Tag Archives: AWS KMS

New – Encryption at Rest for DynamoDB

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-encryption-at-rest-for-dynamodb/

At AWS re:Invent 2017, Werner encouraged his audience to “Dance like nobody is watching, and to encrypt like everyone is:

The AWS team is always eager to add features that make it easier for you to protect your sensitive data and to help you to achieve your compliance objectives. For example, in 2017 we launched encryption at rest for SQS and EFS, additional encryption options for S3, and server-side encryption of Kinesis Data Streams.

Today we are giving you another data protection option with the introduction of encryption at rest for Amazon DynamoDB. You simply enable encryption when you create a new table and DynamoDB takes care of the rest. Your data (tables, local secondary indexes, and global secondary indexes) will be encrypted using AES-256 and a service-default AWS Key Management Service (KMS) key. The encryption adds no storage overhead and is completely transparent; you can insert, query, scan, and delete items as before. The team did not observe any changes in latency after enabling encryption and running several different workloads on an encrypted DynamoDB table.

Creating an Encrypted Table
You can create an encrypted table from the AWS Management Console, API (CreateTable), or CLI (create-table). I’ll use the console! I enter the name and set up the primary key as usual:

Before proceeding, I uncheck Use default settings, scroll down to the Encrypytion section, and check Enable encryption. Then I click Create and my table is created in encrypted form:

I can see the encryption setting for the table at a glance:

When my compliance team asks me to show them how DynamoDB uses the key to encrypt the data, I can create a AWS CloudTrail trail, insert an item, and then scan the table to see the calls to the AWS KMS API. Here’s an extract from the trail:

{
  "eventTime": "2018-01-24T00:06:34Z",
  "eventSource": "kms.amazonaws.com",
  "eventName": "Decrypt",
  "awsRegion": "us-west-2",
  "sourceIPAddress": "dynamodb.amazonaws.com",
  "userAgent": "dynamodb.amazonaws.com",
  "requestParameters": {
    "encryptionContext": {
      "aws:dynamodb:tableName": "reg-users",
      "aws:dynamodb:subscriberId": "1234567890"
    }
  },
  "responseElements": null,
  "requestID": "7072def1-009a-11e8-9ab9-4504c26bd391",
  "eventID": "3698678a-d04e-48c7-96f2-3d734c5c7903",
  "readOnly": true,
  "resources": [
    {
      "ARN": "arn:aws:kms:us-west-2:1234567890:key/e7bd721d-37f3-4acd-bec5-4d08c765f9f5",
      "accountId": "1234567890",
      "type": "AWS::KMS::Key"
    }
  ]
}

Available Now
This feature is available now in the US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), and EU (Ireland) Regions and you can start using it today.

There’s no charge for the encryption; you will be charged for the calls that DynamoDB makes to AWS KMS on your behalf.

Jeff;

 

How to Encrypt Amazon S3 Objects with the AWS SDK for Ruby

Post Syndicated from Doug Schwartz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-encrypt-amazon-s3-objects-with-the-aws-sdk-for-ruby/

AWS KMS image

Recently, Amazon announced some new Amazon S3 encryption and security features. The AWS Blog post showed how to use the Amazon S3 console to take advantage of these new features. However, if you have a large number of Amazon S3 buckets, using the console to implement these features could take hours, if not days. As an alternative, I created documentation topics in the AWS SDK for Ruby Developer Guide that include code examples showing you how to use the new Amazon S3 encryption features using the AWS SDK for Ruby.

What are my encryption options?

You can encrypt Amazon S3 bucket objects on a server or on a client:

  • When you encrypt objects on a server, you request that Amazon S3 encrypt the objects before saving them to disk in data centers and decrypt the objects when you download them. The main advantage of this approach is that Amazon S3 manages the entire encryption process.
  • When you encrypt objects on a client, you encrypt the objects before you upload them to Amazon S3. In this case, you manage the encryption process, the encryption keys, and related tools. Use this option when:
    • Company policy and standards require it.
    • You already have a development process in place that meets your needs.

    Encrypting on the client has always been available, but you should know the following points:

    • You must be diligent about protecting your encryption keys, which is analogous to having a burglar-proof lock on your front door. If you leave a key under the mat, your security is compromised.
    • If you lose your encryption keys, you won’t be able to decrypt your data.

    If you encrypt objects on the client, we strongly recommend that you use an AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) managed customer master key (CMK)

How to use encryption on a server

You can specify that Amazon S3 automatically encrypts objects as you upload them to a bucket or require that objects uploaded to an Amazon S3 bucket include encryption on a server before they are uploaded to an Amazon S3 bucket.

The advantage of these settings is that when you specify them, you ensure that objects uploaded to Amazon S3 are encrypted. Alternatively, you can have Amazon S3 encrypt individual objects on the server as you upload them to a bucket or encrypt them on the server with your own key as you upload them to a bucket.

The AWS SDK for Ruby Developer Guide now contains the following topics that explain your encryption options on a server:

How to use encryption on a client

You can encrypt objects on a client before you upload them to a bucket and decrypt them after you download them from a bucket by using the Amazon S3 encryption client.

The AWS SDK for Ruby Developer Guide now contains the following topics that explain your encryption options on the client:

Note: The Amazon S3 encryption client in the AWS SDK for Ruby is compatible with other Amazon S3 encryption clients, but it is not compatible with other AWS client-side encryption libraries, including the AWS Encryption SDK and the Amazon DynamoDB encryption client for Java. Each library returns a different ciphertext (“encrypted message”) format, so you can’t use one library to encrypt objects and a different library to decrypt them. For more information, see Protecting Data Using Client-Side Encryption.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about encrypting objects on servers and clients, start a new thread on the Amazon S3 forum or contact AWS Support.

– Doug

How to Enhance the Security of Sensitive Customer Data by Using Amazon CloudFront Field-Level Encryption

Post Syndicated from Alex Tomic original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-enhance-the-security-of-sensitive-customer-data-by-using-amazon-cloudfront-field-level-encryption/

Amazon CloudFront is a web service that speeds up distribution of your static and dynamic web content to end users through a worldwide network of edge locations. CloudFront provides a number of benefits and capabilities that can help you secure your applications and content while meeting compliance requirements. For example, you can configure CloudFront to help enforce secure, end-to-end connections using HTTPS SSL/TLS encryption. You also can take advantage of CloudFront integration with AWS Shield for DDoS protection and with AWS WAF (a web application firewall) for protection against application-layer attacks, such as SQL injection and cross-site scripting.

Now, CloudFront field-level encryption helps secure sensitive data such as a customer phone numbers by adding another security layer to CloudFront HTTPS. Using this functionality, you can help ensure that sensitive information in a POST request is encrypted at CloudFront edge locations. This information remains encrypted as it flows to and beyond your origin servers that terminate HTTPS connections with CloudFront and throughout the application environment. In this blog post, we demonstrate how you can enhance the security of sensitive data by using CloudFront field-level encryption.

Note: This post assumes that you understand concepts and services such as content delivery networks, HTTP forms, public-key cryptography, CloudFrontAWS Lambda, and the AWS CLI. If necessary, you should familiarize yourself with these concepts and review the solution overview in the next section before proceeding with the deployment of this post’s solution.

How field-level encryption works

Many web applications collect and store data from users as those users interact with the applications. For example, a travel-booking website may ask for your passport number and less sensitive data such as your food preferences. This data is transmitted to web servers and also might travel among a number of services to perform tasks. However, this also means that your sensitive information may need to be accessed by only a small subset of these services (most other services do not need to access your data).

User data is often stored in a database for retrieval at a later time. One approach to protecting stored sensitive data is to configure and code each service to protect that sensitive data. For example, you can develop safeguards in logging functionality to ensure sensitive data is masked or removed. However, this can add complexity to your code base and limit performance.

Field-level encryption addresses this problem by ensuring sensitive data is encrypted at CloudFront edge locations. Sensitive data fields in HTTPS form POSTs are automatically encrypted with a user-provided public RSA key. After the data is encrypted, other systems in your architecture see only ciphertext. If this ciphertext unintentionally becomes externally available, the data is cryptographically protected and only designated systems with access to the private RSA key can decrypt the sensitive data.

It is critical to secure private RSA key material to prevent unauthorized access to the protected data. Management of cryptographic key material is a larger topic that is out of scope for this blog post, but should be carefully considered when implementing encryption in your applications. For example, in this blog post we store private key material as a secure string in the Amazon EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store. The Parameter Store provides a centralized location for managing your configuration data such as plaintext data (such as database strings) or secrets (such as passwords) that are encrypted using AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS). You may have an existing key management system in place that you can use, or you can use AWS CloudHSM. CloudHSM is a cloud-based hardware security module (HSM) that enables you to easily generate and use your own encryption keys in the AWS Cloud.

To illustrate field-level encryption, let’s look at a simple form submission where Name and Phone values are sent to a web server using an HTTP POST. A typical form POST would contain data such as the following.

POST / HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length:60

Name=Jane+Doe&Phone=404-555-0150

Instead of taking this typical approach, field-level encryption converts this data similar to the following.

POST / HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length: 1713

Name=Jane+Doe&Phone=AYABeHxZ0ZqWyysqxrB5pEBSYw4AAA...

To further demonstrate field-level encryption in action, this blog post includes a sample serverless application that you can deploy by using a CloudFormation template, which creates an application environment using CloudFront, Amazon API Gateway, and Lambda. The sample application is only intended to demonstrate field-level encryption functionality and is not intended for production use. The following diagram depicts the architecture and data flow of this sample application.

Sample application architecture and data flow

Diagram of the solution's architecture and data flow

Here is how the sample solution works:

  1. An application user submits an HTML form page with sensitive data, generating an HTTPS POST to CloudFront.
  2. Field-level encryption intercepts the form POST and encrypts sensitive data with the public RSA key and replaces fields in the form post with encrypted ciphertext. The form POST ciphertext is then sent to origin servers.
  3. The serverless application accepts the form post data containing ciphertext where sensitive data would normally be. If a malicious user were able to compromise your application and gain access to your data, such as the contents of a form, that user would see encrypted data.
  4. Lambda stores data in a DynamoDB table, leaving sensitive data to remain safely encrypted at rest.
  5. An administrator uses the AWS Management Console and a Lambda function to view the sensitive data.
  6. During the session, the administrator retrieves ciphertext from the DynamoDB table.
  7. The administrator decrypts sensitive data by using private key material stored in the EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store.
  8. Decrypted sensitive data is transmitted over SSL/TLS via the AWS Management Console to the administrator for review.

Deployment walkthrough

The high-level steps to deploy this solution are as follows:

  1. Stage the required artifacts
    When deployment packages are used with Lambda, the zipped artifacts have to be placed in an S3 bucket in the target AWS Region for deployment. This step is not required if you are deploying in the US East (N. Virginia) Region because the package has already been staged there.
  2. Generate an RSA key pair
    Create a public/private key pair that will be used to perform the encrypt/decrypt functionality.
  3. Upload the public key to CloudFront and associate it with the field-level encryption configuration
    After you create the key pair, the public key is uploaded to CloudFront so that it can be used by field-level encryption.
  4. Launch the CloudFormation stack
    Deploy the sample application for demonstrating field-level encryption by using AWS CloudFormation.
  5. Add the field-level encryption configuration to the CloudFront distribution
    After you have provisioned the application, this step associates the field-level encryption configuration with the CloudFront distribution.
  6. Store the RSA private key in the Parameter Store
    Store the private key in the Parameter Store as a SecureString data type, which uses AWS KMS to encrypt the parameter value.

Deploy the solution

1. Stage the required artifacts

(If you are deploying in the US East [N. Virginia] Region, skip to Step 2, “Generate an RSA key pair.”)

Stage the Lambda function deployment package in an Amazon S3 bucket located in the AWS Region you are using for this solution. To do this, download the zipped deployment package and upload it to your in-region bucket. For additional information about uploading objects to S3, see Uploading Object into Amazon S3.

2. Generate an RSA key pair

In this section, you will generate an RSA key pair by using OpenSSL:

  1. Confirm access to OpenSSL.
    $ openssl version

    You should see version information similar to the following.

    OpenSSL <version> <date>

  1. Create a private key using the following command.
    $ openssl genrsa -out private_key.pem 2048

    The command results should look similar to the following.

    Generating RSA private key, 2048 bit long modulus
    ................................................................................+++
    ..........................+++
    e is 65537 (0x10001)
  1. Extract the public key from the private key by running the following command.
    $ openssl rsa -pubout -in private_key.pem -out public_key.pem

    You should see output similar to the following.

    writing RSA key
  1. Restrict access to the private key.$ chmod 600 private_key.pem Note: You will use the public and private key material in Steps 3 and 6 to configure the sample application.

3. Upload the public key to CloudFront and associate it with the field-level encryption configuration

Now that you have created the RSA key pair, you will use the AWS Management Console to upload the public key to CloudFront for use by field-level encryption. Complete the following steps to upload and configure the public key.

Note: Do not include spaces or special characters when providing the configuration values in this section.

  1. From the AWS Management Console, choose Services > CloudFront.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Public Key and choose Add Public Key.
    Screenshot of adding a public key

Complete the Add Public Key configuration boxes:

  • Key Name: Type a name such as DemoPublicKey.
  • Encoded Key: Paste the contents of the public_key.pem file you created in Step 2c. Copy and paste the encoded key value for your public key, including the -----BEGIN PUBLIC KEY----- and -----END PUBLIC KEY----- lines.
  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  1. Choose Create.
  2. After adding at least one public key to CloudFront, the next step is to create a profile to tell CloudFront which fields of input you want to be encrypted. While still on the CloudFront console, choose Field-level encryption in the navigation pane.
  3. Under Profiles, choose Create profile.
    Screenshot of creating a profile

Complete the Create profile configuration boxes:

  • Name: Type a name such as FLEDemo.
  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  • Public key: Select the public key you configured in Step 4.b.
  • Provider name: Type a provider name such as FLEDemo.
    This information will be used when the form data is encrypted, and must be provided to applications that need to decrypt the data, along with the appropriate private key.
  • Pattern to match: Type phone. This configures field-level encryption to match based on the phone.
  1. Choose Save profile.
  2. Configurations include options for whether to block or forward a query to your origin in scenarios where CloudFront can’t encrypt the data. Under Encryption Configurations, choose Create configuration.
    Screenshot of creating a configuration

Complete the Create configuration boxes:

  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  • Content type: Enter application/x-www-form-urlencoded. This is a common media type for encoding form data.
  • Default profile ID: Select the profile you added in Step 3e.
  1. Choose Save configuration

4. Launch the CloudFormation stack

Launch the sample application by using a CloudFormation template that automates the provisioning process.

Input parameter Input parameter description
ProviderID Enter the Provider name you assigned in Step 3e. The ProviderID is used in field-level encryption configuration in CloudFront (letters and numbers only, no special characters)
PublicKeyName Enter the Key Name you assigned in Step 3b. This name is assigned to the public key in field-level encryption configuration in CloudFront (letters and numbers only, no special characters).
PrivateKeySSMPath Leave as the default: /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key
ArtifactsBucket The S3 bucket with artifact files (staged zip file with app code). Leave as default if deploying in us-east-1.
ArtifactsPrefix The path in the S3 bucket containing artifact files. Leave as default if deploying in us-east-1.

To finish creating the CloudFormation stack:

  1. Choose Next on the Select Template page, enter the input parameters and choose Next.
    Note: The Artifacts configuration needs to be updated only if you are deploying outside of us-east-1 (US East [N. Virginia]). See Step 1 for artifact staging instructions.
  2. On the Options page, accept the defaults and choose Next.
  3. On the Review page, confirm the details, choose the I acknowledge that AWS CloudFormation might create IAM resources check box, and then choose Create. (The stack will be created in approximately 15 minutes.)

5. Add the field-level encryption configuration to the CloudFront distribution

While still on the CloudFront console, choose Distributions in the navigation pane, and then:

    1. In the Outputs section of the FLE-Sample-App stack, look for CloudFrontDistribution and click the URL to open the CloudFront console.
    2. Choose Behaviors, choose the Default (*) behavior, and then choose Edit.
    3. For Field-level Encryption Config, choose the configuration you created in Step 3g.
      Screenshot of editing the default cache behavior
    4. Choose Yes, Edit.
    5. While still in the CloudFront distribution configuration, choose the General Choose Edit, scroll down to Distribution State, and change it to Enabled.
    6. Choose Yes, Edit.

6. Store the RSA private key in the Parameter Store

In this step, you store the private key in the EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store as a SecureString data type, which uses AWS KMS to encrypt the parameter value. For more information about AWS KMS, see the AWS Key Management Service Developer Guide. You will need a working installation of the AWS CLI to complete this step.

  1. Store the private key in the Parameter Store with the AWS CLI by running the following command. You will find the <KMSKeyID> in the KMSKeyID in the CloudFormation stack Outputs. Substitute it for the placeholder in the following command.
    $ aws ssm put-parameter --type "SecureString" --name /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key --value file://private_key.pem --key-id "<KMSKeyID>"
    
    ------------------
    |  PutParameter  |
    +----------+-----+
    |  Version |  1  |
    +----------+-----+

  1. Verify the parameter. Your private key material should be accessible through the ssm get-parameter in the following command in the Value The key material has been truncated in the following output.
    $ aws ssm get-parameter --name /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key --with-decryption
    
    -----…
    
    ||  Value  |  -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
    MIIEowIBAAKCAQEAwGRBGuhacmw+C73kM6Z…….

    Notice we use the —with decryption argument in this command. This returns the private key as cleartext.

    This completes the sample application deployment. Next, we show you how to see field-level encryption in action.

  1. Delete the private key from local storage. On Linux for example, using the shred command, securely delete the private key material from your workstation as shown below. You may also wish to store the private key material within an AWS CloudHSM or other protected location suitable for your security requirements. For production implementations, you also should implement key rotation policies.
    $ shred -zvu -n  100 private*.pem
    
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 1/101 (random)...
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 2/101 (dddddd)...
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 3/101 (555555)...
    ….

Test the sample application

Use the following steps to test the sample application with field-level encryption:

  1. Open sample application in your web browser by clicking the ApplicationURL link in the CloudFormation stack Outputs. (for example, https:d199xe5izz82ea.cloudfront.net/prod/). Note that it may take several minutes for the CloudFront distribution to reach the Deployed Status from the previous step, during which time you may not be able to access the sample application.
  2. Fill out and submit the HTML form on the page:
    1. Complete the three form fields: Full Name, Email Address, and Phone Number.
    2. Choose Submit.
      Screenshot of completing the sample application form
      Notice that the application response includes the form values. The phone number returns the following ciphertext encryption using your public key. This ciphertext has been stored in DynamoDB.
      Screenshot of the phone number as ciphertext
  3. Execute the Lambda decryption function to download ciphertext from DynamoDB and decrypt the phone number using the private key:
    1. In the CloudFormation stack Outputs, locate DecryptFunction and click the URL to open the Lambda console.
    2. Configure a test event using the “Hello World” template.
    3. Choose the Test button.
  4. View the encrypted and decrypted phone number data.
    Screenshot of the encrypted and decrypted phone number data

Summary

In this blog post, we showed you how to use CloudFront field-level encryption to encrypt sensitive data at edge locations and help prevent access from unauthorized systems. The source code for this solution is available on GitHub. For additional information about field-level encryption, see the documentation.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, please start a new thread on the CloudFront forum.

– Alex and Cameron

Introducing the New GDPR Center and “Navigating GDPR Compliance on AWS” Whitepaper

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/introducing-the-new-gdpr-center-and-navigating-gdpr-compliance-on-aws-whitepaper/

European Union flag

At AWS re:Invent 2017, the AWS Compliance team participated in excellent engagements with AWS customers about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), including discussions that generated helpful input. Today, I am announcing resulting enhancements to our recently launched GDPR Center and the release of a new whitepaper, Navigating GDPR Compliance on AWS. The resources available on the GDPR Center are designed to give you GDPR basics, and provide some ideas as you work out the details of the regulation and find a path to compliance.

In this post, I focus on two of these new GDPR requirements in terms of articles in the GDPR, and explain some of the AWS services and other resources that can help you meet these requirements.

Background about the GDPR

The GDPR is a European privacy law that will become enforceable on May 25, 2018, and is intended to harmonize data protection laws throughout the European Union (EU) by applying a single data protection law that is binding throughout each EU member state. The GDPR not only applies to organizations located within the EU, but also to organizations located outside the EU if they offer goods or services to, or monitor the behavior of, EU data subjects. All AWS services will comply with the GDPR in advance of the May 25, 2018, enforcement date.

We are already seeing customers move personal data to AWS to help solve challenges in complying with the EU’s GDPR because of AWS’s advanced toolset for identifying, securing, and managing all types of data, including personal data. Steve Schmidt, the AWS CISO, has already written about the internal and external work we have been undertaking to help you use AWS services to meet your own GDPR compliance goals.

Article 25 – Data Protection by Design and by Default (Privacy by Design)

Privacy by Design is the integration of data privacy and compliance into the systems development process, enabling applications, systems, and accounts, among other things, to be secure by default. To secure your AWS account, we offer a script to evaluate your AWS account against the full Center for Internet Security (CIS) Amazon Web Services Foundations Benchmark 1.1. You can access this public benchmark on GitHub. Additionally, AWS Trusted Advisor is an online resource to help you improve security by optimizing your AWS environment. Among other things, Trusted Advisor lists a number of security-related controls you should be monitoring. AWS also offers AWS CloudTrail, a logging tool to track usage and API activity. Another example of tooling that enables data protection is Amazon Inspector, which includes a knowledge base of hundreds of rules (regularly updated by AWS security researchers) mapped to common security best practices and vulnerability definitions. Examples of built-in rules include checking for remote root login being enabled or vulnerable software versions installed. These and other tools enable you to design an environment that protects customer data by design.

An accurate inventory of all the GDPR-impacting data is important but sometimes difficult to assess. AWS has some advanced tooling, such as Amazon Macie, to help you determine where customer data is present in your AWS resources. Macie uses advanced machine learning to automatically discover and classify data so that you can protect data, per Article 25.

Article 32 – Security of Processing

You can use many AWS services and features to secure the processing of data regulated by the GDPR. Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) lets you provision a logically isolated section of the AWS Cloud where you can launch resources in a virtual network that you define. You have complete control over your virtual networking environment, including the selection of your own IP address range, creation of subnets, and configuration of route tables and network gateways. With Amazon VPC, you can make the Amazon Cloud a seamless extension of your existing on-premises resources.

AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) is a managed service that makes it easy for you to create and control the encryption keys used to encrypt your data, and uses hardware security modules (HSMs) to help protect your keys. Managing keys with AWS KMS allows you to choose to encrypt data either on the server side or the client side. AWS KMS is integrated with several other AWS services to help you protect the data you store with these services. AWS KMS is also integrated with CloudTrail to provide you with logs of all key usage to help meet your regulatory and compliance needs. You can also use the AWS Encryption SDK to correctly generate and use encryption keys, as well as protect keys after they have been used.

We also recently announced new encryption and security features for Amazon S3, including default encryption and a detailed inventory report. Services of this type as well as additional GDPR enablers will be published regularly on our GDPR Center.

Other resources

As you prepare for GDPR, you may want to visit our AWS Customer Compliance Center or Tools for Amazon Web Services to learn about options for building anything from small scripts that delete data to a full orchestration framework that uses AWS Code services.

-Chad

Glenn’s Take on re:Invent Part 2

Post Syndicated from Glenn Gore original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/glenns-take-on-reinvent-part-2/

Glenn Gore here, Chief Architect for AWS. I’m in Las Vegas this week — with 43K others — for re:Invent 2017. We’ve got a lot of exciting announcements this week. I’m going to check in to the Architecture blog with my take on what’s interesting about some of the announcements from an cloud architectural perspective. My first post can be found here.

The Media and Entertainment industry has been a rapid adopter of AWS due to the scale, reliability, and low costs of our services. This has enabled customers to create new, online, digital experiences for their viewers ranging from broadcast to streaming to Over-the-Top (OTT) services that can be a combination of live, scheduled, or ad-hoc viewing, while supporting devices ranging from high-def TVs to mobile devices. Creating an end-to-end video service requires many different components often sourced from different vendors with different licensing models, which creates a complex architecture and a complex environment to support operationally.

AWS Media Services
Based on customer feedback, we have developed AWS Media Services to help simplify distribution of video content. AWS Media Services is comprised of five individual services that can either be used together to provide an end-to-end service or individually to work within existing deployments: AWS Elemental MediaConvert, AWS Elemental MediaLive, AWS Elemental MediaPackage, AWS Elemental MediaStore and AWS Elemental MediaTailor. These services can help you with everything from storing content safely and durably to setting up a live-streaming event in minutes without having to be concerned about the underlying infrastructure and scalability of the stream itself.

In my role, I participate in many AWS and industry events and often work with the production and event teams that put these shows together. With all the logistical tasks they have to deal with, the biggest question is often: “Will the live stream work?” Compounding this fear is the reality that, as users, we are also quick to jump on social media and make noise when a live stream drops while we are following along remotely. Worse is when I see event organizers actively selecting not to live stream content because of the risk of failure and and exposure — leading them to decide to take the safe option and not stream at all.

With AWS Media Services addressing many of the issues around putting together a high-quality media service, live streaming, and providing access to a library of content through a variety of mechanisms, I can’t wait to see more event teams use live streaming without the concern and worry I’ve seen in the past. I am excited for what this also means for non-media companies, as video becomes an increasingly common way of sharing information and adding a more personalized touch to internally- and externally-facing content.

AWS Media Services will allow you to focus more on the content and not worry about the platform. Awesome!

Amazon Neptune
As a civilization, we have been developing new ways to record and store information and model the relationships between sets of information for more than a thousand years. Government census data, tax records, births, deaths, and marriages were all recorded on medium ranging from knotted cords in the Inca civilization, clay tablets in ancient Babylon, to written texts in Western Europe during the late Middle Ages.

One of the first challenges of computing was figuring out how to store and work with vast amounts of information in a programmatic way, especially as the volume of information was increasing at a faster rate than ever before. We have seen different generations of how to organize this information in some form of database, ranging from flat files to the Information Management System (IMS) used in the 1960s for the Apollo space program, to the rise of the relational database management system (RDBMS) in the 1970s. These innovations drove a lot of subsequent innovations in information management and application development as we were able to move from thousands of records to millions and billions.

Today, as architects and developers, we have a vast variety of database technologies to select from, which have different characteristics that are optimized for different use cases:

  • Relational databases are well understood after decades of use in the majority of companies who required a database to store information. Amazon Relational Database (Amazon RDS) supports many popular relational database engines such as MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server, PostgreSQL, MariaDB, and Oracle. We have even brought the traditional RDBMS into the cloud world through Amazon Aurora, which provides MySQL and PostgreSQL support with the performance and reliability of commercial-grade databases at 1/10th the cost.
  • Non-relational databases (NoSQL) provided a simpler method of storing and retrieving information that was often faster and more scalable than traditional RDBMS technology. The concept of non-relational databases has existed since the 1960s but really took off in the early 2000s with the rise of web-based applications that required performance and scalability that relational databases struggled with at the time. AWS published this Dynamo whitepaper in 2007, with DynamoDB launching as a service in 2012. DynamoDB has quickly become one of the critical design elements for many of our customers who are building highly-scalable applications on AWS. We continue to innovate with DynamoDB, and this week launched global tables and on-demand backup at re:Invent 2017. DynamoDB excels in a variety of use cases, such as tracking of session information for popular websites, shopping cart information on e-commerce sites, and keeping track of gamers’ high scores in mobile gaming applications, for example.
  • Graph databases focus on the relationship between data items in the store. With a graph database, we work with nodes, edges, and properties to represent data, relationships, and information. Graph databases are designed to make it easy and fast to traverse and retrieve complex hierarchical data models. Graph databases share some concepts from the NoSQL family of databases such as key-value pairs (properties) and the use of a non-SQL query language such as Gremlin. Graph databases are commonly used for social networking, recommendation engines, fraud detection, and knowledge graphs. We released Amazon Neptune to help simplify the provisioning and management of graph databases as we believe that graph databases are going to enable the next generation of smart applications.

A common use case I am hearing every week as I talk to customers is how to incorporate chatbots within their organizations. Amazon Lex and Amazon Polly have made it easy for customers to experiment and build chatbots for a wide range of scenarios, but one of the missing pieces of the puzzle was how to model decision trees and and knowledge graphs so the chatbot could guide the conversation in an intelligent manner.

Graph databases are ideal for this particular use case, and having Amazon Neptune simplifies the deployment of a graph database while providing high performance, scalability, availability, and durability as a managed service. Security of your graph database is critical. To help ensure this, you can store your encrypted data by running AWS in Amazon Neptune within your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) and using encryption at rest integrated with AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS). Neptune also supports Amazon VPC and AWS Identity and Access Management (AWS IAM) to help further protect and restrict access.

Our customers now have the choice of many different database technologies to ensure that they can optimize each application and service for their specific needs. Just as DynamoDB has unlocked and enabled many new workloads that weren’t possible in relational databases, I can’t wait to see what new innovations and capabilities are enabled from graph databases as they become easier to use through Amazon Neptune.

Look for more on DynamoDB and Amazon S3 from me on Monday.

 

Glenn at Tour de Mont Blanc

 

 

GDPR – A Practical Guide For Developers

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/gdpr-practical-guide-developers/

You’ve probably heard about GDPR. The new European data protection regulation that applies practically to everyone. Especially if you are working in a big company, it’s most likely that there’s already a process for gettign your systems in compliance with the regulation.

The regulation is basically a law that must be followed in all European countries (but also applies to non-EU companies that have users in the EU). In this particular case, it applies to companies that are not registered in Europe, but are having European customers. So that’s most companies. I will not go into yet another “12 facts about GDPR” or “7 myths about GDPR” posts/whitepapers, as they are often aimed at managers or legal people. Instead, I’ll focus on what GDPR means for developers.

Why am I qualified to do that? A few reasons – I was advisor to the deputy prime minister of a EU country, and because of that I’ve been both exposed and myself wrote some legislation. I’m familiar with the “legalese” and how the regulatory framework operates in general. I’m also a privacy advocate and I’ve been writing about GDPR-related stuff in the past, i.e. “before it was cool” (protecting sensitive data, the right to be forgotten). And finally, I’m currently working on a project that (among other things) aims to help with covering some GDPR aspects.

I’ll try to be a bit more comprehensive this time and cover as many aspects of the regulation that concern developers as I can. And while developers will mostly be concerned about how the systems they are working on have to change, it’s not unlikely that a less informed manager storms in in late spring, realizing GDPR is going to be in force tomorrow, asking “what should we do to get our system/website compliant”.

The rights of the user/client (referred to as “data subject” in the regulation) that I think are relevant for developers are: the right to erasure (the right to be forgotten/deleted from the system), right to restriction of processing (you still keep the data, but mark it as “restricted” and don’t touch it without further consent by the user), the right to data portability (the ability to export one’s data), the right to rectification (the ability to get personal data fixed), the right to be informed (getting human-readable information, rather than long terms and conditions), the right of access (the user should be able to see all the data you have about them), the right to data portability (the user should be able to get a machine-readable dump of their data).

Additionally, the relevant basic principles are: data minimization (one should not collect more data than necessary), integrity and confidentiality (all security measures to protect data that you can think of + measures to guarantee that the data has not been inappropriately modified).

Even further, the regulation requires certain processes to be in place within an organization (of more than 250 employees or if a significant amount of data is processed), and those include keeping a record of all types of processing activities carried out, including transfers to processors (3rd parties), which includes cloud service providers. None of the other requirements of the regulation have an exception depending on the organization size, so “I’m small, GDPR does not concern me” is a myth.

It is important to know what “personal data” is. Basically, it’s every piece of data that can be used to uniquely identify a person or data that is about an already identified person. It’s data that the user has explicitly provided, but also data that you have collected about them from either 3rd parties or based on their activities on the site (what they’ve been looking at, what they’ve purchased, etc.)

Having said that, I’ll list a number of features that will have to be implemented and some hints on how to do that, followed by some do’s and don’t’s.

  • “Forget me” – you should have a method that takes a userId and deletes all personal data about that user (in case they have been collected on the basis of consent, and not due to contract enforcement or legal obligation). It is actually useful for integration tests to have that feature (to cleanup after the test), but it may be hard to implement depending on the data model. In a regular data model, deleting a record may be easy, but some foreign keys may be violated. That means you have two options – either make sure you allow nullable foreign keys (for example an order usually has a reference to the user that made it, but when the user requests his data be deleted, you can set the userId to null), or make sure you delete all related data (e.g. via cascades). This may not be desirable, e.g. if the order is used to track available quantities or for accounting purposes. It’s a bit trickier for event-sourcing data models, or in extreme cases, ones that include some sort of blcokchain/hash chain/tamper-evident data structure. With event sourcing you should be able to remove a past event and re-generate intermediate snapshots. For blockchain-like structures – be careful what you put in there and avoid putting personal data of users. There is an option to use a chameleon hash function, but that’s suboptimal. Overall, you must constantly think of how you can delete the personal data. And “our data model doesn’t allow it” isn’t an excuse.
  • Notify 3rd parties for erasure – deleting things from your system may be one thing, but you are also obligated to inform all third parties that you have pushed that data to. So if you have sent personal data to, say, Salesforce, Hubspot, twitter, or any cloud service provider, you should call an API of theirs that allows for the deletion of personal data. If you are such a provider, obviously, your “forget me” endpoint should be exposed. Calling the 3rd party APIs to remove data is not the full story, though. You also have to make sure the information does not appear in search results. Now, that’s tricky, as Google doesn’t have an API for removal, only a manual process. Fortunately, it’s only about public profile pages that are crawlable by Google (and other search engines, okay…), but you still have to take measures. Ideally, you should make the personal data page return a 404 HTTP status, so that it can be removed.
  • Restrict processing – in your admin panel where there’s a list of users, there should be a button “restrict processing”. The user settings page should also have that button. When clicked (after reading the appropriate information), it should mark the profile as restricted. That means it should no longer be visible to the backoffice staff, or publicly. You can implement that with a simple “restricted” flag in the users table and a few if-clasues here and there.
  • Export data – there should be another button – “export data”. When clicked, the user should receive all the data that you hold about them. What exactly is that data – depends on the particular usecase. Usually it’s at least the data that you delete with the “forget me” functionality, but may include additional data (e.g. the orders the user has made may not be delete, but should be included in the dump). The structure of the dump is not strictly defined, but my recommendation would be to reuse schema.org definitions as much as possible, for either JSON or XML. If the data is simple enough, a CSV/XLS export would also be fine. Sometimes data export can take a long time, so the button can trigger a background process, which would then notify the user via email when his data is ready (twitter, for example, does that already – you can request all your tweets and you get them after a while).
  • Allow users to edit their profile – this seems an obvious rule, but it isn’t always followed. Users must be able to fix all data about them, including data that you have collected from other sources (e.g. using a “login with facebook” you may have fetched their name and address). Rule of thumb – all the fields in your “users” table should be editable via the UI. Technically, rectification can be done via a manual support process, but that’s normally more expensive for a business than just having the form to do it. There is one other scenario, however, when you’ve obtained the data from other sources (i.e. the user hasn’t provided their details to you directly). In that case there should still be a page where they can identify somehow (via email and/or sms confirmation) and get access to the data about them.
  • Consent checkboxes – this is in my opinion the biggest change that the regulation brings. “I accept the terms and conditions” would no longer be sufficient to claim that the user has given their consent for processing their data. So, for each particular processing activity there should be a separate checkbox on the registration (or user profile) screen. You should keep these consent checkboxes in separate columns in the database, and let the users withdraw their consent (by unchecking these checkboxes from their profile page – see the previous point). Ideally, these checkboxes should come directly from the register of processing activities (if you keep one). Note that the checkboxes should not be preselected, as this does not count as “consent”.
  • Re-request consent – if the consent users have given was not clear (e.g. if they simply agreed to terms & conditions), you’d have to re-obtain that consent. So prepare a functionality for mass-emailing your users to ask them to go to their profile page and check all the checkboxes for the personal data processing activities that you have.
  • “See all my data” – this is very similar to the “Export” button, except data should be displayed in the regular UI of the application rather than an XML/JSON format. For example, Google Maps shows you your location history – all the places that you’ve been to. It is a good implementation of the right to access. (Though Google is very far from perfect when privacy is concerned)
  • Age checks – you should ask for the user’s age, and if the user is a child (below 16), you should ask for parent permission. There’s no clear way how to do that, but my suggestion is to introduce a flow, where the child should specify the email of a parent, who can then confirm. Obviosuly, children will just cheat with their birthdate, or provide a fake parent email, but you will most likely have done your job according to the regulation (this is one of the “wishful thinking” aspects of the regulation).

Now some “do’s”, which are mostly about the technical measures needed to protect personal data. They may be more “ops” than “dev”, but often the application also has to be extended to support them. I’ve listed most of what I could think of in a previous post.

  • Encrypt the data in transit. That means that communication between your application layer and your database (or your message queue, or whatever component you have) should be over TLS. The certificates could be self-signed (and possibly pinned), or you could have an internal CA. Different databases have different configurations, just google “X encrypted connections. Some databases need gossiping among the nodes – that should also be configured to use encryption
  • Encrypt the data at rest – this again depends on the database (some offer table-level encryption), but can also be done on machine-level. E.g. using LUKS. The private key can be stored in your infrastructure, or in some cloud service like AWS KMS.
  • Encrypt your backups – kind of obvious
  • Implement pseudonymisation – the most obvious use-case is when you want to use production data for the test/staging servers. You should change the personal data to some “pseudonym”, so that the people cannot be identified. When you push data for machine learning purposes (to third parties or not), you can also do that. Technically, that could mean that your User object can have a “pseudonymize” method which applies hash+salt/bcrypt/PBKDF2 for some of the data that can be used to identify a person
  • Protect data integrity – this is a very broad thing, and could simply mean “have authentication mechanisms for modifying data”. But you can do something more, even as simple as a checksum, or a more complicated solution (like the one I’m working on). It depends on the stakes, on the way data is accessed, on the particular system, etc. The checksum can be in the form of a hash of all the data in a given database record, which should be updated each time the record is updated through the application. It isn’t a strong guarantee, but it is at least something.
  • Have your GDPR register of processing activities in something other than Excel – Article 30 says that you should keep a record of all the types of activities that you use personal data for. That sounds like bureaucracy, but it may be useful – you will be able to link certain aspects of your application with that register (e.g. the consent checkboxes, or your audit trail records). It wouldn’t take much time to implement a simple register, but the business requirements for that should come from whoever is responsible for the GDPR compliance. But you can advise them that having it in Excel won’t make it easy for you as a developer (imagine having to fetch the excel file internally, so that you can parse it and implement a feature). Such a register could be a microservice/small application deployed separately in your infrastructure.
  • Log access to personal data – every read operation on a personal data record should be logged, so that you know who accessed what and for what purpose
  • Register all API consumers – you shouldn’t allow anonymous API access to personal data. I’d say you should request the organization name and contact person for each API user upon registration, and add those to the data processing register. Note: some have treated article 30 as a requirement to keep an audit log. I don’t think it is saying that – instead it requires 250+ companies to keep a register of the types of processing activities (i.e. what you use the data for). There are other articles in the regulation that imply that keeping an audit log is a best practice (for protecting the integrity of the data as well as to make sure it hasn’t been processed without a valid reason)

Finally, some “don’t’s”.

  • Don’t use data for purposes that the user hasn’t agreed with – that’s supposed to be the spirit of the regulation. If you want to expose a new API to a new type of clients, or you want to use the data for some machine learning, or you decide to add ads to your site based on users’ behaviour, or sell your database to a 3rd party – think twice. I would imagine your register of processing activities could have a button to send notification emails to users to ask them for permission when a new processing activity is added (or if you use a 3rd party register, it should probably give you an API). So upon adding a new processing activity (and adding that to your register), mass email all users from whom you’d like consent.
  • Don’t log personal data – getting rid of the personal data from log files (especially if they are shipped to a 3rd party service) can be tedious or even impossible. So log just identifiers if needed. And make sure old logs files are cleaned up, just in case
  • Don’t put fields on the registration/profile form that you don’t need – it’s always tempting to just throw as many fields as the usability person/designer agrees on, but unless you absolutely need the data for delivering your service, you shouldn’t collect it. Names you should probably always collect, but unless you are delivering something, a home address or phone is unnecessary.
  • Don’t assume 3rd parties are compliant – you are responsible if there’s a data breach in one of the 3rd parties (e.g. “processors”) to which you send personal data. So before you send data via an API to another service, make sure they have at least a basic level of data protection. If they don’t, raise a flag with management.
  • Don’t assume having ISO XXX makes you compliant – information security standards and even personal data standards are a good start and they will probably 70% of what the regulation requires, but they are not sufficient – most of the things listed above are not covered in any of those standards

Overall, the purpose of the regulation is to make you take conscious decisions when processing personal data. It imposes best practices in a legal way. If you follow the above advice and design your data model, storage, data flow , API calls with data protection in mind, then you shouldn’t worry about the huge fines that the regulation prescribes – they are for extreme cases, like Equifax for example. Regulators (data protection authorities) will most likely have some checklists into which you’d have to somehow fit, but if you follow best practices, that shouldn’t be an issue.

I think all of the above features can be implemented in a few weeks by a small team. Be suspicious when a big vendor offers you a generic plug-and-play “GDPR compliance” solution. GDPR is not just about the technical aspects listed above – it does have organizational/process implications. But also be suspicious if a consultant claims GDPR is complicated. It’s not – it relies on a few basic principles that are in fact best practices anyway. Just don’t ignore them.

The post GDPR – A Practical Guide For Developers appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

The 10 Most Viewed Security-Related AWS Knowledge Center Articles and Videos for November 2017

Post Syndicated from Maggie Burke original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/the-10-most-viewed-security-related-aws-knowledge-center-articles-and-videos-for-november-2017/

AWS Knowledge Center image

The AWS Knowledge Center helps answer the questions most frequently asked by AWS Support customers. The following 10 Knowledge Center security articles and videos have been the most viewed this month. It’s likely you’ve wondered about a few of these topics yourself, so here’s a chance to learn the answers!

  1. How do I create an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy to restrict access for an IAM user, group, or role to a particular Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC)?
    Learn how to apply a custom IAM policy to restrict IAM user, group, or role permissions for creating and managing Amazon EC2 instances in a specified VPC.
  2. How do I use an MFA token to authenticate access to my AWS resources through the AWS CLI?
    One IAM best practice is to protect your account and its resources by using a multi-factor authentication (MFA) device. If you plan use the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) while using an MFA device, you must create a temporary session token.
  3. Can I restrict an IAM user’s EC2 access to specific resources?
    This article demonstrates how to link multiple AWS accounts through AWS Organizations and isolate IAM user groups in their own accounts.
  4. I didn’t receive a validation email for the SSL certificate I requested through AWS Certificate Manager (ACM)—where is it?
    Can’t find your ACM validation emails? Be sure to check the email address to which you requested that ACM send validation emails.
  5. How do I create an IAM policy that has a source IP restriction but still allows users to switch roles in the AWS Management Console?
    Learn how to write an IAM policy that not only includes a source IP restriction but also lets your users switch roles in the console.
  6. How do I allow users from another account to access resources in my account through IAM?
    If you have the 12-digit account number and permissions to create and edit IAM roles and users for both accounts, you can permit specific IAM users to access resources in your account.
  7. What are the differences between a service control policy (SCP) and an IAM policy?
    Learn how to distinguish an SCP from an IAM policy.
  8. How do I share my customer master keys (CMKs) across multiple AWS accounts?
    To grant another account access to your CMKs, create an IAM policy on the secondary account that grants access to use your CMKs.
  9. How do I set up AWS Trusted Advisor notifications?
    Learn how to receive free weekly email notifications from Trusted Advisor.
  10. How do I use AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) encryption context to protect the integrity of encrypted data?
    Encryption context name-value pairs used with AWS KMS encryption and decryption operations provide a method for checking ciphertext authenticity. Learn how to use encryption context to help protect your encrypted data.

The AWS Security Blog will publish an updated version of this list regularly going forward. You also can subscribe to the AWS Knowledge Center Videos playlist on YouTube.

– Maggie

AWS Developer Tools Expands Integration to Include GitHub

Post Syndicated from Balaji Iyer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/aws-developer-tools-expands-integration-to-include-github/

AWS Developer Tools is a set of services that include AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS CodeDeploy. Together, these services help you securely store and maintain version control of your application’s source code and automatically build, test, and deploy your application to AWS or your on-premises environment. These services are designed to enable developers and IT professionals to rapidly and safely deliver software.

As part of our continued commitment to extend the AWS Developer Tools ecosystem to third-party tools and services, we’re pleased to announce AWS CodeStar and AWS CodeBuild now integrate with GitHub. This will make it easier for GitHub users to set up a continuous integration and continuous delivery toolchain as part of their release process using AWS Developer Tools.

In this post, I will walk through the following:

Prerequisites:

You’ll need an AWS account, a GitHub account, an Amazon EC2 key pair, and administrator-level permissions for AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS CodeStar, AWS CodeBuild, AWS CodePipeline, Amazon EC2, Amazon S3.

 

Integrating GitHub with AWS CodeStar

AWS CodeStar enables you to quickly develop, build, and deploy applications on AWS. Its unified user interface helps you easily manage your software development activities in one place. With AWS CodeStar, you can set up your entire continuous delivery toolchain in minutes, so you can start releasing code faster.

When AWS CodeStar launched in April of this year, it used AWS CodeCommit as the hosted source repository. You can now choose between AWS CodeCommit or GitHub as the source control service for your CodeStar projects. In addition, your CodeStar project dashboard lets you centrally track GitHub activities, including commits, issues, and pull requests. This makes it easy to manage project activity across the components of your CI/CD toolchain. Adding the GitHub dashboard view will simplify development of your AWS applications.

In this section, I will show you how to use GitHub as the source provider for your CodeStar projects. I’ll also show you how to work with recent commits, issues, and pull requests in the CodeStar dashboard.

Sign in to the AWS Management Console and from the Services menu, choose CodeStar. In the CodeStar console, choose Create a new project. You should see the Choose a project template page.

CodeStar Project

Choose an option by programming language, application category, or AWS service. I am going to choose the Ruby on Rails web application that will be running on Amazon EC2.

On the Project details page, you’ll now see the GitHub option. Type a name for your project, and then choose Connect to GitHub.

Project details

You’ll see a message requesting authorization to connect to your GitHub repository. When prompted, choose Authorize, and then type your GitHub account password.

Authorize

This connects your GitHub identity to AWS CodeStar through OAuth. You can always review your settings by navigating to your GitHub application settings.

Installed GitHub Apps

You’ll see AWS CodeStar is now connected to GitHub:

Create project

You can choose a public or private repository. GitHub offers free accounts for users and organizations working on public and open source projects and paid accounts that offer unlimited private repositories and optional user management and security features.

In this example, I am going to choose the public repository option. Edit the repository description, if you like, and then choose Next.

Review your CodeStar project details, and then choose Create Project. On Choose an Amazon EC2 Key Pair, choose Create Project.

Key Pair

On the Review project details page, you’ll see Edit Amazon EC2 configuration. Choose this link to configure instance type, VPC, and subnet options. AWS CodeStar requires a service role to create and manage AWS resources and IAM permissions. This role will be created for you when you select the AWS CodeStar would like permission to administer AWS resources on your behalf check box.

Choose Create Project. It might take a few minutes to create your project and resources.

Review project details

When you create a CodeStar project, you’re added to the project team as an owner. If this is the first time you’ve used AWS CodeStar, you’ll be asked to provide the following information, which will be shown to others:

  • Your display name.
  • Your email address.

This information is used in your AWS CodeStar user profile. User profiles are not project-specific, but they are limited to a single AWS region. If you are a team member in projects in more than one region, you’ll have to create a user profile in each region.

User settings

User settings

Choose Next. AWS CodeStar will create a GitHub repository with your configuration settings (for example, https://github.com/biyer/ruby-on-rails-service).

When you integrate your integrated development environment (IDE) with AWS CodeStar, you can continue to write and develop code in your preferred environment. The changes you make will be included in the AWS CodeStar project each time you commit and push your code.

IDE

After setting up your IDE, choose Next to go to the CodeStar dashboard. Take a few minutes to familiarize yourself with the dashboard. You can easily track progress across your entire software development process, from your backlog of work items to recent code deployments.

Dashboard

After the application deployment is complete, choose the endpoint that will display the application.

Pipeline

This is what you’ll see when you open the application endpoint:

The Commit history section of the dashboard lists the commits made to the Git repository. If you choose the commit ID or the Open in GitHub option, you can use a hotlink to your GitHub repository.

Commit history

Your AWS CodeStar project dashboard is where you and your team view the status of your project resources, including the latest commits to your project, the state of your continuous delivery pipeline, and the performance of your instances. This information is displayed on tiles that are dedicated to a particular resource. To see more information about any of these resources, choose the details link on the tile. The console for that AWS service will open on the details page for that resource.

Issues

You can also filter issues based on their status and the assigned user.

Filter

AWS CodeBuild Now Supports Building GitHub Pull Requests

CodeBuild is a fully managed build service that compiles source code, runs tests, and produces software packages that are ready to deploy. With CodeBuild, you don’t need to provision, manage, and scale your own build servers. CodeBuild scales continuously and processes multiple builds concurrently, so your builds are not left waiting in a queue. You can use prepackaged build environments to get started quickly or you can create custom build environments that use your own build tools.

We recently announced support for GitHub pull requests in AWS CodeBuild. This functionality makes it easier to collaborate across your team while editing and building your application code with CodeBuild. You can use the AWS CodeBuild or AWS CodePipeline consoles to run AWS CodeBuild. You can also automate the running of AWS CodeBuild by using the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), the AWS SDKs, or the AWS CodeBuild Plugin for Jenkins.

AWS CodeBuild

In this section, I will show you how to trigger a build in AWS CodeBuild with a pull request from GitHub through webhooks.

Open the AWS CodeBuild console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/codebuild/. Choose Create project. If you already have a CodeBuild project, you can choose Edit project, and then follow along. CodeBuild can connect to AWS CodeCommit, S3, BitBucket, and GitHub to pull source code for builds. For Source provider, choose GitHub, and then choose Connect to GitHub.

Configure

After you’ve successfully linked GitHub and your CodeBuild project, you can choose a repository in your GitHub account. CodeBuild also supports connections to any public repository. You can review your settings by navigating to your GitHub application settings.

GitHub Apps

On Source: What to Build, for Webhook, select the Rebuild every time a code change is pushed to this repository check box.

Note: You can select this option only if, under Repository, you chose Use a repository in my account.

Source

In Environment: How to build, for Environment image, select Use an image managed by AWS CodeBuild. For Operating system, choose Ubuntu. For Runtime, choose Base. For Version, choose the latest available version. For Build specification, you can provide a collection of build commands and related settings, in YAML format (buildspec.yml) or you can override the build spec by inserting build commands directly in the console. AWS CodeBuild uses these commands to run a build. In this example, the output is the string “hello.”

Environment

On Artifacts: Where to put the artifacts from this build project, for Type, choose No artifacts. (This is also the type to choose if you are just running tests or pushing a Docker image to Amazon ECR.) You also need an AWS CodeBuild service role so that AWS CodeBuild can interact with dependent AWS services on your behalf. Unless you already have a role, choose Create a role, and for Role name, type a name for your role.

Artifacts

In this example, leave the advanced settings at their defaults.

If you expand Show advanced settings, you’ll see options for customizing your build, including:

  • A build timeout.
  • A KMS key to encrypt all the artifacts that the builds for this project will use.
  • Options for building a Docker image.
  • Elevated permissions during your build action (for example, accessing Docker inside your build container to build a Dockerfile).
  • Resource options for the build compute type.
  • Environment variables (built-in or custom). For more information, see Create a Build Project in the AWS CodeBuild User Guide.

Advanced settings

You can use the AWS CodeBuild console to create a parameter in Amazon EC2 Systems Manager. Choose Create a parameter, and then follow the instructions in the dialog box. (In that dialog box, for KMS key, you can optionally specify the ARN of an AWS KMS key in your account. Amazon EC2 Systems Manager uses this key to encrypt the parameter’s value during storage and decrypt during retrieval.)

Create parameter

Choose Continue. On the Review page, either choose Save and build or choose Save to run the build later.

Choose Start build. When the build is complete, the Build logs section should display detailed information about the build.

Logs

To demonstrate a pull request, I will fork the repository as a different GitHub user, make commits to the forked repo, check in the changes to a newly created branch, and then open a pull request.

Pull request

As soon as the pull request is submitted, you’ll see CodeBuild start executing the build.

Build

GitHub sends an HTTP POST payload to the webhook’s configured URL (highlighted here), which CodeBuild uses to download the latest source code and execute the build phases.

Build project

If you expand the Show all checks option for the GitHub pull request, you’ll see that CodeBuild has completed the build, all checks have passed, and a deep link is provided in Details, which opens the build history in the CodeBuild console.

Pull request

Summary:

In this post, I showed you how to use GitHub as the source provider for your CodeStar projects and how to work with recent commits, issues, and pull requests in the CodeStar dashboard. I also showed you how you can use GitHub pull requests to automatically trigger a build in AWS CodeBuild — specifically, how this functionality makes it easier to collaborate across your team while editing and building your application code with CodeBuild.


About the author:

Balaji Iyer is an Enterprise Consultant for the Professional Services Team at Amazon Web Services. In this role, he has helped several customers successfully navigate their journey to AWS. His specialties include architecting and implementing highly scalable distributed systems, serverless architectures, large scale migrations, operational security, and leading strategic AWS initiatives. Before he joined Amazon, Balaji spent more than a decade building operating systems, big data analytics solutions, mobile services, and web applications. In his spare time, he enjoys experiencing the great outdoors and spending time with his family.

 

AWS Earns Department of Defense Impact Level 5 Provisional Authorization

Post Syndicated from Chris Gile original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-earns-department-of-defense-impact-level-5-provisional-authorization/

AWS GovCloud (US) Region image

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) has granted the AWS GovCloud (US) Region an Impact Level 5 (IL5) Department of Defense (DoD) Cloud Computing Security Requirements Guide (CC SRG) Provisional Authorization (PA) for six core services. This means that AWS’s DoD customers and partners can now deploy workloads for Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) exceeding IL4 and for unclassified National Security Systems (NSS).

We have supported sensitive Defense community workloads in the cloud for more than four years, and this latest IL5 authorization is complementary to our FedRAMP High Provisional Authorization that covers 18 services in the AWS GovCloud (US) Region. Our customers now have the flexibility to deploy any range of IL 2, 4, or 5 workloads by leveraging AWS’s services, attestations, and certifications. For example, when the US Air Force needed compute scale to support the Next Generation GPS Operational Control System Program, they turned to AWS.

In partnership with a certified Third Party Assessment Organization (3PAO), an independent validation was conducted to assess both our technical and nontechnical security controls to confirm that they meet the DoD’s stringent CC SRG standards for IL5 workloads. Effective immediately, customers can begin leveraging the IL5 authorization for the following six services in the AWS GovCloud (US) Region:

AWS has been a long-standing industry partner with DoD, federal-agency customers, and private-sector customers to enhance cloud security and policy. We continue to collaborate on the DoD CC SRG, Defense Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) and other government requirements to ensure that policy makers enact policies to support next-generation security capabilities.

In an effort to reduce the authorization burden of our DoD customers, we’ve worked with DISA to port our assessment results into an easily ingestible format by the Enterprise Mission Assurance Support Service (eMASS) system. Additionally, we undertook a separate effort to empower our industry partners and customers to efficiently solve their compliance, governance, and audit challenges by launching the AWS Customer Compliance Center, a portal providing a breadth of AWS-specific compliance and regulatory information.

We look forward to providing sustained cloud security and compliance support at scale for our DoD customers and adding additional services within the IL5 authorization boundary. See AWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program for updates. To request access to AWS’s DoD security and authorization documentation, contact AWS Sales and Business Development. For a list of frequently asked questions related to AWS DoD SRG compliance, see the AWS DoD SRG page.

To learn more about the announcement in this post, tune in for the AWS Automating DoD SRG Impact Level 5 Compliance in AWS GovCloud (US) webinar on October 11, 2017, at 11:00 A.M. Pacific Time.

– Chris Gile, Senior Manager, AWS Public Sector Risk & Compliance

 

 

New AWS DevOps Blog Post: How to Help Secure Your Code in a Cross-Region/Cross-Account Deployment Solution on AWS

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/new-aws-devops-blog-post-how-to-help-secure-your-code-in-a-cross-regioncross-account-deployment-solution/

Security image

You can help to protect your data in a number of ways while it is in transit and at rest, such as by using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or client-side encryption. AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) is a managed service that makes it easy for you to create, control, rotate, and use your encryption keys. AWS KMS allows you to create custom keys, which you can share with AWS Identity and Access Management users and roles in your AWS account or in an AWS account owned by someone else.

In a new AWS DevOps Blog post, BK Chaurasiya describes a solution for building a cross-region/cross-account code deployment solution on AWS. BK explains options for helping to protect your source code as it travels between regions and between AWS accounts.

For more information, see the full AWS DevOps Blog post.

– Craig

AWS CloudHSM Update – Cost Effective Hardware Key Management at Cloud Scale for Sensitive & Regulated Workloads

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-cloudhsm-update-cost-effective-hardware-key-management/

Our customers run an incredible variety of mission-critical workloads on AWS, many of which process and store sensitive data. As detailed in our Overview of Security Processes document, AWS customers have access to an ever-growing set of options for encrypting and protecting this data. For example, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) supports encryption of data at rest and in transit, with options tailored for each supported database engine (MySQL, SQL Server, Oracle, MariaDB, PostgreSQL, and Aurora).

Many customers use AWS Key Management Service (KMS) to centralize their key management, with others taking advantage of the hardware-based key management, encryption, and decryption provided by AWS CloudHSM to meet stringent security and compliance requirements for their most sensitive data and regulated workloads (you can read my post, AWS CloudHSM – Secure Key Storage and Cryptographic Operations, to learn more about Hardware Security Modules, also known as HSMs).

Major CloudHSM Update
Today, building on what we have learned from our first-generation product, we are making a major update to CloudHSM, with a set of improvements designed to make the benefits of hardware-based key management available to a much wider audience while reducing the need for specialized operating expertise. Here’s a summary of the improvements:

Pay As You Go – CloudHSM is now offered under a pay-as-you-go model that is simpler and more cost-effective, with no up-front fees.

Fully Managed – CloudHSM is now a scalable managed service; provisioning, patching, high availability, and backups are all built-in and taken care of for you. Scheduled backups extract an encrypted image of your HSM from the hardware (using keys that only the HSM hardware itself knows) that can be restored only to identical HSM hardware owned by AWS. For durability, those backups are stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), and for an additional layer of security, encrypted again with server-side S3 encryption using an AWS KMS master key.

Open & Compatible  – CloudHSM is open and standards-compliant, with support for multiple APIs, programming languages, and cryptography extensions such as PKCS #11, Java Cryptography Extension (JCE), and Microsoft CryptoNG (CNG). The open nature of CloudHSM gives you more control and simplifies the process of moving keys (in encrypted form) from one CloudHSM to another, and also allows migration to and from other commercially available HSMs.

More Secure – CloudHSM Classic (the original model) supports the generation and use of keys that comply with FIPS 140-2 Level 2. We’re stepping that up a notch today with support for FIPS 140-2 Level 3, with security mechanisms that are designed to detect and respond to physical attempts to access or modify the HSM. Your keys are protected with exclusive, single-tenant access to tamper-resistant HSMs that appear within your Virtual Private Clouds (VPCs). CloudHSM supports quorum authentication for critical administrative and key management functions. This feature allows you to define a list of N possible identities that can access the functions, and then require at least M of them to authorize the action. It also supports multi-factor authentication using tokens that you provide.

AWS-Native – The updated CloudHSM is an integral part of AWS and plays well with other tools and services. You can create and manage a cluster of HSMs using the AWS Management Console, AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), or API calls.

Diving In
You can create CloudHSM clusters that contain 1 to 32 HSMs, each in a separate Availability Zone in a particular AWS Region. Spreading HSMs across AZs gives you high availability (including built-in load balancing); adding more HSMs gives you additional throughput. The HSMs within a cluster are kept in sync: performing a task or operation on one HSM in a cluster automatically updates the others. Each HSM in a cluster has its own Elastic Network Interface (ENI).

All interaction with an HSM takes place via the AWS CloudHSM client. It runs on an EC2 instance and uses certificate-based mutual authentication to create secure (TLS) connections to the HSMs.

At the hardware level, each HSM includes hardware-enforced isolation of crypto operations and key storage. Each customer HSM runs on dedicated processor cores.

Setting Up a Cluster
Let’s set up a cluster using the CloudHSM Console:

I click on Create cluster to get started, select my desired VPC and the subnets within it (I can also create a new VPC and/or subnets if needed):

Then I review my settings and click on Create:

After a few minutes, my cluster exists, but is uninitialized:

Initialization simply means retrieving a certificate signing request (the Cluster CSR):

And then creating a private key and using it to sign the request (these commands were copied from the Initialize Cluster docs and I have omitted the output. Note that ID identifies the cluster):

$ openssl genrsa -out CustomerRoot.key 2048
$ openssl req -new -x509 -days 365 -key CustomerRoot.key -out CustomerRoot.crt
$ openssl x509 -req -days 365 -in ID_ClusterCsr.csr   \
                              -CA CustomerRoot.crt    \
                              -CAkey CustomerRoot.key \
                              -CAcreateserial         \
                              -out ID_CustomerHsmCertificate.crt

The next step is to apply the signed certificate to the cluster using the console or the CLI. After this has been done, the cluster can be activated by changing the password for the HSM’s administrative user, otherwise known as the Crypto Officer (CO).

Once the cluster has been created, initialized and activated, it can be used to protect data. Applications can use the APIs in AWS CloudHSM SDKs to manage keys, encrypt & decrypt objects, and more. The SDKs provide access to the CloudHSM client (running on the same instance as the application). The client, in turn, connects to the cluster across an encrypted connection.

Available Today
The new HSM is available today in the US East (Northern Virginia), US West (Oregon), US East (Ohio), and EU (Ireland) Regions, with more in the works. Pricing starts at $1.45 per HSM per hour.

Jeff;

AWS Encryption SDK: How to Decide if Data Key Caching Is Right for Your Application

Post Syndicated from June Blender original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-encryption-sdk-how-to-decide-if-data-key-caching-is-right-for-your-application/

AWS KMS image

Today, the AWS Crypto Tools team introduced a new feature in the AWS Encryption SDK: data key caching. Data key caching lets you reuse the data keys that protect your data, instead of generating a new data key for each encryption operation.

Data key caching can reduce latency, improve throughput, reduce cost, and help you stay within service limits as your application scales. In particular, caching might help if your application is hitting the AWS Key Management Service (KMS) requests-per-second limit and raising the limit does not solve the problem.

However, these benefits come with some security tradeoffs. Encryption best practices generally discourage extensive reuse of data keys.

In this blog post, I explore those tradeoffs and provide information that can help you decide whether data key caching is a good strategy for your application. I also explain how data key caching is implemented in the AWS Encryption SDK and describe the security thresholds that you can set to limit the reuse of data keys. Finally, I provide some practical examples of using the security thresholds to meet cost, performance, and security goals.

Introducing data key caching

The AWS Encryption SDK is a client-side encryption library that makes it easier for you to implement cryptography best practices in your application. It includes secure default behavior for developers who are not encryption experts, while being flexible enough to work for the most experienced users.

In the AWS Encryption SDK, by default, you generate a new data key for each encryption operation. This is the most secure practice. However, in some applications, the overhead of generating a new data key for each operation is not acceptable.

Data key caching saves the plaintext and ciphertext of the data keys you use in a configurable cache. When you need a key to encrypt or decrypt data, you can reuse a data key from the cache instead of creating a new data key. You can create multiple data key caches and configure each one independently. Most importantly, the AWS Encryption SDK provides security thresholds that you can set to determine how much data key reuse you will allow.

To make data key caching easier to implement, the AWS Encryption SDK provides LocalCryptoMaterialsCache, an in-memory, least-recently-used cache with a configurable size. The SDK manages the cache for you, including adding store, search, and match logic to all encryption and decryption operations.

We recommend that you use LocalCryptoMaterialsCache as it is, but you can customize it, or substitute a compatible cache. However, you should never store plaintext data keys on disk.

The AWS Encryption SDK documentation includes sample code in Java and Python for an application that uses data key caching to encrypt data sent to and from Amazon Kinesis Streams.

Balance cost and security

Your decision to use data key caching should balance cost—in time, money, and resources—against security. In every consideration, though, the balance should favor your security requirements. As a rule, use the minimal caching required to achieve your cost and performance goals.

Before implementing data key caching, consider the details of your applications, your security requirements, and the cost and frequency of your encryption operations. In general, your application can benefit from data key caching if each operation is slow or expensive, or if you encrypt and decrypt data frequently. If the cost and speed of your encryption operations are already acceptable or can be improved by other means, do not use a data key cache.

Data key caching can be the right choice for your application if you have high encryption and decryption traffic. For example, if you are hitting your KMS requests-per-second limit, caching can help because you get some of your data keys from the cache instead of calling KMS for every request.

However, you can also create a case in the AWS Support Center to raise the KMS limit for your account. If raising the limit solves the problem, you do not need data key caching.

Configure caching thresholds for cost and security

In the AWS Encryption SDK, you can configure data key caching to allow just enough data key reuse to meet your cost and performance targets while conforming to the security requirements of your application. The SDK enforces the thresholds so that you can use them with any compatible cache.

The data key caching security thresholds apply to each cache entry. The AWS Encryption SDK will not use the data key from a cache entry that exceeds any of the thresholds that you set.

  • Maximum age (required): Set the lifetime of each cached key to be long enough to get cache hits, but short enough to limit exposure of a plaintext data key in memory to a specific time period.

You can use the maximum age threshold like a key rotation policy. Use it to limit the reuse of data keys and minimize exposure of cryptographic materials. You can also use it to evict data keys when the type or source of data that your application is processing changes.

  • Maximum messages encrypted (optional; default is 232 messages): Set the number of messages protected by each cached data key to be large enough to get value from reuse, but small enough to limit the number of messages that might potentially be exposed.

The AWS Encryption SDK only caches data keys that use an algorithm suite with a key derivation function. This technique avoids the cryptographic limits on the number of bytes encrypted with a single key. However, the more data that a key encrypts, the more data that is exposed if the data key is compromised.

Limiting the number of messages, rather than the number of bytes, is particularly useful if your application encrypts many messages of a similar size or when potential exposure must be limited to very few messages. This threshold is also useful when you want to reuse a data key for a particular type of message and know in advance how many messages of that type you have. You can also use an encryption context to select particular cached data keys for your encryption requests.

  • Maximum bytes encrypted (optional; default is 263 – 1): Set the bytes protected by each cached data key to be large enough to allow the reuse you need, but small enough to limit the amount of data encrypted under the same key.

Limiting the number of bytes, rather than the number of messages, is preferable when your application encrypts messages of widely varying size or when possibly exposing large amounts of data is much more of a concern than exposing smaller amounts of data.

In addition to these security thresholds, the LocalCryptoMaterialsCache in the AWS Encryption SDK lets you set its capacity, which is the maximum number of entries the cache can hold.

Use the capacity value to tune the performance of your LocalCryptoMaterialsCache. In general, use the smallest value that will achieve the performance improvements that your application requires. You might want to test with a very small cache of 5–10 entries and expand if necessary. You will need a slightly larger cache if you are using the cache for both encryption and decryption requests, or if you are using encryption contexts to select particular cache entries.

Consider these cache configuration examples

After you determine the security and performance requirements of your application, consider the cache security thresholds carefully and adjust them to meet your needs. There are no magic numbers for these thresholds: the ideal settings are specific to each application, its security and performance requirements, and budget. Use the minimal amount of caching necessary to get acceptable performance and cost.

The following examples show ways you can use the LocalCryptoMaterialsCache capacity setting and the security thresholds to help meet your security requirements:

  • Slow master key operations: If your master key processes only 100 transactions per second (TPS) but your application needs to process 1,000 TPS, you can meet your application requirements by allowing a maximum of 10 messages to be protected under each data key.
  • High frequency and volume: If your master key costs $0.01 per operation and you need to process a consistent 1,000 TPS while staying within a budget of $100,000 per month, allow a maximum of 275 messages for each cache entry.
  • Burst traffic: If your application’s processing bursts to 100 TPS for five seconds in each minute but is otherwise zero, and your master key costs $0.01 per operation, setting maximum messages to 3 can achieve significant savings. To prevent data keys from being reused across bursts (55 seconds), set the maximum age of each cached data key to 20 seconds.
  • Expensive master key operations: If your application uses a low-throughput encryption service that costs as much as $1.00 per operation, you might want to minimize the number of operations. To do so, create a cache that is large enough to contain the data keys you need. Then, set the byte and message limits high enough to allow reuse while conforming to your security requirements. For example, if your security requirements do not permit a data key to encrypt more than 10 GB of data, setting bytes processed to 10 GB still significantly minimizes operations and conforms to your security requirements.

Learn more about data key caching

To learn more about data key caching, including how to implement it, how to set the security thresholds, and details about the caching components, see Data Key Caching in the AWS Encryption SDK. Also, see the AWS Encryption SDKs for Java and Python as well as the Javadoc and Python documentation.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions, file an issue in the GitHub repos for the Encryption SDK in Java or Python, or start a new thread on the KMS forum.

– June