Tag Archives: CCPA

A Technical Guide to CCPA

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/a-technical-guide-to-ccpa/

CCPA, or the California Consumer Privacy Act, is the upcoming “small GDPR” that is applied for all companies that have users from California (i.e. it has extraterritorial application). It is not as massive as GDPR, but you may want to follow its general recommendations.

A few years ago I wrote a technical GDPR guide. Now I’d like to do the same with CCPA. GDPR is much more prescriptive on the fact that you should protect users’ data, whereas CCPA seems to be mainly concerned with the rights of the users – to be informed, to opt out of having their data sold, and to be forgotten. That focus is mainly because other laws in California and the US have provisions about protecting confidentiality of data and data breaches; in that regard GDPR is a more holistic piece of legislation, whereas CCPA covers mostly the aspect of users’ rights (or “consumers”, which is the term used in CCPA). I’ll use “user” as it’s the term more often use in technical discussions.

I’ll list below some important points from CCPA – this is not an exhaustive list of requirements to a software system, but aims to highlight some important bits. And, obviously, I’m not a lawyer, but I’ve been doing data protection consultations and products (like SentinelDB) for the past several years, so I’m qualified to talk about the technical side of privacy regulations.

  • Right of access – you should be able to export (in a human-readable format, and preferable in machine-readable as well) all the data that you have collected about an individual. Their account details, their orders, their preferences, their posts and comments, etc.
  • Deletion – you should delete any data you hold about the user. Exceptions apply, of course, including data used for prevention of fraud, other legal reasons, needed for debugging, necessary to complete the business requirement, or anything that the user can reasonably expect. From a technical perspective, this means you most likely have to delete what’s in your database, but other places where you have personal data, like logs or analytics, can be skipped (provided you don’t use it to reconstruct user profiles, of course)
  • Notify 3rd party providers that received data from you – when data deletion is requested, you have to somehow send notifications to wherever you’ve sent personal data. This can be a SaaS like Mailchimp, Salesforce or Hubspot, or it can be someone you sold the data (apparently that’s a major thing in CCPA). So ideally you should know where data has been sent and invoke APIs for forgetting it. Fortunately, most of these companies are already compliant with GDPR anyway, so they have these endpoints exposed. You just have to add the logic. If your company sells data by posting dumps to S3 or sending Excel sheets via email, you have a bigger problem as you have to keep track of those activities and send unstructured requests (e.g. emails).
  • Data lineage – this is not spelled out as a requirement, but it follows from multiple articles, including the one for deletion as well as the one for disclosing who data was sent to and where did data came from in your system (in order to know if you can re-sell it, among other things). In order to avoid buying expensive data lineage solutions, you can either have a spreadsheet (in case of simpler processes), or come up with a meaningful way to tag your data. For example, using a separate table with columns (ID, table, sourceType, sourceId, sourceDetails), where ID and table identify a record of personal data in your database, sourceType is the way you have ingested the data (e.g. API call, S3, email) and the ID is the identifier that you can use to track how it came in your system – API key, S3 bucket name, email “from”, or even company registration ID (data might still be sent around flash drives, I guess). Similar table for the outgoing data (with targetType and targetId). It’s a simplified implementation but it might work in cases where a spreadsheet would be too cumbersome to take care of.
  • Age restriction – if you’ve had the opportunity to know the age of a person whose data you have, you should check it. That means not to ignore the age or data of birth field when you import data from 3rd parties, and also to politely ask users about their age. You can’t sell that data, so you need to know which records are automatically opted out. If you never ever sell data, well, it’s still a good idea to keep it (per GDPR)
  • Don’t discriminate if users have used their privacy rights – that’s more of a business requirement, but as technical people we should know that we are not allowed to have logic based on users having used their CCPA (or GDPR) rights. From a data organization perspective, I’d put rights requests in a separate database than the actual data to make it harder to fulfill such requirements. You can’t just do a SQL query to check if someone should get a better price, you should do cross system integration and that might dissuade product owners from breaking the law; furthermore it will be a good sign in case of audits.
  • “Do Not Sell My Personal Information” – this should be on the homepage if you have to comply with CCPA. It’s a bit of a harsh requirement, but it should take users to a form where they can opt out of having their data sold. As mentioned in a previous point, this could be a different system to hold users’ CCPA preferences. It might be easier to just have a set of columns in the users’ table, of course.
  • Identifying users is an important aspect. CCPA speaks about “verifiable requests”. So if someone drops you an email “I want my data deleted”, you should be able to confirm it’s really them. In an online system that can be a button in the user profile (for opting out, for deletion, or for data access) – if they know the password, it’s fairly certain it’s them. However, in some cases, users don’t have accounts in the system. In that case there should be other ways to identify them. SSN sounds like one, and although it’s a terrible things to use for authentication, with the lack of universal digital identity, especially in the US, it’s hard not to use it at least as part of the identifying information. But it can’t be the only thing – it’s not a password, it’s an identifier. So users sharing their SSN (if you have it), their phone or address, passport or driving license might be some data points to collect for identifying them. Note that once you collect that data, you can’t use it for other purposes, even if you are tempted to. CCPA requires also a toll-free phone support, which is hardly applicable to non-US companies even though they have customers in California, but it poses the question of identifying people online based on real-world data rather than account credentials. And please don’t ask users about their passwords over the phone; just initiate a request on their behalf in the system and direct them to login and confirm it. There should be additional guidelines for identifying users as per 1798.185(a)(7).
  • Deidentification and aggregate consumer information – aggregated information, e.g. statistics, is not personal data, unless you are able to extract personal data based on it (e.g. the statistics is split per town and age and you have only two users in a given town, you can easily see who is who). Aggregated data is differentiate from deidentified data, which is data that has its identifiers removed. Simply removing identifiers, though, might again not be sufficient to deidentify data – based on several other data points, like IP address (+ logs), physical address (+ snail mail history), phone (+ phone book), one can be uniquely identified. If you can’t reasonably identify a person based on a set of data, it can be considered deidentified. Do make the mental exercise of thinking how to deidentify your data, as then it’s much easier to share it (or sell it) to third parties. Probably nobody minds being part of an aggregated statistics sold to someone, or an anonymized account used for trend analysis.
  • Pseudonymization is a measure to be taken in many scenarios to protect data. CCPA mentions it particularly in research context, but I’d support a generic pseudonymization functionality. That means replacing the identifying information with a pseudonym, that’s not reversible unless a secret piece of data is used. Think of it (and you can do that quite literally) as encrypting the identifier(s) with a secret key to form the pseudonym. You can then give that data to third parties to work with it (e.g. to do market segmentation) and then give it back to you. You can then decrypt the pseudonyms and fill the obtained market segment(s) into your own database. The 3rd party doesn’t get personal information, but you still get the relevant data
  • Audit trail is not explicitly stated as a requirement, but since you have the obligation to handle users requests and track the use of their data in and outside of your system, it’s a good idea to have a form of audit trail – who did what with which data; who handled a particular user request; how was the user identified in order to perform the request, etc.

As CCPA is not concerned with data confidentiality requirements, I won’t repeat my GDPR advice about using encryption whenever possible (notably, for backups), or about internal security measures for authentication.

CCPA is focused on the rights of your users and you should be able to handle them (and track how you handled them). You can have manual and spreadsheet based processes if you are not too big, and you should definitely check with your legal team if and to what extent CCPA applies to your company. But if you have implemented the GDPR data subject rights, it’s likely that you are already compliant with CCPA in terms of the overall system architecture, except for a few minor details.

The post A Technical Guide to CCPA appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

Introducing the “Preparing for the California Consumer Privacy Act” whitepaper

Post Syndicated from Julia Soscia original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/introducing-the-preparing-for-the-california-consumer-privacy-act-whitepaper/

AWS has published a whitepaper, Preparing for the California Consumer Protection Act, to provide guidance on designing and updating your cloud architecture to follow the requirements of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which goes into effect on January 1, 2020.

The whitepaper is intended for engineers and solution builders, but it also serves as a guide for qualified security assessors (QSAs) and internal security assessors (ISAs) so that you can better understand the range of AWS products and services that are available for you to use.

The CCPA was enacted into law on June 28, 2018 and grants California consumers certain privacy rights. The CCPA grants consumers the right to request that a business disclose the categories and specific pieces of personal information collected about the consumer, the categories of sources from which that information is collected, the “business purposes” for collecting or selling the information, and the categories of third parties with whom the information is shared. This whitepaper looks to address the three main subsections of the CCPA: data collection, data retrieval and deletion, and data awareness.

To read the text of the CCPA please visit the website for California Legislative Information.

If you have questions or want to learn more, contact your account executive or leave a comment below.

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Julia Soscia

Julia is a Solutions Architect at Amazon Web Services based out of New York City. Her main focus is to help customers create well-architected environments on the AWS cloud platform. She is an experienced data analyst with a focus in Big Data and Analytics.

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Anthony Pasquarielo

Anthony is a Solutions Architect at Amazon Web Services. He’s based in New York City. His main focus is providing customers technical guidance and consultation during their cloud journey. Anthony enjoys delighting customers by designing well-architected solutions that drive value and provide growth opportunity for their business.

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Justin De Castri

Justin is a Manager of Solutions Architecture at Amazon Web Services based in New York City. His primary focus is helping customers build secure, scaleable, and cost optimized solutions that are aligned with their business objectives.