Tag Archives: AWS Serverless Application Model

ICYMI: Serverless Q3 2019

Post Syndicated from James Beswick original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q3-2019/

This post is courtesy of Julian Wood, Senior Developer Advocate – AWS Serverless

Welcome to the seventh edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share all of the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

In case you missed our last ICYMI, checkout what happened last quarter here.

ICYMI calendar

Launches/New products

Amazon EventBridge was technically launched in this quarter although we were so excited to let you know, we squeezed it into the Q2 2019 update. If you missed it, EventBridge is the serverless event bus that connects application data from your own apps, SaaS, and AWS services. This allows you to create powerful event-driven serverless applications using a variety of event sources.

The AWS Bahrain Region has opened, the official name is Middle East (Bahrain) and the API name is me-south-1. AWS Cloud now spans 22 geographic Regions with 69 Availability Zones around the world.

AWS Lambda

In September we announced dramatic improvements in cold starts for Lambda functions inside a VPC. With this announcement, you see faster function startup performance and more efficient usage of elastic network interfaces, drastically reducing VPC cold starts.

VPC to VPC NAT

These improvements are rolling out to all existing and new VPC functions at no additional cost. Rollout is ongoing, you can track the status from the announcement post.

AWS Lambda now supports custom batch window for Kinesis and DynamoDB Event sources, which helps fine-tune Lambda invocation for cost optimization.

You can now deploy Amazon Machine Images (AMIs) and Lambda functions together from the AWS Marketplace using using AWS CloudFormation with just a few clicks.

AWS IoT Events actions now support AWS Lambda as a target. Previously you could only define actions to publish messages to SNS and MQTT. Now you can define actions to invoke AWS Lambda functions and even more targets, such as Amazon Simple Queue Service and Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose, and republish messages to IoT Events.

The AWS Lambda Console now shows recent invocations using CloudWatch Logs Insights. From the monitoring tab in the console, you can view duration, billing, and memory statistics for the 10 most recent invocations.

AWS Step Functions

AWS Step Functions example

AWS Step Functions has now been extended to support probably its most requested feature, Dynamic Parallelism, which allows steps within a workflow to be executed in parallel, with a new Map state type.

One way to use the new Map state is for fan-out or scatter-gather messaging patterns in your workflows:

  • Fan-out is applied when delivering a message to multiple destinations, and can be useful in workflows such as order processing or batch data processing. For example, you can retrieve arrays of messages from Amazon SQS and Map sends each message to a separate AWS Lambda function.
  • Scatter-gather broadcasts a single message to multiple destinations (scatter), and then aggregates the responses back for the next steps (gather). This is useful in file processing and test automation. For example, you can transcode ten 500-MB media files in parallel, and then join to create a 5-GB file.

Another important update is AWS Step Functions adds support for nested workflows, which allows you to orchestrate more complex processes by composing modular, reusable workflows.

AWS Amplify

A new Predictions category as been added to the Amplify Framework to quickly add machine learning capabilities to your web and mobile apps.

Amplify framework

With a few lines of code you can add and configure AI/ML services to configure your app to:

  • Identify text, entities, and labels in images using Amazon Rekognition, or identify text in scanned documents to get the contents of fields in forms and information stored in tables using Amazon Textract.
  • Convert text into a different language using Amazon Translate, text to speech using Amazon Polly, and speech to text using Amazon Transcribe.
  • Interpret text to find the dominant language, the entities, the key phrases, the sentiment, or the syntax of unstructured text using Amazon Comprehend.

AWS Amplify CLI (part of the open source Amplify Framework) has added local mocking and testing. This allows you to mock some of the most common cloud services and test your application 100% locally.

For this first release, the Amplify CLI can mock locally:

amplify mock

AWS CloudFormation

The CloudFormation team has released the much-anticipated CloudFormation Coverage Roadmap.

Styled after the popular AWS Containers Roadmap, the CloudFormation Coverage Roadmap provides transparency about our priorities, and the opportunity to provide your input.

The roadmap contains four columns:

  • Shipped – Available for use in production in all public AWS Regions.
  • Coming Soon – Generally a few months out.
  • We’re working on It – Work in progress, but further out.
  • Researching – We’re thinking about the right way to implement the coverage.

AWS CloudFormation roadmap

Amazon DynamoDB

NoSQL Workbench for Amazon DynamoDB has been released in preview. This is a free, client-side application available for Windows and macOS. It helps you more easily design and visualize your data model, run queries on your data, and generate the code for your application.

Amazon Aurora

Amazon Aurora Serverless is a dynamically scaling version of Amazon Aurora. It automatically starts up, shuts down, and scales up or down, based on your application workload.

Aurora Serverless has had a MySQL compatible edition for a while, now we’re excited to bring more serverless joy to databases with the PostgreSQL compatible version now GA.

We also have a useful post on Reducing Aurora PostgreSQL storage I/O costs.

AWS Serverless Application Repository

The AWS Serverless Application Repository has had some useful SAR apps added by Serverless Developer Advocate James Beswick.

  • S3 Auto Translator which automatically converts uploaded objects into other languages specified by the user, using Amazon Translate.
  • Serverless S3 Uploader allows you to upload JPG files to Amazon S3 buckets from your web applications using presigned URLs.

Serverless posts

July

August

September

Tech talks

We hold several AWS Online Tech Talks covering serverless tech talks throughout the year. These are listed in the Serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page.

Here are the ones from Q3:

Twitch

July

August

September

There are also a number of other helpful video series covering Serverless available on the AWS Twitch Channel.

AWS re:Invent

AWS re:Invent

December 2 – 6 in Las Vegas, Nevada is peak AWS learning time with AWS re:Invent 2019. Join tens of thousands of AWS customers to learn, share ideas, and see exciting keynote announcements.

Be sure to take a look at the growing catalog of serverless sessions this year. Make sure to book time for Builders SessionsChalk Talks, and Workshops as these sessions will fill up quickly. The schedule is updated regularly so if your session is currently fully booked, a repeat may be scheduled.

Register for AWS re:Invent now!

What did we do at AWS re:Invent 2018? Check out our recap here: AWS re:Invent 2018 Recap at the San Francisco Loft.

Our friends at IOPipe have written 5 tips for avoiding serverless FOMO at this year’s re:Invent.

AWS Serverless Heroes

We are excited to welcome some new AWS Serverless Heroes to help grow the serverless community. We look forward to some amazing content to help you with your serverless journey.

Still looking for more?

The Serverless landing page has much more information. The Lambda resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials.

 

Building a Serverless FHIR Interface on AWS

Post Syndicated from Annik Stahl original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/building-a-serverless-fhir-interface-on-aws/

This post is courtesy of Mithun Mallick, Senior Solutions Architect (Messaging), and Navneet Srivastava, Senior Solutions Architect.

Technology is revolutionizing the healthcare industry but it can be a challenge for healthcare providers to take full advantage because of software systems that don’t easily communicate with each other. A single patient visit involves multiple systems such as practice management, electronic health records, and billing. When these systems can’t operate together, it’s harder to leverage them to improve patient care.

To help make it easier to exchange data between these systems, Health Level Seven International (HL7) developed the Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR), an interoperability standard for the electronic exchange of healthcare information. In this post, I will show you the AWS services you use to build a serverless FHIR interface on the cloud.

In FHIR, resources are your basic building blocks. A resource is an exchangeable piece of content that has a common way to define and represent it, a set of common metadata, and a human readable part. Each resource type has the same set of operations, called interactions, that you use to manage the resources in a granular fashion. For more information, see the FHIR overview.

FHIR Serverless Architecture

My FHIR architecture features a server with its own data repository and a simple consumer application that displays Patient and Observation data. To make it easier to build, my server only supports the JSON content type over HTTPs, and it only supports the Bundle, Patient, and Observation FHIR resource types. In a production environment, your server should support all resource types.

For this architecture, the server supports the following interactions:

  • Posting bundles as collections of Patients and Observations
  • Searching Patients and Observations
  • Updating and reading Patients
  • Creating a CapabilityStatement

You can expand this architecture to support all FHIR resource types, interactions, and data formats.

The following diagram shows how the described services work together to create a serverless FHIR messaging interface.

 

Services work together to create a serverless FHIR messaging interface.

 

Amazon API Gateway

In Amazon API Gateway, you create the REST API that acts as a “front door” for the consumer application to access the data and business logic of this architecture. I used API Gateway to host the API endpoints. I created the resource definitions and API methods in the API Gateway.

For this architecture, the FHIR resources map to the resource definitions in API Gateway. The Bundle FHIR resource type maps to the Bundle API Gateway resource. The observation FHIR resource type maps to the observation API Gateway resource. And, the Patient FHIR resource type maps to the Patient API Gateway resource.

To keep the API definitions simple, I used the ANY method. The ANY method handles the various URL mappings in the AWS Lambda code, and uses Lambda proxy integration to send requests to the Lambda function.

You can use the ANY method to handle HTTP methods, such as:

  • POST to represent the interaction to create a Patient resource type
  • GET to read a Patient instance based on a patient ID, or to search based on predefined parameters

We chose Amazon DynamoDB because it provides the input data representation and query patterns necessary for a FHIR data repository. For this architecture, each resource type is stored in its own Amazon DynamoDB table. Metadata for resources stored in the repository is also stored in its own table.

We set up global secondary indexes on the patient and observations tables in order to perform searches and retrieve observations for a patient. In this architecture, the patient id is stored as a patient reference id in the observation table. The patientRefid-index allows you to retrieve observations based on the patient id without performing a full scan of the table.

We chose Amazon S3 to store archived FHIR messages because of its low cost and high durability.

Processing FHIR Messages

Each Amazon API Gateway request in this architecture is backed by an AWS Lambda function containing the Jersey RESTful web services framework, the AWS serverless Java container framework, and the HAPI FHIR library.

The AWS serverless Java framework provides a base implementation for the handleRequest method in LambdaHandler class. It uses the serverless Java container initialized in the global scope to proxy requests to our jersey application.

The handler method calls a proxy class and passes the stream classes along with the context.

This source code from the LambdaHandler class shows the handleRequest method:

// Main entry point of the Lambda function, uses the serverless-java-container initialized in the global scope
// to proxy requests to our jersey application
public void handleRequest(InputStream inputStream, OutputStream outputStream, Context context) 
    throws IOException {
    	
        handler.proxyStream(inputStream, outputStream, context);

        // just in case it wasn't closed by the map	per
        outputStream.close();
}

The resource implementations classes are in the com.amazonaws.lab.resources package. This package defines the URL mappings necessary for routing the REST API calls.

The following method from the PatientResource class implements the GET patient interaction based on a patient id. The annotations describe the HTTP method called, as well as the path that is used to make the call. This method is invoked when a request is sent with the URL pattern: Patient/{id}. It retrieves the Patient resource type based on the id sent as part of the URL.

	@GET
	@Path("/{id}")
public Response gETPatientid(@Context SecurityContext securityContext,
			@ApiParam(value = "", required = true) @PathParam("id") String id, @HeaderParam("Accept") String accepted) {
…
}

Deploying the FHIR Interface

To deploy the resources for this architecture, we used an AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM) template. During deployment, SAM templates are expanded and transformed into AWS CloudFormation syntax. The template launches and configures all the services that make up the architecture.

Building the Consumer Application

For out architecture, we wrote a simple Node.JS client application that calls the APIs on FHIR server to get a list of patients and related observations. You can build more advanced applications for this architecture. For example, you could build a patient-focused application that displays vitals and immunization charts. Or, you could build a backend/mid-tier application that consumes a large number of messages and transforms them for downstream analytics.

This is the code we used to get the token from Amazon Cognito:

token = authcognito.token();

//Setting url to call FHIR server

     var options = {
       url: "https://<FHIR SERVER>",
       host: "FHIR SERVER",
       path: "Prod/Patient",
       method: "GET",
       headers: {
         "Content-Type": "application/json",
         "Authorization": token
         }
       }

This is the code we used to call the FHIR server:

request(options, function(err, response, body) {
     if (err) {
       console.log("In error  ");
       console.log(err);

}
else {
     let patientlist = JSON.parse(body);

     console.log(patientlist);
     res.json(patientlist["entry"]);
}
});
 

We used AWS CloudTrail and AWS X-Ray for logging and debugging.

The screenshots below display the results:

Conclusion

In this post, we demonstrated how to build a serverless FHIR architecture. We used Amazon API Gateway and AWS Lambda to ingest and process FHIR resources, and Amazon DynamoDB and Amazon S3 to provide a repository for the resources. Amazon Cognito provides secure access to the API Gateway. We also showed you how to build a simple consumer application that displays patient and observation data. You can modify this architecture for your individual use case.

About the authors

Mithun MallickMithun is a Sr. Solutions Architect and is responsible for helping customers in the HCLS industry build secure, scalable and cost-effective solutions on AWS. Mithun helps develop and implement strategic plan to engage customers and partners in the industry and works with the community of technically focused HCLS specialists within AWS. He has hands on experience on messaging standards like X12, HL7 and FHIR. Mithun has a M.B.A from CSU (Ft. Collins, CO) and a bachelors in Computer Engineering. He holds several associate and professional certifications for architecting on AWS.

 

 

Navneet SrivastavaNavneet, a Sr. Solutions Architect, is responsible for helping provider organizations and healthcare companies to deploy electronic medical records, devices, and AI/ML-based applications while educating customers about how to build secure, scalable, and cost-effective AWS solutions. He develops strategic plans to engage customers and partners, and works with a community of technically focused HCLS specialists within AWS. He is skilled AI, ML, Big Data, and healthcare related technologies. Navneet has a M.B.A from NYIT and a bachelors in software Engineering and holds several associate and professional certifications for architecting on AWS.

ICYMI: Serverless Q2 2019

Post Syndicated from Eric Johnson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q2-2019/

This post is courtesy of Moheeb Zara, Senior Developer Advocate – AWS Serverless

Welcome to the sixth edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share all of the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

In case you missed our last ICYMI, checkout what happened last quarter here.

April - June 2019

Amazon EventBridge

Before we dive in to all that happened in Q2, we’re excited about this quarter’s launch of Amazon EventBridge, the serverless event bus that connects application data from your own apps, SaaS, and AWS-as-a-service. This allows you to create powerful event-driven serverless applications using a variety of event sources.

Our very own AWS Solutions Architect, Mike Deck, sat down with AWS Serverless Hero Jeremy Daly and recorded a podcast on Amazon EventBridge. It’s a worthy listen if you’re interested in exploring all the features offered by this launch.

Now, back to Q2, here’s what’s new.

AWS Lambda

Lambda Monitoring

Amazon CloudWatch Logs Insights now allows you to see statistics from recent invocations of your Lambda functions in the Lambda monitoring tab.

Additionally, as of June, you can monitor the [email protected] functions associated with your Amazon CloudFront distributions directly from your Amazon CloudFront console. This includes a revamped monitoring dashboard for CloudFront distributions and [email protected] functions.

AWS Step Functions

Step Functions

AWS Step Functions now supports workflow execution events, which help in the building and monitoring of even-driven serverless workflows. Automatic Execution event notifications can be delivered upon start/completion of CloudWatch Events/Amazon EventBridge. This allows services such as AWS Lambda, Amazon SNS, Amazon Kinesis, or AWS Step Functions to respond to these events.

Additionally you can use callback patterns to automate workflows for applications with human activities and custom integrations with third-party services. You create callback patterns in minutes with less code to write and maintain, run without servers and infrastructure to manage, and scale reliably.

Amazon API Gateway

API Gateway Tag Based Control

Amazon API Gateway now offers tag-based access control for WebSocket APIs using AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policies, allowing you to categorize API Gateway resources for WebSocket APIs by purpose, owner, or other criteria.  With the addition of tag-based access control to WebSocket resources, you can now give permissions to WebSocket resources at various levels by creating policies based on tags. For example, you can grant full access to admins to while limiting access to developers.

You can now enforce a minimum Transport Layer Security (TLS) version and cipher suites through a security policy for connecting to your Amazon API Gateway custom domain.

In addition, Amazon API Gateway now allows you to define VPC Endpoint policies, enabling you to specify which Private APIs a VPC Endpoint can connect to. This enables granular security control using VPC Endpoint policies.

AWS Amplify

Amplify CLI (part of the open source Amplify Framework) now includes support for adding and configuring AWS Lambda triggers for events when using Amazon Cognito, Amazon Simple Storage Service, and Amazon DynamoDB as event sources. This means you can setup custom authentication flows for mobile and web applications via the Amplify CLI and Amazon Cognito User Pool as an authentication provider.

Amplify Console

Amplify Console,  a Git-based workflow for continuous deployment and hosting for fullstack serverless web apps, launched several updates to the build service including SAM CLI and custom container support.

Amazon Kinesis

Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose can now utilize AWS PrivateLink to securely ingest data. AWS PrivateLink provides private connectivity between VPCs, AWS services, and on-premises applications, securely over the Amazon network. When AWS PrivateLink is used with Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose, all traffic to a Kinesis Data Firehose from a VPC flows over a private connection.

You can now assign AWS resource tags to applications in Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics. These key/value tags can be used to organize and identify resources, create cost allocation reports, and control access to resources within Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics.

Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose is now available in the AWS GovCloud (US-East), Europe (Stockholm), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), and EU (London) regions.

For a complete list of where Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics is available, please see the AWS Region Table.

AWS Cloud9

Cloud9 Quick Starts

Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud9 integrated development environment (IDE) now has a Quick Start which deploys in the AWS cloud in about 30 minutes. This enables organizations to provide developers a powerful cloud-based IDE that can edit, run, and debug code in the browser and allow easy sharing and collaboration.

AWS Cloud9 is also now available in the EU (Frankfurt) and Asia Pacific (Tokyo) regions. For a current list of supported regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints in the AWS documentation.

Amazon DynamoDB

You can now tag Amazon DynamoDB tables when you create them. Tags are labels you can attach to AWS resources to make them easier to manage, search, and filter.  Tagging support has also been extended to the AWS GovCloud (US) Regions.

DynamoDBMapper now supports Amazon DynamoDB transactional API calls. This support is included within the AWS SDK for Java. These transactional APIs provide developers atomic, consistent, isolated, and durable (ACID) operations to help ensure data correctness.

Amazon DynamoDB now applies adaptive capacity in real time in response to changing application traffic patterns, which helps you maintain uninterrupted performance indefinitely, even for imbalanced workloads.

AWS Training and Certification has launched Amazon DynamoDB: Building NoSQL Database–Driven Applications, a new self-paced, digital course available exclusively on edX.

Amazon Aurora

Amazon Aurora Serverless MySQL 5.6 can now be accessed using the built-in Data API enabling you to access Aurora Serverless with web services-based applications, including AWS LambdaAWS AppSync, and AWS Cloud9. For more check out this post.

Sharing snapshots of Aurora Serverless DB clusters with other AWS accounts or publicly is now possible. We are also giving you the ability to copy Aurora Serverless DB cluster snapshots across AWS regions.

You can now set the minimum capacity of your Aurora Serverless DB clusters to 1 Aurora Capacity Unit (ACU). With Aurora Serverless, you specify the minimum and maximum ACUs for your Aurora Serverless DB cluster instead of provisioning and managing database instances. Each ACU is a combination of processing and memory capacity. By setting the minimum capacity to 1 ACU, you can keep your Aurora Serverless DB cluster running at a lower cost.

AWS Serverless Application Repository

The AWS Serverless Application Repository is now available in 17 regions with the addition of the AWS GovCloud (US-West) region.

Region support includes Asia Pacific (Mumbai, Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo), Canada (Central), EU (Frankfurt, Ireland, London, Paris, Stockholm), South America (São Paulo), US West (N. California, Oregon), and US East (N. Virginia, Ohio).

Amazon Cognito

Amazon Cognito has launched a new API – AdminSetUserPassword – for the Cognito User Pool service that provides a way for administrators to set temporary or permanent passwords for their end users. This functionality is available for end users even when their verified phone or email are unavailable.

Serverless Posts

April

May

June

Events

Events this quarter

Senior Developer Advocates for AWS Serverless spoke at several conferences this quarter. Here are some recordings worth watching!

Tech Talks

We hold several AWS Online Tech Talks covering serverless tech talks throughout the year, so look out for them in the Serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page. Here are the ones from Q2.

Twitch

Twitch Series

In April, we started a 13-week deep dive into building APIs on AWS as part of our Twitch Build On series. The Building Happy Little APIs series covers the common and not-so-common use cases for APIs on AWS and the features available to customers as they look to build secure, scalable, efficient, and flexible APIs.

There are also a number of other helpful video series covering Serverless available on the AWS Twitch Channel.

Build with Serverless on Twitch

Serverless expert and AWS Specialist Solutions architect, Heitor Lessa, has been hosting a weekly Twitch series since April. Join him and others as they build an end-to-end airline booking solution using serverless. The final episode airs on August 7th at Wednesday 8:00am PT.

Here’s a recap of the last quarter:

AWS re:Invent

AWS re:Invent 2019

AWS re:Invent 2019 is around the corner! From December 2 – 6 in Las Vegas, Nevada, join tens of thousands of AWS customers to learn, share ideas, and see exciting keynote announcements. Be sure to take a look at the growing catalog of serverless sessions this year.

Register for AWS re:Invent now!

What did we do at AWS re:Invent 2018? Check out our recap here: AWS re:Invent 2018 Recap at the San Francisco Loft

AWS Serverless Heroes

We urge you to explore the efforts of our AWS Serverless Heroes Community. This is a worldwide network of AWS Serverless experts with a diverse background of experience. For example, check out this post from last month where Marcia Villalba demonstrates how to set up unit tests for serverless applications.

Still looking for more?

The Serverless landing page has lots of information. The Lambda resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials.

Increasing real-time stream processing performance with Amazon Kinesis Data Streams enhanced fan-out and AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Eric Johnson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/increasing-real-time-stream-processing-performance-with-amazon-kinesis-data-streams-enhanced-fan-out-and-aws-lambda/

Live business data and real-time analytics are critical to informed decision-making and customer service. For example, streaming services like Netflix process billions of traffic flows each day to help you binge-watch your favorite shows. And consumer audio specialists like Sonos monitor a billion events per week to improve listener experiences. These data-savvy businesses collect and analyze massive amounts of real-time data every day.

Kinesis Data Streams overview

To help ingest real-time data or streaming data at large scales, AWS customers turn to Amazon Kinesis Data Streams. Kinesis Data Streams can continuously capture gigabytes of data per second from hundreds of thousands of sources. The data collected is available in milliseconds, enabling real-time analytics.

To provide this massively scalable throughput, Kinesis Data Streams relies on shards, which are units of throughput and represent a parallelism. One shard provides an ingest throughput of 1 MB/second or 1000 records/second. A shard also has an outbound throughput of 2 MB/sec. As you ingest more data, Kinesis Data Streams can add more shards. Customers often ingest thousands of shards in a single stream.

Enhanced fan-out

One of the main advantages of stream processing is that you can attach multiple unique applications, each consuming data from the same Kinesis data stream. For example, one application can aggregate the records in the data stream, batch them, and write the batch to S3 for long-term retention. Another application can enrich the records and write them into an Amazon DynamoDB table. At the same time, a third application can filter the stream and write a subset of the data into a different Kinesis data stream.

Before the adoption of enhanced fan-out technology, users consumed data from a Kinesis data stream with multiple AWS Lambda functions sharing the same 2 MB/second outbound throughput. Due to shared bandwidth constraints, no more than two or three functions could efficiently connect to the data stream at a time, as shown in the following diagram.

Default Method

To achieve greater outbound throughput across multiple applications, you could spread data ingestion across multiple data streams. So, a developer seeking to achieve 10 GB/second of outbound throughput to support five separate applications might resort to math like the following table:

StreamShardsInputOutput
111000 records/second
or 1 MB/second
2 MB/second
22500 ea.5,000,000 records/second
or 5000 MB/second
10,000 MB/second
or 10 GB/second

Due to the practical limitation of two to three applications per stream, you must have at least two streams to support five individual applications. You could attach three applications to the first stream and two applications to the second. However, diverting data into two separate streams adds complexity.

In August of 2018, Kinesis Data Streams announced a solution: support for enhanced fan-out and HTTP/2 for faster streaming. The enhanced fan-out method is an option that you can use for consuming Kinesis data streams at a higher capacity. The enhanced capacity enables you to achieve higher outbound throughput without having to provision more streams or shards in the same stream.

When using the enhanced fan-out option, first create a Kinesis data stream consumer. A consumer is an isolated connection to the stream that provides a 2 MB/second outbound throughput. A Kinesis data stream can support up to five consumers, providing a combined outbound throughput capacity of 10MB/second/shard. As the stream scales dynamically by adding shards, so does the amount of throughput scale through the consumers.

Consider again the requirement of 10 GB of output capacity—but rerun your math using enhanced fan-out.

StreamShardsInputConsumersOutput
111000 records/second
or 1 MB/second
510 MB/second
110001,000,000 records
or 1,000 MB/second
510,000 MB/second
or 10 GB/second

Enhanced fan-out with Lambda functions

Just before re:Invent 2018, AWS Lambda announced support for enhanced fan-out and HTTP/2. Lambda functions can now be triggered using the enhanced fan-out pattern to reduce latency. These improvements increase the amount of real-time data that can be processed in serverless applications, as seen in the following diagram.

Enhanced Fan-Out Method

In addition to using the enhanced fan-out option, you can still attach Lambda functions to the stream using the GetRecords API, as before. You can attach up to five consumers with Lambda functions at 2 MB/second outbound throughput capacity and another two or three Lambda functions sharing a single 2 MB/second outbound throughput capacity. Thus, enhanced fan-out enables you to support up to eight Lambda functions, simultaneously.

HTTP/2

The streaming technology in HTTP/2 increases the output ability of Kinesis data streams. In addition, it allows data delivery from producers to consumers in 70 milliseconds or better (a 65% improvement) in typical scenarios. These new features enable you to build faster, more reactive, highly parallel, and latency-sensitive applications on top of Kinesis Data Streams.

Comparing methods

To demonstrate the advantage of Kinesis Data Streams enhanced fan-out, I built an application with a single shard stream. It has three Lambda functions connected using the standard method and three Lambda functions connected using enhanced fan-out for consumers. I created roughly 76 KB of dummy data and inserted it into the stream at 1,000 records per second. After four seconds, I stopped the process, leaving a total of 4,000 records to be processed.

As seen in the following diagram, each of the enhanced fan-out functions processed the 4000 records in under 2 seconds, averaging at 1,852 MS each. Interestingly, the standard method got a jumpstart in the first function, processing 4,000 records in 1,732 MS. However, because of the shared resources, the other two functions took longer to process the data, at just over 2.5 seconds.

Comparison of Methods

By Kinesis Data Streams standards, 4000 records is a small dataset. But when processing millions of records in real time, the latency between standard and enhanced fan-out becomes much more significant.

Cost

When using Kinesis Data Streams, a company incurs an hourly cost of $0.015 per shard and a PUT fee of $0.014 per one million units. You can purchase enhanced fan-out for a consumer-shard per hour fee of $0.015 and $0.013 per GB data retrieval fee. These fees are for the us-east-1 Region only. To see a full list of prices, see Kinesis Data Streams pricing.

Show me the code

To demonstrate the use of Kinesis Data Streams enhanced fan-out with Lambda functions, I built a simple application. It ingests simulated IoT sensor data and stores it in an Amazon DynamoDB table as well as in an Amazon S3 bucket for later use. I could have conceivably done this in a single Lambda function. However, to keep things simple, I broke it into two separate functions.

Deploying the application

I built the Kinesis-Enhanced-Fan-Out-to-DDB-S3 application and made it available through the AWS Serverless Application Repository.

Deploy the application in your AWS account. The application is only available in the us-east-1 Region.

On the deployment status page, you can monitor the resources being deployed, including policies and capabilities.

Deployment Status

After all the resources deploy, you should see a green banner.

Exploring the application

Take a moment to examine the list of deployed resources. The two Lambda functions, DDBFunction and S3Function, receive data and write to DynamoDB and S3, respectively. Additionally, two roles have been created to allow the functions access to their respective targets.

There are also two consumers, DDBConsumer and S3Consumer, which provide isolated output at 2 MB/second throughput. Each consumer is connected to the KinesisStream stream and triggers the Lambda functions when data occurs.

Also, there is a DynamoDB table called DBRecords and an S3 bucket called S3Records.

Finally, there is a stream consumption app, as shown in the following diagram.

Application Example

Testing the application

Now that you have your application installed, test it by putting data into the Kinesis data stream.

There are several ways to do this. You can build your producer using the Kinesis Producer Library (KPL), or you could create an app that uses the AWS SDK to input data. However, there is an easier way that suits your purposes for this post: the Amazon Kinesis Data Generator. The easiest way to use this tool is to use the hosted generator and follow the setup instructions.

After you have the generator configured, you should have a custom URL to generate data for your Kinesis data stream. In your configuration steps, you created a username and password. Log in to the generator using those credentials.

When you are logged in, you can generate data for your stream test.

  1. For Region, choose us-east-1.
  2. For Stream/delivery stream, select your stream. It should start with serverlessrepo.
  3. For Records per second, keep the default value of 100.
  4. On the Template 1 tab, name the template Sensor1.
  5. Use the following template:
    {
        "sensorId": {{random.number(50)}},
        "currentTemperature": {{random.number(
            {
                "min":10,
                "max":150
            }
        )}},
        "status": "{{random.arrayElement(
            ["OK","FAIL","WARN"]
        )}}"
    }
  6. Choose Send Data.
  7. After several seconds, choose Stop Sending Data.

At this point, if all went according to plan, you should see data in both your DynamoDB table and S3 bucket. Use the following steps to verify that your enhanced fan-out process worked.

  1. On the Lambda console, choose Applications.
  2. Select the application that starts with serverlessrepo-.
  3. Choose Resources, DDBFunction. This opens the DynamoDB console.
  4. Choose Items.

The following screenshot shows the first 100 items that your database absorbed from the DDBFunction attached to KinesisStream through DDBConsumer.

DynamoDB Records

Next, check your S3 bucket,

  1. On the Lambda console, choose Applications.
  2. Select the application that starts with serverlessrepo-.
  3. Choose Resources, S3Records. This opens the S3 console.

As in DynamoDB, you should now see the fake IoT sensor data stored in your S3 bucket for later use.

S3 Records

Now that the demonstration is working, I want to point out the benefits of what you have just done. By using the enhanced fan-out method, you have increased your performance in the following ways.

  1. HTTP/2 has decreased the time from data producers to consumers to <=70 MS, a 65% improvement.
  2. At the consumer level, each consumer has an isolated 2 MB/second outbound throughput speed. Because you are using two consumers, it works out to 2x the performance.

Conclusion

Using Lambda functions in concert with Kinesis Data Streams to collect and analyze massive amounts of data isn’t a new idea. However, the introduction of enhanced fan-out technology and HTTP/2 enables you to use more functions at the same time without losing throughput capacity.

If you only connect one or two Lambda functions to a data stream, then enhanced fan-out might not be a great fit. However, if you attach more than three Lambda functions to a stream for real-time manipulation and data routing, it makes sense to evaluate this option.

I hope this helps. Happy coding!

ICYMI: Serverless Q1 2019

Post Syndicated from Eric Johnson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q1-2019/

Welcome to the fifth edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share all of the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

If you didn’t see them, check our previous posts for what happened in 2018:

So, what might you have missed this past quarter? Here’s the recap.

Amazon API Gateway

Amazon API Gateway improved the experience for publishing APIs on the API Gateway Developer Portal. In addition, we also added features like a search capability, feedback mechanism, and SDK-generation capabilities.

Last year, API Gateway announced support for WebSockets. As of early February 2019, it is now possible to build WebSocket-enabled APIs via AWS CloudFormation and AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM). The following diagram shows an example application.WebSockets

API Gateway is also now supported in AWS Config. This feature enhancement allows API administrators to track changes to their API configuration automatically. With the power of AWS Config, you can automate alerts—and even remediation—with triggered Lambda functions.

In early January, API Gateway also announced a service level agreement (SLA) of 99.95% availability.

AWS Step Functions

Step Functions Local

AWS Step Functions added the ability to tag Step Function resources and provide access control with tag-based permissions. With this feature, developers can use tags to define access via AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policies.

In addition to tag-based permissions, Step Functions was one of 10 additional services to have support from the Resource Group Tagging API, which allows a single central point of administration for tags on resources.

In early February, Step Functions released the ability to develop and test applications locally using a local Docker container. This new feature allows you to innovate faster by iterating faster locally.

In late January, Step Functions joined the family of services offering SLAs with an SLA of 99.9% availability. They also increased their service footprint to include the AWS China (Ningxia) and AWS China (Beijing) Regions.

AWS SAM Command Line Interface

AWS SAM Command Line Interface (AWS SAM CLI) released the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio Code and the AWS Toolkit for IntelliJ. These toolkits are open source plugins that make it easier to develop applications on AWS. The toolkits provide an integrated experience for developing serverless applications in Node.js (Visual Studio Code) as well as Java and Python (IntelliJ), with more languages and features to come.

The toolkits help you get started fast with built-in project templates that leverage AWS SAM to define and configure resources. They also include an integrated experience for step-through debugging of serverless applications and make it easy to deploy your applications from the integrated development environment (IDE).

AWS Serverless Application Repository

AWS Serverless Application Repository applications can now be published to the application repository using AWS CodePipeline. This allows you to update applications in the AWS Serverless Application Repository with a continuous integration and continuous delivery (CICD) process. The CICD process is powered by a pre-built application that publishes other applications to the AWS Serverless Application Repository.

AWS Event Fork Pipelines

Event Fork Pipelines

AWS Event Fork Pipelines is now available in AWS Serverless Application Repository. AWS Event Fork Pipelines is a suite of nested open-source applications based on AWS SAM. You can deploy Event Fork Pipelines directly from AWS Serverless Application Repository into your AWS account. These applications help you build event-driven serverless applications by providing pipelines for common event-handling requirements.

AWS Cloud9

Cloud9

AWS Cloud9 announced that, in addition to Amazon Linux, you can now select Ubuntu as the operating system for their AWS Cloud9 environment. Before this announcement, you would have to stand up an Ubuntu server and connect AWS Cloud9 to the instance by using SSH. With native support for Ubuntu, you can take advantage of AWS Cloud9 features, such as instance lifecycle management for cost efficiency and preconfigured tooling environments.

AWS Cloud9 also added support for AWS CloudTrail, which allows you to monitor and react to changes made to your AWS Cloud9 environment.

Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics

Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics now supports CloudTrail logging. CloudTrail captures changes made to Kinesis Data Analytics and delivers the logs to an Amazon S3 bucket. This makes it easy for administrators to understand changes made to the application and who made them.

Amazon DynamoDB

Amazon DynamoDB removed the associated costs of DynamoDB Streams used in replicating data globally. Because of their use of streams to replicate data between Regions, this translates to cost savings in global tables. However, DynamoDB streaming costs remain the same for your applications reading from a replica table’s stream.

DynamoDB added the ability to switch encryption keys used to encrypt data. DynamoDB, by default, encrypts all data at rest. You can use the default encryption, the AWS-owned customer master key (CMK), or the AWS managed CMK to encrypt data. It is now possible to change between the AWS-owned CMK and the AWS managed CMK without having to modify code or applications.

Amazon DynamoDB Local, a local installable version of DynamoDB, has added support for transactional APIs, on-demand capacity, and as many as 20 global secondary indexes per table.

AWS Amplify

Amplify Deploy

AWS Amplify added support for OAuth 2.0 Authorization Code Grant flows in the native (iOS and Android) and React Native libraries. Previously, you would have to use third-party libraries and handwritten logic to achieve these use cases.

Additionally, Amplify also launched the ability to perform instant cache invalidation and delta deployments on every code commit. To achieve this, Amplify creates unique references to all the build artifacts on each deploy. Amplify has also added the ability to detect and upload only modified artifacts at the time of release to help reduce deployment time.

Amplify also added features for multiple environments, custom resolvers, larger data models, and IAM roles, including multi-factor authentication (MFA).

AWS AppSync

AWS AppSync increased its availability footprint to the EU (London) Region.

Amazon Cognito

Amazon Cognito increased its service footprint to include the Canada (central) Region. It also published an SLA of 99.9% availability.

Amazon Aurora

Amazon Aurora Serverless increases performance visibility by publishing logs to Amazon CloudWatch.

AWS CodePipeline

CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline announces support for deploying static files to Amazon S3. While this may not usually fall under the serverless blogs and announcements, if you’re a developer who builds single-page applications or host static websites, this makes your life easier. Your static site can now be part of your CICD process without custom coding.

Serverless Posts

January:

February:

March

Tech talks

We hold several AWS Online Tech Talks covering serverless tech talks throughout the year, so look out for them in the Serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page. Here are the three tech talks that we delivered in Q1:

Whitepapers

Security Overview of AWS Lambda: This whitepaper presents a deep dive into the Lambda service through a security lens. It provides a well-rounded picture of the service, which can be useful for new adopters, as well as deepening understanding of Lambda for current users. Read the full whitepaper.

Twitch

AWS Launchpad Santa Clara

There is always something going on at our Twitch channel! Be sure and follow us so you don’t miss anything! For information about upcoming broadcasts and recent livestreams, keep an eye on AWS on Twitch for more Serverless videos and on the Join us on Twitch AWS page.

In other news

Building Happy Little APIs

Twitch Series: Building Happy Little APIs

In April, we started a 13-week deep dive into building APIs on AWS as part of our Twitch Build On series. The Building Happy Little APIs series covers the common and not-so-common use cases for APIs on AWS and the features available to customers as they look to build secure, scalable, efficient, and flexible APIs.

Twitch series: Build on Serverless: Season 2

Build On Serverless

Join Heitor Lessa across 14 weeks, nearly every Wednesday from April 24 – August 7 at 8AM PST/11AM EST/3PM UTC. Heitor is live-building a full-stack, serverless airline-booking application using a bunch of services: Lambda, Amplify, API Gateway, Amazon Cognito, AWS SAM, CloudWatch, AWS AppSync, and others. See the episode guide and sign up for stream reminders.

2019 AWS Summits

AWS Summit

The 2019 schedule is in full swing for 2019 AWS Global Summits held in major cities around the world. These free events bring the cloud computing community together to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS. They attract technologists from all industries and skill levels who want to discover how AWS can help them innovate quickly and deliver flexible, reliable solutions at scale. Get notified when to register and learn more at the AWS Global Summit Program website.

Still looking for more?

The Serverless landing page has lots of information. The Lambda resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials. Check it out!

Enriching Event-Driven Architectures with AWS Event Fork Pipelines

Post Syndicated from Rachel Richardson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/enriching-event-driven-architectures-with-aws-event-fork-pipelines/

This post is courtesy of Otavio Ferreira, Mgr, Amazon SNS, and James Hood, Sr. Software Dev Engineer

Many customers are choosing to build event-driven applications in which subscriber services automatically perform work in response to events triggered by publisher services. This architectural pattern can make services more reusable, interoperable, and scalable.

Customers often fork event processing into pipelines that address common event handling requirements, such as event storage, backup, search, analytics, or replay. To help you build event-driven applications even faster, AWS introduces Event Fork Pipelines, a collection of open-source event handling pipelines that you can subscribe to Amazon SNS topics in your AWS account.

Event Fork Pipelines is a suite of open-source nested applications, based on the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM). You can deploy it directly from the AWS Serverless Application Repository into your AWS account.

Event Fork Pipelines is built on top of serverless services, including Amazon SNS, Amazon SQS, and AWS Lambda. These services provide serverless building blocks that help you build fully managed, highly available, and scalable event-driven platforms. Lambda enables you to build event-driven microservices as serverless functions. SNS and SQS provide serverless topics and queues for integrating these microservices and other distributed systems in your architecture. These building blocks are at the core of the modern application development best practices.

Surfacing the event fork pattern

At AWS, we’ve worked closely with customers across market segments and geographies on event-driven architectures. For example:

  • Financial platforms that handle events related to bank transactions and stock ticks
  • Retail platforms that trigger checkout and fulfillment events

At scale, event-driven architectures often require a set of supporting services to address common requirements such as system auditability, data discoverability, compliance, business insights, and disaster recovery. Translated to AWS, customers often connect event-driven applications to services such as Amazon S3 for event storage and backup, and to Amazon Elasticsearch Service for event search and analytics. Also, customers often implement an event replay mechanism to recover from failure modes in their applications.

AWS created Event Fork Pipelines to encapsulate these common requirements, reducing the amount of effort required for you to connect your event-driven architectures to these supporting AWS services.

AWS then started sharing this pattern more broadly, so more customers could benefit. At the 2018 AWS re:Invent conference in Las Vegas, Amazon CTO Werner Vogels announced the launch of nested applications in his keynote. Werner shared the Event Fork Pipelines pattern with the audience as an example of common application logic that had been encapsulated as a set of nested applications.

The following reference architecture diagram shows an application supplemented by three nested applications:

Each pipeline is subscribed to the same SNS topic, and can process events in parallel as these events are published to the topic. Each pipeline is independent and can set its own subscription filter policy. That way, it processes only the subset of events that it’s interested in, rather than all events published to the topic.

Amazon SNS Fork pipelines reference architecture

Figure 1 – Reference architecture using Event Fork Pipelines

The three event fork pipelines are placed alongside your regular event processing pipelines, which are potentially already subscribed to your SNS topic. Therefore, you don’t have to change any portion of your current message publisher to take advantage of Event Fork Pipelines in your existing workloads. The following sections describe these pipelines and how to deploy them in your system architecture.

Understanding the catalog of event fork pipelines

In the abstract, Event Fork Pipelines is a serverless design pattern. Concretely, Event Fork Pipelines is also a suite of nested serverless applications, based on AWS SAM. You deploy the nested applications directly from the AWS Serverless Application Repository to your AWS account, to enrich your event-driven platforms. You can deploy them individually in your architecture, as needed.

Here’s more information about each nested application in the Event Fork Pipelines suite.

Event Storage & Backup pipeline

Event Fork Pipeline for Event Storage & Backup

Figure 2 – Event Fork Pipeline for Event Storage & Backup

The preceding diagram shows the Event Storage & Backup pipeline. You can subscribe this pipeline to your SNS topic to automatically back up the events flowing through your system. This pipeline is composed of the following resources:

  • An SQS queue that buffers the events delivered by the SNS topic
  • A Lambda function that automatically polls for these events in the queue and pushes them into an Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose delivery stream
  • An S3 bucket that durably backs up the events loaded by the stream

You can configure this pipeline to fine-tune the behavior of your delivery stream. For example, you can configure your pipeline so that the underlying delivery stream buffers, transforms, and compresses your events before loading them into the bucket. As events are loaded, you can use Amazon Athena to query the bucket using standard SQL queries. Also, you can configure the pipeline to either reuse an existing S3 bucket or create a new one for you.

Event Search & Analytics pipeline

Event Fork Pipeline for Event Search & Analytics

Figure 3 – Event Fork Pipeline for Event Search & Analytics

The preceding diagram shows the Event Search & Analytics pipeline. You can subscribe this pipeline to your SNS topic to index in a search domain the events flowing through your system, and then run analytics on them. This pipeline is composed of the following resources:

  • An SQS queue that buffers the events delivered by the SNS topic
  • A Lambda function that polls events from the queue and pushes them into a Data Firehose delivery stream
  • An Amazon ES domain that indexes the events loaded by the delivery stream
  • An S3 bucket that stores the dead-letter events that couldn’t be indexed in the search domain

You can configure this pipeline to fine-tune your delivery stream in terms of event buffering, transformation and compression. You can also decide whether the pipeline should reuse an existing Amazon ES domain in your AWS account or create a new one for you. As events are indexed in the search domain, you can use Kibana to run analytics on your events and update visual dashboards in real time.

Event Replay pipeline

Event Fork Pipeline for Event Replay

Figure 4 – Event Fork Pipeline for Event Replay

The preceding diagram shows the Event Replay pipeline. You can subscribe this pipeline to your SNS topic to record the events that have been processed by your system for up to 14 days. You can then reprocess them in case your platform is recovering from a failure or a disaster. This pipeline is composed of the following resources:

  • An SQS queue that buffers the events delivered by the SNS topic
  • A Lambda function that polls events from the queue and redrives them into your regular event processing pipeline, which is also subscribed to your topic

By default, the replay function is disabled, which means it isn’t redriving your events. If the events need to be reprocessed, your operators must enable the replay function.

Applying event fork pipelines in a use case

This is how everything comes together. The following scenario describes an event-driven, serverless ecommerce application that uses the Event Fork Pipelines pattern. This example ecommerce application is available in AWS Serverless Application Repository. You can deploy it to your AWS account using the Lambda console, test it, and look at its source code in GitHub.

Example ecommerce application using Event Fork Pipelines

Figure 5 – Example e-commerce application using Event Fork Pipelines

The ecommerce application takes orders from buyers through a RESTful API hosted by Amazon API Gateway and backed by a Lambda function named CheckoutFunction. This function publishes all orders received to an SNS topic named CheckoutEventsTopic, which in turn fans out the orders to four different pipelines. The first pipeline is the regular checkout-processing pipeline designed and implemented by you as the ecommerce application owner. This pipeline has the following resources:

  • An SQS queue named CheckoutQueue that buffers all orders received
  • A Lambda function named CheckoutFunction that polls the queue to process these orders
  • An Amazon DynamoDB table named CheckoutTable that securely saves all orders as they’re placed

The components of the system described thus far handle what you might think of as the core business logic. But in addition, you should address the set of elements necessary for making the system resilient, compliant, and searchable:

  • Backing up all orders securely. Compressed backups must be encrypted at rest, with sensitive payment details removed for security and compliance purposes.
  • Searching and running analytics on orders, if the amount is $100 or more. Analytics are needed for key ecommerce metrics, such as average ticket size, average shipping time, most popular products, and preferred payment options.
  • Replaying recent orders. If the fulfillment process is disrupted at any point, you should be able to replay the most recent orders from up to two weeks. This is a key requirement that guarantees the continuity of the ecommerce business.

Rather than implementing all the event processing logic yourself, you can choose to subscribe Event Fork Pipelines to your existing SNS topic CheckoutEventsTopic. The pipelines are configured as follows:

  • The Event Storage & Backup pipeline is configured to transform data as follows:
    • Remove credit card details
    • Buffer data for 60 seconds
    • Compress data using GZIP
    • Encrypt data using the default customer master key (CMK) for S3

This CMK is managed by AWS and powered by AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS). For more information, see Choosing Amazon S3 for Your Destination, Data Transformation, and Configuration Settings in the Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose Developer Guide.

  • The Event Search & Analytics pipeline is configured with:
    • An index retry duration of 30 seconds
    • A bucket for storing orders that failed to be indexed in the search domain
    • A filter policy to restrict the set of orders that are indexed

For more information, see Choosing Amazon ES for Your Destination, in the Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose Developer Guide.

  • The Event Replay pipeline is configured with the SQS queue name that is part of the regular checkout processing pipeline. For more information, see Queue Name and URL in the Amazon SQS Developer Guide.

The filter policy, shown in JSON format, is set in the configuration for the Event Search & Analytics pipeline. This filter policy matches only incoming orders in which the total amount is $100 or more. For more information, see Message Filtering in the Amazon SNS Developer Guide.


{

    "amount": [

        { "numeric": [ ">=", 100 ] }

    ]

}

By using the Event Fork Pipelines pattern, you avoid the development overhead associated with coding undifferentiated logic for handling events.

Event Fork Pipelines can be deployed directly from AWS Serverless Application Repository into your AWS account.

Deploying event fork pipelines

Event Fork Pipelines is available as a set of public apps in the AWS Serverless Application Repository (to find the apps, select the ‘Show apps that create custom IAM roles or resource policies’ check box under the search bar). It can be deployed and tested manually via the Lambda console. In a production scenario, we recommend embedding fork pipelines within the AWS SAM template of your overall application. The nested applications feature enables you to do this by adding an AWS::Serverless::Application resource to your AWS SAM template. The resource references the ApplicationId and SemanticVersion values of the application to nest.

For example, you can include the Event Storage & Backup pipeline as a nested application by adding the following YAML snippet to the Resources section of your AWS SAM template:


Backup:

  Type: AWS::Serverless::Application

  Properties:

    Location:

      ApplicationId: arn:aws:serverlessrepo:us-east-1:012345678901:applications/fork-event-storage-backup-pipeline

      SemanticVersion: 1.0.0

    Parameters:

      # SNS topic ARN whose messages should be backed up to the S3 bucket.

      TopicArn: !Ref MySNSTopic

When specifying parameter values, you can use AWS CloudFormation intrinsic functions to reference other resources in your template. In the preceding example, the TopicArn parameter is filled in by referencing an AWS::SNS::Topic called MySNSTopic, defined elsewhere in the AWS SAM template. For more information, see Intrinsic Function Reference in the AWS CloudFormation User Guide.

To copy the YAML required for nesting, in the Lambda console page for an AWS Serverless Application Repository application, choose Copy as SAM Resource.

Authoring new event fork pipelines

We invite you to fork the Event Fork Pipelines repository in GitHub and submit pull requests for contributing with new pipelines. In addition to event storage and backup, event search and analytics, and event replay, what other common event handling requirements have you seen?

We look forward to seeing what you’ll come up with for extending the Event Fork Pipelines suite.

Summary

Event Fork Pipelines is a serverless design pattern and a suite of open-source nested serverless applications, based on AWS SAM. You can deploy it directly from AWS Serverless Application Repository to enrich your event-driven system architecture. Event Fork Pipelines lets you store, back up, replay, search, and run analytics on the events flowing through your system. There’s no need to write code, manually stitch resources together, or set up infrastructure.

You can deploy Event Fork Pipelines in any AWS Region that supports the underlying AWS services used in the pipelines. There are no additional costs associated with Event Fork Pipelines itself, and you pay only for using the AWS resources inside each nested application.

Get started today by deploying the example ecommerce application or searching for Event Fork Pipelines in AWS Serverless Application Repository.