Tag Archives: ICYMI

ICYMI: Serverless Q2 2020

Post Syndicated from Moheeb Zara original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q2-2020/

Welcome to the 10th edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share all of the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

In case you missed our last ICYMI, checkout what happened last quarter here.

AWS Lambda

AWS Lambda functions can now mount an Amazon Elastic File System (EFS). EFS is a scalable and elastic NFS file system storing data within and across multiple Availability Zones (AZ) for high availability and durability. In this way, you can use a familiar file system interface to store and share data across all concurrent execution environments of one, or more, Lambda functions. EFS supports full file system access semantics, such as strong consistency and file locking.

Using different EFS access points, each Lambda function can access different paths in a file system, or use different file system permissions. You can share the same EFS file system with Amazon EC2 instances, containerized applications using Amazon ECS and AWS Fargate, and on-premises servers.

Learn how to create an Amazon EFS-mounted Lambda function using the AWS Serverless Application Model in Sessions With SAM Episode 10.

With our recent launch of .NET Core 3.1 AWS Lambda runtime, we’ve also released version 2.0.0 of the PowerShell module AWSLambdaPSCore. The new version now supports PowerShell 7.

Amazon EventBridge

At AWS re:Invent 2019, we introduced a preview of Amazon EventBridge schema registry and discovery. This is a way to store the structure of the events (the schema) in a central location. It can simplify using events in your code by generating the code to process them for Java, Python, and TypeScript. In April, we announced general availability of EventBridge Schema Registry.

We also added support for resource policies. Resource policies allow sharing of schema repository across different AWS accounts and organizations. In this way, developers on different teams can search for and use any schema that another team has added to the shared registry.

Ben Smith, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, published a guide on how to capture user events and monitor user behavior using the Amazon EventBridge partner integration with Auth0. This enables better insight into your application to help deliver a more customized experience for your users.

AWS Step Functions

In May, we launched a new AWS Step Functions service integration with AWS CodeBuild. CodeBuild is a fully managed continuous integration service that compiles source code, runs tests, and produces packages that are ready for deployment. Now, during the execution of a state machine, you can start or stop a build, get build report summaries, and delete past build executions records.

With the new AWS CodePipeline support to invoke Step Functions you can customize your delivery pipeline with choices, external validations, or parallel tasks. Each of those tasks can now call CodeBuild to create a custom build following specific requirements. Learn how to build a continuous integration workflow with Step Functions and AWS CodeBuild.

Rob Sutter, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, has published a video series on Step Functions. We’ve compiled a playlist on YouTube to help you on your serverless journey.

AWS Amplify

The AWS Amplify Framework announced in April that they have rearchitected the Amplify UI component library to enable JavaScript developers to easily add authentication scenarios to their web apps. The authentication components include numerous improvements over previous versions. These include the ability to automatically sign in users after sign-up confirmation, better customization, and improved accessibility.

Amplify also announced the availability of Amplify Framework iOS and Amplify Framework Android libraries and tools. These help mobile application developers to easily build secure and scalable cloud-powered applications. Previously, mobile developers relied on a combination of tools and SDKS along with the Amplify CLI to create and manage a backend.

These new native libraries are oriented around use-cases, such as authentication, data storage and access, machine learning predictions etc. They provide a declarative interface that enables you to programmatically apply best practices with abstractions.

A mono-repository is a repository that contains more than one logical project, each in its own repository. Monorepo support is now available for the AWS Amplify Console, allowing developers to connect Amplify Console to a sub-folder in your mono-repository. Learn how to set up continuous deployment and hosting on a monorepo with the Amplify Console.

Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra)

Amazon Managed Apache Cassandra Service (MCS) is now generally available under the new name: Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra). Amazon Keyspaces is built on Apache Cassandra and can be used as a fully managed serverless database. Your applications can read and write data from Amazon Keyspaces using your existing Cassandra Query Language (CQL) code, with little or no changes. Danilo Poccia explains how to use Amazon Keyspace with API Gateway and Lambda in this launch post.

AWS Glue

In April we extended AWS Glue jobs, based on Apache Spark, to run continuously and consume data from streaming platforms such as Amazon Kinesis Data Streams and Apache Kafka (including the fully-managed Amazon MSK). Learn how to manage a serverless extract, transform, load (ETL) pipeline with Glue in this guide by Danilo Poccia.

Serverless posts

Our team is always working to build and write content to help our customers better understand all our serverless offerings. Here is a list of the latest published to the AWS Compute Blog this quarter.

Introducing the new serverless LAMP stack

Ben Smith, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, introduces the Serverless LAMP stack. He explains how to use serverless technologies with PHP. Learn about the available tools, frameworks and strategies to build serverless applications, and why now is the right time to start.

 

Building a location-based, scalable, serverless web app

James Beswick, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, walks through building a location-based, scalable, serverless web app. Ask Around Me is an example project that allows users to ask questions within a geofence to create an engaging community driven experience.

Building well-architected serverless applications

Julian Wood, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, published two blog series on building well-architected serverless applications. Learn how to better understand application health and lifecycle management.

Device hacking with serverless

Go beyond the browser with these creative and physical projects. Moheeb Zara, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, published several serverless powered device hacks, all using off the shelf parts.

April

May

June

Tech Talks and events

We hold AWS Online Tech Talks covering serverless topics throughout the year. You can find these in the serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page. We also regularly join in on podcasts, and record short videos you can find to learn in quick bite-sized chunks.

Here are the highlights from Q2.

Innovator Island Workshop

Learn how to build a complete serverless web application for a popular theme park called Innovator Island. James Beswick created a video series to walk you through this popular workshop at your own pace.

Serverless First Function

In May, we held a new virtual event series, the Serverless-First Function, to help you and your organization get the most out of the cloud. The first event, on May 21, included sessions from Amazon CTO, Dr. Werner Vogels, and VP of Serverless at AWS, David Richardson. The second event, May 28, was packed with sessions with our AWS Serverless Developer Advocate team. Catch up on the AWS Twitch channel.

Live streams

The AWS Serverless Developer Advocate team hosts several weekly livestreams on the AWS Twitch channel covering a wide range of topics. You can catch up on all our past content, including workshops, on the AWS Serverless YouTube channel.

Eric Johnson hosts “Sessions with SAM” every Thursday at 10AM PST. Each week, Eric shows how to use SAM to solve different serverless challenges. He explains how to use SAM templates to build powerful serverless applications. Catch up on the last few episodes.

James Beswick, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, has compiled a round-up of all his content from Q2. He has plenty of videos ranging from beginner to advanced topics.

AWS Serverless Heroes

We’re pleased to welcome Kyuhyun Byun and Serkan Özal to the growing list of AWS Serverless Heroes. The AWS Hero program is a selection of worldwide experts that have been recognized for their positive impact within the community. They share helpful knowledge and organize events and user groups. They’re also contributors to numerous open-source projects in and around serverless technologies.

Still looking for more?

The Serverless landing page has much more information. The Lambda resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more getting started tutorials.

Follow the AWS Serverless team on our new LinkedIn page we share all the latest news and events. You can also follow all of us on Twitter to see latest news, follow conversations, and interact with the team.

Chris Munns: @chrismunns
Eric Johnson: @edjgeek
James Beswick: @jbesw
Moheeb Zara: @virgilvox
Ben Smith: @benjamin_l_s
Rob Sutter: @rts_rob
Julian Wood: @julian_wood

ICYMI: Serverless-First Function

Post Syndicated from Rachel Richardson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-first-function/

On May 21 and May 28, AWS hosted the first-ever serverless-focused virtual event, the AWS Serverless-First Function. These two free virtual events covered important aspects of a successful serverless approach: Serverless for your Organization and Serverless for your Application.

Serverless for your Organization, on May 21, focused on real-world tactics for transforming your organization to get the most out of the cloud. Serverless for your Application on May 28 was a builder’s guide to serverless applications for end-to-end best practices. See the following recap of the sessions, including recordings and slides.

Serverless for your organization [Recording]

Day one offered best practices and key takeaways for organizations looking to adopt a serverless-first mindset. Throughout the day, thought leaders, analysts, and customer discussed real-world examples about the benefits and process of bringing serverless to your organization. The following sessions are geared towards business leaders and developers who are looking to influence organization-wide technical decisions to unlock the fullest benefits of the cloud.

Introduction by Amazon CTO, Dr. Werner Vogels [Recording] [Slides]

The day starts with an introduction by Amazon CTO, Dr. Werner Vogels. He expands on his popular article, Modern Applications at AWS.

How operations change as your organization embraces event-driven architectures with AWS VP of Serverless, David Richardson [Recording] [Slides]

AWS VP of Serverless David Richardson’s session complements Dr. Vogels’ introduction with an overview of operational changes that occur when modernizing with event-driven architectures.

Eliminating busywork at the organizational level: Tips for using serverless to its fullest potential with AWS Sr. Principal Engineer, David Yanacek [Recording] [Slides]

David Yanacek discusses important ways to unlock the full benefits of serverless. He shows how to build services around APIs and use service-oriented architectures built on serverless systems.

Built Serverless-First: How Workgrid Software transformed from a Liberty Mutual project to its own global startup with Workgrid Software Head of Cloud Engineering, Gillian McCann and AWS Principal Serverless Solutions Architect, Sam Dengler [Recording] [Slides]

Connected through a central IT team, Liberty Mutual has embraced serverless since AWS Lambda’s inception in 2014. In this session, Gillian McCann discusses Workgrid’s serverless journey—from internal microservices project within Liberty Mutual to independent business entity. It’s all built serverless-first.

Move fast and ship things: Using serverless to increase speed and agility within your organization with AWS VP of Cloud Architecture Strategy, Adrian Cockcroft [Recording] [Slides]

Adrian Cockcroft demonstrates how you can use serverless to build modern applications faster than ever. Adrian uses real-life examples and customer stories to debunk common misconceptions about serverless.

Market insights: A conversation with Forrester VP and Principal Analyst Jeffrey Hammond & AWS Director of Product for Lambda Ajay Nair [Recording]

Guest speaker Jeffrey Hammond and Director of Product for AWS Lambda, Ajay Nair, discuss the state of serverless. They cover Lambda-based architectural approaches, Functions-as-a-Service platforms, and more. They also talk through the high-level and enduring enterprise patterns and advancements that analysts see as market drivers both today and in the future.

Closing statements with Jeff Barr, AWS VP and Chief Evangelist [Recording]

In his closing remarks, Jeff Barr recaps what he learned during the event, his favorite takeaways, and next steps you can take to keep learning.

Serverless for your Application [Recording]

The second day of the function was a developer-focused track centered around an application called FreshTracks. These sessions show end-to-end best practices when designing a serverless web application. Serverless subject matter experts led each session and covered topics like automation, observability, security, and more.

Navigating the new world of serverless: VP of Application Integration Jesse Dougherty interviews Charlie Bell, AWS SVP [Recording]

AWS VP of Application Integration Jesse Dougherty interviews AWS SVP Charlie Bell about serverless operations today. They discuss how AWS uses serverless and the benefits AWS teams get from adopting serverless-first.

Building serverless web applications with Sr. Developer Advocate, Ben Smith [Recording] [Slides]

Ben Smith demonstrates how to build and deploy a completely serverless web application from scratch. The application includes a mobile friendly front end to complex business logic on the backend.

Automating serverless application development workflows with Sr. Developer Advocate, Eric Johnson [Recording] [Slides]

Eric Johnson breaks down how to think about CI/CD when building serverless applications with AWS Lambda and Amazon API Gateway. This session covers how to use technologies like AWS SAM to build CI/CD pipelines for serverless application back ends.

Observability for your serverless applications with Sr. Developer Advocate, Julian Wood [Recording] [Slides]

Julian Wood demonstrates how to add monitoring, logging, and distributed tracing to your serverless applications. He covers how to track platform and business metrics, and visualize the performance and operations of your application. He shows how to decide which services should be optimized to improve your customers’ experience.

Serverless application security with Sr. Developer Advocate, Rob Sutter [Recording] [Slides]

Rob Sutter discusses how to think about security for a serverless web application from front to back. The session introduces several controls available to you and the best practices for configuring them. He highlights ways to build more secure applications for an event-driven model.

Performance tuning for serverless web applications with Sr. Developer Advocate, James Beswick [Recording] [Slides]

James Beswick demonstrates how to get the most from your serverless backend. He shows how to reduce and eliminate cold starts and how to identify bottlenecks and areas for improvement. He covers advanced approaches to measuring application performance.

Closing statements with Sr. Manager of Developer Advocacy, Chris Munns and Sr. Developer Advocate, Eric Johnson [Recording]

Chris Munns and Eric Johnson close the function with their final remarks and takeaways on the two days of sessions.

ICYMI: Serverless Q4 2019

Post Syndicated from Rob Sutter original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q4-2019/

Welcome to the eighth edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

In case you missed our last ICYMI, checkout what happened last quarter here.

The three months comprising the fourth quarter of 2019

AWS re:Invent

AWS re:Invent 2019

re:Invent 2019 dominated the fourth quarter at AWS. The serverless team presented a number of talks, workshops, and builder sessions to help customers increase their skills and deliver value more rapidly to their own customers.

Serverless talks from re:Invent 2019

Chris Munns presenting 'Building microservices with AWS Lambda' at re:Invent 2019

We presented dozens of sessions showing how customers can improve their architecture and agility with serverless. Here are some of the most popular.

Videos

Decks

You can also find decks for many of the serverless presentations and other re:Invent presentations on our AWS Events Content.

AWS Lambda

For developers needing greater control over performance of their serverless applications at any scale, AWS Lambda announced Provisioned Concurrency at re:Invent. This feature enables Lambda functions to execute with consistent start-up latency making them ideal for building latency sensitive applications.

As shown in the below graph, provisioned concurrency reduces tail latency, directly impacting response times and providing a more responsive end user experience.

Graph showing performance enhancements with AWS Lambda Provisioned Concurrency

Lambda rolled out enhanced VPC networking to 14 additional Regions around the world. This change brings dramatic improvements to startup performance for Lambda functions running in VPCs due to more efficient usage of elastic network interfaces.

Illustration of AWS Lambda VPC to VPC NAT

New VPC to VPC NAT for Lambda functions

Lambda now supports three additional runtimes: Node.js 12, Java 11, and Python 3.8. Each of these new runtimes has new version-specific features and benefits, which are covered in the linked release posts. Like the Node.js 10 runtime, these new runtimes are all based on an Amazon Linux 2 execution environment.

Lambda released a number of controls for both stream and async-based invocations:

  • You can now configure error handling for Lambda functions consuming events from Amazon Kinesis Data Streams or Amazon DynamoDB Streams. It’s now possible to limit the retry count, limit the age of records being retried, configure a failure destination, or split a batch to isolate a problem record. These capabilities help you deal with potential “poison pill” records that would previously cause streams to pause in processing.
  • For asynchronous Lambda invocations, you can now set the maximum event age and retry attempts on the event. If either configured condition is met, the event can be routed to a dead letter queue (DLQ), Lambda destination, or it can be discarded.

AWS Lambda Destinations is a new feature that allows developers to designate an asynchronous target for Lambda function invocation results. You can set separate destinations for success and failure. This unlocks new patterns for distributed event-based applications and can replace custom code previously used to manage routing results.

Illustration depicting AWS Lambda Destinations with success and failure configurations

Lambda Destinations

Lambda also now supports setting a Parallelization Factor, which allows you to set multiple Lambda invocations per shard for Kinesis Data Streams and DynamoDB Streams. This enables faster processing without the need to increase your shard count, while still guaranteeing the order of records processed.

Illustration of multiple AWS Lambda invocations per Kinesis Data Streams shard

Lambda Parallelization Factor diagram

Lambda introduced Amazon SQS FIFO queues as an event source. “First in, first out” (FIFO) queues guarantee the order of record processing, unlike standard queues. FIFO queues support messaging batching via a MessageGroupID attribute that supports parallel Lambda consumers of a single FIFO queue, enabling high throughput of record processing by Lambda.

Lambda now supports Environment Variables in the AWS China (Beijing) Region and the AWS China (Ningxia) Region.

You can now view percentile statistics for the duration metric of your Lambda functions. Percentile statistics show the relative standing of a value in a dataset, and are useful when applied to metrics that exhibit large variances. They can help you understand the distribution of a metric, discover outliers, and find hard-to-spot situations that affect customer experience for a subset of your users.

Amazon API Gateway

Screen capture of creating an Amazon API Gateway HTTP API in the AWS Management Console

Amazon API Gateway announced the preview of HTTP APIs. In addition to significant performance improvements, most customers see an average cost savings of 70% when compared with API Gateway REST APIs. With HTTP APIs, you can create an API in four simple steps. Once the API is created, additional configuration for CORS and JWT authorizers can be added.

AWS SAM CLI

Screen capture of the new 'sam deploy' process in a terminal window

The AWS SAM CLI team simplified the bucket management and deployment process in the SAM CLI. You no longer need to manage a bucket for deployment artifacts – SAM CLI handles this for you. The deployment process has also been streamlined from multiple flagged commands to a single command, sam deploy.

AWS Step Functions

One powerful feature of AWS Step Functions is its ability to integrate directly with AWS services without you needing to write complicated application code. In Q4, Step Functions expanded its integration with Amazon SageMaker to simplify machine learning workflows. Step Functions also added a new integration with Amazon EMR, making EMR big data processing workflows faster to build and easier to monitor.

Screen capture of an AWS Step Functions step with Amazon EMR

Step Functions step with EMR

Step Functions now provides the ability to track state transition usage by integrating with AWS Budgets, allowing you to monitor trends and react to usage on your AWS account.

You can now view CloudWatch Metrics for Step Functions at a one-minute frequency. This makes it easier to set up detailed monitoring for your workflows. You can use one-minute metrics to set up CloudWatch Alarms based on your Step Functions API usage, Lambda functions, service integrations, and execution details.

Step Functions now supports higher throughput workflows, making it easier to coordinate applications with high event rates. This increases the limits to 1,500 state transitions per second and a default start rate of 300 state machine executions per second in US East (N. Virginia), US West (Oregon), and Europe (Ireland). Click the above link to learn more about the limit increases in other Regions.

Screen capture of choosing Express Workflows in the AWS Management Console

Step Functions released AWS Step Functions Express Workflows. With the ability to support event rates greater than 100,000 per second, this feature is designed for high-performance workloads at a reduced cost.

Amazon EventBridge

Illustration of the Amazon EventBridge schema registry and discovery service

Amazon EventBridge announced the preview of the Amazon EventBridge schema registry and discovery service. This service allows developers to automate discovery and cataloging event schemas for use in their applications. Additionally, once a schema is stored in the registry, you can generate and download a code binding that represents the schema as an object in your code.

Amazon SNS

Amazon SNS now supports the use of dead letter queues (DLQ) to help capture unhandled events. By enabling a DLQ, you can catch events that are not processed and re-submit them or analyze to locate processing issues.

Amazon CloudWatch

Amazon CloudWatch announced Amazon CloudWatch ServiceLens to provide a “single pane of glass” to observe health, performance, and availability of your application.

Screenshot of Amazon CloudWatch ServiceLens in the AWS Management Console

CloudWatch ServiceLens

CloudWatch also announced a preview of a capability called Synthetics. CloudWatch Synthetics allows you to test your application endpoints and URLs using configurable scripts that mimic what a real customer would do. This enables the outside-in view of your customers’ experiences, and your service’s availability from their point of view.

CloudWatch introduced Embedded Metric Format, which helps you ingest complex high-cardinality application data as logs and easily generate actionable metrics. You can publish these metrics from your Lambda function by using the PutLogEvents API or using an open source library for Node.js or Python applications.

Finally, CloudWatch announced a preview of Contributor Insights, a capability to identify who or what is impacting your system or application performance by identifying outliers or patterns in log data.

AWS X-Ray

AWS X-Ray announced trace maps, which enable you to map the end-to-end path of a single request. Identifiers show issues and how they affect other services in the request’s path. These can help you to identify and isolate service points that are causing degradation or failures.

X-Ray also announced support for Amazon CloudWatch Synthetics, currently in preview. CloudWatch Synthetics on X-Ray support tracing canary scripts throughout the application, providing metrics on performance or application issues.

Screen capture of AWS X-Ray Service map in the AWS Management Console

X-Ray Service map with CloudWatch Synthetics

Amazon DynamoDB

Amazon DynamoDB announced support for customer-managed customer master keys (CMKs) to encrypt data in DynamoDB. This allows customers to bring your own key (BYOK) giving you full control over how you encrypt and manage the security of your DynamoDB data.

It is now possible to add global replicas to existing DynamoDB tables to provide enhanced availability across the globe.

Another new DynamoDB capability to identify frequently accessed keys and database traffic trends is currently in preview. With this, you can now more easily identify “hot keys” and understand usage of your DynamoDB tables.

Screen capture of Amazon CloudWatch Contributor Insights for DynamoDB in the AWS Management Console

CloudWatch Contributor Insights for DynamoDB

DynamoDB also released adaptive capacity. Adaptive capacity helps you handle imbalanced workloads by automatically isolating frequently accessed items and shifting data across partitions to rebalance them. This helps reduce cost by enabling you to provision throughput for a more balanced workload instead of over provisioning for uneven data access patterns.

Amazon RDS

Amazon Relational Database Services (RDS) announced a preview of Amazon RDS Proxy to help developers manage RDS connection strings for serverless applications.

Illustration of Amazon RDS Proxy

The RDS Proxy maintains a pool of established connections to your RDS database instances. This pool enables you to support a large number of application connections so your application can scale without compromising performance. It also increases security by enabling IAM authentication for database access and enabling you to centrally manage database credentials using AWS Secrets Manager.

AWS Serverless Application Repository

The AWS Serverless Application Repository (SAR) now offers Verified Author badges. These badges enable consumers to quickly and reliably know who you are. The badge appears next to your name in the SAR and links to your GitHub profile.

Screen capture of SAR Verifiedl developer badge in the AWS Management Console

SAR Verified developer badges

AWS Developer Tools

AWS CodeCommit launched the ability for you to enforce rule workflows for pull requests, making it easier to ensure that code has pass through specific rule requirements. You can now create an approval rule specifically for a pull request, or create approval rule templates to be applied to all future pull requests in a repository.

AWS CodeBuild added beta support for test reporting. With test reporting, you can now view the detailed results, trends, and history for tests executed on CodeBuild for any framework that supports the JUnit XML or Cucumber JSON test format.

Screen capture of AWS CodeBuild

CodeBuild test trends in the AWS Management Console

Amazon CodeGuru

AWS announced a preview of Amazon CodeGuru at re:Invent 2019. CodeGuru is a machine learning based service that makes code reviews more effective and aids developers in writing code that is more secure, performant, and consistent.

AWS Amplify and AWS AppSync

AWS Amplify added iOS and Android as supported platforms. Now developers can build iOS and Android applications using the Amplify Framework with the same category-based programming model that they use for JavaScript apps.

Screen capture of 'amplify init' for an iOS application in a terminal window

The Amplify team has also improved offline data access and synchronization by announcing Amplify DataStore. Developers can now create applications that allow users to continue to access and modify data, without an internet connection. Upon connection, the data synchronizes transparently with the cloud.

For a summary of Amplify and AppSync announcements before re:Invent, read: “A round up of the recent pre-re:Invent 2019 AWS Amplify Launches”.

Illustration of AWS AppSync integrations with other AWS services

Q4 serverless content

Blog posts

October

November

December

Tech talks

We hold several AWS Online Tech Talks covering serverless tech talks throughout the year. These are listed in the Serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page.

Here are the ones from Q4:

Twitch

October

There are also a number of other helpful video series covering Serverless available on the AWS Twitch Channel.

AWS Serverless Heroes

We are excited to welcome some new AWS Serverless Heroes to help grow the serverless community. We look forward to some amazing content to help you with your serverless journey.

AWS Serverless Application Repository (SAR) Apps

In this edition of ICYMI, we are introducing a section devoted to SAR apps written by the AWS Serverless Developer Advocacy team. You can run these applications and review their source code to learn more about serverless and to see examples of suggested practices.

Still looking for more?

The Serverless landing page has much more information. The Lambda resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials. We’re also kicking off a fresh series of Tech Talks in 2020 with new content providing greater detail on everything new coming out of AWS for serverless application developers.

Throughout 2020, the AWS Serverless Developer Advocates are crossing the globe to tell you more about serverless, and to hear more about what you need. Follow this blog to keep up on new launches and announcements, best practices, and examples of serverless applications in action.

You can also follow all of us on Twitter to see latest news, follow conversations, and interact with the team.

Chris Munns: @chrismunns
Eric Johnson: @edjgeek
James Beswick: @jbesw
Moheeb Zara: @virgilvox
Ben Smith: @benjamin_l_s
Rob Sutter: @rts_rob
Julian Wood: @julian_wood

Happy coding!

ICYMI: Serverless pre:Invent 2019

Post Syndicated from Eric Johnson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-preinvent-2019/

With Contributions from Chris Munns – Sr Manager – Developer Advocacy – AWS Serverless

The last two weeks have been a frenzy of AWS service and feature launches, building up to AWS re:Invent 2019. As there has been a lot announced we thought we’d ship an ICYMI post summarizing the serverless service specific features that have been announced. We’ve also dropped in some service announcements from services that are commonly used in serverless application architectures or development.

AWS re:Invent

AWS re:Invent 2019

We also want you to know that we’ll be talking about many of these features (as well as those coming) in sessions at re:Invent.

Here’s what’s new!

AWS Lambda

On September 3, AWS Lambda started rolling out a major improvement to how AWS Lambda functions work with your Amazon VPC networks. This change brings both scale and performance improvements, and addresses several of the limitations of the previous networking model with VPCs.

On November 25, Lambda announced that the rollout of this new capability has completed in 6 additional regions including US East (Virginia) and US West (Oregon).

New VPC to VPC NAT for Lambda functions

New VPC to VPC NAT for Lambda functions

On November 18, Lambda announced three new runtime updates. Lambda now supports Node.js 12, Java 11, and Python 3.8. Each of these new runtimes has new language features and benefits so be sure to check out the linked release posts. These new runtimes are all based on an Amazon Linux 2 execution environment.

Lambda has released a number of controls for both stream and async based invocations:

  • For Lambda functions consuming events from Amazon Kinesis Data Streams or Amazon DynamoDB Streams, it’s now possible to limit the retry count, limit the age of records being retried, configure a failure destination, or split a batch to isolate a problem record. These capabilities will help you deal with potential “poison pill” records that would previously cause streams to pause in processing.
  • For asynchronous Lambda invocations, you can now set the maximum event age and retry attempts on the event. If either configured condition is met, the event can be routed to a dead letter queue (DLQ), Lambda destination, or it can be discarded.

In addition to the above controls, Lambda Destinations is a new feature that allows developers to designate an asynchronous target for Lambda function invocation results. You can set one destination for a success, and another for a failure. This unlocks really useful patterns for distributed event-based applications and can reduce code to send function results to a destination manually.

Lambda Destinations

Lambda Destinations

Lambda also now supports setting a Parallelization Factor, which allows you to set multiple Lambda invocations per shard for Amazon Kinesis Data Streams and Amazon DynamoDB Streams. This allows for faster processing without the need to increase your shard count, while still guaranteeing the order of records processed.

Lambda Parallelization Factor diagram

Lambda Parallelization Factor diagram

Lambda now supports Amazon SQS FIFO queues as an event source. FIFO queues guarantee the order of record processing compared to standard queues which are unordered. FIFO queues support messaging batching via a MessageGroupID attribute which allows for parallel Lambda consumers of a single FIFO queue. This allows for high throughput of record processing by Lambda.

Lambda now supports Environment Variables in AWS China (Beijing) Region, operated by Sinnet and the AWS China (Ningxia) Region, operated by NWCD.

Lastly, you can now view percentile statistics for the duration metric of your Lambda functions. Percentile statistics tell you the relative standing of a value in a dataset, and are useful when applied to metrics that exhibit large variances. They can help you understand the distribution of a metric, spot outliers, and find hard-to-spot situations that create a poor customer experience for a subset of your users.

AWS SAM CLI

AWS SAM CLI deploy command

AWS SAM CLI deploy command

The SAM CLI team simplified the bucket management and deployment process in the SAM CLI. You no longer need to manage a bucket for deployment artifacts – SAM CLI handles this for you. The deployment process has also been streamlined from multiple flagged commands to a single command, sam deploy.

AWS Step Functions

One of the powerful features of Step Functions is its ability to integrate directly with AWS services without you needing to write complicated application code. Step Functions has expanded its integration with Amazon SageMaker to simplify machine learning workflows, and added a new integration with Amazon EMR, making it faster to build and easier to monitor EMR big data processing workflows.

Step Functions step with EMR

Step Functions step with EMR

Step Functions now provides the ability to track state transition usage by integrating with AWS Budgets, allowing you to monitor and react to usage and spending trends on your AWS accounts.

You can now view CloudWatch Metrics for Step Functions at a one-minute frequency. This makes it easier to set up detailed monitoring for your workflows. You can use one-minute metrics to set up CloudWatch Alarms based on your Step Functions API usage, Lambda functions, service integrations, and execution details.

AWS Step Functions now supports higher throughput workflows, making it easier to coordinate applications with high event rates.

In US East (N. Virginia), US West (Oregon), and EU (Ireland), throughput has increased from 1,000 state transitions per second to 1,500 state transitions per second with bucket capacity of 5,000 state transitions. The default start rate for state machine executions has also increased from 200 per second to 300 per second, with bucket capacity of up to 1,300 starts in these regions.

In all other regions, throughput has increased from 400 state transitions per second to 500 state transitions per second with bucket capacity of 800 state transitions. The default start rate for AWS Step Functions state machine executions has also increased from 25 per second to 150 per second, with bucket capacity of up to 800 state machine executions.

Amazon SNS

Amazon SNS now supports the use of dead letter queues (DLQ) to help capture unhandled events. By enabling a DLQ, you can catch events that are not processed and re-submit them or analyze to locate processing issues.

Amazon CloudWatch

CloudWatch announced Amazon CloudWatch ServiceLens to provide a “single pane of glass” to observe health, performance, and availability of your application.

CloudWatch ServiceLens

CloudWatch ServiceLens

CloudWatch also announced a preview of a capability called Synthetics. CloudWatch Synthetics allows you to test your application endpoints and URLs using configurable scripts that mimic what a real customer would do. This enables the outside-in view of your customers’ experiences, and your service’s availability from their point of view.

On November 18, CloudWatch launched Embedded Metric Format to help you ingest complex high-cardinality application data in the form of logs and easily generate actionable metrics from them. You can publish these metrics from your Lambda function by using the PutLogEvents API or for Node.js or Python based applications using an open source library.

Lastly, CloudWatch announced a preview of Contributor Insights, a capability to identify who or what is impacting your system or application performance by identifying outliers or patterns in log data.

AWS X-Ray

X-Ray announced trace maps, which enable you to map the end to end path of a single request. Identifiers will show issues and how they affect other services in the request’s path. These can help you to identify and isolate service points that are causing degradation or failures.

X-Ray also announced support for Amazon CloudWatch Synthetics, currently in preview. X-Ray supports tracing canary scripts throughout the application providing metrics on performance or application issues.

X-Ray Service map with CloudWatch Synthetics

X-Ray Service map with CloudWatch Synthetics

Amazon DynamoDB

DynamoDB announced support for customer managed customer master keys (CMKs) to encrypt data in DynamoDB. This allows customers to bring your own key (BYOK) giving you full control over how you encrypt and manage the security of your DynamoDB data.

It is now possible to add global replicas to existing DynamoDB tables to provide enhanced availability across the globe.

Currently under preview, is another new DynamoDB capability to identify frequently accessed keys and database traffic trends. With this you can now more easily identify “hot keys” and understand usage of your DynamoDB tables.

CloudWatch Contributor Insights for DynamoDB

CloudWatch Contributor Insights for DynamoDB

Last but far from least for DynamoDB, is adaptive capacity, a feature which helps you handle imbalanced workloads by isolating frequently accessed items automatically and shifting data across partitions to rebalance them. This helps both reduce cost by enabling you to provision throughput for a more balanced out workload vs. over provisioning for uneven data access patterns.

AWS Serverless Application Repository

The AWS Serverless Application Repository (SAR) now offers Verified Author badges. These badges enable consumers to quickly and reliably know who you are. The badge will appear next to your name in the SAR and will deep-link to your GitHub profile.

SAR Verified developer badges

SAR Verified developer badges

AWS Code Services

AWS CodeCommit launched the ability for you to enforce rule workflows for pull requests, making it easier to ensure that code has pass through specific rule requirements. You can now create an approval rule specifically for a pull request, or create approval rule templates to be applied to all future pull requests in a repository.

AWS CodeBuild added beta support for test reporting. With test reporting, you can now view the detailed results, trends, and history for tests executed on CodeBuild for any framework that supports the JUnit XML or Cucumber JSON test format.

CodeBuild test trends

CodeBuild test trends

AWS Amplify and AWS AppSync

Instead of trying to summarize all the awesome things that our peers over in the Amplify and AppSync teams have done recently we’ll instead link you to their own recent summary: “A round up of the recent pre-re:Invent 2019 AWS Amplify Launches”.

AWS AppSync

AWS AppSync

Still looking for more?

We only covered a small bit of all the awesome new things that were recently announced. Keep your eyes peeled for more exciting announcements next week during re:Invent and for a future ICYMI Serverless Q4 roundup. We’ll also be kicking off a fresh series of Tech Talks in 2020 with new content helping to dive deeper on everything new coming out of AWS for serverless application developers.

ICYMI: Serverless Q1 2019

Post Syndicated from Eric Johnson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q1-2019/

Welcome to the fifth edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share all of the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

If you didn’t see them, check our previous posts for what happened in 2018:

So, what might you have missed this past quarter? Here’s the recap.

Amazon API Gateway

Amazon API Gateway improved the experience for publishing APIs on the API Gateway Developer Portal. In addition, we also added features like a search capability, feedback mechanism, and SDK-generation capabilities.

Last year, API Gateway announced support for WebSockets. As of early February 2019, it is now possible to build WebSocket-enabled APIs via AWS CloudFormation and AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM). The following diagram shows an example application.WebSockets

API Gateway is also now supported in AWS Config. This feature enhancement allows API administrators to track changes to their API configuration automatically. With the power of AWS Config, you can automate alerts—and even remediation—with triggered Lambda functions.

In early January, API Gateway also announced a service level agreement (SLA) of 99.95% availability.

AWS Step Functions

Step Functions Local

AWS Step Functions added the ability to tag Step Function resources and provide access control with tag-based permissions. With this feature, developers can use tags to define access via AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policies.

In addition to tag-based permissions, Step Functions was one of 10 additional services to have support from the Resource Group Tagging API, which allows a single central point of administration for tags on resources.

In early February, Step Functions released the ability to develop and test applications locally using a local Docker container. This new feature allows you to innovate faster by iterating faster locally.

In late January, Step Functions joined the family of services offering SLAs with an SLA of 99.9% availability. They also increased their service footprint to include the AWS China (Ningxia) and AWS China (Beijing) Regions.

AWS SAM Command Line Interface

AWS SAM Command Line Interface (AWS SAM CLI) released the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio Code and the AWS Toolkit for IntelliJ. These toolkits are open source plugins that make it easier to develop applications on AWS. The toolkits provide an integrated experience for developing serverless applications in Node.js (Visual Studio Code) as well as Java and Python (IntelliJ), with more languages and features to come.

The toolkits help you get started fast with built-in project templates that leverage AWS SAM to define and configure resources. They also include an integrated experience for step-through debugging of serverless applications and make it easy to deploy your applications from the integrated development environment (IDE).

AWS Serverless Application Repository

AWS Serverless Application Repository applications can now be published to the application repository using AWS CodePipeline. This allows you to update applications in the AWS Serverless Application Repository with a continuous integration and continuous delivery (CICD) process. The CICD process is powered by a pre-built application that publishes other applications to the AWS Serverless Application Repository.

AWS Event Fork Pipelines

Event Fork Pipelines

AWS Event Fork Pipelines is now available in AWS Serverless Application Repository. AWS Event Fork Pipelines is a suite of nested open-source applications based on AWS SAM. You can deploy Event Fork Pipelines directly from AWS Serverless Application Repository into your AWS account. These applications help you build event-driven serverless applications by providing pipelines for common event-handling requirements.

AWS Cloud9

Cloud9

AWS Cloud9 announced that, in addition to Amazon Linux, you can now select Ubuntu as the operating system for their AWS Cloud9 environment. Before this announcement, you would have to stand up an Ubuntu server and connect AWS Cloud9 to the instance by using SSH. With native support for Ubuntu, you can take advantage of AWS Cloud9 features, such as instance lifecycle management for cost efficiency and preconfigured tooling environments.

AWS Cloud9 also added support for AWS CloudTrail, which allows you to monitor and react to changes made to your AWS Cloud9 environment.

Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics

Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics now supports CloudTrail logging. CloudTrail captures changes made to Kinesis Data Analytics and delivers the logs to an Amazon S3 bucket. This makes it easy for administrators to understand changes made to the application and who made them.

Amazon DynamoDB

Amazon DynamoDB removed the associated costs of DynamoDB Streams used in replicating data globally. Because of their use of streams to replicate data between Regions, this translates to cost savings in global tables. However, DynamoDB streaming costs remain the same for your applications reading from a replica table’s stream.

DynamoDB added the ability to switch encryption keys used to encrypt data. DynamoDB, by default, encrypts all data at rest. You can use the default encryption, the AWS-owned customer master key (CMK), or the AWS managed CMK to encrypt data. It is now possible to change between the AWS-owned CMK and the AWS managed CMK without having to modify code or applications.

Amazon DynamoDB Local, a local installable version of DynamoDB, has added support for transactional APIs, on-demand capacity, and as many as 20 global secondary indexes per table.

AWS Amplify

Amplify Deploy

AWS Amplify added support for OAuth 2.0 Authorization Code Grant flows in the native (iOS and Android) and React Native libraries. Previously, you would have to use third-party libraries and handwritten logic to achieve these use cases.

Additionally, Amplify also launched the ability to perform instant cache invalidation and delta deployments on every code commit. To achieve this, Amplify creates unique references to all the build artifacts on each deploy. Amplify has also added the ability to detect and upload only modified artifacts at the time of release to help reduce deployment time.

Amplify also added features for multiple environments, custom resolvers, larger data models, and IAM roles, including multi-factor authentication (MFA).

AWS AppSync

AWS AppSync increased its availability footprint to the EU (London) Region.

Amazon Cognito

Amazon Cognito increased its service footprint to include the Canada (central) Region. It also published an SLA of 99.9% availability.

Amazon Aurora

Amazon Aurora Serverless increases performance visibility by publishing logs to Amazon CloudWatch.

AWS CodePipeline

CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline announces support for deploying static files to Amazon S3. While this may not usually fall under the serverless blogs and announcements, if you’re a developer who builds single-page applications or host static websites, this makes your life easier. Your static site can now be part of your CICD process without custom coding.

Serverless Posts

January:

February:

March

Tech talks

We hold several AWS Online Tech Talks covering serverless tech talks throughout the year, so look out for them in the Serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page. Here are the three tech talks that we delivered in Q1:

Whitepapers

Security Overview of AWS Lambda: This whitepaper presents a deep dive into the Lambda service through a security lens. It provides a well-rounded picture of the service, which can be useful for new adopters, as well as deepening understanding of Lambda for current users. Read the full whitepaper.

Twitch

AWS Launchpad Santa Clara

There is always something going on at our Twitch channel! Be sure and follow us so you don’t miss anything! For information about upcoming broadcasts and recent livestreams, keep an eye on AWS on Twitch for more Serverless videos and on the Join us on Twitch AWS page.

In other news

Building Happy Little APIs

Twitch Series: Building Happy Little APIs

In April, we started a 13-week deep dive into building APIs on AWS as part of our Twitch Build On series. The Building Happy Little APIs series covers the common and not-so-common use cases for APIs on AWS and the features available to customers as they look to build secure, scalable, efficient, and flexible APIs.

Twitch series: Build on Serverless: Season 2

Build On Serverless

Join Heitor Lessa across 14 weeks, nearly every Wednesday from April 24 – August 7 at 8AM PST/11AM EST/3PM UTC. Heitor is live-building a full-stack, serverless airline-booking application using a bunch of services: Lambda, Amplify, API Gateway, Amazon Cognito, AWS SAM, CloudWatch, AWS AppSync, and others. See the episode guide and sign up for stream reminders.

2019 AWS Summits

AWS Summit

The 2019 schedule is in full swing for 2019 AWS Global Summits held in major cities around the world. These free events bring the cloud computing community together to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS. They attract technologists from all industries and skill levels who want to discover how AWS can help them innovate quickly and deliver flexible, reliable solutions at scale. Get notified when to register and learn more at the AWS Global Summit Program website.

Still looking for more?

The Serverless landing page has lots of information. The Lambda resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials. Check it out!

ICYMI: Serverless Q4 2018

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q4-2018/

This post is courtesy of Eric Johnson, Senior Developer Advocate – AWS Serverless

Welcome to the fourth edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share all of the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

This edition of ICYMI includes all announcements from AWS re:Invent 2018!

If you didn’t see them, check our Q1 ICYMIQ2 ICYMI, and Q3 ICYMI posts for what happened then.

So, what might you have missed this past quarter? Here’s the recap.

New features

AWS Lambda introduced the Lambda runtime API and Lambda layers, which enable developers to bring their own runtime and share common code across Lambda functions. With the release of the runtime API, we can now support runtimes from AWS partners such as the PHP runtime from Stackery and the Erlang and Elixir runtimes from Alert Logic. Using layers, partners such as Datadog and Twistlock have also simplified the process of using their Lambda code libraries.

To meet the demand of larger Lambda payloads, Lambda doubled the payload size of asynchronous calls to 256 KB.

In early October, Lambda also lengthened the runtime limit by enabling Lambda functions that can run up to 15 minutes.

Lambda also rolled out native support for Ruby 2.5 and Python 3.7.

You can now process Amazon Kinesis streams up to 68% faster with AWS Lambda support for Kinesis Data Streams enhanced fan-out and HTTP/2 for faster streaming.

Lambda also released a new Application view in the console. It’s a high-level view of all of the resources in your application. It also gives you a quick view of deployment status with the ability to view service metrics and custom dashboards.

Application Load Balancers added support for targeting Lambda functions. ALBs can provide a simple HTTP/S front end to Lambda functions. ALB features such as host- and path-based routing are supported to allow flexibility in triggering Lambda functions.

Amazon API Gateway added support for AWS WAF. You can use AWS WAF for your Amazon API Gateway APIs to protect from attacks such as SQL injection and cross-site scripting (XSS).

API Gateway has also improved parameter support by adding support for multi-value parameters. You can now pass multiple values for the same key in the header and query string when calling the API. Returning multiple headers with the same name in the API response is also supported. For example, you can send multiple Set-Cookie headers.

In October, API Gateway relaunched the Serverless Developer Portal. It provides a catalog of published APIs and associated documentation that enable self-service discovery and onboarding. You can customize it for branding through either custom domain names or logo/styling updates. In November, we made it easier to launch the developer portal from the Serverless Application Repository.

In the continuous effort to decrease customer costs, API Gateway introduced tiered pricing. The tiered pricing model allows the cost of API Gateway at scale with an API Requests price as low as $1.51 per million requests at the highest tier.

Last but definitely not least, API Gateway released support for WebSocket APIs in mid-December as a final holiday gift. With this new feature, developers can build bidirectional communication applications without having to provision and manage any servers. This has been a long-awaited and highly anticipated announcement for the serverless community.

AWS Step Functions added eight new service integrations. With this release, the steps of your workflow can exist on Amazon ECS, AWS Fargate, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon SNS, Amazon SQS, AWS Batch, AWS Glue, and Amazon SageMaker. This is in addition to the services that Step Functions already supports: AWS Lambda and Amazon EC2.

Step Functions expanded by announcing availability in the EU (Paris) and South America (São Paulo) Regions.

The AWS Serverless Application Repository increased its functionality by supporting more resources in the repository. The Serverless Application Repository now supports Application Auto Scaling, Amazon Athena, AWS AppSync, AWS Certificate Manager, Amazon CloudFront, AWS CodeBuild, AWS CodePipeline, AWS Glue, AWS dentity and Access Management, Amazon SNS, Amazon SQS, AWS Systems Manager, and AWS Step Functions.

The Serverless Application Repository also released support for nested applications. Nested applications enable you to build highly sophisticated serverless architectures by reusing services that are independently authored and maintained but easily composed using AWS SAM and the Serverless Application Repository.

AWS SAM made authorization simpler by introducing SAM support for authorizers. Enabling authorization for your APIs is as simple as defining an Amazon Cognito user pool or an API Gateway Lambda authorizer as a property of your API in your SAM template.

AWS SAM CLI introduced two new commands. First, you can now build locally with the sam build command. This functionality allows you to compile deployment artifacts for Lambda functions written in Python. Second, the sam publish command allows you to publish your SAM application to the Serverless Application Repository.

Our SAM tooling team also released the AWS Toolkit for PyCharm, which provides an integrated experience for developing serverless applications in Python.

The AWS Toolkits for Visual Studio Code (Developer Preview) and IntelliJ (Developer Preview) are still in active development and will include similar features when they become generally available.

AWS SAM and the AWS SAM CLI implemented support for Lambda layers. Using a SAM template, you can manage your layers, and using the AWS SAM CLI, you can develop and debug Lambda functions that are dependent on layers.

Amazon DynamoDB added support for transactions, allowing developer to enforce all-or-nothing operations. In addition to transaction support, Amazon DynamoDB Accelerator also added support for DynamoDB transactions.

Amazon DynamoDB also announced Amazon DynamoDB on-demand, a flexible new billing option for DynamoDB capable of serving thousands of requests per second without capacity planning. DynamoDB on-demand offers simple pay-per-request pricing for read and write requests so that you only pay for what you use, making it easy to balance costs and performance.

AWS Amplify released the Amplify Console, which is a continuous deployment and hosting service for modern web applications with serverless backends. Modern web applications include single-page app frameworks such as React, Angular, and Vue and static-site generators such as Jekyll, Hugo, and Gatsby.

Amazon SQS announced support for Amazon VPC Endpoints using PrivateLink.

Serverless blogs

October

November

December

Tech talks

We hold several Serverless tech talks throughout the year, so look out for them in the Serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page. Here are the three tech talks that we delivered in Q4:

Twitch

We’ve been so busy livestreaming on Twitch that you’re most certainly missing out if you aren’t following along!

For information about upcoming broadcasts and recent livestreams, keep an eye on AWS on Twitch for more Serverless videos and on the Join us on Twitch AWS page.

New Home for SAM Docs

This quarter, we moved all SAM docs to https://docs.aws.amazon.com/serverless-application-model. Everything you need to know about SAM is there. If you don’t find what you’re looking for, let us know!

In other news

The schedule is out for 2019 AWS Global Summits in cities around the world. AWS Global Summits are free events that bring the cloud computing community together to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS. Summits are held in major cities around the world. They attract technologists from all industries and skill levels who want to discover how AWS can help them innovate quickly and deliver flexible, reliable solutions at scale. Get notified when to register and learn more at the AWS Global Summits website.

Still looking for more?

The Serverless landing page has lots of information. The resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials. Check it out!