Tag Archives: Token

SecureLogin For Java Web Applications

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/securelogin-java-web-applications/

No, there is not a missing whitespace in the title. It’s not about any secure login, it’s about the SecureLogin protocol developed by Egor Homakov, a security consultant, who became famous for committing to master in the Rails project without having permissions.

The SecureLogin protocol is very interesting, as it does not rely on any central party (e.g. OAuth providers like Facebook and Twitter), thus avoiding all the pitfalls of OAuth (which Homakov has often criticized). It is not a password manager either. It is just a client-side software that performs a bit of crypto in order to prove to the server that it is indeed the right user. For that to work, two parts are key:

  • Using a master password to generate a private key. It uses a key-derivation function, which guarantees that the produced private key has sufficient entropy. That way, using the same master password and the same email, you will get the same private key everytime you use the password, and therefore the same public key. And you are the only one who can prove this public key is yours, by signing a message with your private key.
  • Service providers (websites) identify you by your public key by storing it in the database when you register and then looking it up on each subsequent login

The client-side part is performed ideally by a native client – a browser plugin (one is available for Chrome) or a OS-specific application (including mobile ones). That may sound tedious, but it’s actually quick and easy and a one-time event (and is easier than password managers).

I have to admit – I like it, because I’ve been having a similar idea for a while. In my “biometric identification” presentation (where I discuss the pitfalls of using biometrics-only identification schemes), I proposed (slide 23) an identification scheme that uses biometrics (e.g. scanned with your phone) + a password to produce a private key (using a key-derivation function). And the biometric can easily be added to SecureLogin in the future.

It’s not all roses, of course, as one issue isn’t fully resolved yet – revocation. In case someone steals your master password (or you suspect it might be stolen), you may want to change it and notify all service providers of that change so that they can replace your old public key with a new one. That has two implications – first, you may not have a full list of sites that you registered on, and since you may have changed devices, or used multiple devices, there may be websites that never get to know about your password change. There are proposed solutions (points 3 and 4), but they are not intrinsic to the protocol and rely on centralized services. The second issue is – what if the attacker changes your password first? To prevent that, service providers should probably rely on email verification, which is neither part of the protocol, nor is encouraged by it. But you may have to do it anyway, as a safeguard.

Homakov has not only defined a protocol, but also provided implementations of the native clients, so that anyone can start using it. So I decided to add it to a project I’m currently working on (the login page is here). For that I needed a java implementation of the server verification, and since no such implementation existed (only ruby and node.js are provided for now), I implemented it myself. So if you are going to use SecureLogin with a Java web application, you can use that instead of rolling out your own. While implementing it, I hit a few minor issues that may lead to protocol changes, so I guess backward compatibility should also be somehow included in the protocol (through versioning).

So, how does the code look like? On the client side you have a button and a little javascript:

<!-- get the latest sdk.js from the GitHub repo of securelogin
   or include it from https://securelogin.pw/sdk.js -->
<script src="js/securelogin/sdk.js"></script>
....
<p class="slbutton" id="securelogin">&#9889; SecureLogin</p>
$("#securelogin").click(function() {
  SecureLogin(function(sltoken){
	// TODO: consider adding csrf protection as in the demo applications
        // Note - pass as request body, not as param, as the token relies 
        // on url-encoding which some frameworks mess with
	$.post('/app/user/securelogin', sltoken, function(result) {
            if(result == 'ok') {
		 window.location = "/app/";
            } else {
                 $.notify("Login failed, try again later", "error");
            }
	});
  });
  return false;
});

A single button can be used for both login and signup, or you can have a separate signup form, if it has to include additional details rather than just an email. Since I added SecureLogin in addition to my password-based login, I kept the two forms.

On the server, you simply do the following:

@RequestMapping(value = "/securelogin/register", method = RequestMethod.POST)
@ResponseBody
public String secureloginRegister(@RequestBody String token, HttpServletResponse response) {
    try {
        SecureLogin login = SecureLogin.verify(request.getSecureLoginToken(), Options.create(websiteRootUrl));
        UserDetails details = userService.getUserDetailsByEmail(login.getEmail());
        if (details == null || !login.getRawPublicKey().equals(details.getSecureLoginPublicKey())) {
            return "failure";
        }
        // sets the proper cookies to the response
        TokenAuthenticationService.addAuthentication(response, login.getEmail(), secure));
        return "ok";
    } catch (SecureLoginVerificationException e) {
        return "failure";
    }
}

This is spring-mvc, but it can be any web framework. You can also incorporate that into a spring-security flow somehow. I’ve never liked spring-security’s complexity, so I did it manually. Also, instead of strings, you can return proper status codes. Note that I’m doing a lookup by email and only then checking the public key (as if it’s a password). You can do the other way around if you have the proper index on the public key column.

I wouldn’t suggest having a SecureLogin-only system, as the project is still in an early stage and users may not be comfortable with it. But certainly adding it as an option is a good idea.

The post SecureLogin For Java Web Applications appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

[$] Linking commits to reviews

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/734018/rss

In a talk in the refereed track of the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference,
Alexandre Courouble presented the email2git tool that
links kernel commits to their review discussion on the mailing lists. Email2git
is a plugin for cregit, which implements token-level history for a Git repository; we covered a talk on cregit just over one year
ago. Email2git combines cregit with Patchwork to link
the commit to a patch and its discussion threads from any of the mailing
lists that are scanned by patchwork.kernel.org. The result
is a way to easily find the discussion that led to a piece of code—or even
just a token—changing in the kernel source tree.

Manage Kubernetes Clusters on AWS Using CoreOS Tectonic

Post Syndicated from Arun Gupta original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/kubernetes-clusters-aws-coreos-tectonic/

There are multiple ways to run a Kubernetes cluster on Amazon Web Services (AWS). The first post in this series explained how to manage a Kubernetes cluster on AWS using kops. This second post explains how to manage a Kubernetes cluster on AWS using CoreOS Tectonic.

Tectonic overview

Tectonic delivers the most current upstream version of Kubernetes with additional features. It is a commercial offering from CoreOS and adds the following features over the upstream:

  • Installer
    Comes with a graphical installer that installs a highly available Kubernetes cluster. Alternatively, the cluster can be installed using AWS CloudFormation templates or Terraform scripts.
  • Operators
    An operator is an application-specific controller that extends the Kubernetes API to create, configure, and manage instances of complex stateful applications on behalf of a Kubernetes user. This release includes an etcd operator for rolling upgrades and a Prometheus operator for monitoring capabilities.
  • Console
    A web console provides a full view of applications running in the cluster. It also allows you to deploy applications to the cluster and start the rolling upgrade of the cluster.
  • Monitoring
    Node CPU and memory metrics are powered by the Prometheus operator. The graphs are available in the console. A large set of preconfigured Prometheus alerts are also available.
  • Security
    Tectonic ensures that cluster is always up to date with the most recent patches/fixes. Tectonic clusters also enable role-based access control (RBAC). Different roles can be mapped to an LDAP service.
  • Support
    CoreOS provides commercial support for clusters created using Tectonic.

Tectonic can be installed on AWS using a GUI installer or Terraform scripts. The installer prompts you for the information needed to boot the Kubernetes cluster, such as AWS access and secret key, number of master and worker nodes, and instance size for the master and worker nodes. The cluster can be created after all the options are specified. Alternatively, Terraform assets can be downloaded and the cluster can be created later. This post shows using the installer.

CoreOS License and Pull Secret

Even though Tectonic is a commercial offering, a cluster for up to 10 nodes can be created by creating a free account at Get Tectonic for Kubernetes. After signup, a CoreOS License and Pull Secret files are provided on your CoreOS account page. Download these files as they are needed by the installer to boot the cluster.

IAM user permission

The IAM user to create the Kubernetes cluster must have access to the following services and features:

  • Amazon Route 53
  • Amazon EC2
  • Elastic Load Balancing
  • Amazon S3
  • Amazon VPC
  • Security groups

Use the aws-policy policy to grant the required permissions for the IAM user.

DNS configuration

A subdomain is required to create the cluster, and it must be registered as a public Route 53 hosted zone. The zone is used to host and expose the console web application. It is also used as the static namespace for the Kubernetes API server. This allows kubectl to be able to talk directly with the master.

The domain may be registered using Route 53. Alternatively, a domain may be registered at a third-party registrar. This post uses a kubernetes-aws.io domain registered at a third-party registrar and a tectonic subdomain within it.

Generate a Route 53 hosted zone using the AWS CLI. Download jq to run this command:

ID=$(uuidgen) && \
aws route53 create-hosted-zone \
--name tectonic.kubernetes-aws.io \
--caller-reference $ID \
| jq .DelegationSet.NameServers

The command shows an output such as the following:

[
  "ns-1924.awsdns-48.co.uk",
  "ns-501.awsdns-62.com",
  "ns-1259.awsdns-29.org",
  "ns-749.awsdns-29.net"
]

Create NS records for the domain with your registrar. Make sure that the NS records can be resolved using a utility like dig web interface. A sample output would look like the following:

The bottom of the screenshot shows NS records configured for the subdomain.

Download and run the Tectonic installer

Download the Tectonic installer (version 1.7.1) and extract it. The latest installer can always be found at coreos.com/tectonic. Start the installer:

./tectonic/tectonic-installer/$PLATFORM/installer

Replace $PLATFORM with either darwin or linux. The installer opens your default browser and prompts you to select the cloud provider. Choose Amazon Web Services as the platform. Choose Next Step.

Specify the Access Key ID and Secret Access Key for the IAM role that you created earlier. This allows the installer to create resources required for the Kubernetes cluster. This also gives the installer full access to your AWS account. Alternatively, to protect the integrity of your main AWS credentials, use a temporary session token to generate temporary credentials.

You also need to choose a region in which to install the cluster. For the purpose of this post, I chose a region close to where I live, Northern California. Choose Next Step.

Give your cluster a name. This name is part of the static namespace for the master and the address of the console.

To enable in-place update to the Kubernetes cluster, select the checkbox next to Automated Updates. It also enables update to the etcd and Prometheus operators. This feature may become a default in future releases.

Choose Upload “tectonic-license.txt” and upload the previously downloaded license file.

Choose Upload “config.json” and upload the previously downloaded pull secret file. Choose Next Step.

Let the installer generate a CA certificate and key. In this case, the browser may not recognize this certificate, which I discuss later in the post. Alternatively, you can provide a CA certificate and a key in PEM format issued by an authorized certificate authority. Choose Next Step.

Use the SSH key for the region specified earlier. You also have an option to generate a new key. This allows you to later connect using SSH into the Amazon EC2 instances provisioned by the cluster. Here is the command that can be used to log in:

ssh –i <key> [email protected]<ec2-instance-ip>

Choose Next Step.

Define the number and instance type of master and worker nodes. In this case, create a 6 nodes cluster. Make sure that the worker nodes have enough processing power and memory to run the containers.

An etcd cluster is used as persistent storage for all of Kubernetes API objects. This cluster is required for the Kubernetes cluster to operate. There are three ways to use the etcd cluster as part of the Tectonic installer:

  • (Default) Provision the cluster using EC2 instances. Additional EC2 instances are used in this case.
  • Use an alpha support for cluster provisioning using the etcd operator. The etcd operator is used for automated operations of the etcd master nodes for the cluster itself, in addition to for etcd instances that are created for application usage. The etcd cluster is provisioned within the Tectonic installer.
  • Bring your own pre-provisioned etcd cluster.

Use the first option in this case.

For more information about choosing the appropriate instance type, see the etcd hardware recommendation. Choose Next Step.

Specify the networking options. The installer can create a new public VPC or use a pre-existing public or private VPC. Make sure that the VPC requirements are met for an existing VPC.

Give a DNS name for the cluster. Choose the domain for which the Route 53 hosted zone was configured earlier, such as tectonic.kubernetes-aws.io. Multiple clusters may be created under a single domain. The cluster name and the DNS name would typically match each other.

To select the CIDR range, choose Show Advanced Settings. You can also choose the Availability Zones for the master and worker nodes. By default, the master and worker nodes are spread across multiple Availability Zones in the chosen region. This makes the cluster highly available.

Leave the other values as default. Choose Next Step.

Specify an email address and password to be used as credentials to log in to the console. Choose Next Step.

At any point during the installation, you can choose Save progress. This allows you to save configurations specified in the installer. This configuration file can then be used to restore progress in the installer at a later point.

To start the cluster installation, choose Submit. At another time, you can download the Terraform assets by choosing Manually boot. This allows you to boot the cluster later.

The logs from the Terraform scripts are shown in the installer. When the installation is complete, the console shows that the Terraform scripts were successfully applied, the domain name was resolved successfully, and that the console has started. The domain works successfully if the DNS resolution worked earlier, and it’s the address where the console is accessible.

Choose Download assets to download assets related to your cluster. It contains your generated CA, kubectl configuration file, and the Terraform state. This download is an important step as it allows you to delete the cluster later.

Choose Next Step for the final installation screen. It allows you to access the Tectonic console, gives you instructions about how to configure kubectl to manage this cluster, and finally deploys an application using kubectl.

Choose Go to my Tectonic Console. In our case, it is also accessible at http://cluster.tectonic.kubernetes-aws.io/.

As I mentioned earlier, the browser does not recognize the self-generated CA certificate. Choose Advanced and connect to the console. Enter the login credentials specified earlier in the installer and choose Login.

The Kubernetes upstream and console version are shown under Software Details. Cluster health shows All systems go and it means that the API server and the backend API can be reached.

To view different Kubernetes resources in the cluster choose, the resource in the left navigation bar. For example, all deployments can be seen by choosing Deployments.

By default, resources in the all namespace are shown. Other namespaces may be chosen by clicking on a menu item on the top of the screen. Different administration tasks such as managing the namespaces, getting list of the nodes and RBAC can be configured as well.

Download and run Kubectl

Kubectl is required to manage the Kubernetes cluster. The latest version of kubectl can be downloaded using the following command:

curl -LO https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/$(curl -s https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/stable.txt)/bin/darwin/amd64/kubectl

It can also be conveniently installed using the Homebrew package manager. To find and access a cluster, Kubectl needs a kubeconfig file. By default, this configuration file is at ~/.kube/config. This file is created when a Kubernetes cluster is created from your machine. However, in this case, download this file from the console.

In the console, choose admin, My Account, Download Configuration and follow the steps to download the kubectl configuration file. Move this file to ~/.kube/config. If kubectl has already been used on your machine before, then this file already exists. Make sure to take a backup of that file first.

Now you can run the commands to view the list of deployments:

~ $ kubectl get deployments --all-namespaces
NAMESPACE         NAME                                    DESIRED   CURRENT   UP-TO-DATE   AVAILABLE   AGE
kube-system       etcd-operator                           1         1         1            1           43m
kube-system       heapster                                1         1         1            1           40m
kube-system       kube-controller-manager                 3         3         3            3           43m
kube-system       kube-dns                                1         1         1            1           43m
kube-system       kube-scheduler                          3         3         3            3           43m
tectonic-system   container-linux-update-operator         1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   default-http-backend                    1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   kube-state-metrics                      1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   kube-version-operator                   1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   prometheus-operator                     1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-channel-operator               1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-console                        2         2         2            2           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-identity                       2         2         2            2           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-ingress-controller             1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-monitoring-auth-alertmanager   1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-monitoring-auth-prometheus     1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-prometheus-operator            1         1         1            1           40m
tectonic-system   tectonic-stats-emitter                  1         1         1            1           40m

This output is similar to the one shown in the console earlier. Now, this kubectl can be used to manage your resources.

Upgrade the Kubernetes cluster

Tectonic allows the in-place upgrade of the cluster. This is an experimental feature as of this release. The clusters can be updated either automatically, or with manual approval.

To perform the update, choose Administration, Cluster Settings. If an earlier Tectonic installer, version 1.6.2 in this case, is used to install the cluster, then this screen would look like the following:

Choose Check for Updates. If any updates are available, choose Start Upgrade. After the upgrade is completed, the screen is refreshed.

This is an experimental feature in this release and so should only be used on clusters that can be easily replaced. This feature may become a fully supported in a future release. For more information about the upgrade process, see Upgrading Tectonic & Kubernetes.

Delete the Kubernetes cluster

Typically, the Kubernetes cluster is a long-running cluster to serve your applications. After its purpose is served, you may delete it. It is important to delete the cluster as this ensures that all resources created by the cluster are appropriately cleaned up.

The easiest way to delete the cluster is using the assets downloaded in the last step of the installer. Extract the downloaded zip file. This creates a directory like <cluster-name>_TIMESTAMP. In that directory, give the following command to delete the cluster:

TERRAFORM_CONFIG=$(pwd)/.terraformrc terraform destroy --force

This destroys the cluster and all associated resources.

You may have forgotten to download the assets. There is a copy of the assets in the directory tectonic/tectonic-installer/darwin/clusters. In this directory, another directory with the name <cluster-name>_TIMESTAMP contains your assets.

Conclusion

This post explained how to manage Kubernetes clusters using the CoreOS Tectonic graphical installer.  For more details, see Graphical Installer with AWS. If the installation does not succeed, see the helpful Troubleshooting tips. After the cluster is created, see the Tectonic tutorials to learn how to deploy, scale, version, and delete an application.

Future posts in this series will explain other ways of creating and running a Kubernetes cluster on AWS.

Arun

Instagram Leak From API Spills High Profile User Info

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2017/08/instagram-leak-api-spills-high-profile-user-info/?utm_source=darknet&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=feed

Instagram Leak From API Spills High Profile User Info

Another high profile Instagram leak, this time no there’s actual tangible repercussions other than it could possibly link to the recent Justin Bieber nudes leaked via a compromise of Selena Gomez’s account.

There isn’t a whole lot of details about what actually happened, in terms of what went wrong with the API? A wild guess would be some kind of authentication or token bug in the API that allowed you to access certain information about other users that you weren’t supposed to be able to get access to.

Read the rest of Instagram Leak From API Spills High Profile User Info now! Only available at Darknet.

AWS CloudHSM Update – Cost Effective Hardware Key Management at Cloud Scale for Sensitive & Regulated Workloads

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-cloudhsm-update-cost-effective-hardware-key-management/

Our customers run an incredible variety of mission-critical workloads on AWS, many of which process and store sensitive data. As detailed in our Overview of Security Processes document, AWS customers have access to an ever-growing set of options for encrypting and protecting this data. For example, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) supports encryption of data at rest and in transit, with options tailored for each supported database engine (MySQL, SQL Server, Oracle, MariaDB, PostgreSQL, and Aurora).

Many customers use AWS Key Management Service (KMS) to centralize their key management, with others taking advantage of the hardware-based key management, encryption, and decryption provided by AWS CloudHSM to meet stringent security and compliance requirements for their most sensitive data and regulated workloads (you can read my post, AWS CloudHSM – Secure Key Storage and Cryptographic Operations, to learn more about Hardware Security Modules, also known as HSMs).

Major CloudHSM Update
Today, building on what we have learned from our first-generation product, we are making a major update to CloudHSM, with a set of improvements designed to make the benefits of hardware-based key management available to a much wider audience while reducing the need for specialized operating expertise. Here’s a summary of the improvements:

Pay As You Go – CloudHSM is now offered under a pay-as-you-go model that is simpler and more cost-effective, with no up-front fees.

Fully Managed – CloudHSM is now a scalable managed service; provisioning, patching, high availability, and backups are all built-in and taken care of for you. Scheduled backups extract an encrypted image of your HSM from the hardware (using keys that only the HSM hardware itself knows) that can be restored only to identical HSM hardware owned by AWS. For durability, those backups are stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), and for an additional layer of security, encrypted again with server-side S3 encryption using an AWS KMS master key.

Open & Compatible  – CloudHSM is open and standards-compliant, with support for multiple APIs, programming languages, and cryptography extensions such as PKCS #11, Java Cryptography Extension (JCE), and Microsoft CryptoNG (CNG). The open nature of CloudHSM gives you more control and simplifies the process of moving keys (in encrypted form) from one CloudHSM to another, and also allows migration to and from other commercially available HSMs.

More Secure – CloudHSM Classic (the original model) supports the generation and use of keys that comply with FIPS 140-2 Level 2. We’re stepping that up a notch today with support for FIPS 140-2 Level 3, with security mechanisms that are designed to detect and respond to physical attempts to access or modify the HSM. Your keys are protected with exclusive, single-tenant access to tamper-resistant HSMs that appear within your Virtual Private Clouds (VPCs). CloudHSM supports quorum authentication for critical administrative and key management functions. This feature allows you to define a list of N possible identities that can access the functions, and then require at least M of them to authorize the action. It also supports multi-factor authentication using tokens that you provide.

AWS-Native – The updated CloudHSM is an integral part of AWS and plays well with other tools and services. You can create and manage a cluster of HSMs using the AWS Management Console, AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), or API calls.

Diving In
You can create CloudHSM clusters that contain 1 to 32 HSMs, each in a separate Availability Zone in a particular AWS Region. Spreading HSMs across AZs gives you high availability (including built-in load balancing); adding more HSMs gives you additional throughput. The HSMs within a cluster are kept in sync: performing a task or operation on one HSM in a cluster automatically updates the others. Each HSM in a cluster has its own Elastic Network Interface (ENI).

All interaction with an HSM takes place via the AWS CloudHSM client. It runs on an EC2 instance and uses certificate-based mutual authentication to create secure (TLS) connections to the HSMs.

At the hardware level, each HSM includes hardware-enforced isolation of crypto operations and key storage. Each customer HSM runs on dedicated processor cores.

Setting Up a Cluster
Let’s set up a cluster using the CloudHSM Console:

I click on Create cluster to get started, select my desired VPC and the subnets within it (I can also create a new VPC and/or subnets if needed):

Then I review my settings and click on Create:

After a few minutes, my cluster exists, but is uninitialized:

Initialization simply means retrieving a certificate signing request (the Cluster CSR):

And then creating a private key and using it to sign the request (these commands were copied from the Initialize Cluster docs and I have omitted the output. Note that ID identifies the cluster):

$ openssl genrsa -out CustomerRoot.key 2048
$ openssl req -new -x509 -days 365 -key CustomerRoot.key -out CustomerRoot.crt
$ openssl x509 -req -days 365 -in ID_ClusterCsr.csr   \
                              -CA CustomerRoot.crt    \
                              -CAkey CustomerRoot.key \
                              -CAcreateserial         \
                              -out ID_CustomerHsmCertificate.crt

The next step is to apply the signed certificate to the cluster using the console or the CLI. After this has been done, the cluster can be activated by changing the password for the HSM’s administrative user, otherwise known as the Crypto Officer (CO).

Once the cluster has been created, initialized and activated, it can be used to protect data. Applications can use the APIs in AWS CloudHSM SDKs to manage keys, encrypt & decrypt objects, and more. The SDKs provide access to the CloudHSM client (running on the same instance as the application). The client, in turn, connects to the cluster across an encrypted connection.

Available Today
The new HSM is available today in the US East (Northern Virginia), US West (Oregon), US East (Ohio), and EU (Ireland) Regions, with more in the works. Pricing starts at $1.45 per HSM per hour.

Jeff;

Ethereum, Proof-of-Stake… and the consequences

Post Syndicated from Григор original http://www.gatchev.info/blog/?p=2070

For those who have been living the last few years in a cave without Internet: Ethereum is a cryptocurrency project, based around the coin Ether. It has the support of many big banks, big hedge funds and some states (Russia, China etc). Among the cryptocurrencies, it is second only to Bitcoin – and might even overtake it with the time. (Especially if Bitcoin doesn’t finally move and fix some of its problems.)

Ethereum offers some abilities that few other cryptocurrencies do. The most important one is the support for “smart projects” – kind of electronic contracts that can easily be executed and enforced with little to no human participation. This post however is dedicated to another of its traits – the Proof of Stake.

To work and exist, every cryptocurrency depends on some proof. Most of them use Proof-of-Work scheme. In it, one has to put some work – eg. calculating checksums – behind its participation in the network and its decision, and receive newly generated coins for it. This however results in huge amount of work done only to prove that, well, you can do it and deserve to be in and receive some of the newly squeezed juice.

As of August 2017, Ethereum uses this scheme too. However, they plan to switch to a Proof-of-Stake algorithm named Casper. In it, you prove yourself not by doing work, but by proving to own Ether. As this requires practically no work, it is much more technically effective than the Proof-of-Work schemes.

Technically, Caspar is an amazing design. I congratulate the Ethereum team for it. However, economically its usage appears to have an important weakness. It is described below.

—-

A polarized system

With Casper, the Ether generated by the Ethereum network and the decision power in it are distributed to these who already own Ether. As a consequence, most of both go to those who own most Ether. (There might be attempts to limit that, but these are easily defeatable. For example, limiting the amount distributed to an address can be circumvented by a Sybil attack.)

Such a distribution will create with the time a financial ecosystem where most money and vote are held by a small minority of the participants. The big majority will have little to no of both – it will summarily hold less money and vote than the minority of “haves”. Giving the speed with which the cryptocurrency systems evolve, it is realistic to expect this development in ten, maybe even in five or less years after introducing Casper.

The “middle class”

Economists love to repeat how important is to have a strong middle class. Why, and how that translates to the situation in a cryptocurrency-based financial system?

In systemic terms, “middle class” denotes in a financial system the set of entities that control each a noticeable but not very big amount of resources.

Game theory shows that in a financial system, entities with different clout usually have different interests. These interests usually reflect the amount of resources they control. Entities with little to no resources tend to have interests opposing to these with biggest resources – especially in systems where the total amount of resources changes slowly and the economics is close to a zero-sum game. (For example, in most cryptocurrency systems.) The “middle class” entities interests in most aspects are in the middle.

For an economics to work, there must be a balance of interests that creates incentive for all of its members to participate. In financial systems, where “haves” interests are mostly opposing to “have-nots” interests, creating such a balance depends on the presence and influence of a “middle class”. Its interests are usually the closest to a compromise that satisfies all, and its influence is the key to achieving that compromise within the system.

If the system state is not acceptable for all entities, these who do not accept it eventually leave. (Usually their participation is required for the system survival, so this brings the system down.) If these entities cannot leave the system, they ultimately reject its rules and try to change it by force. If that is impossible too, they usually resort to denying the system what makes them useful for it, thus decreasing its competitiveness to other systems.

The most reliable way to have acceptable compromise enforced in a system is to have in it a “middle class” that summarily controls more resources than any other segment of entities, preferably at least 51% of the system resources. (This assumes that the “middle class” is able and willing to protect their interests. If some of these entities are controlled into defending someone else’s interests – eg. botnets in computer networks, manipulated voters during elections, etc – these numbers apply to the non-controlled among them.)

A system that doesn’t have a non-controlled “middle class” that controls a decisive amount of resources, usually does not have an influential set of interests that are an acceptable compromise between the interests poles. For this reason, it can be called a polarized system.

The limitation on development

In a polarized system, the incentive for development is minimized. (Development is potentially disruptive, and the majority of the financial abilities and the decision power there has only to lose from a disruption. When factoring in the expected profits from development, the situation always becomes a zero-sum game.) The system becomes static (thus cementing the zero-sum game situation in it) and is under threat of being overtaken by a competing financial system. When that happens, it is usually destroyed with all stakes in it.

Also, almost any initiative in such a financial system is bound to turn into a cartel, oligopoly or monopoly, due to the small number of participants with resources to start and support an initiative. That effectively destroys its markets, contributing to the weakness of the system and limiting further its ability to develop.

Another problem that stems from this is that the incentive during an interaction to violate the rules and to push the contragent into a loss is greater than the incentive to compete by giving a better offer. This in turn removes the incentive to increase productivity, which is a key incentive for development.)

Yet another problem of the concentration of most resources into few entities is the increased gain from attacking one of them and appropriating their resources, and thus the incentive to do it. Since good defensive capabilities are usually an excellent offense base, this pulls the “haves” into an “arms race”, redirecting more and more of their resources into defense. This also leaves the development outside the arms race increasingly resource-strapped. (The “arms race” itself generates development, but the race situation prevents that into trickling into “non-military” applications.)

These are only a part of the constraints on development in a polarized system. Listing all of them will make a long read.

Trickle-up and trickle-down

In theory, every economical system involves two processes: trickle-down and trickle-up. So, any concentration of resources on the top should be decreased by an automatically increased trickle-down. However, a better understanding how these processes work shows that this logic is faulty.

Any financial exchange in a system consists of two parts. One of them covers the actual production cost of whatever resource is being exchanged against the finances. The other part is the profit of the entity that obtains the finances. From the viewpoint of that entity, the first part vs. the resource given is zero-sum – its incentive to participate in this exchange is the second part, the profit. That second part is effectively the trickle in the system, as it is the only resource really gained.

The direction and the size of the trickle ultimately depends on the balance of many factors, some of them random, others constant. On the long run, it is the constant factors that determine the size and the direction of the trickle sum.

The most important constant factor is the benefit of scale (BOS). It dictates that the bigger entities are able to pull the balance to their side more strongly than the smaller ones. Some miss that chance, but others use it. It makes the trickle-up stronger than the trickle-down. In a system where the transaction outcome is close to a zero-sum game, this concentrates all resources at the top with a speed depending on the financial interactions volume per an unit of time.

(Actually the formula is a bit more complex. All dynamic entities – eg. living organisms, active companies etc – have an “existence maintenance” expense, which they cannot avoid. However, the amount of resources in a system above the summary existence maintenance follows the simple rule above. And these are the only resources that are available for investing in anything, eg. development.)

In the real-life systems the BOS power is limited. There are many different random factors that compete with and influence one another, some of them outweighing BOS. Also, in every moment some factors lose importance and / or cease to exist, while others appear and / or gain importance. The complexity of this system makes any attempt by an entity or entities pool to take control over it hard and slow. This gives the other entities time and ways to react and try to block the takeover attempt. Also, the real-life systems have many built-in constraints against scale-based takeovers – anti-trust laws, separation of the government powers, enforced financial trickle-down through taxes on the rich and benefits for the poor, etc. All these together manage to prevent most takeover attempts, or to limit them into only a segment of the system.

How a Proof-of-Stake based cryptocurrency fares at these?

A POS-based cryptocurrency financial system has no constraints against scale-based takeovers. It has only one kind of clout – the amount of resources controlled by an entity. This kind of clout is built in it, has all the importance in it and cannot lose that or disappear. It has no other types of resources, and has no slowing due to complexity. It is not segmented – who has these resources has it all. There are no built-in constraints against scale-based takeovers, or mechanisms to strengthen resource trickle-down. In short, it is the ideal ground for creating a polarized financial system.

So, it would be only logical to expect that a Proof-of-Stake based Ether financial system will suffer by the problems a polarized system presents. Despite all of its technical ingenuity, its longer-term financial usability is limited, and the participation in it may be dangerous to any entity smaller than eg. a big bank, a big hedge fund or a big authoritarian state.

All fixes for this problem I could think of by now would be easily beaten by simple attacks. I am not sure if it is possible to have a reliable solution to it at all.

Do smart contracts and secondary tokens change this?

Unhappily, no. Smart contracts are based on having Ether, and need Ether to exist and act. Thus, they are bound to the financial situation of the Ether financial system, and are influenced by it. The bigger is the scope of the smart contract, the bigger is its dependence on the Ether situation.

Due to this, smart contracts of meaningful size will find themselves hampered and maybe even endangered by a polarization in the financial system powered by POS-based Ethereum. It is technically possible to migrate these contracts to a competing underlying system, but it won’t be easy – probably even when the competing system is technically a clone of Ethereum, like Ethereum Classic. The migration cost might exceed the migration benefits at any given stage of the contract project development, even if the total migration benefits are far larger than this cost.

Eventually this problem might become public knowledge and most projects in need of a smart contract might start avoiding Ethereum. This will lead to decreased interest in participation in the Ethereum ecosystem, to a loss of market cap, and eventually maybe even to the demise of this technically great project.

Other dangers

There is a danger that the “haves” minority in a polarized system might start actively investing resources in creating other systems that suffer from the same problem (as they benefit from it), or in modifying existing systems in this direction. This might decrease the potential for development globally. As some of the backers of Ethereum are entities with enormous clout worldwide, that negative influence on the global system might be significant.

Email2git: Matching Linux Code with its Mailing List Discussions (Linux.com)

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/729090/rss

Linux.com is carrying an article about email2git by its developer, Alexandre Courouble. Email2git is a way to match up commits and the email thread that discussed them. It currently targets the kernel and threads from the linux-kernel mailing list. There are two separate ways to use it, as an extension to cregit (at https://cregit.linuxsources.org/) that allows browsing changes at the token level or via a search by commit ID interface. “The Linux project’s email-based reviewing process is highly effective in filtering open source contributions on their way from mailing list discussions towards Linus Torvalds’ Git repository. However, once integrated, it can be difficult to link Git commits back to their review comments in mailing list discussions, especially when considering commits that underwent multiple versions (and hence review rounds), that belong to a multi-patch series, or that were cherry-picked.

As an answer to these and other issues, we created email2git, a patch retrieving system built for the Linux kernel. For a given commit, the tool is capable of finding the email patch as well as the email conversation that took place during the review process. We are currently improving the system with support for multi-patch series and cherry-picking.” The code for email2git is available on GitHub.

Concerns About The Blockchain Technology

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/concerns-blockchain-technology/

The so-called (and marketing-branded) “blockchain technology” is promised to revolutionize every industry. Anything, they say, will become decentralized, free from middle men or government control. Services will thrive on various installments of the blockchain, and smart contracts will automatically enforce any logic that is related to the particular domain.

I don’t mind having another technological leap (after the internet), and given that I’m technically familiar with the blockchain, I may even be part of it. But I’m not convinced it will happen, and I’m not convinced it’s going to be the next internet.

If we strip the hype, the technology behind Bitcoin is indeed a technical masterpiece. It combines existing techniques (likes hash chains and merkle trees) with a very good proof-of-work based consensus algorithm. And it creates a digital currency, which ontop of being worth billions now, is simply cool.

But will this technology be mass-adopted, and will mass adoption allow it to retain the technological benefits it has?

First, I’d like to nitpick a little bit – if anyone is speaking about “decentralized software” when referring to “the blockchain”, be suspicious. Bitcon and other peer-to-peer overlay networks are in fact “distributed” (see the pictures here). “Decentralized” means having multiple providers, but doesn’t mean each user will be full-featured nodes on the network. This nitpicking is actually part of another argument, but we’ll get to that.

If blockchain-based applications want to reach mass adoption, they have to be user-friendly. I know I’m being captain obvious here (and fortunately some of the people in the area have realized that), but with the current state of the technology, it’s impossible for end users to even get it, let alone use it.

My first serious concern is usability. To begin with, you need to download the whole blockchain on your machine. When I got my first bitcoin several years ago (when it was still 10 euro), the blockchain was kind of small and I didn’t notice that problem. Nowadays both the Bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains take ages to download. I still haven’t managed to download the ethereum one – after several bugs and reinstalls of the client, I’m still at 15%. And we are just at the beginning. A user just will not wait for days to download something in order to be able to start using a piece of technology.

I recently proposed downloading snapshots of the blockchain via bittorrent to be included in the Ethereum protocol itself. I know that snapshots of the Bitcoin blockchain have been distributed that way, but it has been a manual process. If a client can quickly download the huge file up to a recent point, and then only donwload the latest ones in the the traditional way, starting up may be easier. Of course, the whole chain would have to be verified, but maybe that can be a background process that doesn’t stop you from using whatever is built ontop of the particular blockchain. (I’m not sure if that will be secure enough, and that, say potential Sybil attacks on the bittorrent part won’t make it undesirable, it’s just an idea).

But even if such an approach works and is adopted, that would still mean that for every service you’d have to download a separate blockchain. Of course, projects like Ethereum may seem like the “one stop shop” for cool blockchain-based applications, but fragmentation is already happening – there are alt-coins bundled with various services like file storage, DNS, etc. That will not be workable for end-users. And it’s certainly not an option for mobile, which is the dominant client now. If instead of downloading the entire chain, something like consistent hashing is used to distribute the content in small portions among clients, it might be workable. But how will trust work in that case, I don’t know. Maybe it’s possible, maybe not.

And yes, I know that you don’t necessarily have to install a wallet/client in order to make use of a given blockchain – you can just have a cloud-based wallet. Which is fairly convenient, but that gets me to my nitpicking from a few paragraphs above and to may second concern – this effectively turns a distributed system into a decentralized one – a limited number of cloud providers hold most of the data (just as a limited number of miners hold most of the processing power). And then, even though the underlying technology allows for a distributed deployment, we’ll end-up again with simply decentralized or even de-facto cenetralized, if mergers and acquisitions lead us there (and they probably will). And in order to be able to access our wallets/accounts from multiple devices, we’d use a convenient cloud service where we’d login with our username and password (because the private key is just too technical and hard for regular users). And that seems to defeat the whole idea.

Not only that, but there is an inevitable centralization of decisions (who decides on the size of the block, who has commit rights to the client repository) as well as a hidden centralization of power – how much GPU power does the Chinese mining “farms” control and can they influence the network significantly? And will the average user ever know that or care (as they don’t care that Google is centralized). I think that overall, distributed technologies will follow the power law, and the majority of data/processing power/decision power will be controller by a minority of actors. And so our distributed utopia will not happen in its purest form we dream of.

My third concern is incentive. Distributed technologies that have been successful so far have a pretty narrow set of incentives. The internet was promoted by large public institutions, including government agencies and big universitives. Bittorrent was successful mainly because it allowed free movies and songs with 2 clicks of the mouse. And Bitcoin was successful because it offered financial benefits. I’m oversimplifying of course, but “government effort”, “free & easy” and “source of more money” seem to have been the successful incentives. On the other side of the fence there are dozens of failed distributed technologies. I’ve tried many of them – alternative search engines, alternative file storage, alternative ride-sharings, alternative social networks, alternative “internets” even. None have gained traction. Because they are not easier to use than their free competitors and you can’t make money out of them (and no government bothers promoting them).

Will blockchain-based services have sufficient incentives to drive customers? Will centralized competitors just easily crush the distributed alternatives by being cheaper, more-user friendly, having sales departments that can target more than hardcore geeks who have no problem syncing their blockchain via the command line? The utopian slogans seem very cool to idealists and futurists, but don’t sell. “Free from centralized control, full control over your data” – we’d have to go through a long process of cultural change before these things make sense to more than a handful of people.

Speaking of services, often examples include “the sharing economy”, where one stranger offers a service to another stranger. Blockchain technology seems like a good fit here indeed – the services are by nature distributed, why should the technology be centralized? Here comes my fourth concern – identity. While for the cryptocurrencies it’s actually beneficial to be anonymous, for most of the real-world services (i.e. the industries that ought to be revolutionized) this is not an option. You can’t just go in the car of publicKey=5389BC989A342…. “But there are already distributed reputation systems”, you may say. Yes, and they are based on technical, not real-world identities. That doesn’t build trust. I don’t trust that publicKey=5389BC989A342… is the same person that got the high reputation. There may be five people behind that private key. The private key may have been stolen (e.g. in a cloud-provider breach).

The values of companies like Uber and AirBNB is that they serve as trust brokers. They verify and vouch for their drivers and hosts (and passengers and guests). They verify their identity through government-issued documents, skype calls, selfies, compare pictures to documents, get access to government databases, credit records, etc. Can a fully distributed service do that? No. You’d need a centralized provider to do it. And how would the blockchain make any difference then? Well, I may not be entirely correct here. I’ve actually been thinking quite a lot about decentralized identity. E.g. a way to predictably generate a private key based on, say biometrics+password+government-issued-documents, and use the corresponding public key as your identifier, which is then fed into reputation schemes and ultimately – real-world services. But we’re not there yet.

And that is part of my fifth concern – the technology itself. We are not there yet. There are bugs, there are thefts and leaks. There are hard-forks. There isn’t sufficient understanding of the technology (I confess I don’t fully grasp all the implementation details, and they are always the key). Often the technology is advertised as “just working”, but it isn’t. The other day I read an article (lost the link) that clarifies a common misconception about smart contracts – they cannot interact with the outside world – they can’t call APIs (e.g. stock market prices, bank APIs), they can’t push or fetch data from anywhere but the blockchain. That mandates the need, again, for a centralized service that pushes the relevant information before smart contracts can pick it up. I’m pretty sure that all cool-sounding applications are not possible without extensive research. And even if/when they are, writing distributed code is hard. Debugging a smart contract is hard. Yes, hard is cool, but that doesn’t drive economic value.

I have mostly been referring to public blockchains so far. Private blockchains may have their practical application, but there’s one catch – they are not exactly the cool distributed technology that the Bitcoin uses. They may be called “blockchains” because they…chain blocks, but they usually centralize trust. For example the Hyperledger project uses PKI, with all its benefits and risks. In these cases, a centralized authority issues the identity “tokens”, and then nodes communicate and form a shared ledger. That’s a bit easier problem to solve, and the nodes would usually be on actual servers in real datacenters, and not on your uncle’s Windows XP.

That said, hash chaining has been around for quite a long time. I did research on the matter because of a side-project of mine and it seems providing a tamper-proof/tamper-evident log/database on semi-trusted machines has been discussed in many computer science papers since the 90s. That alone is not “the magic blockchain” that will solve all of our problems, no matter what gossip protocols you sprinkle ontop. I’m not saying that’s bad, on the contrary – any variation and combinations of the building blocks of the blockchain (the hash chain, the consensus algorithm, the proof-of-work (or stake), possibly smart contracts), has potential for making useful products.

I know I sound like the a naysayer here, but I hope I’ve pointed out particular issues, rather than aimlessly ranting at the hype (though that’s tempting as well). I’m confident that blockchain-like technologies will have their practical applications, and we will see some successful, widely-adopted services and solutions based on that, just as pointed out in this detailed report. But I’m not convinced it will be revolutionizing.

I hope I’m proven wrong, though, because watching a revolutionizing technology closely and even being part of it would be quite cool.

The post Concerns About The Blockchain Technology appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

Running an elastic HiveMQ cluster with auto discovery on AWS

Post Syndicated from The HiveMQ Team original http://www.hivemq.com/blog/running-hivemq-cluster-aws-auto-discovery

hivemq-aws

HiveMQ is a cloud-first MQTT broker with elastic clustering capabilities and a resilient software design which is a perfect fit for common cloud infrastructures. This blogpost discussed what benefits a MQTT broker cluster offers. Today’s post aims to be more practical and talk about how to set up a HiveMQ on one of the most popular cloud computing platform: Amazon Webservices.

Running HiveMQ on cloud infrastructure

Running a HiveMQ cluster on cloud infrastructure like AWS not only offers the advantage the possibility of elastically scaling the infrastructure, it also assures that state of the art security standards are in place on the infrastructure side. These platforms are typically highly available and new virtual machines can be spawned in a snap if they are needed. HiveMQ’s unique ability to add (and remove) cluster nodes at runtime without any manual reconfiguration of the cluster allow to scale linearly on IaaS providers. New cluster nodes can be started (manually or automatically) and the cluster sizes adapts automatically. For more detailed information about HiveMQ clustering and how to achieve true high availability and linear scalability with HiveMQ, we recommend reading the HiveMQ Clustering Paper.

As Amazon Webservice is amongst the best known and most used cloud platforms, we want to illustrate the setup of a HiveMQ cluster on AWS in this post. Note that similar concepts as displayed in this step by step guide for Running an elastic HiveMQ cluster on AWS apply to other cloud platforms such as Microsoft Azure or Google Cloud Platform.

Setup and Configuration

Amazon Webservices prohibits the use of UDP multicast, which is the default HiveMQ cluster discovery mode. The use of Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) buckets for auto-discovery is a perfect alternative if the brokers are running on AWS EC2 instances anyway. HiveMQ has a free off-the-shelf plugin available for AWS S3 Cluster Discovery.

The following provides a step-by-step guide how to setup the brokers on AWS EC2 with automatic cluster member discovery via S3.

Setup Security Group

The first step is creating a security group that allows inbound traffic to the listeners we are going to configure for MQTT communication. It is also vital to have SSH access on the instances. After you created the security group you need to edit the group and add an additional rule for internal communication between the cluster nodes (meaning the source is the security group itself) on all TCP ports.

To create and edit security groups go to the EC2 console – NETWORK & SECURITY – Security Groups

Inbound traffic

Inbound traffic

Outbound traffic

Outbound traffic

The next step is to create an s3-bucket in the s3 console. Make sure to choose a region, close to the region you want to run your HiveMQ instances on.

Option A: Create IAM role and assign to EC2 instance

Our recommendation is to configure your EC2 instances in a way, allowing them to have access to the s3 bucket. This way you don’t need to create a specific user and don’t need to use the user’s credentials in the

s3discovery.properties

file.

Create IAM Role

Create IAM Role

EC2 Instance Role Type

EC2 Instance Role Type

Select S3 Full Access

Select S3 Full Access

Assign new Role to Instance

Assign new Role to Instance

Option B: Create user and assign IAM policy

The next step is creating a user in the IAM console.

Choose name and set programmatic access

Choose name and set programmatic access

Assign s3 full access role

Assign s3 full access role

Review and create

Review and create

Download credentials

Download credentials

It is important you store these credentials, as they will be needed later for configuring the S3 Cluster Discovery Plugin.

Start EC2 instances with HiveMQ

The next step is spawning 2 or more EC-2 instances with HiveMQ. Follow the steps in the HiveMQ User Guide.

Install s3 discovery plugin

The final step is downloading, installing and configuring the S3 Cluster Discovery Plugin.
After you downloaded the plugin you need to configure the s3 access in the

s3discovery.properties

file according to which s3 access option you chose.

Option A:

# AWS Credentials                                          #
############################################################

#
# Use environment variables to specify your AWS credentials
# the following variables need to be set:
# AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID
# AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY
#
#credentials-type:environment_variables

#
# Use Java system properties to specify your AWS credentials
# the following variables need to be set:
# aws.accessKeyId
# aws.secretKey
#
#credentials-type:java_system_properties

#
# Uses the credentials file wich ############################################################
# can be created by calling 'aws configure' (AWS CLI)
# usually this file is located at ~/.aws/credentials (platform dependent)
# The location of the file can be configured by setting the environment variable
# AWS_CREDENTIAL_PROFILE_FILE to the location of your file
#
#credentials-type:user_credentials_file

#
# Uses the IAM Profile assigned to the EC2 instance running HiveMQ to access S3
# Notice: This only works if HiveMQ is running on an EC2 instance !
#
credentials-type:instance_profile_credentials

#
# Tries to access S3 via the default mechanisms in the following order
# 1) Environment variables
# 2) Java system properties
# 3) User credentials file
# 4) IAM profiles assigned to EC2 instance
#
#credentials-type:default

#
# Uses the credentials specified in this file.
# The variables you must provide are:
# credentials-access-key-id
# credentials-secret-access-key
#
#credentials-type:access_key
#credentials-access-key-id:
#credentials-secret-access-key:

#
# Uses the credentials specified in this file to authenticate with a temporary session
# The variables you must provide are:
# credentials-access-key-id
# credentials-secret-access-key
# credentials-session-token
#
#credentials-type:temporary_session
#credentials-access-key-id:{access_key_id}
#credentials-secret-access-key:{secret_access_key}
#credentials-session-token:{session_token}


############################################################
# S3 Bucket                                                #
############################################################

#
# Region for the S3 bucket used by hivemq
# see http://docs.aws.amazon.com/general/latest/gr/rande.html#s3_region for a list of regions for S3
# example: us-west-2
#
s3-bucket-region:<your region here>

#
# Name of the bucket used by HiveMQ
#
s3-bucket-name:<your s3 bucket name here>

#
# Prefix for the filename of every node's file (optional)
#
file-prefix:hivemq/cluster/nodes/

#
# Expiration timeout (in minutes).
# Files with a timestamp older than (timestamp + expiration) will be automatically deleted
# Set to 0 if you do not want the plugin to handle expiration.
#
file-expiration:360

#
# Interval (in minutes) in which the own information in S3 is updated.
# Set to 0 if you do not want the plugin to update its own information.
# If you disable this you also might want to disable expiration.
#
update-interval:180

Option B:

# AWS Credentials                                          #
############################################################

#
# Use environment variables to specify your AWS credentials
# the following variables need to be set:
# AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID
# AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY
#
#credentials-type:environment_variables

#
# Use Java system properties to specify your AWS credentials
# the following variables need to be set:
# aws.accessKeyId
# aws.secretKey
#
#credentials-type:java_system_properties

#
# Uses the credentials file wich ############################################################
# can be created by calling 'aws configure' (AWS CLI)
# usually this file is located at ~/.aws/credentials (platform dependent)
# The location of the file can be configured by setting the environment variable
# AWS_CREDENTIAL_PROFILE_FILE to the location of your file
#
#credentials-type:user_credentials_file

#
# Uses the IAM Profile assigned to the EC2 instance running HiveMQ to access S3
# Notice: This only works if HiveMQ is running on an EC2 instance !
#
#credentials-type:instance_profile_credentials

#
# Tries to access S3 via the default mechanisms in the following order
# 1) Environment variables
# 2) Java system properties
# 3) User credentials file
# 4) IAM profiles assigned to EC2 instance
#
#credentials-type:default

#
# Uses the credentials specified in this file.
# The variables you must provide are:
# credentials-access-key-id
# credentials-secret-access-key
#
credentials-type:access_key
credentials-access-key-id:<your access key id here>
credentials-secret-access-key:<your secret access key here>

#
# Uses the credentials specified in this file to authenticate with a temporary session
# The variables you must provide are:
# credentials-access-key-id
# credentials-secret-access-key
# credentials-session-token
#
#credentials-type:temporary_session
#credentials-access-key-id:{access_key_id}
#credentials-secret-access-key:{secret_access_key}
#credentials-session-token:{session_token}


############################################################
# S3 Bucket                                                #
############################################################

#
# Region for the S3 bucket used by hivemq
# see http://docs.aws.amazon.com/general/latest/gr/rande.html#s3_region for a list of regions for S3
# example: us-west-2
#
s3-bucket-region:<your region here>

#
# Name of the bucket used by HiveMQ
#
s3-bucket-name:<your s3 bucket name here>

#
# Prefix for the filename of every node's file (optional)
#
file-prefix:hivemq/cluster/nodes/

#
# Expiration timeout (in minutes).
# Files with a timestamp older than (timestamp + expiration) will be automatically deleted
# Set to 0 if you do not want the plugin to handle expiration.
#
file-expiration:360

#
# Interval (in minutes) in which the own information in S3 is updated.
# Set to 0 if you do not want the plugin to update its own information.
# If you disable this you also might want to disable expiration.
#
update-interval:180

This file has to be identical on all your cluster nodes.

That’s it. Starting HiveMQ on multiple EC2 instances will now result in them forming a cluster, taking advantage of the S3 bucket for discovery.
You know that your setup was successful when HiveMQ logs something similar to this.

Cluster size = 2, members : [0QMpE, jw8wu].

Enjoy an elastic MQTT broker cluster

We are now able to take advantage of rapid elasticity. Scaling the HiveMQ cluster up or down by adding or removing EC2 instances without the need of administrative intervention is now possible.

For production environments it’s recommended to use automatic provisioning of the EC2 instances (e.g. by using Chef, Puppet, Ansible or similar tools) so you don’t need to configure each EC2 instance manually. Of course HiveMQ can also be used with Docker, which can also ease the provisioning of HiveMQ nodes.

Deploying Java Microservices on Amazon EC2 Container Service

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/deploying-java-microservices-on-amazon-ec2-container-service/

This post and accompanying code graciously contributed by:

Huy Huynh
Sr. Solutions Architect
Magnus Bjorkman
Solutions Architect

Java is a popular language used by many enterprises today. To simplify and accelerate Java application development, many companies are moving from a monolithic to microservices architecture. For some, it has become a strategic imperative. Containerization technology, such as Docker, lets enterprises build scalable, robust microservice architectures without major code rewrites.

In this post, I cover how to containerize a monolithic Java application to run on Docker. Then, I show how to deploy it on AWS using Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS), a high-performance container management service. Finally, I show how to break the monolith into multiple services, all running in containers on Amazon ECS.

Application Architecture

For this example, I use the Spring Pet Clinic, a monolithic Java application for managing a veterinary practice. It is a simple REST API, which allows the client to manage and view Owners, Pets, Vets, and Visits.

It is a simple three-tier architecture:

  • Client
    You simulate this by using curl commands.
  • Web/app server
    This is the Java and Spring-based application that you run using the embedded Tomcat. As part of this post, you run this within Docker containers.
  • Database server
    This is the relational database for your application that stores information about owners, pets, vets, and visits. For this post, use MySQL RDS.

I decided to not put the database inside a container as containers were designed for applications and are transient in nature. The choice was made even easier because you have a fully managed database service available with Amazon RDS.

RDS manages the work involved in setting up a relational database, from provisioning the infrastructure capacity that you request to installing the database software. After your database is up and running, RDS automates common administrative tasks, such as performing backups and patching the software that powers your database. With optional Multi-AZ deployments, Amazon RDS also manages synchronous data replication across Availability Zones with automatic failover.

Walkthrough

You can find the code for the example covered in this post at amazon-ecs-java-microservices on GitHub.

Prerequisites

You need the following to walk through this solution:

  • An AWS account
  • An access key and secret key for a user in the account
  • The AWS CLI installed

Also, install the latest versions of the following:

  • Java
  • Maven
  • Python
  • Docker

Step 1: Move the existing Java Spring application to a container deployed using Amazon ECS

First, move the existing monolith application to a container and deploy it using Amazon ECS. This is a great first step before breaking the monolith apart because you still get some benefits before breaking apart the monolith:

  • An improved pipeline. The container also allows an engineering organization to create a standard pipeline for the application lifecycle.
  • No mutations to machines.

You can find the monolith example at 1_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic.

Container deployment overview

The following diagram is an overview of what the setup looks like for Amazon ECS and related services:

This setup consists of the following resources:

  • The client application that makes a request to the load balancer.
  • The load balancer that distributes requests across all available ports and instances registered in the application’s target group using round-robin.
  • The target group that is updated by Amazon ECS to always have an up-to-date list of all the service containers in the cluster. This includes the port on which they are accessible.
  • One Amazon ECS cluster that hosts the container for the application.
  • A VPC network to host the Amazon ECS cluster and associated security groups.

Each container has a single application process that is bound to port 8080 within its namespace. In reality, all the containers are exposed on a different, randomly assigned port on the host.

The architecture is containerized but still monolithic because each container has all the same features of the rest of the containers

The following is also part of the solution but not depicted in the above diagram:

  • One Amazon EC2 Container Registry (Amazon ECR) repository for the application.
  • A service/task definition that spins up containers on the instances of the Amazon ECS cluster.
  • A MySQL RDS instance that hosts the applications schema. The information about the MySQL RDS instance is sent in through environment variables to the containers, so that the application can connect to the MySQL RDS instance.

I have automated setup with the 1_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic/ecs-cluster.cf AWS CloudFormation template and a Python script.

The Python script calls the CloudFormation template for the initial setup of the VPC, Amazon ECS cluster, and RDS instance. It then extracts the outputs from the template and uses those for API calls to create Amazon ECR repositories, tasks, services, Application Load Balancer, and target groups.

Environment variables and Spring properties binding

As part of the Python script, you pass in a number of environment variables to the container as part of the task/container definition:

'environment': [
{
'name': 'SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE',
'value': 'mysql'
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_URL',
'value': my_sql_options['dns_name']
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_USERNAME',
'value': my_sql_options['username']
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_PASSWORD',
'value': my_sql_options['password']
}
],

The preceding environment variables work in concert with the Spring property system. The value in the variable SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE, makes Spring use the MySQL version of the application property file. The other environment files override the following properties in that file:

  • spring.datasource.url
  • spring.datasource.username
  • spring.datasource.password

Optionally, you can also encrypt sensitive values by using Amazon EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store. Instead of handing in the password, you pass in a reference to the parameter and fetch the value as part of the container startup. For more information, see Managing Secrets for Amazon ECS Applications Using Parameter Store and IAM Roles for Tasks.

Spotify Docker Maven plugin

Use the Spotify Docker Maven plugin to create the image and push it directly to Amazon ECR. This allows you to do this as part of the regular Maven build. It also integrates the image generation as part of the overall build process. Use an explicit Dockerfile as input to the plugin.

FROM frolvlad/alpine-oraclejdk8:slim
VOLUME /tmp
ADD spring-petclinic-rest-1.7.jar app.jar
RUN sh -c 'touch /app.jar'
ENV JAVA_OPTS=""
ENTRYPOINT [ "sh", "-c", "java $JAVA_OPTS -Djava.security.egd=file:/dev/./urandom -jar /app.jar" ]

The Python script discussed earlier uses the AWS CLI to authenticate you with AWS. The script places the token in the appropriate location so that the plugin can work directly against the Amazon ECR repository.

Test setup

You can test the setup by running the Python script:
python setup.py -m setup -r <your region>

After the script has successfully run, you can test by querying an endpoint:
curl <your endpoint from output above>/owner

You can clean this up before going to the next section:
python setup.py -m cleanup -r <your region>

Step 2: Converting the monolith into microservices running on Amazon ECS

The second step is to convert the monolith into microservices. For a real application, you would likely not do this as one step, but re-architect an application piece by piece. You would continue to run your monolith but it would keep getting smaller for each piece that you are breaking apart.

By migrating microservices, you would get four benefits associated with microservices:

  • Isolation of crashes
    If one microservice in your application is crashing, then only that part of your application goes down. The rest of your application continues to work properly.
  • Isolation of security
    When microservice best practices are followed, the result is that if an attacker compromises one service, they only gain access to the resources of that service. They can’t horizontally access other resources from other services without breaking into those services as well.
  • Independent scaling
    When features are broken out into microservices, then the amount of infrastructure and number of instances of each microservice class can be scaled up and down independently.
  • Development velocity
    In a monolith, adding a new feature can potentially impact every other feature that the monolith contains. On the other hand, a proper microservice architecture has new code for a new feature going into a new service. You can be confident that any code you write won’t impact the existing code at all, unless you explicitly write a connection between two microservices.

Find the monolith example at 2_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic_Microservices.
You break apart the Spring Pet Clinic application by creating a microservice for each REST API operation, as well as creating one for the system services.

Java code changes

Comparing the project structure between the monolith and the microservices version, you can see that each service is now its own separate build.
First, the monolith version:

You can clearly see how each API operation is its own subpackage under the org.springframework.samples.petclinic package, all part of the same monolithic application.
This changes as you break it apart in the microservices version:

Now, each API operation is its own separate build, which you can build independently and deploy. You have also duplicated some code across the different microservices, such as the classes under the model subpackage. This is intentional as you don’t want to introduce artificial dependencies among the microservices and allow these to evolve differently for each microservice.

Also, make the dependencies among the API operations more loosely coupled. In the monolithic version, the components are tightly coupled and use object-based invocation.

Here is an example of this from the OwnerController operation, where the class is directly calling PetRepository to get information about pets. PetRepository is the Repository class (Spring data access layer) to the Pet table in the RDS instance for the Pet API:

@RestController
class OwnerController {

    @Inject
    private PetRepository pets;
    @Inject
    private OwnerRepository owners;
    private static final Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(OwnerController.class);

    @RequestMapping(value = "/owner/{ownerId}/getVisits", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public ResponseEntity<List<Visit>> getOwnerVisits(@PathVariable int ownerId){
        List<Pet> petList = this.owners.findById(ownerId).getPets();
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        petList.forEach(pet -> visitList.addAll(pet.getVisits()));
        return new ResponseEntity<List<Visit>>(visitList, HttpStatus.OK);
    }
}

In the microservice version, call the Pet API operation and not PetRepository directly. Decouple the components by using interprocess communication; in this case, the Rest API. This provides for fault tolerance and disposability.

@RestController
class OwnerController {

    @Value("#{environment['SERVICE_ENDPOINT'] ?: 'localhost:8080'}")
    private String serviceEndpoint;

    @Inject
    private OwnerRepository owners;
    private static final Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(OwnerController.class);

    @RequestMapping(value = "/owner/{ownerId}/getVisits", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public ResponseEntity<List<Visit>> getOwnerVisits(@PathVariable int ownerId){
        List<Pet> petList = this.owners.findById(ownerId).getPets();
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        petList.forEach(pet -> {
            logger.info(getPetVisits(pet.getId()).toString());
            visitList.addAll(getPetVisits(pet.getId()));
        });
        return new ResponseEntity<List<Visit>>(visitList, HttpStatus.OK);
    }

    private List<Visit> getPetVisits(int petId){
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate();
        Pet pet = restTemplate.getForObject("http://"+serviceEndpoint+"/pet/"+petId, Pet.class);
        logger.info(pet.getVisits().toString());
        return pet.getVisits();
    }
}

You now have an additional method that calls the API. You are also handing in the service endpoint that should be called, so that you can easily inject dynamic endpoints based on the current deployment.

Container deployment overview

Here is an overview of what the setup looks like for Amazon ECS and the related services:

This setup consists of the following resources:

  • The client application that makes a request to the load balancer.
  • The Application Load Balancer that inspects the client request. Based on routing rules, it directs the request to an instance and port from the target group that matches the rule.
  • The Application Load Balancer that has a target group for each microservice. The target groups are used by the corresponding services to register available container instances. Each target group has a path, so when you call the path for a particular microservice, it is mapped to the correct target group. This allows you to use one Application Load Balancer to serve all the different microservices, accessed by the path. For example, https:///owner/* would be mapped and directed to the Owner microservice.
  • One Amazon ECS cluster that hosts the containers for each microservice of the application.
  • A VPC network to host the Amazon ECS cluster and associated security groups.

Because you are running multiple containers on the same instances, use dynamic port mapping to avoid port clashing. By using dynamic port mapping, the container is allocated an anonymous port on the host to which the container port (8080) is mapped. The anonymous port is registered with the Application Load Balancer and target group so that traffic is routed correctly.

The following is also part of the solution but not depicted in the above diagram:

  • One Amazon ECR repository for each microservice.
  • A service/task definition per microservice that spins up containers on the instances of the Amazon ECS cluster.
  • A MySQL RDS instance that hosts the applications schema. The information about the MySQL RDS instance is sent in through environment variables to the containers. That way, the application can connect to the MySQL RDS instance.

I have again automated setup with the 2_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic_Microservices/ecs-cluster.cf CloudFormation template and a Python script.

The CloudFormation template remains the same as in the previous section. In the Python script, you are now building five different Java applications, one for each microservice (also includes a system application). There is a separate Maven POM file for each one. The resulting Docker image gets pushed to its own Amazon ECR repository, and is deployed separately using its own service/task definition. This is critical to get the benefits described earlier for microservices.

Here is an example of the POM file for the Owner microservice:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <groupId>org.springframework.samples</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-petclinic-rest</artifactId>
    <version>1.7</version>
    <parent>
        <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
        <version>1.5.2.RELEASE</version>
    </parent>
    <properties>
        <!-- Generic properties -->
        <java.version>1.8</java.version>
        <docker.registry.host>${env.docker_registry_host}</docker.registry.host>
    </properties>
    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.inject</groupId>
            <artifactId>javax.inject</artifactId>
            <version>1</version>
        </dependency>
        <!-- Spring and Spring Boot dependencies -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-actuator</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-rest</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-cache</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-jpa</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-test</artifactId>
            <scope>test</scope>
        </dependency>
        <!-- Databases - Uses HSQL by default -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.hsqldb</groupId>
            <artifactId>hsqldb</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>mysql</groupId>
            <artifactId>mysql-connector-java</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <!-- caching -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.cache</groupId>
            <artifactId>cache-api</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.ehcache</groupId>
            <artifactId>ehcache</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <!-- end of webjars -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-devtools</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>
    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
                <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>com.spotify</groupId>
                <artifactId>docker-maven-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>0.4.13</version>
                <configuration>
                    <imageName>${env.docker_registry_host}/${project.artifactId}</imageName>
                    <dockerDirectory>src/main/docker</dockerDirectory>
                    <useConfigFile>true</useConfigFile>
                    <registryUrl>${env.docker_registry_host}</registryUrl>
                    <!--dockerHost>https://${docker.registry.host}</dockerHost-->
                    <resources>
                        <resource>
                            <targetPath>/</targetPath>
                            <directory>${project.build.directory}</directory>
                            <include>${project.build.finalName}.jar</include>
                        </resource>
                    </resources>
                    <forceTags>false</forceTags>
                    <imageTags>
                        <imageTag>${project.version}</imageTag>
                    </imageTags>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
</project>

Test setup

You can test this by running the Python script:

python setup.py -m setup -r <your region>

After the script has successfully run, you can test by querying an endpoint:

curl <your endpoint from output above>/owner

Conclusion

Migrating a monolithic application to a containerized set of microservices can seem like a daunting task. Following the steps outlined in this post, you can begin to containerize monolithic Java apps, taking advantage of the container runtime environment, and beginning the process of re-architecting into microservices. On the whole, containerized microservices are faster to develop, easier to iterate on, and more cost effective to maintain and secure.

This post focused on the first steps of microservice migration. You can learn more about optimizing and scaling your microservices with components such as service discovery, blue/green deployment, circuit breakers, and configuration servers at http://aws.amazon.com/containers.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Under the Hood of Server-Side Encryption for Amazon Kinesis Streams

Post Syndicated from Damian Wylie original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/under-the-hood-of-server-side-encryption-for-amazon-kinesis-streams/

Customers are using Amazon Kinesis Streams to ingest, process, and deliver data in real time from millions of devices or applications. Use cases for Kinesis Streams vary, but a few common ones include IoT data ingestion and analytics, log processing, clickstream analytics, and enterprise data bus architectures.

Within milliseconds of data arrival, applications (KCL, Apache Spark, AWS Lambda, Amazon Kinesis Analytics) attached to a stream are continuously mining value or delivering data to downstream destinations. Customers are then scaling their streams elastically to match demand. They pay incrementally for the resources that they need, while taking advantage of a fully managed, serverless streaming data service that allows them to focus on adding value closer to their customers.

These benefits are great; however, AWS learned that many customers could not take advantage of Kinesis Streams unless their data-at-rest within a stream was encrypted. Many customers did not want to manage encryption on their own, so they asked for a fully managed, automatic, server-side encryption mechanism leveraging centralized AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) customer master keys (CMK).

Motivated by this feedback, AWS added another fully managed, low cost aspect to Kinesis Streams by delivering server-side encryption via KMS managed encryption keys (SSE-KMS) in the following regions:

  • US East (N. Virginia)
  • US West (Oregon)
  • US West (N. California)
  • EU (Ireland)
  • Asia Pacific (Singapore)
  • Asia Pacific (Tokyo)

In this post, I cover the mechanics of the Kinesis Streams server-side encryption feature. I also share a few best practices and considerations so that you can get started quickly.

Understanding the mechanics

The following section walks you through how Kinesis Streams uses CMKs to encrypt a message in the PutRecord or PutRecords path before it is propagated to the Kinesis Streams storage layer, and then decrypt it in the GetRecords path after it has been retrieved from the storage layer.

When server-side encryption is enabled—which takes just a few clicks in the console—the partition key and payload for every incoming record is encrypted automatically as it’s flowing into Kinesis Streams, using the selected CMK. When data is at rest within a stream, it’s encrypted.

When records are retrieved through a GetRecords request from the encrypted stream, they are decrypted automatically as they are flowing out of the service. That means your Kinesis Streams producers and consumers do not need to be aware of encryption. You have a fully managed data encryption feature at your fingertips, which can be enabled within seconds.

AWS also makes it easy to audit the application of server-side encryption. You can use the AWS Management Console for instant stream-level verification; the responses from PutRecord, PutRecords, and getRecords; or AWS CloudTrail.

Calling PutRecord or PutRecords

When server-side encryption is enabled for a particular stream, Kinesis Streams and KMS perform the following actions when your applications call PutRecord or PutRecords on a stream with server-side encryption enabled. The Amazon Kinesis Producer Library (KPL) uses PutRecords.

 

  1. Data is sent from a customer’s producer (client) to a Kinesis stream using TLS via HTTPS. Data in transit to a stream is encrypted by default.
  2. After data is received, it is momentarily stored in RAM within a front-end proxy layer.
  3. Kinesis Streams authenticates the producer, then impersonates the producer to request input keying material from KMS.
  4. KMS creates key material, encrypts it by using CMK, and sends both the plaintext and encrypted key material to the service, encrypted with TLS.
  5. The client uses the plaintext key material to derive data encryption keys (data keys) that are unique per-record.
  6. The client encrypts the payload and partition key using the data key in RAM within the front-end proxy layer and removes the plaintext data key from memory.
  7. The client appends the encrypted key material to the encrypted data.
  8. The plaintext key material is securely cached in memory within the front-end layer for reuse, until it expires after 5 minutes.
  9. The client delivers the encrypted message to a back-end store where it is stored at rest and fetchable by an authorized consumer through a GetRecords The Amazon Kinesis Client Library (KCL) calls GetRecords to retrieve records from a stream.

Calling getRecords

Kinesis Streams and KMS perform the following actions when your applications call GetRecords on a server-side encrypted stream.

 

  1. When a GeRecords call is made, the front-end proxy layer retrieves the encrypted record from its back-end store.
  2. The consumer (client) makes a request to KMS using a token generated by the customer’s request. KMS authorizes it.
  3. The client requests that KMS decrypt the encrypted key material.
  4. KMS decrypts the encrypted key material and sends the plaintext key material to the client.
  5. Kinesis Streams derives the per-record data keys from the decrypted key material.
  6. If the calling application is authorized, the client decrypts the payload and removes the plaintext data key from memory.
  7. The client delivers the payload over TLS and HTTPS to the consumer, requesting the records. Data in transit to a consumer is encrypted by default.

Verifying server-side encryption

Auditors or administrators often ask for proof that server-side encryption was or is enabled. Here are a few ways to do this.

To check if encryption is enabled now for your streams:

  • Use the AWS Management Console or the DescribeStream API operation. You can also see what CMK is being used for encryption.
  • See encryption in action by looking at responses from PutRecord, PutRecords, or GetRecords When encryption is enabled, the encryptionType parameter is set to “KMS”. If encryption is not enabled, encryptionType is not included in the response.

Sample PutRecord response

{
    "SequenceNumber": "49573959617140871741560010162505906306417380215064887298",
    "ShardId": "shardId-000000000000",
    "EncryptionType": "KMS"
}

Sample GetRecords response

{
    "Records": [
        {
            "Data": "aGVsbG8gd29ybGQ=", 
            "PartitionKey": "test", 
            "ApproximateArrivalTimestamp": 1498292565.825, 
            "EncryptionType": "KMS", 
            "SequenceNumber": "495735762417140871741560010162505906306417380215064887298"
        }, 
        {
            "Data": "ZnJvZG8gbGl2ZXMK", 
            "PartitionKey": "3d0d9301-3c30-4c48-a9a8-e485b2982b28", 
            "ApproximateArrivalTimestamp": 1498292801.747, 
            "EncryptionType": "KMS", 
            "SequenceNumber": "49573959617140871741560010162507115232237011062036103170"
        }
    ], 
    "NextShardIterator": "AAAAAAAAAAEvFypHZDx/4bJVAS34puwdiNcwssKqbh/XhRK7HSYRq3RS+YXJnVKJ8j0gQUt94bONdqQYHk9X9JHgefMUDKzDzndy5WbZWO4CS3hRdMdrbmJ/9KoR4lOfZvqTLt6JWQjDqXv0IaKs06/LHYcEA3oPcyQLOTJHdJl2EzplCTZnn/U295ovxvqF9g9DY8y2nVoMkdFLmdcEMVXjhCDKiRIt", 
    "MillisBehindLatest": 0
}

To check if encryption was enabled, use CloudTrail, which logs the StartStreamEncryption() and StopStreamEncryption() API calls made against a particular stream.

Getting started

It’s very easy to enable, disable, or modify server-side encryption for a particular stream.

  1. In the Kinesis Streams console, select a stream and choose Details.
  2. Select a CMK and select Enabled.
  3. Choose Save.

You can enable encryption only for a live stream, not upon stream creation.  Follow the same process to disable a stream. To use a different CMK, select it and choose Save.

Each of these tasks can also be accomplished using the StartStreamEncryption and StopStreamEncryption API operations.

Considerations

There are a few considerations you should be aware of when using server-side encryption for Kinesis Streams:

  • Permissions
  • Costs
  • Performance

Permissions

One benefit of using the “(Default) aws/kinesis” AWS managed key is that every producer and consumer with permissions to call PutRecord, PutRecords, or GetRecords inherits the right permissions over the “(Default) aws/kinesis” key automatically.

However, this is not necessarily the same case for a CMK. Kinesis Streams producers and consumers do not need to be aware of encryption. However, if you enable encryption using a custom master key but a producer or consumer doesn’t have IAM permissions to use it, PutRecord, PutRecords, or GetRecords requests fail.

This is a great security feature. On the other hand, it can effectively lead to data loss if you inadvertently apply a custom master key that restricts producers and consumers from interacting from the Kinesis stream. Take precautions when applying a custom master key. For more information about the minimum IAM permissions required for producers and consumers interacting with an encrypted stream, see Using Server-Side Encryption.

Costs

When you apply server-side encryption, you are subject to KMS API usage and key costs. Unlike custom KMS master keys, the “(Default) aws/kinesis” CMK is offered free of charge. However, you still need to pay for the API usage costs that Kinesis Streams incurs on your behalf.

API usage costs apply for every CMK, including custom ones. Kinesis Streams calls KMS approximately every 5 minutes when it is rotating the data key. In a 30-day month, the total cost of KMS API calls initiated by a Kinesis stream should be less than a few dollars.

Performance

During testing, AWS discovered that there was a slight increase (typically 0.2 millisecond or less per record) with put and get record latencies due to the additional overhead of encryption.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Analysis of Top-N DynamoDB Objects using Amazon Athena and Amazon QuickSight

Post Syndicated from Rendy Oka original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/analysis-of-top-n-dynamodb-objects-using-amazon-athena-and-amazon-quicksight/

If you run an operation that continuously generates a large amount of data, you may want to know what kind of data is being inserted by your application. The ability to analyze data intake quickly can be very valuable for business units, such as operations and marketing. For many operations, it’s important to see what is driving the business at any particular moment. For retail companies, for example, understanding which products are currently popular can aid in planning for future growth. Similarly, for PR companies, understanding the impact of an advertising campaign can help them market their products more effectively.

This post covers an architecture that helps you analyze your streaming data. You’ll build a solution using Amazon DynamoDB Streams, AWS Lambda, Amazon Kinesis Firehose, and Amazon Athena to analyze data intake at a frequency that you choose. And because this is a serverless architecture, you can use all of the services here without the need to provision or manage servers.

The data source

You’ll collect a random sampling of tweets via Twitter’s API and store a variety of attributes in your DynamoDB table, such as: Twitter handle, tweet ID, hashtags, location, and Time-To-Live (TTL) value.

In DynamoDB, the primary key is used as an input to an internal hash function. The output from this function determines the partition in which the data will be stored. When using a combination of primary key and sort key as a DynamoDB schema, you need to make sure that no single partition key contains many more objects than the other partition keys because this can cause partition level throttling. For the demonstration in this blog, the Twitter handle will be the primary key and the tweet ID will be the sort key. This allows you to group and sort tweets from each user.

To help you get started, I have written a script that pulls a live Twitter stream that you can use to generate your data. All you need to do is provide your own Twitter Apps credentials, and it should generate the data immediately. Alternatively, I have also provided a script that you can use to generate random Tweets with little effort.

You can find both scripts in the Github repository:

https://github.com/awslabs/aws-blog-dynamodb-analysis

There are some modules that you may need to install to run these scripts. You can find them in Python’s module repository:

To get your own Twitter credentials, go to https://www.twitter.com/ and sign up for a free account, if you don’t already have one. After your account is set up, go to https://apps.twitter.com/. On the main landing page, choose the Create New App button. After the application is created, go to Keys and Access Tokens to get your credentials to use the Twitter API. You’ll need to generate Customer Tokens/Secret and Access Token/Secret. All four keys will be used to authenticate your request.

Architecture overview

Before we begin, let’s take a look at the overall flow of information will look like, from data ingestion into DynamoDB to visualization of results in Amazon QuickSight.

As illustrated in the architecture diagram above, any changes made to the items in DynamoDB will be captured and processed using DynamoDB Streams. Next, a Lambda function will be invoked by a trigger that is configured to respond to events in DynamoDB Streams. The Lambda function processes the data prior to pushing to Amazon Kinesis Firehose, which will output to Amazon S3. Finally, you use Amazon Athena to analyze the streaming data landing in Amazon S3. The result can be explored and visualized in Amazon QuickSight for your company’s business analytics.

You’ll need to implement your custom Lambda function to help transform the raw <key, value> data stored in DynamoDB to a JSON format for Athena to digest, but I can help you with a sample code that you are free to modify.

Implementation

In the following sections, I’ll walk through how you can set up the architecture discussed earlier.

Create your DynamoDB table

First, let’s create a DynamoDB table and enable DynamoDB Streams. This will enable data to be copied out of this table. From the console, use the user_id as the partition key and tweet_id as the sort key:

After the table is ready, you can enable DynamoDB Streams. This process operates asynchronously, so there is no performance impact on the table when you enable this feature. The easiest way to manage DynamoDB Streams is also through the DynamoDB console.

In the Overview tab of your newly created table, click Manage Stream. In the window, choose the information that will be written to the stream whenever data in the table is added or modified. In this example, you can choose either New image or New and old images.

For more details on this process, check out our documentation:

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/amazondynamodb/latest/developerguide/Streams.html

Configure Kinesis Firehose

Before creating the Lambda function, you need to configure Kinesis Firehose delivery stream so that it’s ready to accept data from Lambda. Open the Firehose console and choose Create Firehose Delivery Stream. From here, choose S3 as the destination and use the following to information to configure the resource. Note the Delivery stream name because you will use it in the next step.

For more details on this process, check out our documentation:

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/firehose/latest/dev/basic-create.html#console-to-s3

Create your Lambda function

Now that Kinesis Firehose is ready to accept data, you can create your Lambda function.

From the AWS Lambda console, choose the Create a Lambda function button and use the Blank Function. Enter a name and description, and choose Python 2.7 as the Runtime. Note your Lambda function name because you’ll need it in the next step.

In the Lambda function code field, you can paste the script that I have written for this purpose. All this function needs is the name of your Firehose stream name set as an environment variable.

import boto3
import json
import os

# Initiate Firehose client
firehose_client = boto3.client('firehose')

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    records = []
    batch   = []
    try :
        for record in event['Records']:
            tweet = {}
            t_stats = '{ "table_name":"%s", "user_id":"%s", "tweet_id":"%s", "approx_post_time":"%d" }\n' \
                      % ( record['eventSourceARN'].split('/')[1], \
                          record['dynamodb']['Keys']['user_id']['S'], \
                          record['dynamodb']['Keys']['tweet_id']['N'], \
                          int(record['dynamodb']['ApproximateCreationDateTime']) )
            tweet["Data"] = t_stats
            records.append(tweet)
        batch.append(records)
        res = firehose_client.put_record_batch(
            DeliveryStreamName = os.environ['firehose_stream_name'],
            Records = batch[0]
        )
        return 'Successfully processed {} records.'.format(len(event['Records']))
    except Exception :
        pass

The handler should be set to lambda_function.lambda_handler and you can use the existing lambda_dynamodb_streams role that’s been created by default.

Enable DynamoDB trigger and start collecting data

Everything is ready to go. Open your table using the DynamoDB console and go to the Triggers tab. Select the Create trigger drop down list and choose Existing Lambda function. In the pop-up window, select the function that you just created, and choose the Create button.

At this point, you can start collecting data with the Python script that I’ve provided. The first one will create a script that will pull public Twitter data and the other will generate fake tweets using Lorem Ipsum text.

Configure Amazon Athena to read the data

Next, you will configure Amazon Athena so that it can read the data Kinesis Firehose outputs to Amazon S3 and allow you to analyze the data as needed. You can connect to Athena directly from the Athena console, and you can establish a connection using JDBC or the Athena API. In this example, I’m going to demonstrate what this looks like on the Athena console.

First, create a new database and a new table. You can do this by running the following two queries. The first query creates a new database:

CREATE DATABASE IF NOT EXISTS ddbtablestats

And the second query creates a new table:

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE IF NOT EXISTS ddbtablestats.twitterfeed (
    `table_name` string,
    `user_id` string,
    `tweet_id` bigint,
    `approx_post_time` timestamp 
) PARTITIONED BY (
    year string,
    month string,
    day string,
    hour string 
)
ROW FORMAT SERDE 'org.openx.data.jsonserde.JsonSerDe'
WITH SERDEPROPERTIES ('serialization.format' = '1')
LOCATION 's3://myBucket/dynamodb/streams/transactions/'

Note that this table is created using partitions. Partitioning separates your data into logical parts based on certain criteria, such as date, location, language, etc. This allows Athena to selectively pull your data without needing to process the entire data set. This effectively minimizes the query execution time, and it also allows you to have greater control over the data that you want to query.

After the query has completed, you should be able to see the table in the left side pane of the Athena dashboard.

After the database and table have been created, execute the ALTER TABLE query to populate the partitions in your table. Replace the date with the current date when the script was executed.

ALTER TABLE ddbtablestats.TwitterFeed ADD IF NOT EXISTS
PARTITION (year='2017',month='05',day='17',hour='01') location 's3://myBucket/dynamodb/streams/transactions/2017/05/17/01/'

Using the Athena console, you’ll need to manually populate each partition for each additional partition that you’d like to analyze, however you can programmatically automate this process by using the JDBC driver or any AWS SDK of your choice.

For more information on partitioning in Athena, check out our documentation:

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/athena/latest/ug/partitions.html

Querying the data in Amazon Athena

This is it! Let’s run this query to see the top 10 most active Twitter users in the last 24 hours. You can do this from the Athena console:

SELECT user_id, COUNT(DISTINCT tweet_id) tweets FROM ddbTableStats.TwitterFeed
WHERE year='2017' AND month='05' AND day='17'
GROUP BY user_id
ORDER BY tweets DESC
LIMIT 10

The result should look similar to the following:

Linking Athena to Amazon QuickSight

Finally, to make this data available to a larger audience, let’s visualize this data in Amazon QuickSight. Amazon QuickSight provides native connectivity to AWS data sources such as Amazon Redshift, Amazon RDS, and Amazon Athena. Amazon QuickSight can also connect to on-premises databases, Excel, or CSV files, and it can connect to cloud data sources such as Salesforce.com. For this solution, we will connect Amazon QuickSight to the Athena table we just created.

Amazon QuickSight has a free tier that provides 1 user and 1GB of SPICE (Superfast Parallel In-memory Calculated Engine) capacity free. So you can sign up and use QuickSight free of charge.

When you are signing up for Amazon QuickSight, ensure that you grant permissions for QuickSight to connect to Athena and the S3 bucket where the data is stored.

After you’ve signed up, navigate to the new analysis button, and choose new data set, and then select the Athena data source option. Create a new name for your data source and proceed to the next prompt. At this point, you should see the Athena table you created earlier.

Choose the option to import the data to SPICE for a quicker analysis. SPICE is an in-memory optimized calculation engine that is designed for quick data visualization through parallel processing. SPICE also enables you to refresh your data sets at a regular interval or on-demand as you want.

In the dialog box, confirm this data set creation, and you’ll arrive on the landing page where you can start building your graph. The X-axis will represent the user_id and the Value will be used to represent the SUM total of the tweets from each user.

The Amazon QuickSight report looks like this:

Through this visualization, I can easily see that there are 3 users that tweeted over 20 times that day and that the majority of the users have fewer than 10 tweets that day. I can also set up a scheduled refresh of my SPICE dataset so that I have a dashboard that is regularly updated with the latest data.

Closing thoughts

Here are the benefits that you can gain from using this architecture:

  1. You can optimize the design of your DynamoDB schema that follows AWS best practice recommendations.
  1. You can run analysis and data intelligence in order to understand the current customer demands for your business.
  1. You can store incremental backup for future auditing.

The flexibility of our AWS services invites you to create and design the ideal workflow for your production at any scale, and, as always, if you ever need some guidance, don’t hesitate to reach out to us.I  hope this has been helpful to you! Please leave any questions and comments below.

 


Additional Reading

Learn how to analyze VPC Flow Logs with Amazon Kinesis Firehose, Amazon Athena, and Amazon QuickSight.


About the Author

Rendy Oka is a Big Data Support Engineer for Amazon Web Services. He provides consultations and architectural designs and partners with the TAMs, Solution Architects, and AWS product teams to help develop solutions for our customers. He is also a team lead for the big data support team in Seattle. Rendy has traveled to dozens of countries around the world and takes every opportunity to experience the local culture wherever he goes

 

 

 

 

Developers and Ethics

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/developers-and-ethics/

“What are some areas you are particularly interested in” – recruiters (head-hunters) tend to ask that question a lot. I don’t have a good answer for that – I’ll know it when I see it. But I have a list of areas that I wouldn’t like to work in. And one of them is gambling.

Several years ago I got a very lucrative offer for a gambling company, both well paid and technically challenging. But I rejected it. Because I didn’t want to contribute to abusing peoples’ weaknesses for the sake of getting their money. And no, I’m not a raging Marxist, but gambling is bad. You may argue that it’s a necessary vice and people need it to suppress other internal struggles, but I’m not buying that as a motivator.

I felt it’s unethical to write code that does that. Like I feel it’s unethical to profile users’ behaviours and “read” their emails in order to target ads, or to write bots to disseminate fake news.

A few months ago I was part of the campaign HQ for a party in a parliamentary election. Cambridge Analytica had already become popular after “delivering Brexit and Trump’s victory”, that using voters’ data in order to target messages at them sounded like the new cool thing. As head of IT & data, I rejected this approach. Because it would be unethical to bait unsuspecting users to take dumb tests in order to provide us with facebook tokens. Yes, we didn’t have any money to hire Cambridge Analytica-like companies, but even if we had, is “outsourcing” the dubious practice changing anything? If you pay someone to trick users into unknowingly giving their personal data, it’s as if you did it yourself.

This can be a very long post about technology and ethics. But it won’t, as this is a technical blog, not a philosophical one. It won’t be about philosophy – for interesting takes on the matter you can listen to Damon Horowitz’s TED talk or even go through all of Michael Sandel’s Justice lectures at Harvard. It won’t be about how companies should be ethical (e.g. following the ethical design manifesto)

Instead, it will be a short post focusing on developers and their ethical choices.

I think we have the freedom to be ethical – there’s so much demand on the job market that rejecting an offer, refusing to do something, or leaving a company for ethical reasons is something we have the luxury to do without compromising our well-being. When asked to do something unethical, we can refuse (several years ago I was asked to take part in some shady interactions related to a potential future government contract, which I refused to do). When offered jobs that are slightly better paid but would have us build abusive technology, we can turn the offer down. When a new feature requires us to breach people’s privacy, we can argue it, and ultimately not do it.

But in order to start making these ethical choices, we have to start thinking about ethics. To put ourselves in context. We, developers, are building the world of tomorrow (it sounds grandiose, but we know it’s way more mundane than that). We are the “tools” with which future products will be shaped. And yes, that’s true even for the average back-office system of an insurance company (which allows for raising the insurance for pre-existing conditions), and true for boring banking software (which allows mortgages way beyond the actual coverage the bank has), and so on.

Are these decisions ours to make? Isn’t it legislators that should define what’s allowed and what isn’t? We are just building whatever they tell us to build. Forgive me the far-fetched analogy, but Nazi Germany was an anti-humanity machine based on people who “just followed orders”. Yes, we’ll refuse, someone else will come and do it, but collective ethics gets built over time.

As Hannah Arendt had put it – “The sad truth is that most evil is done by people who never make up their minds to be good or evil.”. We may think that as developers we don’t have a say. But without us, no software can be built. So with our individual ethical stance, a certain unethical software may not be built or be successful, and that’s a stance worth considering, especially when it costs us next to nothing.

The post Developers and Ethics appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

Synchronizing Amazon S3 Buckets Using AWS Step Functions

Post Syndicated from Andy Katz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/synchronizing-amazon-s3-buckets-using-aws-step-functions/

Constantin Gonzalez is a Principal Solutions Architect at AWS

In my free time, I run a small blog that uses Amazon S3 to host static content and Amazon CloudFront to distribute it world-wide. I use a home-grown, static website generator to create and upload my blog content onto S3.

My blog uses two S3 buckets: one for staging and testing, and one for production. As a website owner, I want to update the production bucket with all changes from the staging bucket in a reliable and efficient way, without having to create and populate a new bucket from scratch. Therefore, to synchronize files between these two buckets, I use AWS Lambda and AWS Step Functions.

In this post, I show how you can use Step Functions to build a scalable synchronization engine for S3 buckets and learn some common patterns for designing Step Functions state machines while you do so.

Step Functions overview

Step Functions makes it easy to coordinate the components of distributed applications and microservices using visual workflows. Building applications from individual components that each perform a discrete function lets you scale and change applications quickly.

While this particular example focuses on synchronizing objects between two S3 buckets, it can be generalized to any other use case that involves coordinated processing of any number of objects in S3 buckets, or other, similar data processing patterns.

Bucket replication options

Before I dive into the details on how this particular example works, take a look at some alternatives for copying or replicating data between two Amazon S3 buckets:

  • The AWS CLI provides customers with a powerful aws s3 sync command that can synchronize the contents of one bucket with another.
  • S3DistCP is a powerful tool for users of Amazon EMR that can efficiently load, save, or copy large amounts of data between S3 buckets and HDFS.
  • The S3 cross-region replication functionality enables automatic, asynchronous copying of objects across buckets in different AWS regions.

In this use case, you are looking for a slightly different bucket synchronization solution that:

  • Works within the same region
  • Is more scalable than a CLI approach running on a single machine
  • Doesn’t require managing any servers
  • Uses a more finely grained cost model than the hourly based Amazon EMR approach

You need a scalable, serverless, and customizable bucket synchronization utility.

Solution architecture

Your solution needs to do three things:

  1. Copy all objects from a source bucket into a destination bucket, but leave out objects that are already present, for efficiency.
  2. Delete all "orphaned" objects from the destination bucket that aren’t present on the source bucket, because you don’t want obsolete objects lying around.
  3. Keep track of all objects for #1 and #2, regardless of how many objects there are.

In the beginning, you read in the source and destination buckets as parameters and perform basic parameter validation. Then, you operate two separate, independent loops, one for copying missing objects and one for deleting obsolete objects. Each loop is a sequence of Step Functions states that read in chunks of S3 object lists and use the continuation token to decide in a choice state whether to continue the loop or not.

This solution is based on the following architecture that uses Step Functions, Lambda, and two S3 buckets:

As you can see, this setup involves no servers, just two main building blocks:

  • Step Functions manages the overall flow of synchronizing the objects from the source bucket with the destination bucket.
  • A set of Lambda functions carry out the individual steps necessary to perform the work, such as validating input, getting lists of objects from source and destination buckets, copying or deleting objects in batches, and so on.

To understand the synchronization flow in more detail, look at the Step Functions state machine diagram for this example.

Walkthrough

Here’s a detailed discussion of how this works.

To follow along, use the code in the sync-buckets-state-machine GitHub repo. The code comes with a ready-to-run deployment script in Python that takes care of all the IAM roles, policies, Lambda functions, and of course the Step Functions state machine deployment using AWS CloudFormation, as well as instructions on how to use it.

Fine print: Use at your own risk

Before I start, here are some disclaimers:

  • Educational purposes only.

    The following example and code are intended for educational purposes only. Make sure that you customize, test, and review it on your own before using any of this in production.

  • S3 object deletion.

    In particular, using the code included below may delete objects on S3 in order to perform synchronization. Make sure that you have backups of your data. In particular, consider using the Amazon S3 Versioning feature to protect yourself against unintended data modification or deletion.

Step Functions execution starts with an initial set of parameters that contain the source and destination bucket names in JSON:

{
    "source":       "my-source-bucket-name",
    "destination":  "my-destination-bucket-name"
}

Armed with this data, Step Functions execution proceeds as follows.

Step 1: Detect the bucket region

First, you need to know the regions where your buckets reside. In this case, take advantage of the Step Functions Parallel state. This allows you to use a Lambda function get_bucket_location.py inside two different, parallel branches of task states:

  • FindRegionForSourceBucket
  • FindRegionForDestinationBucket

Each task state receives one bucket name as an input parameter, then detects the region corresponding to "their" bucket. The output of these functions is collected in a result array containing one element per parallel function.

Step 2: Combine the parallel states

The output of a parallel state is a list with all the individual branches’ outputs. To combine them into a single structure, use a Lambda function called combine_dicts.py in its own CombineRegionOutputs task state. The function combines the two outputs from step 1 into a single JSON dict that provides you with the necessary region information for each bucket.

Step 3: Validate the input

In this walkthrough, you only support buckets that reside in the same region, so you need to decide if the input is valid or if the user has given you two buckets in different regions. To find out, use a Lambda function called validate_input.py in the ValidateInput task state that tests if the two regions from the previous step are equal. The output is a Boolean.

Step 4: Branch the workflow

Use another type of Step Functions state, a Choice state, which branches into a Failure state if the comparison in step 3 yields false, or proceeds with the remaining steps if the comparison was successful.

Step 5: Execute in parallel

The actual work is happening in another Parallel state. Both branches of this state are very similar to each other and they re-use some of the Lambda function code.

Each parallel branch implements a looping pattern across the following steps:

  1. Use a Pass state to inject either the string value "source" (InjectSourceBucket) or "destination" (InjectDestinationBucket) into the listBucket attribute of the state document.

    The next step uses either the source or the destination bucket, depending on the branch, while executing the same, generic Lambda function. You don’t need two Lambda functions that differ only slightly. This step illustrates how to use Pass states as a way of injecting constant parameters into your state machine and as a way of controlling step behavior while re-using common step execution code.

  2. The next step UpdateSourceKeyList/UpdateDestinationKeyList lists objects in the given bucket.

    Remember that the previous step injected either "source" or "destination" into the state document’s listBucket attribute. This step uses the same list_bucket.py Lambda function to list objects in an S3 bucket. The listBucket attribute of its input decides which bucket to list. In the left branch of the main parallel state, use the list of source objects to work through copying missing objects. The right branch uses the list of destination objects, to check if they have a corresponding object in the source bucket and eliminate any orphaned objects. Orphans don’t have a source object of the same S3 key.

  3. This step performs the actual work. In the left branch, the CopySourceKeys step uses the copy_keys.py Lambda function to go through the list of source objects provided by the previous step, then copies any missing object into the destination bucket. Its sister step in the other branch, DeleteOrphanedKeys, uses its destination bucket key list to test whether each object from the destination bucket has a corresponding source object, then deletes any orphaned objects.

  4. The S3 ListObjects API action is designed to be scalable across many objects in a bucket. Therefore, it returns object lists in chunks of configurable size, along with a continuation token. If the API result has a continuation token, it means that there are more objects in this list. You can work from token to token to continue getting object list chunks, until you get no more continuation tokens.

By breaking down large amounts of work into chunks, you can make sure each chunk is completed within the timeframe allocated for the Lambda function, and within the maximum input/output data size for a Step Functions state.

This approach comes with a slight tradeoff: the more objects you process at one time in a given chunk, the faster you are done. There’s less overhead for managing individual chunks. On the other hand, if you process too many objects within the same chunk, you risk going over time and space limits of the processing Lambda function or the Step Functions state so the work cannot be completed.

In this particular case, use a Lambda function that maximizes the number of objects listed from the S3 bucket that can be stored in the input/output state data. This is currently up to 32,768 bytes, assuming (based on some experimentation) that the execution of the COPY/DELETE requests in the processing states can always complete in time.

A more sophisticated approach would use the Step Functions retry/catch state attributes to account for any time limits encountered and adjust the list size accordingly through some list site adjusting.

Step 6: Test for completion

Because the presence of a continuation token in the S3 ListObjects output signals that you are not done processing all objects yet, use a Choice state to test for its presence. If a continuation token exists, it branches into the UpdateSourceKeyList step, which uses the token to get to the next chunk of objects. If there is no token, you’re done. The state machine then branches into the FinishCopyBranch/FinishDeleteBranch state.

By using Choice states like this, you can create loops exactly like the old times, when you didn’t have for statements and used branches in assembly code instead!

Step 7: Success!

Finally, you’re done, and can step into your final Success state.

Lessons learned

When implementing this use case with Step Functions and Lambda, I learned the following things:

  • Sometimes, it is necessary to manipulate the JSON state of a Step Functions state machine with just a few lines of code that hardly seem to warrant their own Lambda function. This is ok, and the cost is actually pretty low given Lambda’s 100 millisecond billing granularity. The upside is that functions like these can be helpful to make the data more palatable for the following steps or for facilitating Choice states. An example here would be the combine_dicts.py function.
  • Pass states can be useful beyond debugging and tracing, they can be used to inject arbitrary values into your state JSON and guide generic Lambda functions into doing specific things.
  • Choice states are your friend because you can build while-loops with them. This allows you to reliably grind through large amounts of data with the patience of an engine that currently supports execution times of up to 1 year.

    Currently, there is an execution history limit of 25,000 events. Each Lambda task state execution takes up 5 events, while each choice state takes 2 events for a total of 7 events per loop. This means you can loop about 3500 times with this state machine. For even more scalability, you can split up work across multiple Step Functions executions through object key sharding or similar approaches.

  • It’s not necessary to spend a lot of time coding exception handling within your Lambda functions. You can delegate all exception handling to Step Functions and instead simplify your functions as much as possible.

  • Step Functions are great replacements for shell scripts. This could have been a shell script, but then I would have had to worry about where to execute it reliably, how to scale it if it went beyond a few thousand objects, etc. Think of Step Functions and Lambda as tools for scripting at a cloud level, beyond the boundaries of servers or containers. "Serverless" here also means "boundary-less".

Summary

This approach gives you scalability by breaking down any number of S3 objects into chunks, then using Step Functions to control logic to work through these objects in a scalable, serverless, and fully managed way.

To take a look at the code or tweak it for your own needs, use the code in the sync-buckets-state-machine GitHub repo.

To see more examples, please visit the Step Functions Getting Started page.

Enjoy!

Secure API Access with Amazon Cognito Federated Identities, Amazon Cognito User Pools, and Amazon API Gateway

Post Syndicated from Ed Lima original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/secure-api-access-with-amazon-cognito-federated-identities-amazon-cognito-user-pools-and-amazon-api-gateway/

Ed Lima, Solutions Architect

 

Our identities are what define us as human beings. Philosophical discussions aside, it also applies to our day-to-day lives. For instance, I need my work badge to get access to my office building or my passport to travel overseas. My identity in this case is attached to my work badge or passport. As part of the system that checks my access, these documents or objects help define whether I have access to get into the office building or travel internationally.

This exact same concept can also be applied to cloud applications and APIs. To provide secure access to your application users, you define who can access the application resources and what kind of access can be granted. Access is based on identity controls that can confirm authentication (AuthN) and authorization (AuthZ), which are different concepts. According to Wikipedia:

 

The process of authorization is distinct from that of authentication. Whereas authentication is the process of verifying that “you are who you say you are,” authorization is the process of verifying that “you are permitted to do what you are trying to do.” This does not mean authorization presupposes authentication; an anonymous agent could be authorized to a limited action set.

Amazon Cognito allows building, securing, and scaling a solution to handle user management and authentication, and to sync across platforms and devices. In this post, I discuss the different ways that you can use Amazon Cognito to authenticate API calls to Amazon API Gateway and secure access to your own API resources.

 

Amazon Cognito Concepts

 

It’s important to understand that Amazon Cognito provides three different services:

Today, I discuss the use of the first two. One service doesn’t need the other to work; however, they can be configured to work together.
 

Amazon Cognito Federated Identities

 
To use Amazon Cognito Federated Identities in your application, create an identity pool. An identity pool is a store of user data specific to your account. It can be configured to require an identity provider (IdP) for user authentication, after you enter details such as app IDs or keys related to that specific provider.

After the user is validated, the provider sends an identity token to Amazon Cognito Federated Identities. In turn, Amazon Cognito Federated Identities contacts the AWS Security Token Service (AWS STS) to retrieve temporary AWS credentials based on a configured, authenticated IAM role linked to the identity pool. The role has appropriate IAM policies attached to it and uses these policies to provide access to other AWS services.

Amazon Cognito Federated Identities currently supports the IdPs listed in the following graphic.

 



Continue reading Secure API Access with Amazon Cognito Federated Identities, Amazon Cognito User Pools, and Amazon API Gateway

EtherApe – Graphical Network Monitor

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/DxSK15EgI5k/

EtherApe is a graphical network monitor for Unix modelled after etherman. Featuring link layer, IP and TCP modes, it displays network activity graphically. Hosts and links change in size with traffic. Colour coded protocols display. It supports Ethernet, FDDI, Token Ring, ISDN, PPP, SLIP and WLAN devices, plus several encapsulation formats. It can…

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk