ever truly for free and there have been consequences.

After taunting Hollywood and the music industry with its refusals to capitulate, endless legal action that the site would have ordinarily been forced to participate in largely took place without The Pirate Bay being present. It doesn’t take a law degree to work out what happened in each and every one of those cases, whatever complex route they took through the legal system. No defense, no win.

For example, the web-blocking phenomenon across the UK, Europe, Asia and Australia was driven by the site’s absolute resilience and although there would clearly have been other scapegoats had The Pirate Bay disappeared, the site was the ideal bogeyman the copyright lobby required to move forward.

Filing blocking lawsuits while bringing hosts, advertisers, and ISPs on board for anti-piracy initiatives were also made easier with the ‘evil’ Pirate Bay still online. Immune from every anti-piracy technique under the sun, the existence of the platform in the face of all onslaughts only strengthened the cases of those arguing for even more drastic measures.

Over a decade, this has meant a significant tightening of the sharing and streaming climate. Without any big legislative changes but plenty of case law against The Pirate Bay, web-blocking is now a walk in the park, ad hoc domain seizures are a fairly regular occurrence, and few companies want to host sharing sites. Advertisers and brands are also hesitant over where they place their ads. It’s a very different world to the one of 10 years ago.

While it would be wrong to attribute every tightening of the noose to the actions of The Pirate Bay, there’s little doubt that the site and its chaotic image played a huge role in where copyright enforcement is today. The platform set out to provoke and succeeded in every way possible, gaining supporters in their millions. It could also be argued it kicked a hole in a hornets’ nest, releasing the hell inside.

But perhaps the site’s most amazing achievement is the way it has managed to stay online, despite all the turmoil.

This week yet another ruling, this time from the powerful European Court of Justice, found that by offering links in the manner it does, The Pirate Bay and other sites are liable for communicating copyright works to the public. Of course, this prompted the usual swathe of articles claiming that this could be the final nail in the site’s coffin.

Wrong.

In common with every ruling, legal defeat, and legislative restriction put in place due to the site’s activities, this week’s decision from the ECJ will have zero effect on the Pirate Bay’s availability. For right or wrong, the site was breaking the law long before this ruling and will continue to do so until it decides otherwise.

What we have instead is a further tightened legal landscape that will have a lasting effect on everything BUT the site, including weaker torrent sites, Internet users, and user-uploaded content sites such as YouTube.

With The Pirate Bay carrying on regardless, that is nothing short of remarkable.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

“Kodi Boxes Are a Fire Risk”: Awful Timing or Opportunism?

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/kodi-boxes-are-a-fire-risk-awful-timing-or-opportunism-170618/

Anyone who saw the pictures this week couldn’t have failed to be moved by the plight of Londoners caught up in the Grenfell Tower inferno. The apocalyptic images are likely to stay with people for years to come and the scars for those involved may never heal.

As the building continued to smolder and the death toll increased, UK tabloids provided wall-to-wall coverage of the disaster. On Thursday, however, The Sun took a short break to put out yet another sensationalized story about Kodi. Given the week’s events, it was bound to raise eyebrows.

“HOT GOODS: Kodi boxes are a fire hazard because thousands of IPTV devices nabbed by customs ‘failed UK electrical standards’,” the headline reads.

Another sensational ‘Kodi’ headline

“It’s estimated that thousands of Brits have bought so-called Kodi boxes which can be connected to telly sets to stream pay-per-view sport and films for free,” the piece continued.

“But they could be a fire hazard, according to the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT), which has been nabbing huge deliveries of the devices as they arrive in the UK.”

As the image below shows, “Kodi box” fire hazard claims appeared next to images from other news articles about the huge London fire. While all separate stories, the pairing is not a great look.

A ‘Kodi Box’, as depicted in The Sun

FACT chief executive Kieron Sharp told The Sun that his group had uncovered two parcels of 2,000 ‘Kodi’ boxes and found that they “failed electrical safety standards”, making them potentially dangerous. While that may well be the case, the big question is all about timing.

It’s FACT’s job to reduce copyright infringement on behalf of clients such as The Premier League so it’s no surprise that they’re making a sustained effort to deter the public from buying these devices. That being said, it can’t have escaped FACT or The Sun that fire and death are extremely sensitive topics this week.

That leaves us with a few options including unfortunate opportunism or perhaps terrible timing, but let’s give the benefit of the doubt for a moment.

There’s a good argument that FACT and The Sun brought a valid issue to the public’s attention at a time when fire safety is on everyone’s lips. So, to give credit where it’s due, providing people with a heads-up about potentially dangerous devices is something that most people would welcome.

However, it’s difficult to offer congratulations on the PSA when the story as it appears in The Sun does nothing – absolutely nothing – to help people stay safe.

If some boxes are a risk (and that’s certainly likely given the level of Far East imports coming into the UK) which ones are dangerous? Where were they manufactured? Who sold them? What are the serial numbers? Which devices do people need to get out of their houses?

Sadly, none of these questions were answered or even addressed in the article, making it little more than scaremongering. Only making matters worse, the piece notes that it isn’t even clear how many of the seized devices are indeed a fire risk and that more tests need to be done. Is this how we should tackle such an important issue during an extremely sensitive week?

Timing and lack of useful information aside, one then has to question the terminology employed in the article.

As a piece of computer software, Kodi cannot catch fire. So, what we’re actually talking about here is small computers coming into the country without passing safety checks. The presence of Kodi on the devices – if indeed Kodi was even installed pre-import – is absolutely irrelevant.

Anti-piracy groups warning people of the dangers associated with their piracy habits is nothing new. For years, Internet users have been told that their computers will become malware infested if they share files or stream infringing content. While in some cases that may be true, there’s rarely any effort by those delivering the warnings to inform people on how to stay safe.

A classic example can be found in the numerous reports put out by the Digital Citizens Alliance in the United States. The DCA has produced several and no doubt expensive reports which claim to highlight the risks Internet users are exposed to on ‘pirate’ sites.

The DCA claims to do this in the interests of consumers but the group offers no practical advice on staying safe nor does it provide consumers with risk reduction strategies. Like many high-level ‘drug prevention’ documents shuffled around government, it could be argued that on a ‘street’ level their reports are next to useless.

Demonizing piracy is a well-worn and well-understood strategy but if warnings are to be interpreted as representing genuine concern for the welfare of people, they have to be a lot more substantial than mere scaremongering.

Anyone concerned about potentially dangerous devices can check out these useful guides from Electrical Safety First (pdf) and the Electrical Safety Council (pdf)

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Alleged KickassTorrents Owner Considers ‘Voluntary Surrender’ to the US

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/alleged-kickasstorrents-owner-considers-voluntary-surrender-to-the-us-170616/

Earlier this year a Polish court ruled that Artem Vaulin, the alleged owner of the defunct torrent site KickassTorrents, can be extradited to the United States.

The decision came as a disappointment to the defense team, which quickly announced an appeal.

Vaulin has since been released on bail and currently resides in a Warsaw apartment. His release has made it easier to communicate with his attorneys in the United States, who have started negotiations with the US Government.

While the extradition appeal is still ongoing, it now appears that under the right conditions Vaulin might consider traveling to the United States voluntarily, so he can “resolve” the pending charges.

This is what the defense team states in a motion for a status conference (pdf), which was submitted earlier this week.

“Mr. Vaulin and his counsel in the United States recently have engaged in discussions with the government to determine if the parties can resolve this matter, or at least certain significant issues,” Vaulin’s legal team writes.

This includes “…issues relating to the proper calculation of the sentencing guidelines and/or the possibility of an agreement for bond should Mr. Vaulin decide to voluntarily surrender to the United States authorities and appear before this Court to resolve the pending charges.”

While the alleged KickassTorrents operator would be open to a voluntary “surrender,” he probably wants several guarantees before that happens. TorrentFreak reached out to the defense team for more information, but they preferred not to comment on ongoing negotiations.

Previously, Megaupload’s Kim Dotcom made a similar offer in his criminal case, requesting living expenses and a fair trial. The US Government never took him up on this offer, it appears, as Dotcom still resides in New Zealand.

In Vaulin’s case, the defense previously submitted a motion to dismiss some or all of the charges in the indictment, and they hope a ruling on this will bring more clarity soon. With the requested status conference, both parties will at least be able to update the court on various procedural issues

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

snitch – Information Gathering Tool Via Dorks

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/i9qgH9CxYJ0/

Snitch is an information gathering tool which automates the process for a specified domain. Using built-in dork categories, this tool helps gather specified information domains which can be found using web search engines. It can be quite useful in early phases of penetration tests (commonly called the Information Gathering phase). snitch can…

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Fake News As A Service (FNaaS?) – $400k To Rig An Election

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/UqEqmi9y3oY/

This is pretty interesting, the prices for Fake News as a Service have come out after some research by Trend Micro, imagine that you can create a fake celebrity with 300,000 followers for only $2,600. Now we all know this Fake News thing has been going on for a while, and of course, if it’s […]

The post Fake News As A Service (FNaaS?)…

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UK Police Claim Success in Keeping Gambling Ads off Pirate Sites

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/uk-police-claim-success-in-keeping-gambling-ads-off-pirate-sites-170614/

Over the past several years, there has been a major effort by entertainment industry groups to cut off revenue streams to ‘pirate’ sites. The theory is that if sites cannot generate funds, their operators will eventually lose interest.

Since advertising is a key money earner for any website, significant resources have been expended trying to keep ads off sites that directly or indirectly profit from infringement. It’s been a multi-pronged affair, with agencies being encouraged to do the right thing and brands warned that their ads appearing on pirate sites does nothing for their image.

One sector that has trailed behind most is the gambling industry. Up until fairly recently, ads for some of the UK’s largest bookmakers have been a regular feature on many large pirate sites, either embedded in pages or more often than not, appearing via popup or pop-under spreads. Now, however, a significant change is being reported.

According to the City of London Police’s Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU), over the past 12 months there has been an 87% drop in adverts for licensed gambling operators being displayed on infringing websites.

The research was carried out by whiteBULLET, a brand safety and advertising solutions company which helps advertisers to assess whether placing an advert on a particular URL will cause it to appear on a pirate site.

PIPCU says that licensed gambling operators have an obligation to “keep crime out of gambling” due to their commitments under the Gambling Act 2005. However, the Gambling Commission, the UK’s gambling regulatory body, has recently been taking additional steps to tackle the problem.

In September 2015, the Commission consulted on amendments (pdf) to licensing conditions that would compel licensees to ensure that advertisements “placed by themselves and others” do not appear on websites providing unauthorized access to copyrighted content.

After the consultation was published in May 2016 (pdf), all respondents agreed in principle that gambling operators should not advertise on pirate sites. A month later, the Commission said it would ban the placement of gambling ads on such platforms.

When the new rules came into play last October, 40 gambling companies (including Bet365, Coral and Sky Bet, who had previously been called out for displaying ads on pirate sites) were making use of PIPCU’s ‘Infringing Website List‘, a database of sites that police claim are actively involved in piracy.

Speaking yesterday, acting Detective Superintendent Peter Ratcliffe, Head of the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU), welcomed the ensuing reduction in ad placement on ‘pirate’ domains.

“The success of a strong relationship built between PIPCU and The Gambling Commission can be seen by these figures. This is a fantastic example of a joint working initiative between police and an industry regulator,” Ratcliffe said.

“We commend the 40 gambling companies who are already using the Infringing Website List and encourage others to sign up. We will continue to encourage all UK advertisers to become a member of the Infringing Website List to ensure they’re not inadvertently funding criminal websites.”

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

credmap – The Credential Mapper

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/0qwBmGRtTRY/

Credmap is an open source credential mapper tool that was created to bring awareness to the dangers of credential reuse. It is capable of testing supplied user credentials on several known websites to test if the password has been reused on any of these. It is not uncommon for people who are not experts in […]

The post credmap – The…

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LazyDroid – Android Security Assessment Tool

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/-NTWNlPzYk0/

Lazydroid is a tool written as a bash script to facilitate some aspects of an Android Security Assessment. Features It provides some common tasks such as: Set the debug flag of an application to true Set the backup flag of an application to true Re-Build the application Re-Sign the application Smart log extraction of an […]

The post…

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