Tag Archives: Compute

Deploying an Nginx-based HTTP/HTTPS load balancer with Amazon Lightsail

Post Syndicated from Betsy Chernoff original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/deploying-an-nginx-based-http-https-load-balancer-with-amazon-lightsail/

In this post, I discuss how to configure a load balancer to route web traffic for Amazon Lightsail using NGINX. I define load balancers and explain their value. Then, I briefly weigh the pros and cons of self-hosted load balancers against Lightsail’s managed load balancer service. Finally, I cover how to set up a NGINX-based load balancer inside of a Lightsail instance.

If you feel like you already understand what load balancers are, and the pros and cons of self-hosted load balancers vs. managed services, feel free to skip ahead to the deployment section.

What is a load balancer?

Although load balancers offer many different functionalities, for the sake of this discussion, I focus on one main task: A load balancer accepts your users’ traffic and routes it to the right server.

For example, if I assign the load balancer the DNS name: www.example.com, anyone visiting the site first encounters the load balancer. The load balancer then routes the request to one of the backend servers: web-1, web-2, or web-3. The backend servers then respond to the requestor.

A load balancer provides multiple benefits to your application or website. Here are a few key advantages:

  • Redundancy
  • Publicly available IP addresses
  • Horizontally scaled application capacity

Redundancy

Load balancers usually front at least two backend servers. Using something called a health check, they ensure that these servers are online and available to service user requests. If a backend server goes out of service, the load balancer stops routing traffic to that instance. By running multiple servers, you help to ensure that at least one is always available to respond to incoming traffic. As a result, your users aren’t bogged down by errors from a downed machine.

Publicly available IP addresses

Without a load balancer, a server requires a unique IP address to accept an incoming request via the internet. There are a finite number of these IP addresses, and most cloud providers limit the number of statically assigned public IP addresses that you can have.

By using a load balancer, you can task a single public IP address with servicing multiple backend servers. Later in this post, I return to this topic as I discuss configuring a load balancer.

Horizontally scaled application capacity

As your application or website becomes more popular, its performance may degrade. Adding additional capacity can be as easy as spinning up a new instance and placing it behind your load balancer. If demand drops, you can spin down any unneeded instances to save money.

Horizontal scaling means the deployment of additional identically configured servers to handle increased load. Vertical scaling means the deployment of a more powerful server to handle increased load. If you deploy an underpowered server, expect poor performance, whether you have a single server or ten.

Self-managed load balancer vs. a managed service

Now that you have a better understanding of load balancers and the key benefits that they provide, the next question is: How can you get one into your environment?

On one hand, you could spin up a Lightsail load balancer. These load balancers are all managed by AWS and don’t require any patching or maintenance on your part to stay up-to-date. You only need to name your load balancer and pick instances to service. Your load balancer is then up and running. If you’re so inclined, you can also get a free SSL (secure socket layer) certificate with a few extra clicks.

Lightsail load balancers deploy easily and require essentially no maintenance after they’re operational, for $18 per month (at publication time). Lightsail load balancer design prioritizes easy installation and maintenance. As a result, they lack some advanced configuration settings found with other models.

Consequently, you might prefer to configure your load balancer if you prioritize configuration flexibility or cost reduction. A self-hosted load balancer provides access to many advanced features, and your only hard cost is the instance price.

The downsides of self-hosting are that you are also responsible for the following:

  • Installing the load balancer software.
  • Keeping the software (and the host operating system) updated and secure.

Deploying a NGINX-based load balancer with Lightsail

Although many software-based load balancers are available, I recommend building a solution on NGINX because this wildly popular tool:

  • Is open source/free.
  • Offers great community support.
  • Has a custom Lightsail blueprint.

Prerequisites

This tutorial assumes that you already have your backend servers deployed. These servers should all:

  • Be identically configured.
  • Point to a central backend database.

In other words, the target servers shouldn’t each have database copies installed.

To deploy a centralized database, see Lightsail’s managed database offering.

Because I’ve tailored these instructions to generic website and web app hosting, they may not work with specific applications such as WordPress.

Required prerequisites

Before installing an optional SSL certificate, you need to have the following:

  • A purchased domain name.
  • Permissions to update the DNS servers for that domain.

Optional prerequisites

Although not required, the following prerequisites may also be helpful:

  • Familiarity with accessing instances via SSH.
  • Using basic LINUX commands. 

Deploy an NGINX instance

To begin, deploy an NGINX instance in Lightsail, choosing the NGINX blueprint. Make sure that you are deploying it into the same Region as the servers to load balance.

Choose an appropriate instance size for your application, being aware of the amount of RAM and CPU, as well as the data transfer. If you choose an undersized instance, you can always scale it up via a snapshot. However, an oversized instance cannot as easily be scaled down. You may need to rebuild the load balancer on a smaller-sized instance from scratch.

Configure HTTP load balancing

In the following steps, edit the NGINX configuration file to load balance HTTP requests to the appropriate servers.

First, start up an SSH session with your new NGINX instance and change into the appropriate configuration directory:

cd /opt/bitnami/nginx/conf/bitnami/

Make sure that you have the IP addresses for the servers to load balance. In most cases, traffic shouldn’t flow from your load balancer to your instances across the internet. So, make sure to use the instance’s private IP address. You can find this information on the instance management page, in the Lightsail console.

In this example, my three servers have the following private IP addresses:

  • 192.0.2.67
  • 192.0.2.206
  • 192.0.2.198

The configuration file to edit is named bitnami.conf. Open it using your preferred text editor (use sudo to edit the file):

sudo vi bitnami.conf

Clear the contents of the file and add the following code, making sure to substitute the private IP addresses of the servers to load balance:

# Define Pool of servers to load balance upstream webservers { 
server 192.0.2.67 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s; 
server 192.0.2.206 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
server 192.0.2.198 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
}

In the code, you used the keyword upstream to define a pool (named webservers) of three servers to which NGINX should route traffic. If you don’t specify how NGINX should route each request, it defaults to round-robin server routing. Two other routing methods are available:

  • Least connected, which routes to the server with the fewest number of active connections.
  • IP hash, which uses a hashing function to enable sticky sessions (otherwise called session persistence).

Discussion on these methods is out of scope for this post. For more information, see Using nginx as HTTP load balancer.

Additionally, I recommend max_fails and fail_timeout to define health checks. Based on the configuration above, NGINX marks a server as down if it fails to respond or responds with an error three times in 30 seconds. If a server is marked down, NGINX continues to probe every 30 seconds. If it receives a positive response, it marks the server as live.

After the code you just inserted to the file, add the following:

# Forward traffic on port 80 to one of the servers in the webservers group server {
listen 80; location / {
   proxy_pass http://webservers;
   }
}

This code tells NGINX to listen for requests on port 80, the default port for unencrypted web (HTTP) traffic and forward such requests to one of the servers in the webservers group defined by the upstream keyword.

Save the file and quit back to your command prompt.

For the changes to take effect, restart the NGINX service using the Bitnami control script:

sudo /opt/bitnami/ctlscript.sh restart nginx

At this point, you should be able to visit the IP address of your NGINX instance in your web browser. The load balancer then routes the request to one of the servers defined in your webservers group.

For reference, here’s the full bitnami.conf file.

# Define Pool of servers to load balance
upstream webservers {
server 192.0.2.67 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
server 192.0.2.206 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
server 192.0.2.198 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
}
# Forward traffic on port 80 to one of the servers in the webservers group server {
listen 80; location / {
proxy_pass http://webservers;
}
}

Configure HTTPS load balancing

Configuring your load balancer to use SSL requires three steps:

  1. Ensure that you have a domain record for your NGINX load balancer instance.
  2. Obtain and install a certificate.
  3. Update the NGINX configuration file.

If you have not already done so, assign your NGINX instance an entry with your DNS provider. Remember, the load balancer is the address your users use to reach your site. For instance, it might be appropriate to create a record that points http://www.yourdomain.com/ at your NGINX load balancer. If you need help configuring the DNS in Lightsail, see DNS in Amazon Lightsail.

Similarly, to configure your NGINX instance to use a free SSL certificate from Let’s Encrypt, follow steps 1–7 in Tutorial: Using Let’s Encrypt SSL certificates with your Nginx instance in Amazon Lightsail. You handle step 8 later in this post,

After you configure NGINX to use the SSL certificate and update your DNS, you must modify the configuration file to allow for HTTPS traffic.

Again, use a text editor to open the bitnami.conf file:

sudo vi bitnami.conf

Add the following code to the bottom of the file:

server {
     listen 443 ssl;
     location / {
          proxy_pass http://webservers;
     }
     ssl_certificate server.crt;
     ssl_certificate_key server.key;
     ssl_session_cache shared:SSL:1m;
     ssl_session_timeout 5m;
     ssl_ciphers HIGH:!aNULL:!MD5;
     ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;
}

This code closely resembles the HTTP code added previously. However, in this case, the code tells NGINX to accept SSL connections on the secure port 443 (HTTPS) and forward them to one of your web servers. The rest of the commands instruct NGINX on where to locate SSL certificates, as well as setting various SSL parameters.

Here again, restart the NGINX service:

sudo /opt/bitnami/ctlscript.sh restart nginx

Optional steps

At this point, you should be able to access your website using both HTTP and HTTPS. However, there are a couple of optional steps to consider, including:

  • Shutting off direct HTTP/HTTPS access to your web servers.
  • Automatically redirecting incoming load balancer HTTP requests to HTTPS.

It’s probably not a great idea to allow people to access your load-balanced servers directly. Fortunately, you can easily restrict access:

  1. Navigate to each instance’s management page in the Lightsail console.
  2. Choose Networking.
  3. Remove the HTTP and HTTPS (if enabled) firewall port entries.

This restriction shuts down access via the internet while still allowing communications between the load balancer and the servers over the private AWS network.

In many cases, there’s no good reason to allow access to a website or web app over unencrypted HTTP. However, the load balancer configuration described to this point still accepts HTTP requests. To automatically reroute requests from HTTP to HTTPS, make one small change to the configuration file:

  1. Edit the conf file.
  2. Find this code:
server {
listen 80; location / {
proxy_pass http://webservers;
}
}
  1. Replace it with this code:
server {
listen 80;
return 301 https://$host$request_uri;
}

The replacement code instructs NGINX to respond to HTTP requests with a “page has been permanently redirected” message and a citation of the new page address. The new address is simply requested one, only accessed over HTTPS instead of HTTP.

For this change to take effect, you must restart NGINX:

sudo /opt/bitnami/ctlscript.sh restart nginx

For reference, this is what the final bitnami.conf file looks like:

# Define the pool of servers to load balance
upstream webservers {
server 192.0.2.67 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
server 192.0.2.206 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
server 192.0.2.198 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
}
# Redirect traffic on port 80 to use HTTPS
server {
listen 80;
return 301 https://$host$request_uri;
}
# Forward traffic on port 443 to one of the servers in the web servers group
server {
     listen 443 ssl;
     location / {
          proxy_pass http://webservers;
     }
     ssl_certificate server.crt;
     ssl_certificate_key server.key;
     ssl_session_cache shared:SSL:1m;
     ssl_session_timeout 5m;
     ssl_ciphers HIGH:!aNULL:!MD5;
     ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;
}

Conclusion

This post explained how to configure a load balancer to route web traffic for Amazon Lightsail using NGINX. I defined load balancers and their utility. I weighed the pros and cons of self-hosted load balancers against Lightsail’s managed load balancer service. Finally, I walked you through how to set up a NGINX-based load balancer inside of a Lightsail instance.

Thanks for reading this post. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me on Twitter, @mikegcoleman or visit the Amazon Lightsail forums.

Scaling Kubernetes deployments with Amazon CloudWatch metrics

Post Syndicated from Ignacio Riesgo original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/scaling-kubernetes-deployments-with-amazon-cloudwatch-metrics/

This post is contributed by Kwunhok Chan | Solutions Architect, AWS

 

In an earlier post, AWS introduced Horizontal Pod Autoscaler and Kubernetes Metrics Server support for Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service. These tools make it easy to scale your Kubernetes workloads managed by EKS in response to built-in metrics like CPU and memory.

However, one common use case for applications running on EKS is the integration with AWS services. For example, you administer an application that processes messages published to an Amazon SQS queue. You want the application to scale according to the number of messages in that queue. The Amazon CloudWatch Metrics Adapter for Kubernetes (k8s-cloudwatch-adapter) helps.

 

Amazon CloudWatch Metrics Adapter for Kubernetes

The k8s-cloudwatch-adapter is an implementation of the Kubernetes Custom Metrics API and External Metrics API with integration for CloudWatch metrics. It allows you to scale your Kubernetes deployment using the Horizontal Pod Autoscaler (HPA) with CloudWatch metrics.

 

Prerequisites

Before starting, you need the following:

 

Getting started

Before using the k8s-cloudwatch-adapter, set up a way to manage IAM credentials to Kubernetes pods. The CloudWatch Metrics Adapter requires the following permissions to access metric data from CloudWatch:

cloudwatch:GetMetricData

Create an IAM policy with the following template:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "cloudwatch:GetMetricData"
            ],
            "Resource": "*"
        }
    ]
}

For demo purposes, I’m granting admin permissions to my Kubernetes worker nodes. Don’t do this in your production environment. To associate IAM roles to your Kubernetes pods, you may want to look at kube2iam or kiam.

If you’re using an EKS cluster, you most likely provisioned it with AWS CloudFormation. The following command uses AWS CloudFormation stacks to update the proper instance policy with the correct permissions:

aws iam attach-role-policy \
--policy-arn arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/AdministratorAccess \
--role-name $(aws cloudformation describe-stacks --stack-name ${STACK_NAME} --query 'Stacks[0].Parameters[?ParameterKey==`NodeInstanceRoleName`].ParameterValue' | jq -r ".[0]")

 

Make sure to replace ${STACK_NAME} with the nodegroup stack name from the AWS CloudFormation console .

 

You can now deploy the k8s-cloudwatch-adapter to your Kubernetes cluster.

$ kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/awslabs/k8s-cloudwatch-adapter/master/deploy/adapter.yaml

 

This deployment creates a new namespace—custom-metrics—and deploys the necessary ClusterRole, Service Account, and Role Binding values, along with the deployment of the adapter. Use the created custom resource definition (CRD) to define the configuration for the external metrics to retrieve from CloudWatch. The adapter reads the configuration defined in ExternalMetric CRDs and loads its external metrics. That allows you to use HPA to autoscale your Kubernetes pods.

 

Verifying the deployment

Next, query the metrics APIs to see if the adapter is deployed correctly. Run the following command:

$ kubectl get --raw "/apis/external.metrics.k8s.io/v1beta1" | jq.
{
  "kind": "APIResourceList",
  "apiVersion": "v1",
  "groupVersion": "external.metrics.k8s.io/v1beta1",
  "resources": [
  ]
}

There are no resources from the response because you haven’t registered any metric resources yet.

 

Deploying an Amazon SQS application

Next, deploy a sample SQS application to test out k8s-cloudwatch-adapter. The SQS producer and consumer are provided, together with the YAML files for deploying the consumer, metric configuration, and HPA.

Both the producer and consumer use an SQS queue named helloworld. If it doesn’t exist already, the producer creates this queue.

Deploy the consumer with the following command:

$ kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/awslabs/k8s-cloudwatch-adapter/master/samples/sqs/deploy/consumer-deployment.yaml

 

You can verify that the consumer is running with the following command:

$ kubectl get deploy sqs-consumer
NAME           DESIRED   CURRENT   UP-TO-DATE   AVAILABLE   AGE
sqs-consumer   1         1         1            0           5s

 

Set up Amazon CloudWatch metric and HPA

Next, create an ExternalMetric resource for the CloudWatch metric. Take note of the Kind value for this resource. This CRD resource tells the adapter how to retrieve metric data from CloudWatch.

You define the query parameters used to retrieve the ApproximateNumberOfMessagesVisible for an SQS queue named helloworld. For details about how metric data queries work, see CloudWatch GetMetricData API.

apiVersion: metrics.aws/v1alpha1
kind: ExternalMetric:
  metadata:
    name: hello-queue-length
  spec:
    name: hello-queue-length
    resource:
      resource: "deployment"
      queries:
        - id: sqs_helloworld
          metricStat:
            metric:
              namespace: "AWS/SQS"
              metricName: "ApproximateNumberOfMessagesVisible"
              dimensions:
                - name: QueueName
                  value: "helloworld"
            period: 300
            stat: Average
            unit: Count
          returnData: true

 

Create the ExternalMetric resource:

$ kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/awslabs/k8s-cloudwatch-adapter/master/samples/sqs/deploy/externalmetric.yaml

 

Then, set up the HPA for your consumer. Here is the configuration to use:

kind: HorizontalPodAutoscaler
apiVersion: autoscaling/v2beta1
metadata:
  name: sqs-consumer-scaler
spec:
  scaleTargetRef:
    apiVersion: apps/v1beta1
    kind: Deployment
    name: sqs-consumer
  minReplicas: 1
  maxReplicas: 10
  metrics:
  - type: External
    external:
      metricName: hello-queue-length
      targetValue: 30

 

This HPA rule starts scaling out when the number of messages visible in your SQS queue exceeds 30, and scales in when there are fewer than 30 messages in the queue.

Create the HPA resource:

$ kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/awslabs/k8s-cloudwatch-adapter/master/samples/sqs/deploy/hpa.yaml

 

Generate load using a producer

Finally, you can start generating messages to the queue:

$ kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/awslabs/k8s-cloudwatch-adapter/master/samples/sqs/deploy/producer-deployment.yaml

On a separate terminal, you can now watch your HPA retrieving the queue length and start scaling the replicas. SQS metrics generate at five-minute intervals, so give the process a few minutes:

$ kubectl get hpa sqs-consumer-scaler -w

 

Clean up

After you complete this experiment, you can delete the Kubernetes deployment and respective resources.

Run the following commands to remove the consumer, external metric, HPA, and SQS queue:

$ kubectl delete deploy sqs-producer
$ kubectl delete hpa sqs-consumer-scaler
$ kubectl delete externalmetric sqs-helloworld-length
$ kubectl delete deploy sqs-consumer

$ aws sqs delete-queue helloworld

 

Other CloudWatch integrations

AWS recently announced the preview for Amazon CloudWatch Container Insights, which monitors, isolates, and diagnoses containerized applications running on EKS and Kubernetes clusters. To get started, see Using Container Insights.

 

Get involved

This project is currently under development. AWS welcomes issues and pull requests, and would love to hear your feedback.

How could this adapter be best implemented to work in your environment? Visit the Amazon CloudWatch Metrics Adapter for Kubernetes project on GitHub and let AWS know what you think.

Access Private applications on AWS Fargate using Amazon API Gateway PrivateLink

Post Syndicated from Ignacio Riesgo original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/access-private-applications-on-aws-fargate-using-amazon-api-gateway-privatelink/

This post is contributed by Mani Chandrasekaran | Solutions Architect, AWS

 

Customers would like to run container-based applications in a private subnet inside a virtual private cloud (VPC), where there is no direct connectivity from the outside world to these applications. This is a very secure way of running applications which do not want to be directly exposed to the internet.

AWS Fargate is a compute engine for Amazon ECS that enables you to run containers without having to manage servers or clusters. With AWS Fargate with Amazon ECS, you don’t have to provision, configure, and scale clusters of virtual machines to run containers.

Amazon API Gateway is a fully managed service that makes it easy for developers to create, publish, maintain, monitor, and secure APIs at any scale. The API Gateway private integration makes it simple to expose your HTTP and HTTPS resources behind a virtual private cloud (VPC) with Amazon VPC private endpoints. This allows access by clients outside of the VPC without exposing the resources to the internet.

This post shows how API Gateway can be used to expose an application running on Fargate in a private subnet in a VPC using API Gateway private integration through AWS PrivateLink. With the API Gateway private integration, you can enable access to HTTP and HTTPS resources in a VPC without detailed knowledge of private network configurations or technology-specific appliances.

 

Architecture

You deploy a simple NGINX application running on Fargate within a private subnet as a first step, and then expose this NGINX application to the internet using the API.

As shown in the architecture in the following diagram, you create a VPC with two private subnets and two public subnets. To enable the Fargate tasks to download Docker images from Amazon ECR, you deploy two network address translation (NAT) gateways in the public subnets.

You also deploy a container application, NGINX, as an ECS service with one or more Fargate tasks running inside the private subnets. You provision an internal Network Load Balancer in the VPC private subnets and target the ECS service running as Fargate tasks. This is provisioned using an AWS CloudFormation template (link provided later in this post).

The integration between API Gateway and the Network Load Balancer inside the private subnet uses an API Gateway VpcLink resource. The VpcLink encapsulates connections between the API and targeted VPC resources when the application is hosted on Fargate. You set up an API with the private integration by creating a VpcLink that targets the Network Load Balancer and then uses the VpcLink as an integration endpoint .

 

 

Deployment

Here are the steps to deploy this solution:

  1. Deploy an application on Fargate.
  2. Set up an API Gateway private integration.
  3. Deploy and test the API.
  4. Clean up resources to avoid incurring future charges.

 

Step 1 — Deploy an application on AWS Fargate
I’ve created an AWS CloudFormation template to make it easier for you to get started.

  1. Get the AWS CloudFormation template.
  2. In the AWS Management Console, deploy the CloudFormation template in an AWS Region where Fargate and API Gateway are available.
  3. On the Create stack page, specify the parameters specific to your environment. Or, use the default parameters, which deploy an NGINX Docker image as a Fargate task in an ECS cluster across two Availability Zones.

When the process is finished, the status changes to CREATE_COMPLETE and the details of the Network Load Balancer, VPC, subnets, and ECS cluster name appear on the Outputs tab.

 

Step 2 — Set up an API Gateway Private Integration
Next, set up an API Gateway API with private integrations using the AWS CLI and specify the AWS Region in all the AWS CLI commands.

1. Create a VPCLink in API Gateway with the ARN of the Network Load Balancer that you provisioned. Make sure that you specify the correct endpoint URL and Region based on the AWS Region that you selected for the CloudFormation template. Run the following command:

aws apigateway create-vpc-link \
--name fargate-nlb-private-link \
--target-arns arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:ap-south-1:xxx:loadbalancer/net/Farga-Netwo-XX/xx \
--endpoint-url https://apigateway.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com \
--region ap-south-1

The command immediately returns the following response, acknowledges the receipt of the request, and shows the PENDING status for the new VpcLink:

{
    "id": "alnXXYY",
    "name": "fargate-nlb-private-link",
    "targetArns": [
        " arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:ap-south-1:xxx:loadbalancer/net/Farga-Netwo-XX/xx"
    ],
    "status": "PENDING"
}

It takes 2–4 minutes for API Gateway to create the VpcLink. When the operation finishes successfully, the status changes to AVAILABLE.

 

2. To verify that the VpcLink was successfully created, run the following command:

aws apigateway get-vpc-link --vpc-link-id alnXXYY --region ap-south-1

When the VpcLink status is AVAILABLE, you can create the API and integrate it with the VPC resource through the VpcLink.

 

3. To set up an API, run the following command to create an API Gateway RestApi resource

aws apigateway create-rest-api --name 'API Gateway VPC Link NLB Fargate Test' --region ap-south-1

{
    "id": "qc83xxxx",
    "name": "API Gateway VPC Link NLB Fargate Test",
    "createdDate": 1547703133,
    "apiKeySource": "HEADER",
    "endpointConfiguration": {
        "types": [
            "EDGE"
        ]
    }
}

Find the ID value of the RestApi in the returned result. In this example, it is qc83xxxx. Use this ID to finish the operations on the API, including methods and integrations setup.

 

4. In this example, you create an API with only a GET method on the root resource (/) and integrate the method with the VpcLink.

Set up the GET / method. First, get the identifier of the root resource (/):

aws apigateway get-resources --rest-api-id qc83xxxx --region ap-south-1

In the output, find the ID value of the / path. In this example, it is mq165xxxx.

 

5. Set up the method request for the API method of GET /:

aws apigateway put-method \
       --rest-api-id qc83xxxx \
       --resource-id mq165xxxx \
       --http-method GET \
       --authorization-type "NONE" --region ap-south-1

6. Set up the private integration of the HTTP_PROXY type and call the put-integration command:

aws apigateway put-integration \
--rest-api-id qc83xxxx \
--resource-id mq165xxxx \
--uri 'http://myApi.example.com' \
--http-method GET \
--type HTTP_PROXY \
--integration-http-method GET \
--connection-type VPC_LINK \
--connection-id alnXXYY --region ap-south-1

For a private integration, you must set connection-type to VPC_LINK and set connection-id to the VpcLink identifier, alnXXYY in this example. The URI parameter is not used to route requests to your endpoint, but is used to set the host header and for certificate validation.

 

Step 3 — Deploy and test the API

To test the API, run the following command to deploy the API:

aws apigateway create-deployment \
--rest-api-id qc83xxxx \
--stage-name test \
--variables vpcLinkId= alnXXYY --region ap-south-1

Test the APIs with tools such as Postman or the curl command. To call a deployed API, you must submit requests to the URL for the API Gateway component service for API execution, known as execute-api.

The base URL for REST APIs is in this format:

https://{restapi_id}.execute-api.{region}.amazonaws.com/{stage_name}/

Replace {restapi_id} with the API identifier, {region} with the Region, and {stage_name} with the stage name of the API deployment.

To test the API with curl, run the following command:

curl -X GET https://qc83xxxx.execute-api.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/test/

The curl response should be the NGINX home page.

To test the API with Postman, place the Invoke URL into Postman and choose GET as the method. Choose Send.

The returned result (the NGINX home page) appears.

For more information, see Use Postman to Call a REST API.

 

Step 4 — Clean up resources

After you finish your deployment test, make sure to delete the following resources to avoid incurring future charges.

1. Delete the REST API created in the API Gateway and Amazon VPC endpoint services using the console.
Or, in the AWS CLI, run the following command:

aws apigateway delete-rest-api --rest-api-id qc83xxxx --region ap-south-1

aws apigateway delete-vpc-link --vpc-link-id alnXXYY --region ap-south-1

2. To delete the Fargate-related resources created in CloudFormation, in the console, choose Delete Stack.

 

Conclusion

API Gateway private endpoints enable use cases for building private API–based services running on Fargate inside your own VPCs. You can take advantage of advanced features of API Gateway, such as custom authorizers, Amazon Cognito User Pools integration, usage tiers, throttling, deployment canaries, and API keys. At the same time, you can make sure the APIs or applications running in Fargate are not exposed to the internet.

Now Available: New C5 instance sizes and bare metal instances

Post Syndicated from Julien Simon original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-available-new-c5-instance-sizes-and-bare-metal-instances/

Amazon EC2 C5 instances are very popular for running compute-heavy workloads like batch processing, distributed analytics, high-performance computing, machine/deep learning inference, ad serving, highly scalable multiplayer gaming, and video encoding.

Today, we are happy to expand the Amazon EC2 C5 family with:

  • New larger virtualized instance sizes: 12xlarge and 24xlarge,
  • A bare metal option.

The new C5 instance sizes run on Intel’s Second Generation Xeon Scalable processors (code-named Cascade Lake) with sustained all-core turbo frequency of 3.6GHz and maximum single core turbo frequency of 3.9GHz.

The new processors also enable a new feature called Intel Deep Learning Boost, a capability based on the AVX-512 instruction set. Thanks to the new Vector Neural Network Instructions (AVX-512 VNNI), deep learning frameworks will speed up typical machine learning operations like convolution, and automatically improve inference performance over a wide range of workloads.

These instances are also based on the AWS Nitro System, with dedicated hardware accelerators for EBS processing (including crypto operations), the software-defined network inside of each Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), and ENA networking.

New C5 instance sizes: 12xlarge and 24xlarge

Previously, the largest C5 instance available was C5.18xlarge, with 72 logical processors and 144 GiB of memory. As you can see, the new 24xlarge size increases available resources by 33%, in order to scale up and reduce the time required to compute intensive tasks.

Instance NameLogical ProcessorsMemoryEBS-Optimized BandwidthNetwork Bandwidth
c5.12xlarge4896 GiB7 Gbps12 Gbps
c5.24xlarge96192 GiB14 Gbps25 Gbps

Bare metal C5

Just like for existing bare metal instances (M5, M5d, R5, R5d, z1d, and so forth), your operating system runs directly on the underlying hardware with direct access to the processor.

As described in a previous blog post, you can leverage bare metal instances for applications that:

  • do not want to take the performance hit of nested virtualization,
  • need access to physical resources and low-level hardware features, such as performance counters and Intel VT that are not always available or fully supported in virtualized environments,
  • are intended to run directly on the hardware, or licensed and supported for use in non-virtualized environments.

Bare metal instances can also take advantage of Elastic Load Balancing, Auto Scaling, Amazon CloudWatch, and other AWS services.

Instance NameLogical ProcessorsMemoryEBS-Optimized BandwidthNetwork Bandwidth
c5.metal96192 GiB14 Gbps25 Gbps

Now Available!

You can start using these new instances today in the following regions: US East (N. Virginia), US West (Oregon), Europe (Ireland), Europe (London), Europe (Frankfurt), Europe (Stockholm), Europe (Paris), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney), and AWS GovCloud (US-West).

Please send us feedback and help us build the next generation of compute-optimized instances.

Julien;

Securing credentials using AWS Secrets Manager with AWS Fargate

Post Syndicated from Anuneet Kumar original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/securing-credentials-using-aws-secrets-manager-with-aws-fargate/

This post is contributed by Massimo Re Ferre – Principal Developer Advocate, AWS Container Services.

Cloud security at AWS is the highest priority and the work that the Containers team is doing is a testament to that. A month ago, the team introduced an integration between AWS Secrets Manager and AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store with AWS Fargate tasks. Now, Fargate customers can easily consume secrets securely and parameters transparently from their own task definitions.

In this post, I show you an example of how to use Secrets Manager and Fargate integration to ensure that your secrets are never exposed in the wild.

Overview

AWS has engineered Fargate to be highly secure, with multiple, important security measures. One of these measures is ensuring that each Fargate task has its own isolation boundary and does not share the underlying kernel, CPU resources, memory resources, or elastic network interface with other tasks.

Another area of security focus is the Amazon VPC networking integration, which ensures that tasks can be protected the way that an Amazon EC2 instance can be protected from a networking perspective.

This specific announcement, however, is important in the context of our shared responsibility model. For example, DevOps teams building and running solutions on the AWS platform require proper tooling and functionalities to securely manage secrets, passwords, and sensitive parameters at runtime in their application code. Our job is to empower them with platform capabilities to do exactly that and make it as easy as possible.

Sometimes, in a rush to get things out the door quick, we have seen some users trading off some security aspects for agility, from embedding AWS credentials in source code pushed to public repositories all the way to embedding passwords in clear text in privately stored configuration files. We have solved this problem for developers consuming various AWS services by letting them assign IAM roles to Fargate tasks so that their AWS credentials are transparently handled.

This was useful for consuming native AWS services, but what about accessing services and applications that are outside of the scope of IAM roles and IAM policies? Often, the burden of having to deal with these credentials is pushed onto the developers and AWS users in general. It doesn’t have to be this way. Enter the Secrets Manager and Fargate integration!

Starting with Fargate platform version 1.3.0 and later, it is now possible for you to instruct Fargate tasks to securely grab secrets from Secrets Manager so that these secrets are never exposed in the wild—not even in private configuration files.

In addition, this frees you from the burden of having to implement the undifferentiated heavy lifting of securing these secrets. As a bonus, because Secrets Manager supports secrets rotation, you also gain an additional level of security with no additional effort.

Twitter matcher example

In this example, you create a Fargate task that reads a stream of data from Twitter, matches a particular pattern in the messages, and records some information about the tweet in a DynamoDB table.

To do this, use a Python Twitter library called Tweepy to read the stream from Twitter and the AWS Boto 3 Python library to write to Amazon DynamoDB.

The following diagram shows the high-level flow:

The objective of this example is to show a simple use case where you could use IAM roles assigned to tasks to consume AWS services (such as DynamoDB). It also includes consuming external services (such as Twitter), for which explicit non-AWS credentials need to be stored securely.

This is what happens when you launch the Fargate task:

  • The task starts and inherits the task execution role (1) and the task role (2) from IAM.
  • It queries Secrets Manager (3) using the credentials inherited by the task execution role to retrieve the Twitter credentials and pass them onto the task as variables.
  • It reads the stream from Twitter (4) using the credentials that are stored in Secrets Manager.
  • It matches the stream with a configurable pattern and writes to the DynamoDB table (5) using the credentials inherited by the task role.
  • It matches the stream with a configurable pattern and writes to the DynamoDB table (5) and logs to CloudWatch (6) using the credentials inherited by the task role.

As a side note, while for this specific example I use Twitter as an external service that requires sensitive credentials, any external service that has some form of authentication using passwords or keys is acceptable. Modify the Python script as needed to capture relevant data from your own service to write to the DynamoDB table.

Here are the solution steps:

  • Create the Python script
  • Create the Dockerfile
  • Build the container image
  • Create the image repository
  • Create the DynamoDB table
  • Store the credentials securely
  • Create the IAM roles and IAM policies for the Fargate task
  • Create the Fargate task
  • Clean up

Prerequisites

To be able to execute this exercise, you need an environment configured with the following dependencies:

You can also skip this configuration part and launch an AWS Cloud9 instance.

For the purpose of this example, I am working with the AWS CLI, configured to work with the us-west-2 Region. You can opt to work in a different Region. Make sure that the code examples in this post are modified accordingly.

In addition to the list of AWS prerequisites, you need a Twitter developer account. From there, create an application and use the credentials provided that allow you to connect to the Twitter APIs. We will use them later in the blog post when we will add them to AWS Secrets Manager.

Note: many of the commands suggested in this blog post use $REGION and $AWSACCOUNT in them. You can either set environmental variables that point to the region you want to deploy to and to your own account or you can replace those in the command itself with the region and account number. Also, there are some configuration files (json) that use the same patterns; for those the easiest option is to replace the $REGION and $AWSACCOUNT placeholders with the actual region and account number.

Create the Python script

This script is based on the Tweepy streaming example. I modified the script to include the Boto 3 library and instructions that write data to a DynamoDB table. In addition, the script prints the same data to standard output (to be captured in the container log).

This is the Python script:

from __future__ import absolute_import, print_function from tweepy.streaming import StreamListener from tweepy import OAuthHandler from tweepy import Stream import json import boto3 import os

# DynamoDB table name and Region dynamoDBTable=os.environ['DYNAMODBTABLE'] region_name=os.environ['AWSREGION'] # Filter variable (the word for which to filter in your stream) filter=os.environ['FILTER'] # Go to http://apps.twitter.com and create an app. # The consumer key and secret are generated for you after consumer_key=os.environ['CONSUMERKEY'] consumer_secret=os.environ['CONSUMERSECRETKEY'] # After the step above, you are redirected to your app page. # Create an access token under the "Your access token" section access_token=os.environ['ACCESSTOKEN'] access_token_secret=os.environ['ACCESSTOKENSECRET'] class StdOutListener(StreamListener): """ A listener handles tweets that are received from the stream. This is a basic listener that prints received tweets to stdout. """ def on_data(self, data): j = json.loads(data) tweetuser = j['user']['screen_name'] tweetdate = j['created_at'] tweettext = j['text'].encode('ascii', 'ignore').decode('ascii') print(tweetuser) print(tweetdate) print(tweettext) dynamodb = boto3.client('dynamodb',region_name) dynamodb.put_item(TableName=dynamoDBTable, Item={'user':{'S':tweetuser},'date':{'S':tweetdate},'text':{'S':tweettext}}) return True def on_error(self, status): print(status) if __name__ == '__main__': l = StdOutListener() auth = OAuthHandler(consumer_key, consumer_secret) auth.set_access_token(access_token, access_token_secret) stream = Stream(auth, l) stream.filter(track=[filter]) 

Save this file in a directory and call it twitterstream.py.

This image requires seven parameters, which are clearly visible at the beginning of the script as system variables:

  • The name of the DynamoDB table
  • The Region where you are operating
  • The word or pattern for which to filter
  • The four keys to use to connect to the Twitter API services. Later, I explore how to pass these variables to the container, keeping in mind that some are more sensitive than others.

Create the Dockerfile

Now onto building the actual Docker image. To do that, create a Dockerfile that contains these instructions:

FROM amazonlinux:2
RUN yum install shadow-utils.x86_64 -y
RUN curl https://bootstrap.pypa.io/get-pip.py -o get-pip.py
RUN python get-pip.py
RUN pip install tweepy
RUN pip install boto3
COPY twitterstream.py .
RUN groupadd -r twitterstream && useradd -r -g twitterstream twitterstream
USER twitterstream
CMD ["python", "-u", "twitterstream.py"]

Save it as Dockerfile in the same directory with the twitterstream.py file.

Build the container image

Next, create the container image that you later instantiate as a Fargate task. Build the container image running the following command in the same directory:

docker build -t twitterstream:latest .

Don’t overlook the period (.) at the end of the command: it tells Docker to find the Dockerfile in the current directory.

You now have a local Docker image that, after being properly parameterized, can eventually read from the Twitter APIs and save data in a DynamoDB table.

Create the image repository

Now, store this image in a proper container registry. Create an Amazon ECR repository with the following command:

aws ecr create-repository --repository-name twitterstream --region $REGION

You should see something like the following code example as a result:

{
"repository": {
"registryId": "012345678910",
"repositoryName": "twitterstream",
"repositoryArn": "arn:aws:ecr:us-west-2:012345678910:repository/twitterstream",
"createdAt": 1554473020.0,
"repositoryUri": "012345678910.dkr.ecr.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/twitterstream"
}
}

Tag the local image with the following command:

docker tag twitterstream:latest $AWSACCOUNT.dkr.ecr.$REGION.amazonaws.com/twitterstream:latest

Make sure that you refer to the proper repository by using your AWS account ID and the Region to which you are deploying.

Grab an authorization token from AWS STS:

$(aws ecr get-login --no-include-email --region $REGION)

Now, push the local image to the ECR repository that you just created:

docker push $AWSACCOUNT.dkr.ecr.$REGION.amazonaws.com/twitterstream:latest

You should see something similar to the following result:

The push refers to repository [012345678910.dkr.ecr.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/twitterstream]
435b608431c6: Pushed
86ced7241182: Pushed
e76351c39944: Pushed
e29c13e097a8: Pushed
e55573178275: Pushed
1c729a602f80: Pushed
latest: digest: sha256:010c2446dc40ef2deaedb3f344f12cd916ba0e96877f59029d047417d6cb1f95 size: 1582

Now the image is safely stored in its ECR repository.

Create the DynamoDB table

Now turn to the backend DynamoDB table. This is where you store the extract of the Twitter stream being generated. Specifically, you store the user that published the Tweet, the date when the Tweet was published, and the text of the Tweet.

For the purpose of this example, create a table called twitterStream. This can be customized as one of the parameters that you have to pass to the Fargate task.

Run this command to create the table:

aws dynamodb create-table --region $REGION --table-name twitterStream \
                          --attribute-definitions AttributeName=user,AttributeType=S AttributeName=date,AttributeType=S \
                          --key-schema AttributeName=user,KeyType=HASH AttributeName=date,KeyType=RANGE \
                          --billing-mode PAY_PER_REQUEST

Store the credentials securely

As I hinted earlier, the Python script requires the Fargate task to pass some information as variables. You pass the table name, the Region, and the text to filter as standard task variables. Because this is not sensitive information, it can be shared without raising any concern.

However, other configurations are sensitive and should not be passed over in plaintext, like the Twitter API key. For this reason, use Secrets Manager to store that sensitive information and then read them within the Fargate task securely. This is what the newly announced integration between Fargate and Secrets Manager allows you to accomplish.

You can use the Secrets Manager console or the CLI to store sensitive data.

If you opt to use the console, choose other types of secrets. Under Plaintext, enter your consumer key. Under Select the encryption key, choose DefaultEncryptionKey, as shown in the following screenshot. For more information, see Creating a Basic Secret.

For this example, however, it is easier to use the AWS CLI to create the four secrets required. Run the following commands, but customize them with your own Twitter credentials:

aws secretsmanager create-secret --region $REGION --name CONSUMERKEY \
    --description "Twitter API Consumer Key" \
    --secret-string <your consumer key here> 
aws secretsmanager create-secret --region $REGION --name CONSUMERSECRETKEY \
    --description "Twitter API Consumer Secret Key" \
    --secret-string <your consumer secret key here> 
aws secretsmanager create-secret --region $REGION --name ACCESSTOKEN \
    --description "Twitter API Access Token" \
    --secret-string <your access token here> 
aws secretsmanager create-secret --region $REGION --name ACCESSTOKENSECRET \
    --description "Twitter API Access Token Secret" \
    --secret-string <your access token secret here> 

Each of those commands reports a message confirming that the secret has been created:

{
"VersionId": "7d950825-7aea-42c5-83bb-0c9b36555dbb",
"Name": "CONSUMERSECRETKEY",
"ARN": "arn:aws:secretsmanager:us-west-2:01234567890:secret:CONSUMERSECRETKEY-5D0YUM"
}

From now on, these four API keys no longer appear in any configuration.

The following screenshot shows the console after the commands have been executed:

Create the IAM roles and IAM policies for the Fargate task

To run the Python code properly, your Fargate task must have some specific capabilities. The Fargate task must be able to do the following:

  1. Pull the twitterstream container image (created earlier) from ECR.
  2. Retrieve the Twitter credentials (securely stored earlier) from Secrets Manager.
  3. Log in to a specific Amazon CloudWatch log group (logging is optional but a best practice).
  4. Write to the DynamoDB table (created earlier).

The first three capabilities should be attached to the ECS task execution role. The fourth should be attached to the ECS task role. For more information, see Amazon ECS Task Execution IAM Role.

In other words, the capabilities that are associated with the ECS agent and container instance need to be configured in the ECS task execution role. Capabilities that must be available from within the task itself are configured in the ECS task role.

First, create the two IAM roles that are eventually attached to the Fargate task.

Create a file called ecs-task-role-trust-policy.json with the following content (make sure you replace the $REGION, $AWSACCOUNT placeholders as well as the proper secrets ARNs):

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Sid": "",
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "ecs-tasks.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    }
  ]
}

Now, run the following commands to create the twitterstream-task-role role, as well as the twitterstream-task-execution-role:

aws iam create-role --region $REGION --role-name twitterstream-task-role --assume-role-policy-document file://ecs-task-role-trust-policy.json

aws iam create-role --region $REGION --role-name twitterstream-task-execution-role --assume-role-policy-document file://ecs-task-role-trust-policy.json

Next, create a JSON file that codifies the capabilities required for the ECS task role (twitterstream-task-role):

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "dynamodb:PutItem"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:dynamodb:$REGION:$AWSACCOUNT:table/twitterStream"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

Save the file as twitterstream-iam-policy-task-role.json.

Now, create a JSON file that codifies the capabilities required for the ECS task execution role (twitterstream-task-execution-role):

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "ecr:GetAuthorizationToken",
                "ecr:BatchCheckLayerAvailability",
                "ecr:GetDownloadUrlForLayer",
                "ecr:BatchGetImage"
            ],
            "Resource": "*"
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "secretsmanager:GetSecretValue",
                "kms:Decrypt"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:secretsmanager:$REGION:$AWSACCOUNT:secret:CONSUMERKEY-XXXXXX",
                "arn:aws:secretsmanager:$REGION:$AWSACCOUNT:secret:CONSUMERSECRETKEY-XXXXXX",
                "arn:aws:secretsmanager:$REGION:$AWSACCOUNT:secret:ACCESSTOKEN-XXXXXX",
                "arn:aws:secretsmanager:$REGION:$AWSACCOUNT:secret:ACCESSTOKENSECRET-XXXXXX"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "logs:CreateLogStream",
                "logs:PutLogEvents"
            ],
            "Resource": "*"
        }
    ]
}

Save the file as twitterstream-iam-policy-task-execution-role.json.

The following two commands create IAM policy documents and associate them with the IAM roles that you created earlier:

aws iam put-role-policy --region $REGION --role-name twitterstream-task-role --policy-name twitterstream-iam-policy-task-role --policy-document file://twitterstream-iam-policy-task-role.json

aws iam put-role-policy --region $REGION --role-name twitterstream-task-execution-role --policy-name twitterstream-iam-policy-task-execution-role --policy-document file://twitterstream-iam-policy-task-execution-role.json

Create the Fargate task

Now it’s time to tie everything together. As a recap, so far you have:

  • Created the container image that contains your Python code.
  • Created the DynamoDB table where the code is going to save the extract from the Twitter stream.
  • Securely stored the Twitter API credentials in Secrets Manager.
  • Created IAM roles with specific IAM policies that can write to DynamoDB and read from Secrets Manager (among other things).

Now you can tie everything together by creating a Fargate task that executes the container image. To do so, create a file called twitterstream-task.json and populate it with the following configuration:

{
    "family": "twitterstream", 
    "networkMode": "awsvpc", 
    "executionRoleArn": "arn:aws:iam::$AWSACCOUNT:role/twitterstream-task-execution-role",
    "taskRoleArn": "arn:aws:iam::$AWSACCOUNT:role/twitterstream-task-role",
    "containerDefinitions": [
        {
            "name": "twitterstream", 
            "image": "$AWSACCOUNT.dkr.ecr.$REGION.amazonaws.com/twitterstream:latest", 
            "essential": true,
            "environment": [
                {
                    "name": "DYNAMODBTABLE",
                    "value": "twitterStream"
                },
                {
                    "name": "AWSREGION",
                    "value": "$REGION"
                },                
                {
                    "name": "FILTER",
                    "value": "Cloud Computing"
                }
            ],    
            "secrets": [
                {
                    "name": "CONSUMERKEY",
                    "valueFrom": "arn:aws:secretsmanager:$REGION:$AWSACCOUNT:secret:CONSUMERKEY-XXXXXX"
                },
                {
                    "name": "CONSUMERSECRETKEY",
                    "valueFrom": "arn:aws:secretsmanager:$REGION:$AWSACCOUNT:secret:CONSUMERSECRETKEY-XXXXXX"
                },
                {
                    "name": "ACCESSTOKEN",
                    "valueFrom": "arn:aws:secretsmanager:$REGION:$AWSACCOUNT:secret:ACCESSTOKEN-XXXXXX"
                },
                {
                    "name": "ACCESSTOKENSECRET",
                    "valueFrom": "arn:aws:secretsmanager:$REGION:$AWSACCOUNT:secret:ACCESSTOKENSECRET-XXXXXX"
                }
            ],
            "logConfiguration": {
                    "logDriver": "awslogs",
                    "options": {
                            "awslogs-group": "twitterstream",
                            "awslogs-region": "$REGION",
                            "awslogs-stream-prefix": "twitterstream"
                    }
            }
        }
    ], 
    "requiresCompatibilities": [
        "FARGATE"
    ], 
    "cpu": "256", 
    "memory": "512"
}

To tweak the search string, change the value of the FILTER variable (currently set to “Cloud Computing”).

The Twitter API credentials are never exposed in clear text in these configuration files. There is only a reference to the Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) of the secret names. For example, this is the system variable CONSUMERKEY in the Fargate task configuration:

"secrets": [
                {
                    "name": "CONSUMERKEY",
                    "valueFrom": "arn:aws:secretsmanager:$REGION:$AWSACCOUNT:secret:CONSUMERKEY-XXXXXX"
                }

This directive asks the ECS agent running on the Fargate instance (that has assumed the specified IAM execution role) to do the following:

  • Connect to Secrets Manager.
  • Get the secret securely.
  • Assign its value to the CONSUMERKEY system variable to be made available to the Fargate task.

Register this task by running the following command:

aws ecs register-task-definition --region $REGION --cli-input-json file://twitterstream-task.json

In preparation to run the task, create the CloudWatch log group with the following command:

aws logs create-log-group --log-group-name twitterstream --region $REGION

If you don’t create the log group upfront, the task fails to start.

Create the ECS cluster

The last step before launching the Fargate task is creating an ECS cluster. An ECS cluster has two distinct dimensions:

  • The EC2 dimension, where the compute capacity is managed by the customer as ECS container instances)
  • The Fargate dimension, where the compute capacity is managed transparently by AWS.

For this example, you use the Fargate dimension, so you are essentially using the ECS cluster as a logical namespace.

Run the following command to create a cluster called twitterstream_cluster (change the name as needed). If you have a default cluster already created in your Region of choice, you can use that, too.

aws ecs create-cluster --cluster-name "twitterstream_cluster" --region $REGION

Now launch the task in the ECS cluster just created (in the us-west-2 Region) with a Fargate launch type. Run the following command:

aws ecs run-task --region $REGION \
  --cluster "twitterstream_cluster" \
  --launch-type FARGATE \
  --network-configuration "awsvpcConfiguration={subnets=["subnet-6a88e013","subnet-6a88e013"],securityGroups=["sg-7b45660a"],assignPublicIp=ENABLED}" \
  --task-definition twitterstream:1

A few things to pay attention to with this command:

  • If you created more than one revision of the task (by re-running the aws ecs register-task-definition command), make sure to run the aws ecs run-task command with the proper revision number at the end.
  • Customize the network section of the command for your own environment:
    • Use the default security group in your VPC, as the Fargate task only needs outbound connectivity.
    • Use two public subnets in which to start the Fargate task.

The Fargate task comes up in a few seconds and you can see it from the ECS console, as shown in the following screenshot:

Similarly, the DynamoDB table starts being populated with the information collected by the script running in the task, as shown in the following screenshot:

Finally, the Fargate task logs all the activities in the CloudWatch Log group, as shown in the following screenshot:

The log may take a few minutes to populate and be consolidated in CloudWatch.

Clean up

Now that you have completed the walkthrough, you can tear down all the resources that you created to avoid incurring future charges.

First, stop the ECS task that you started:

aws ecs stop-task --cluster twitterstream_cluster --region $REGION --task 4553111a-748e-4f6f-beb5-f95242235fb5

Your task number is different. You can grab it either from the ECS console or from the AWS CLI. This is how you read it from the AWS CLI:

aws ecs list-tasks --cluster twitterstream_cluster --family twitterstream --region $REGION  
{
"taskArns": [
"arn:aws:ecs:us-west-2:693935722839:task/4553111a-748e-4f6f-beb5-f95242235fb5 "
]
}

Then, delete the ECS cluster that you created:

aws ecs delete-cluster --cluster "twitterstream_cluster" --region $REGION

Next, delete the CloudWatch log group:

aws logs delete-log-group --log-group-name twitterstream --region $REGION

The console provides a fast workflow to delete the IAM roles. In the IAM console, choose Roles and filter your search for twitter. You should see the two roles that you created:

Select the two roles and choose Delete role.

Cleaning up the secrets created is straightforward. Run a delete-secret command for each one:

aws secretsmanager delete-secret --region $REGION --secret-id CONSUMERKEY
aws secretsmanager delete-secret --region $REGION --secret-id CONSUMERSECRETKEY
aws secretsmanager delete-secret --region $REGION --secret-id ACCESSTOKEN
aws secretsmanager delete-secret --region $REGION --secret-id ACCESSTOKENSECRET

The next step is to delete the DynamoDB table:

aws dynamodb delete-table --table-name twitterStream --region $REGION

The last step is to delete the ECR repository. By default, you cannot delete a repository that still has container images in it. To address that, add the –force directive:

aws ecr delete-repository --region $REGION --repository-name twitterstream --force

You can de-register the twitterstream task definition by following this procedure in the ECS console. The task definitions remain inactive but visible in the system.

With this, you have deleted all the resources that you created.

Conclusion

In this post, I demonstrated how Fargate can interact with Secrets Manager to retrieve sensitive data (for example, Twitter API credentials). You can securely make the sensitive data available to the code running in the container inside the Fargate task.

I also demonstrated how a Fargate task with a specific IAM role can access other AWS services (for example, DynamoDB).

 

Improving and securing your game-binaries distribution at scale

Post Syndicated from Ignacio Riesgo original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/improving-and-securing-your-game-binaries-distribution-at-scale/

This post is contributed by Yahav Biran | Sr. Solutions Architect, AWS and Scott Selinger | Associate Solutions Architect, AWS 

One of the challenges that game publishers face when employing CI/CD processes is the distribution of updated game binaries in a scalable, secure, and cost-effective way. Continuous integration and continuous deployment (CI/CD) processes enable game publishers to improve games throughout their lifecycle.

Often, CI/CD jobs contain minor changes that cause the CI/CD processes to push a full set of game binaries over the internet. This is a suboptimal approach. It negatively affects the cost of development network resources, customer network resources (output and input bandwidth), and the time it takes for a game update to propagate.

This post proposes a method of optimizing the game integration and deployments. Specifically, this method improves the distribution of updated game binaries to various targets, such as game-server farms. The proposed mechanism also adds to the security model designed to include progressive layers, starting from the Amazon EC2 instance that runs the game server. It also improves security of the game binaries, the game assets, and the monitoring of the game server deployments across several AWS Regions.

Why CI/CD in gaming is hard today

Game server binaries are usually a native application that includes binaries like graphic, sound, network, and physics assets, as well as scripts and media files. Game servers are usually developed with game engines like Unreal, Amazon Lumberyard, and Unity. Game binaries typically take up tens of gigabytes. However, because game developer teams modify only a few tens of kilobytes every day, frequent distribution of a full set of binaries is wasteful.

For a standard global game deployment, distributing game binaries requires compressing the entire binaries set and transferring the compressed version to destinations, then decompressing it upon arrival. You can optimize the process by decoupling the various layers, pushing and deploying them individually.

In both cases, the continuous deployment process might be slow due to the compression and transfer durations. Also, distributing the image binaries incurs unnecessary data transfer costs, since data is duplicated. Other game-binary distribution methods may require the game publisher’s DevOps teams to install and maintain custom caching mechanisms.

This post demonstrates an optimal method for distributing game server updates. The solution uses containerized images stored in Amazon ECR and deployed using Amazon ECS or Amazon EKS to shorten the distribution duration and reduce network usage.

How can containers help?

Dockerized game binaries enable standard caching with no implementation from the game publisher. Dockerized game binaries allow game publishers to stage their continuous build process in two ways:

  • To rebuild only the layer that was updated in a particular build process and uses the other cached layers.
  • To reassemble both packages into a deployable game server.

The use of ECR with either ECS or EKS takes care of the last mile deployment to the Docker container host.

Larger application binaries mean longer application loading times. To reduce the overall application initialization time, I decouple the deployment of the binaries and media files to allow the application to update faster. For example, updates in the application media files do not require the replication of the engine binaries or media files. This is achievable if the application binaries can be deployed in a separate directory structure. For example:

/opt/local/engine

/opt/local/engine-media

/opt/local/app

/opt/local/app-media

Containerized game servers deployment on EKS

The application server can be deployed as a single Kubernetes pod with multiple containers. The engine media (/opt/local/engine-media), the application (/opt/local/app), and the application media (/opt/local/app-media) spawn as Kubernetes initContainers and the engine binary (/opt/local/engine) runs as the main container.

apiVersion: v1
kind: Pod
metadata:
  name: my-game-app-pod
  labels:
    app: my-game-app
volumes:
      - name: engine-media-volume
          emptyDir: {}
      - name: app-volume
          emptyDir: {}
      - name: app-media-volume
          emptyDir: {}
      initContainers:
        - name: app
          image: the-app- image
          imagePullPolicy: Always
          command:
            - "sh"
            - "-c"
            - "cp /* /opt/local/engine-media"
          volumeMounts:
            - name: engine-media-volume
              mountPath: /opt/local/engine-media
        - name: engine-media
          image: the-engine-media-image
          imagePullPolicy: Always
          command:
            - "sh"
            - "-c"
            - "cp /* /opt/local/app"
          volumeMounts:
            - name: app-volume
              mountPath: /opt/local/app
        - name: app-media
          image: the-app-media-image
          imagePullPolicy: Always
          command:
            - "sh"
            - "-c"
            - "cp /* /opt/local/app-media"
          volumeMounts:
            - name: app-media-volume
              mountPath: /opt/local/app-media
spec:
  containers:
  - name: the-engine
    image: the-engine-image
    imagePullPolicy: Always
    volumeMounts:
       - name: engine-media-volume
         mountPath: /opt/local/engine-media
       - name: app-volume
         mountPath: /opt/local/app
       - name: app-media-volume
         mountPath: /opt/local/app-media
    command: ['sh', '-c', '/opt/local/engine/start.sh']

Applying multi-stage game binaries builds

In this post, I use Docker multi-stage builds for containerizing the game asset builds. I use AWS CodeBuild to manage the build and to deploy the updates of game engines like Amazon Lumberyard as ready-to-play dedicated game servers.

Using this method, frequent changes in the game binaries require less than 1% of the data transfer typically required by full image replication to the nodes that run the game-server instances. This results in significant improvements in build and integration time.

I provide a deployment example for Amazon Lumberyard Multiplayer Sample that is deployed to an EKS cluster, but this can also be done using different container orchestration technology and different game engines. I also show that the image being deployed as a game-server instance is always the latest image, which allows centralized control of the code to be scheduled upon distribution.

This example shows an update of only 50 MB of game assets, whereas the full game-server binary is 3.1 GB. With only 1.5% of the content being updated, that speeds up the build process by 90% compared to non-containerized game binaries.

For security with EKS, apply the imagePullPolicy: Always option as part of the Kubernetes best practice container images deployment option. This option ensures that the latest image is pulled every time that the pod is started, thus deploying images from a single source in ECR, in this case.

Example setup

  • Read through the following sample, a multiplayer game sample, and see how to build and structure multiplayer games to employ the various features of the GridMate networking library.
  • Create an AWS CodeCommit or GitHub repository (multiplayersample-lmbr) that includes the game engine binaries, the game assets (.pak, .cfg and more), AWS CodeBuild specs, and EKS deployment specs.
  • Create a CodeBuild project that points to the CodeCommit repo. The build image uses aws/codebuild/docker:18.09.0: the built-in image maintained by CodeBuild configured with 3 GB of memory and two vCPUs. The compute allocated for build capacity can be modified for cost and build time tradeoff.
  • Create an EKS cluster designated as a staging or an integration environment for the game title. In this case, it’s multiplayersample.

The binaries build Git repository

The Git repository is composed of five core components ordered by their size:

  • The game engine binaries (for example, BinLinux64.Dedicated.tar.gz). This is the compressed version of the game engine artifacts that are not updated regularly, hence they are deployed as a compressed file. The maintenance of this file is usually done by a different team than the developers working on the game title.
  • The game binaries (for example, MultiplayerSample_pc_Paks_Dedicated). This directory is maintained by the game development team and managed as a standard multi-branch repository. The artifacts under this directory get updated on a daily or weekly basis, depending on the game development plan.
  • The build-related specifications (for example, buildspec.yml  and Dockerfile). These files specify the build process. For simplicity, I only included the Docker build process to convey the speed of continuous integration. The process can be easily extended to include the game compilation and linked process as well.
  • The Docker artifacts for containerizing the game engine and the game binaries (for example, start.sh and start.py). These scripts usually are maintained by the game DevOps teams and updated outside of the regular game development plan. More details about these scripts can be found in a sample that describes how to deploy a game-server in Amazon EKS.
  • The deployment specifications (for example, eks-spec) specify the Kubernetes game-server deployment specs. This is for reference only, since the CD process usually runs in a separate set of resources like staging EKS clusters, which are owned and maintained by a different team.

The game build process

The build process starts with any Git push event on the Git repository. The build process includes three core phases denoted by pre_build, buildand post_build in multiplayersample-lmbr/buildspec.yml

  1. The pre_build phase unzips the game-engine binaries and logs in to the container registry (Amazon ECR) to prepare.
  2. The buildphase executes the docker build command that includes the multi-stage build.
    • The Dockerfile spec file describes the multi-stage image build process. It starts by adding the game-engine binaries to the Linux OS, ubuntu:18.04 in this example.
    • FROM ubuntu:18.04
    • ADD BinLinux64.Dedicated.tar /
    • It continues by adding the necessary packages to the game server (for example, ec2-metadata, boto3, libc, and Python) and the necessary scripts for controlling the game server runtime in EKS. These packages are only required for the CI/CD process. Therefore, they are only added in the CI/CD process. This enables a clean decoupling between the necessary packages for development, integration, and deployment, and simplifies the process for both teams.
    • RUN apt-get install -y python python-pip
    • RUN apt-get install -y net-tools vim
    • RUN apt-get install -y libc++-dev
    • RUN pip install mcstatus ec2-metadata boto3
    • ADD start.sh /start.sh
    • ADD start.py /start.py
    • The second part is to copy the game engine from the previous stage --from=0 to the next build stage. In this case, you copy the game engine binaries with the two COPY Docker directives.
    • COPY --from=0 /BinLinux64.Dedicated/* /BinLinux64.Dedicated/
    • COPY --from=0 /BinLinux64.Dedicated/qtlibs /BinLinux64.Dedicated/qtlibs/
    • Finally, the game binaries are added as a separate layer on top of the game-engine layers, which concludes the build. It’s expected that constant daily changes are made to this layer, which is why it is packaged separately. If your game includes other abstractions, you can break this step into several discrete Docker image layers.
    • ADD MultiplayerSample_pc_Paks_Dedicated /BinLinux64.Dedicated/
  3. The post_build phase pushes the game Docker image to the centralized container registry for further deployment to the various regional EKS clusters. In this phase, tag and push the new image to the designated container registry in ECR.

- docker tag $IMAGE_REPO_NAME:$IMAGE_TAG

$AWS_ACCOUNT_ID.dkr.ecr.$AWS_DEFAULT_REGION.amazonaws.com/$IMAGE_REPO_NAME:$IMAGE_TAG

docker push

$AWS_ACCOUNT_ID.dkr.ecr.$AWS_DEFAULT_REGION.amazonaws.com/$IMAGE_REPO_NAME:$IMAGE_TAG

The game deployment process in EKS

At this point, you’ve pushed the updated image to the designated container registry in ECR (/$IMAGE_REPO_NAME:$IMAGE_TAG). This image is scheduled as a game server in an EKS cluster as game-server Kubernetes deployment, as described in the sample.

In this example, I use  imagePullPolicy: Always.


containers:
…
        image: /$IMAGE_REPO_NAME:$IMAGE_TAG/multiplayersample-build
        imagePullPolicy: Always
        name: multiplayersample
…

By using imagePullPolicy, you ensure that no one can circumvent Amazon ECR security. You can securely make ECR the single source of truth with regards to scheduled binaries. However, ECR to the worker nodes via kubelet, the node agent. Given the size of a whole image combined with the frequency with which it is pulled, that would amount to a significant additional cost to your project.

However, Docker layers allow you to update only the layers that were modified, preventing a whole image update. Also, they enable secure image distribution. In this example, only the layer MultiplayerSample_pc_Paks_Dedicated is updated.

Proposed CI/CD process

The following diagram shows an example end-to-end architecture of a full-scale game-server deployment using EKS as the orchestration system, ECR as the container registry, and CodeBuild as the build engine.

Game developers merge changes to the Git repository that include both the preconfigured game-engine binaries and the game artifacts. Upon merge events, CodeBuild builds a multistage game-server image that is pushed to a centralized container registry hosted by ECR. At this point, DevOps teams in different Regions continuously schedule the image as a game server, pulling only the updated layer in the game server image. This keeps the entire game-server fleet running the same game binaries set, making for a secure deployment.

 

Try it out

I published two examples to guide you through the process of building an Amazon EKS cluster and deploying a containerized game server with large binaries.

Conclusion

Adopting CI/CD in game development improves the software development lifecycle by continuously deploying quality-based updated game binaries. CI/CD in game development is usually hindered by the cost of distributing large binaries, in particular, by cross-regional deployments.

Non-containerized paradigms require deployment of the full set of binaries, which is an expensive and time-consuming task. Containerized game-server binaries with AWS build tools and Amazon EKS-based regional clusters of game servers enable secure and cost-effective distribution of large binary sets to enable increased agility in today’s game development.

In this post, I demonstrated a reduction of more than 90% of the network traffic required by implementing an effective CI/CD system in a large-scale deployment of multiplayer game servers.

Running the most reliable choice for Windows workloads: Windows on AWS

Post Syndicated from Sandy Carter original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/running-the-most-reliable-choice-for-windows-workloads-windows-on-aws/

Some of you may not know, but AWS began supporting Microsoft Windows workloads on AWS in 2008—over 11 years ago. Year over year, we have released exciting new services and enhancements based on feedback from customers like you. AWS License Manager and Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights for .NET and SQL Server are just some of the recent examples. The rate and pace of innovation is eye-popping.

In addition to innovation, one of the key areas that companies value is the reliability of the cloud platform. I recently chatted with David Sheehan, DevOps engineer at eMarketer. He told me, “Our move from Azure to AWS improved the performance and reliability of our microservices in addition to significant cost savings.” If a healthcare clinic can’t connect to the internet, then it’s possible that they can’t deliver care to their patients. If a bank can’t process transactions because of an outage, they could lose business.

In 2018, the next-largest cloud provider had almost 7x more downtime hours than AWS per data pulled directly from the public service health dashboards of the major cloud providers. It is the reason companies like Edwards Lifesciences chose AWS. They are a global leader in patient-focused medical innovations for structural heart disease, as well as critical care and surgical monitoring. Rajeev Bhardwaj, the senior director for Enterprise Technology, recently told me, “We chose AWS for our data center workloads, including Windows, based on our assessment of the security, reliability, and performance of the platform.”

There are several reasons as to why AWS delivers a more reliable platform for Microsoft workloads but I would like to focus on two here: designing for reliability and scaling within a Region.

Reason #1—It’s designed for reliability

AWS has significantly better reliability than the next largest cloud provider, due to our fundamentally better global infrastructure design based on Regions and Availability Zones. The AWS Cloud spans 64 zones within 21 geographic Regions around the world. We’ve announced plans for 12 more zones and four more Regions in Bahrain, Cape Town, Jakarta, and Milan.

Look at networking capabilities across five key areas: security, global coverage, performance, manageability, and availability. AWS has made deep investments in each of these areas over the past 12 years. We want to ensure that AWS has the networking capabilities required to run the world’s most demanding workloads.

There is no compression algorithm for experience. From running the most extensive, reliable, and secure global cloud infrastructure technology platform, we’ve learned that you care about the availability and performance of your applications. You want to deploy applications across multiple zones in the same Region for fault tolerance and latency.

I want to take a moment to emphasize that our approach to building our network is fundamentally different from our competitors, and that difference matters. Each of our Regions is fully isolated from all other Regions. Unlike virtually every other cloud provider, each AWS Region has multiple zones and data centers. These zones are a fully isolated partition of our infrastructure that contains up to eight separate data centers.

The zones are connected to each other with fast, private fiber-optic networking, enabling you to easily architect applications that automatically fail over between zones without interruption. With their own power infrastructure, the zones are physically separated by a meaningful distance, many kilometers, from any other zone. You can partition applications across multiple zones in the same Region to better isolate any issues and achieve high availability.

The AWS control plane (including APIs) and AWS Management Console are distributed across AWS Regions. They use a Multi-AZ architecture within each Region to deliver resilience and ensure continuous availability. This ensures that you avoid having a critical service dependency on a single data center.

While other cloud vendors claim to have Availability Zones, they do not have the same stringent requirements for isolation between zones, leading to impact across multiple zones. Furthermore, AWS has more zones and more Regions with support for multiple zones than any other cloud provider. This design is why the next largest cloud provider had almost 7x more downtime hours in 2018 than AWS.

Reason #2—Scale within a Region

We also designed our services into smaller cells that scale out within a Region, as opposed to a single-Region instance that scales up. This approach reduces the blast radius when there is a cell-level failure. It is why AWS—unlike other providers—has never experienced a network event spanning multiple Regions.

AWS also provides the most detailed information on service availability via the Service Health Dashboard, including Regions affected, services impacted, and downtime duration. AWS keeps a running log of all service interruptions for the past year. Finally, you can subscribe to an RSS feed to be notified of interruptions to each individual service.

Reliability matters

Running Windows workloads on AWS means that you not only get the most innovative cloud, but you also have the most reliable cloud as well.

For example, Mary Kay is one of the world’s leading direct sellers of skin care products and cosmetics. They have tens of thousands of employees and beauty consultants working outside the office, so the IT system is fundamental for the success of their company.

Mary Kay used Availability Zones and Microsoft Active Directory to architect their applications on AWS. AWS Microsoft Managed AD provides Mary Kay the features that enabled them to deploy SQL Server Always On availability groups on Amazon EC2 Windows. This configuration gave Mary Kay the control to scale their deployment out to meet their performance requirements. They were able to deploy the service in multiple Regions to support users worldwide. Their on-premises users get the same experience when using Active Directory–aware services, either on-premises or in the AWS Cloud.

Now, with our cross-account and cross-VPC support, Mary Kay is looking at reducing their managed Active Directory infrastructure footprint, saving money and reducing complexity. But this identity management system must be reliable and scalable as well as innovative.

Fugro is a Dutch multinational public company headquartered in the Netherlands. They provide geotechnical, survey, subsea, and geoscience services for clients, typically oil and gas, telecommunications cable, and infrastructure companies. Fugro leverages the cloud to support the delivery of geo-intelligence and asset management services for clients globally in industries including onshore and offshore energy, renewables, power, and construction.

As I was chatting with Scott Carpenter, the global cloud architect for Fugro, he said, “Fugro is also now in the process of migrating a complex ESRI ArcGIS environment from an existing cloud provider to AWS. It is going to centralize and accelerate access from existing AWS hosted datasets, while still providing flexibility and interoperability to external and third-party data sources. The ArcGIS migration is driven by a focus on providing the highest level of operational excellence.”

With AWS, you don’t have to be concerned about reliability. AWS has the reliability and scale that drives innovation for Windows applications running in the cloud. And the same reliability that makes it best for your Windows applications is the same reliability that makes AWS the best cloud for all your applications.

Let AWS help you assess how your company can get the most out of cloud. Join all the AWS customers that trust us to run their most important applications in the best cloud. To have us create an assessment for your Windows applications or all your applications, email us at [email protected].

Optimizing Network Intensive Workloads on Amazon EC2 A1 Instances

Post Syndicated from Martin Yip original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/optimizing-network-intensive-workloads-on-amazon-ec2-a1-instances/

This post courtesy of Ali Saidi, AWS, Principal Engineer

At re:Invent 2018, AWS announced the Amazon EC2 A1 instance. The A1 instances are powered by our internally developed Arm-based AWS Graviton processors and are up to 45% less expensive than other instance types with the same number of vCPUs and DRAM. These instances are based on the AWS Nitro System, and offer enhanced-networking of up to 10 Gbps with Elastic Network Adapters (ENA).

One of the use cases for the A1 instance is key-value stores and in this post, we describe how to get the most performance from the A1 instance running memcached. Some simple configuration options increase the performance of memcached by 3.9X over the out-of-the-box experience as we’ll show below. Although we focus on memcached, the configuration advice is similar for any network intensive workload running on A1 instances. Typically, the performance of network intensive workloads will improve by tuning some of these parameters, however depending on the particular data rates and processing requirements the values below could change.

irqbalance

Most Linux distributions enable irqbalance by default which load-balance interrupts to different CPUs during runtime. It does a good job to balance interrupt load, but in some cases, we can do better by pinning interrupts to specific CPUs. For our optimizations we’re going to temporarily disable irqbalance, however, if this is a production configuration that needs to survive a server reboot, irqbalance would need to be permanently disabled and the changes below would need to be added to the boot sequence.

Receive Packet Steering (RPS)

RPS controls which CPUs process packets are received by the Linux networking stack (softIRQs). Depending on instance size and the amount of application processing needed per packet, sometimes the optimal configuration is to have the core receiving packets also execute the Linux networking stack, other times it’s better to spread the processing among a set of cores. For memcached on EC2 A1 instances, we found that using RPS to spread the load out is helpful on the larger instance sizes.

Networking Queues

A1 instances with medium, large, and xlarge instance sizes have a single queue to send and receive packets while 2xlarge and 4xlarge instance sizes have two queues. On the single queue droplets, we’ll pin the IRQ to core 0, while on the dual-queue droplets we’ll use either core 0 or core 0 and core 8.

Instance TypeIRQ settingsRPS settingsApplication settings
a1.xlargeCore 0Core 0Run on cores 1-3
a1.2xlargeBoth on core 0Core 0-3, 4-7Run on core 1-7
a1.4xlargeCore 0 and core 8Core 0-7, 8-15Run on cores 1-7 and 9-15

 

 

 

 

 

The following script sets up the Linux kernel parameters:

#!/bin/bash 

sudo systemctl stop irqbalance.service
set_irq_affinity() {
  grep eth0 /proc/interrupts | awk '{print $1}' | tr -d : | while read IRQ; 
do
    sudo sh -c "echo $1 > /proc/irq/$IRQ/smp_affinity_list"
    shift
  done
}
 
case `grep ^processor /proc/cpuinfo  | wc -l ` in
  (4) sudo sh -c 'echo 1 > /sys/class/net/eth0/queues/rx-0/rps_cpus'
      set_irq_affinity 0
      ;;
  (8) sudo sh -c 'echo f > /sys/class/net/eth0/queues/rx-0/rps_cpus'
      sudo sh -c 'echo f0 > /sys/class/net/eth0/queues/rx-0/rps_cpus'
      set_irq_affinity 0 0
      ;;
  (16) sudo sh -c 'echo ff > /sys/class/net/eth0/queues/rx-0/rps_cpus'
      sudo sh -c 'echo ff00 > /sys/class/net/eth0/queues/rx-0/rps_cpus'
      set_irq_affinity 0 08
      ;;
  *)  echo "Script only supports 4, 8, 16 cores on A1 instances"
      exit 1;
      ;;
esac

Summary

Some simple tuning parameters can significantly improve the performance of network intensive workloads on the A1 instance. With these changes we get 3.9X the performance on an a1.4xlarge and the other two instance sizes see similar improvements. While the particular values listed here aren’t applicable to all network intensive benchmarks, this article demonstrates the methodology and provides a starting point to tune the system and balance the load across CPUs to improve performance. If you have questions about your own workload running on A1 instances, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us at [email protected] .

Fact-checking the truth on TCO for running Windows workloads in the cloud

Post Syndicated from Sandy Carter original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/fact-checking-the-truth-on-tco-for-running-windows-workloads-in-the-cloud/

We’ve been talking to many customers over the last 3–4 months who are concerned about the total cost of ownership (TCO) for running Microsoft Windows workloads in the cloud.

For example, Infor is a global leader in enterprise resource planning (ERP) for manufacturing, healthcare, and retail. They’ve moved thousands of their existing Microsoft SQL Server workloads to Amazon EC2 instances. As a result, they are saving 75% on monthly backup costs. With these tremendous cost savings, Infor can now focus their resources on exponential business growth, with initiatives around AI and optimization.

We also love the story of Just Eat, a UK-based company that has migrated their SQL Server workloads to AWS. They’re now focused on using that data to train Alexa skills for ordering take out!

Here are three fact checks that you should review to ensure that you are getting the best TCO!

Fact check #1: Microsoft’s cost comparisons are misleading for running Windows workloads in the cloud

Customers have shared with us over and over why they continue to trust AWS to run their most important Windows workloads. Still, some of those customers tell us that Microsoft claims Azure is cheaper for running Windows workloads. But can this really be true?

When looking at Microsoft’s cost comparisons, we can see that their analysis is misleading because of some false assumptions. For example, Microsoft only compares the costs of the compute service and licenses. But every workload needs storage and networking! By leaving out these necessary services, Microsoft is not comparing real-world workloads.

The comparison also assumes that the AWS and Azure offerings are at a performance parity, which isn’t true. While the comparison uses equivalent virtual instance configuration, Microsoft ignores the significantly higher performance of AWS compute. We hear that customers must run between two to three times as many Azure instances to get the same performance as they do on AWS (see Fact check #2).

And the list goes on. Microsoft’s analysis only looks at 2008 versions of Windows Server or SQL Server. Then, it adds in the cost for expensive Extended Support to the AWS calculation (extended support costs 75% of the current license cost per year). This addition makes up more than half of the claimed cost difference.

Microsoft assumes that in the next three years, customers won’t move off software that’s more than 10 years old. What we hear from customers is that they plan to use their upgrade rights from Software Assurance (SA) to move to newer versions, such as SQL Server 2016. They’ll use our new automated upgrade tool to eliminate the need for these expensive fees.

Finally, the comparison assumes the use of Azure Hybrid Benefit to reduce the cost of the Azure virtual instance. It does not factor in the cost of the required Microsoft SA on each license. The required SA adds significant cost to the Microsoft side of the example and further demonstrates that their example was misleading.

These assumptions result in a comparison that does not factor in all the costs needed to run SQL Server in Azure. Nor does it account for the performance gains that you get from running on AWS.

At AWS, we are committed to helping you make the most efficient use of cloud resources and lower your Microsoft bill. It appears that Microsoft is focused on keeping those line items flat or growing them over time by adding more and more licensing complexity.

Fact check #2: Price-performance matters to your business for running SQL Server in the cloud

When deciding what cloud is best for your Windows workloads, you should consider both price and performance to find the right operational combination to maximize value for your business. It is also important to think about the future and not make important platform decisions based on technology that was designed before the rise of the cloud.

We know that getting better application performance for your apps is critical to your customers’ satisfaction. In fact, excellent application performance leads to 39% higher customer satisfaction. For more information, see the Netmagic Solutions whitepaper, Application Performance Management: How End-User Experience Affects Your Bottom Line. Poor performance may lead to damaged reputations or even worse, customer attrition.

To make sure that you have the best possible experience for your customers, we focused on pushing the boundaries around performance.

With that in mind, here are some comparisons done between Azure and AWS:

  • DB Best, an enterprise database consulting company, wrote two blog posts—one each for Azure and AWS. They showed how to get the best price-performance ratio for running current versions of SQL Server in the cloud.
  • ZK Research took these posts and compared the results from DB Best to show an apples-to-apples comparison. The testing from DB Best found that SQL Server on AWS consistently shows a 2–3x better performance compared to Azure, using a TPC-C-like benchmark tool called HammerDB.
  • ZK Research then used the DB Best data to calculate the comparison cost for running 1 billion transactions per month. ZK Research found that SQL Server running on Azure would have twice the cost than when running on AWS, when comparing price-performance, including storage, compute, and networking.

As you can see from this data, running on AWS gives you the best price-performance ratio for Windows workloads.

Fact check #3: What does an optimized TCO for Windows workloads in the cloud look like?

When assessing which cloud to run your Windows workloads, your comparison must go well beyond just the compute and support costs. Look at the TCO of your workloads and include everything necessary to run and support these workloads, like storage, networking, and the cost benefits of better reliability. Then, see how you can use the cloud to lower your overall TCO.

So how do you lower your costs to run Windows workloads like Windows Server and SQL Server in the cloud? Optimize those workloads for the scalability and flexibility of cloud. When companies plan cloud migrations on their own, they often use a spreadsheet inventory of their on-premises servers and try to map them, one-to-one, to new cloud-based servers. But these inventories don’t account for the capabilities of cloud-based systems.

On-premises servers are not optimized, with 84% of workloads currently over-provisioned. Many Windows and SQL Server 2008 workloads are running on older, slower server hardware. By sizing your workloads for performance and capability, not by physical servers, you can optimize your cloud migration.

Reducing the number of licenses that you use, both by server and core counts, can also drive significant cost savings. See which on-premises workloads are fault-tolerant, and then use Amazon EC2 Spot Instances to save up to 90% on your compute costs vs. On-Demand pricing.

To get the most out of moving your Windows workloads into the cloud, review and optimize each workload to take best advantage of cloud scalability and flexibility. Our customers have made the most efficient use of cloud resources by working with assessment partners like Movere or TSO Logic, which is now part of AWS.

By running detailed assessments of their environments before migration, customers can yield up to 36% savings using AWS over three years. Customer with optimized environments often find that their AWS solutions are price-competitive with Microsoft even before taking in account the AWS price-performance advantage.

In addition, you can optimize utilization with AWS Trusted Advisor. In fact, over the last couple years, we’ve used AWS Trusted Advisor to tell customers how to spend less money with us, leading to hundreds of millions of dollars in savings for our customers every year.

Why run Windows Server and SQL Server anywhere else but AWS?

For the past 10 years, many companies, such as Adobe and Salesforce, have trusted AWS to run Windows-based workloads such as Windows Server and SQL Server. Many customers tell us the reasons they choose AWS is due to TCO and reliability. Customers have been able to run their Windows workloads with lower costs and higher performance than on any other cloud. To learn more about our story and why customers trust AWS for their Windows workloads, check out Windows on AWS.

After the workloads are optimized for cloud, you can save even more money by efficiently managing your Window Server and SQL Server licenses with AWS License Manager. By the way, License Manager lets you manage on-premises and in the cloud, as well as other software like SAP, Oracle, and IBM.

Dedicated hosts allow customers to bring Windows Server and SQL Server licenses with or without Software Assurance. Licenses without Software Assurance cannot be taken to Azure. Furthermore, Dedicated Hosts allow customers to license Windows Server at the physical level and achieve a greater number of instances at a lower price than they would get through Azure Hybrid Use Benefits.

Summary

The answer is clear: AWS is the best cloud to run your Windows workloads. AWS offers the best experience for Windows workloads in the cloud, which is why we run almost 2x the number of Windows workloads compared to the next largest cloud.

Our customers have found that migrating their Windows workloads to AWS can yield significant savings and better performance. Customers like Sysco, Hess, Sony DADC New Media Solutions, Ancestry, and Expedia have chosen AWS to upgrade, migrate, and modernize their Windows workloads in the cloud.

Don’t let misleading cost comparisons prevent you from getting the most out of cloud. Let AWS help you assess how you can get the most out of cloud. Join all the AWS customers that trust us to run their most important applications in the best cloud for Windows workloads. If you want us to do an assessment for you, email us at [email protected].

Docker, Amazon ECS, and Spot Fleets: A Great Fit Together

Post Syndicated from Tung Nguyen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/docker-amazon-ecs-and-spot-fleets-a-great-fit-together/

Guest post by AWS Container Hero Tung Nguyen. Tung is the president and founder of BoltOps, a consulting company focused on cloud infrastructure and software on AWS. He also enjoys writing for the BoltOps Nuts and Bolts blog.

EC2 Spot Instances allow me to use spare compute capacity at a steep discount. Using Amazon ECS with Spot Instances is probably one of the best ways to run my workloads on AWS. By using Spot Instances, I can save 50–90% on Amazon EC2 instances. You would think that folks would jump at a huge opportunity like a black Friday sales special. However, most folks either seem to not know about Spot Instances or are hesitant. This may be due to some fallacies about Spot.

Spot Fallacies

With the Spot model, AWS can remove instances at any time. It can be due to a maintenance upgrade; high demand for that instance type; older instance type; or for any reason whatsoever.

Hence the first fear and fallacy that people quickly point out with Spot:

What do you mean that the instance can be replaced at any time? Oh no, that must mean that within 20 minutes of launching the instance, it gets killed.

I felt the same way too initially. The actual Spot Instance Advisor website states:

The average frequency of interruption across all Regions and instance types is less than 5%.

From my own usage, I have seen instances run for weeks. Need proof? Here’s a screenshot from an instance in one of our production clusters.

If you’re wondering how many days that is….

Yes, that is 228 continuous days. You might not get these same long uptimes, but it disproves the fallacy that Spot Instances are usually interrupted within 20 minutes from launch.

Spot Fleets

With Spot Instances, I place a single request for a specific instance in a specific Availability Zone. With Spot Fleets, instead of requesting a single instance type, I can ask for a variety of instance types that meet my requirements. For many workloads, as long as the CPU and RAM are close enough, many instance types do just fine.

So, I can spread my instance bets across instance types and multiple zones with Spot Fleets. Using Spot Fleets dramatically makes the system more robust on top of the already mentioned low interruption rate. Also, I can run an On-Demand cluster to provide additional safeguard capacity.

ECS and Spot Fleets: A Great Fit Together

This is one of my favorite ways to run workloads because it gives me a scalable system at a ridiculously low cost. The technologies are such a great fit together that one might think they were built for each other.

  1. Docker provides a consistent, standard binary format to deploy. If it works in one Docker environment, then it works in another. Containers can be pulled down in seconds, making them an excellent fit for Spot Instances, where containers might move around during an interruption.
  2. ECS provides a great ecosystem to run Docker containers. ECS supports a feature called connection instance draining that allows me to tell ECS to relocate the Docker containers to other EC2 instances.
  3. Spot Instances fire off a two-minute warning signal letting me know when it’s about to terminate the instance.

These are the necessary pieces I need for building an ECS cluster on top of Spot Fleet. I use the two-minute warning to call ECS connection draining, and ECS automatically moves containers to another instance in the fleet.

Here’s a CloudFormation template that achieves this: ecs-ec2-spot-fleet. Because the focus is on understanding Spot Fleets, the VPC is designed to be simple.

The template specifies two instance types in the Spot Fleet: t3.small and t3.medium with 2 GB and 4 GB of RAM, respectively. The template weights the t3.medium twice as much as the t3.small. Essentially, the Spot Fleet TargetCapacity value equals the total RAM to provision for the ECS cluster. So if I specify 8, the Spot Fleet service might provision four t3.small instances or two t3.medium instances. The cluster adds up to at least 8 GB of RAM.

To launch the stack run, I run the following command:

aws cloudformation create-stack --stack-name ecs-spot-demo --template-body file://ecs-spot-demo.yml --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM

The CloudFormation stack launches container instances and registers them to an ECS cluster named developmentby default. I can change this with the EcsCluster parameter. For more information on the parameters, see the README and the template source.

When I deploy the application, the deploy tool creates the ECS cluster itself. Here are the Spot Instances in the EC2 console.

Deploy the demo app

After the Spot cluster is up, I can deploy a demo app on it. I wrote a tool called Ufo that is useful for these tasks:

  1. Build the Docker image.
  2. Register the ECS task definition.
  3. Register and deploy the ECS service.
  4. Create the load balancer.

Docker should be installed as a prerequisite. First, I create an ECR repo and set some variables:

ECR_REPO=$(aws ecr create-repository --repository-name demo/sinatra | jq -r '.repository.repositoryUri')
VPC_ID=$(aws ec2 describe-vpcs --filters Name=tag:Name,Values="demo vpc" | jq -r '.Vpcs[].VpcId')

Now I’m ready to clone the demo repo and deploy a sample app to ECS with ufo.

git clone https://github.com/tongueroo/demo-ufo.git demo
cd demo
ufo init --image $ECR_REPO --vpc-id $VPC_ID
ufo current --service demo-web
ufo ship # deploys to ECS on the Spot Fleet cluster

Here’s the ECS service running:

I then grab the Elastic Load Balancing endpoint from the console or with ufo ps.

$ ufo ps
Elb: develop-Elb-12LHJWU4TH3Q8-597605736.us-west-2.elb.amazonaws.com
$

Now I test with curl:

$ curl develop-Elb-12LHJWU4TH3Q8-597605736.us-west-2.elb.amazonaws.com
42

The application returns “42,” the meaning of life, successfully. That’s it! I now have an application running on ECS with Spot Fleet Instances.

Parting thoughts

One additional advantage of using Spot is that it encourages me to think about my architecture in a highly available manner. The Spot “constraints” ironically result in much better sleep at night as the system must be designed to be self-healing.

Hopefully, this post opens the world of running ECS on Spot Instances to you. It’s a core of part of the systems that BoltOps has been running on its own production system and for customers. I still get excited about the setup today. If you’re interested in Spot architectures, contact me at BoltOps.

One last note: Auto Scaling groups also support running multiple instance types and purchase options. Jeff mentions in his post that weight support is planned for a future release. That’s exciting, as it may streamline the usage of Spot with ECS even further.

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – April AWS Online Tech Talks

Post Syndicated from Robin Park original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/learn-about-aws-services-solutions-april-aws-online-tech-talks/

AWS Tech Talks

Join us this April to learn about AWS services and solutions. The AWS Online Tech Talks are live, online presentations that cover a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. These tech talks, led by AWS solutions architects and engineers, feature technical deep dives, live demonstrations, customer examples, and Q&A with AWS experts. Register Now!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks this month:

Blockchain

May 2, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTHow to Build an Application with Amazon Managed Blockchain – Learn how to build an application on Amazon Managed Blockchain with the help of demo applications and sample code.

Compute

April 29, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTHow to Optimize Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) for Higher Performance – Learn how to optimize performance and spend on your Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) volumes.

May 1, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTIntroducing New Amazon EC2 Instances Featuring AMD EPYC and AWS Graviton Processors – See how new Amazon EC2 instance offerings that feature AMD EPYC processors and AWS Graviton processors enable you to optimize performance and cost for your workloads.

Containers

April 23, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTDeep Dive on AWS App Mesh – Learn how AWS App Mesh makes it easy to monitor and control communications for services running on AWS.

March 22, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTDeep Dive Into Container Networking – Dive deep into microservices networking and how you can build, secure, and manage the communications into, out of, and between the various microservices that make up your application.

Databases

April 23, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTSelecting the Right Database for Your Application – Learn how to develop a purpose-built strategy for databases, where you choose the right tool for the job.

April 25, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTMastering Amazon DynamoDB ACID Transactions: When and How to Use the New Transactional APIs – Learn how the new Amazon DynamoDB’s transactional APIs simplify the developer experience of making coordinated, all-or-nothing changes to multiple items both within and across tables.

DevOps

April 24, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTRunning .NET applications with AWS Elastic Beanstalk Windows Server Platform V2 – Learn about the easiest way to get your .NET applications up and running on AWS Elastic Beanstalk.

Enterprise & Hybrid

April 30, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBusiness Case Teardown: Identify Your Real-World On-Premises and Projected AWS Costs – Discover tools and strategies to help you as you build your value-based business case.

IoT

April 30, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBuilding the Edge of Connected Home – Learn how AWS IoT edge services are enabling smarter products for the connected home.

Machine Learning

April 24, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTStart Your Engines and Get Ready to Race in the AWS DeepRacer League – Learn more about reinforcement learning, how to build a model, and compete in the AWS DeepRacer League.

April 30, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTDeploying Machine Learning Models in Production – Learn best practices for training and deploying machine learning models.

May 2, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTAccelerate Machine Learning Projects with Hundreds of Algorithms and Models in AWS Marketplace – Learn how to use third party algorithms and model packages to accelerate machine learning projects and solve business problems.

Networking & Content Delivery

April 23, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTSmart Tips on Application Load Balancers: Advanced Request Routing, Lambda as a Target, and User Authentication – Learn tips and tricks about important Application Load Balancers (ALBs) features that were recently launched.

Productivity & Business Solutions

April 29, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTLearn How to Set up Business Calling and Voice Connector in Minutes with Amazon Chime – Learn how Amazon Chime Business Calling and Voice Connector can help you with your business communication needs.

May 1, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTBring Voice to Your Workplace – Learn how you can bring voice to your workplace with Alexa for Business.

Serverless

April 25, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTModernizing .NET Applications Using the Latest Features on AWS Development Tools for .NET – Get a dive deep and demonstration of the latest updates to the AWS SDK and tools for .NET to make development even easier, more powerful, and more productive.

May 1, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTCustomer Showcase: Improving Data Processing Workloads with AWS Step Functions’ Service Integrations – Learn how innovative customers like SkyWatch are coordinating AWS services using AWS Step Functions to improve productivity.

Storage

April 24, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTAmazon S3 Glacier Deep Archive: The Cheapest Storage in the Cloud – See how Amazon S3 Glacier Deep Archive offers the lowest cost storage in the cloud, at prices significantly lower than storing and maintaining data in on-premises magnetic tape libraries or archiving data offsite.

Getting started with the A1 instance

Post Syndicated from Martin Yip original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/getting-started-with-the-a1-instance/

This post courtesy of Ali Saidi, Annapurna Labs, Principal Systems Developer

At re:Invent 2018 AWS announced the Amazon EC2 A1 instance. These instances are based on the AWS Nitro System that powers all of our latest generation of instances, and are the first instance types powered by the AWS Graviton Processor. These processors feature 64-bit Arm Neoverse cores and are the first general-purpose processor design by Amazon specifically for use in AWS. The instances are up to 40% less expensive than the same number of vCPUs and DRAM available in other instance types. A1 instances are currently available in the US East (N. Virginia and Ohio), US West (Oregon) and EU (Ireland) regions with the following configurations:

ModelvCPUsMemory (GiB)Instance StoreNetwork BandwidthEBS Bandwidth
a1.medium12EBS OnlyUp to 10 GbpsUp to 3.5 Gbps
a1.large24EBS OnlyUp to 10 GbpsUp to 3.5 Gbps
a1.xlarge48EBS OnlyUp to 10 GbpsUp to 3.5 Gbps
a1.2xlarge816EBS OnlyUp to 10 GbpsUp to 3.5 Gbps
a1.4xlarge1632EBS OnlyUp to 10 GbpsUp to 3.5 Gbps

For further information about the instance itself, developers can watch this re:Invent talk and visit the A1 product details page.

Since introduction, we’ve been expanding the available operating systems for the instance and working with the Arm software ecosystem. This blog will provide a summary of what’s supported and how to use it.

Operating System Support

If you’re running on an open source stack, as many customers who build applications that scale-out in the cloud are, the Arm ecosystem is well developed and likely already supports your application.

The A1 instance requires AMIs and software built for Arm processors. When we announced A1, we had support for Amazon Linux 2, Ubuntu 16.04 and 18.04, as well as Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6. A little over two months later and the available operating systems for our customers has increased to include Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 Beta, NetBSD, Fedora Rawhide, Ubuntu 18.10, and Debian 9.8. We expect to see more operating systems, linux distributions and AMIs available in the coming months.

These operating systems and Linux distributions are offering the same level of support for their Arm AMIs as they do for their existing x86 AMIs. In almost every case, if you’re installing packages with aptor yum those packages exist for Arm in the OS of your choice and will run in the same way.

For example, to install PHP 7.2 on the Arm version of Amazon Linux 2 or Ubuntu we follow the exact same steps we would on an x86 based instance type:

$ sudo amazon-linux-extras php72
$ sudo yum install php

Or on Ubuntu 18.04:

$ sudo apt update
$ sudo apt install php

Containers

Containers are one of the most popular application deployment mechanisms for A1. The Elastic Container Service (ECS) already supports the A1 instance and there’s an Amazon ECS-Optimized Amazon Linux 2 AMI, and we’ll soon be launching support for Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS). The majority of Docker official-images hosted in Docker Hub already have support for 64-bit Arm systems along with x86.

We’ve further expanded support for running containers at scale with AWS Batch support for A1.

Running a container on A1

In this section we show how to run the container on Amazon Linux 2. Many Docker official images (at least 76% as of this writing) already support 64-bit Arm systems, and the majority of the ones that don’t either have pending patches to add support or are based on commercial software

$ sudo yum install -y docker
$ sudo service docker start
$ sudo docker run hello-world
 
$ sudo docker run hello-world
Unable to find image 'hello-world:latest' locally
latest: Pulling from library/hello-world
3b4173355427: Pull complete
Digest: sha256:2557e3c07ed1e38f26e389462d03ed943586f744621577a99efb77324b0fe535
Status: Downloaded newer image for hello-world:latest
 
Hello from Docker!
This message shows that your installation appears to be working correctly.
...

Running WordPress on A1

As an example of automating the running of a LAMP (Linux, Apache HTTPd, MariaDB, and PHP) stack on an A1 instance, we’ve updated a basic CloudFormation template to support the A1 instance type. We made some changes to the template to support Amazon Linux 2, but otherwise the same template works for all our instance types. The template is here and it can be launched like any other CloudFormation template.

It defaults to running on an A1 Arm instance. After the template is launched, the output is the URL of the running instance which can be accessed from a browser to observe the default WordPress home page is being served.

Summary

If you’re using open source software, everything you rely on most likely works on Arm systems today, and over the coming months we’ll be working on increasing the support and improving performance of software running on the A1 instances. If you have an open source based web-tier or containerized application, give the A1 instances a try and let us know what you think. If you run into any issues please don’t hesitate to get in touch at [email protected] , via the AWS Compute Forum, or reach out through your usual AWS support contacts, we love customer’s feedback.

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – February 2019 AWS Online Tech Talks

Post Syndicated from Robin Park original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/learn-about-aws-services-solutions-february-2019-aws-online-tech-talks/

AWS Tech Talks

Join us this February to learn about AWS services and solutions. The AWS Online Tech Talks are live, online presentations that cover a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. These tech talks, led by AWS solutions architects and engineers, feature technical deep dives, live demonstrations, customer examples, and Q&A with AWS experts. Register Now!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks this month:

Application Integration

February 20, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTCustomer Showcase: Migration & Messaging for Mission Critical Apps with S&P Global Ratings – Learn how S&P Global Ratings meets the high availability and fault tolerance requirements of their mission critical applications using the Amazon MQ.

AR/VR

February 28, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTBuild AR/VR Apps with AWS: Creating a Multiplayer Game with Amazon Sumerian – Learn how to build real-world augmented reality, virtual reality and 3D applications with Amazon Sumerian.

Blockchain

February 18, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTDeep Dive on Amazon Managed Blockchain – Explore the components of blockchain technology, discuss use cases, and do a deep dive into capabilities, performance, and key innovations in Amazon Managed Blockchain.

Compute

February 25, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTWhat’s New in Amazon EC2 – Learn about the latest innovations in Amazon EC2, including new instances types, related technologies, and consumption options that help you optimize running your workloads for performance and cost.

February 27, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTDeploy and Scale Your First Cloud Application with Amazon Lightsail – Learn how to quickly deploy and scale your first multi-tier cloud application using Amazon Lightsail.

Containers

February 19, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTSecuring Container Workloads on AWS Fargate – Explore the security controls and best practices for securing containers running on AWS Fargate.

Data Lakes & Analytics

February 18, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTAmazon Redshift Tips & Tricks: Scaling Storage and Compute Resources – Learn about the tools and best practices Amazon Redshift customers can use to scale storage and compute resources on-demand and automatically to handle growing data volume and analytical demand.

Databases

February 18, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBuilding Real-Time Applications with Redis – Learn about Amazon’s fully managed Redis service and how it makes it easier, simpler, and faster to build real-time applications.

February 21, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PT – Introduction to Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB Compatibility) – Get an introduction to Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility), a fast, scalable, and highly available document database that makes it easy to run, manage & scale MongoDB-workloads.

DevOps

February 20, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTFireside Chat: DevOps at Amazon with Ken Exner, GM of AWS Developer Tools – Join our fireside chat with Ken Exner, GM of Developer Tools, to learn about Amazon’s DevOps transformation journey and latest practices and tools that support the current DevOps model.

End-User Computing

February 28, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTEnable Your Remote and Mobile Workforce with Amazon WorkLink – Learn about Amazon WorkLink, a new, fully-managed service that provides your employees secure, one-click access to internal corporate websites and web apps using their mobile phones.

Enterprise & Hybrid

February 26, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTThe Amazon S3 Storage Classes – For cloud ops professionals, by cloud ops professionals. Wallace and Orion will tackle your toughest AWS hybrid cloud operations questions in this live Office Hours tech talk.

IoT

February 26, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBring IoT and AI Together – Learn how to bring intelligence to your devices with the intersection of IoT and AI.

Machine Learning

February 19, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTGetting Started with AWS DeepRacer – Learn about the basics of reinforcement learning, what’s under the hood and opportunities to get hands on with AWS DeepRacer and how to participate in the AWS DeepRacer League.

February 20, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBuild and Train Reinforcement Models with Amazon SageMaker RL – Learn about Amazon SageMaker RL to use reinforcement learning and build intelligent applications for your businesses.

February 21, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTTrain ML Models Once, Run Anywhere in the Cloud & at the Edge with Amazon SageMaker Neo – Learn about Amazon SageMaker Neo where you can train ML models once and run them anywhere in the cloud and at the edge.

February 28, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuild your Machine Learning Datasets with Amazon SageMaker Ground Truth – Learn how customers are using Amazon SageMaker Ground Truth to build highly accurate training datasets for machine learning quickly and reduce data labeling costs by up to 70%.

Migration

February 27, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTMaximize the Benefits of Migrating to the Cloud – Learn how to group and rationalize applications and plan migration waves in order to realize the full set of benefits that cloud migration offers.

Networking

February 27, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTSimplifying DNS for Hybrid Cloud with Route 53 Resolver – Learn how to enable DNS resolution in hybrid cloud environments using Amazon Route 53 Resolver.

Productivity & Business Solutions

February 26, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTTransform the Modern Contact Center Using Machine Learning and Analytics – Learn how to integrate Amazon Connect and AWS machine learning services, such Amazon Lex, Amazon Transcribe, and Amazon Comprehend, to quickly process and analyze thousands of customer conversations and gain valuable insights.

Serverless

February 19, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBest Practices for Serverless Queue Processing – Learn the best practices of serverless queue processing, using Amazon SQS as an event source for AWS Lambda.

Storage

February 25, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PT Introducing AWS Backup: Automate and Centralize Data Protection in the AWS Cloud – Learn about this new, fully managed backup service that makes it easy to centralize and automate the backup of data across AWS services in the cloud as well as on-premises.

Best Practices for Porting Applications to the EC2 A1 Instance Type

Post Syndicated from Martin Yip original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/best-practices-for-porting-applications-to-the-ec2-a1-instance-type/

This post courtesy of Dr. Jonathan Shapiro-Ward, AWS Solutions Architect

The new Amazon EC2 A1 instance types are powered by an ARM based AWS Graviton CPU. A1 instances are extremely cost effective and are ideal for scale-out scenarios where a large number of smaller instances are required.

Prior the launch of A1 instances, all AWS instances were x86 based. There are a number of significant differences between the two instruction sets. The predominant difference is that ARM follows a RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) design, whereas x86 is a CISC (Complex Instruction Set Computer) architecture. In short, ARM is a comparatively simple architecture composed of simple instructions which execute within a single cycle. Meanwhile, x86 has mostly complex instructions that execute over multiple cycles. This key difference has a range of implications for compiler and hardware complexity, power efficiency, and performance, but the key question to application developers is portability.

Workloads built for x86 will not run on the A1 family of instances, they must be ported. In many cases this is trivial. An extensive range of Free and Open Source software supports ARM and requires no modification to port workloads. Aside from installing a different binary, the process for installing the Apache Web Server, Nginx, PostgreSQL, Docker, and many more applications is unchanged. Unfortunately, porting is not always so simple, especially for applications developed in house. Ideally, software is written to be portable, but this is not always the case. Even workloads written in languages designed for portability such as Java can prove a challenge. In this blog post, we’ll review common challenges and migration paths from porting from x86 based architectures to ARM.

A General Porting Strategy

  1. Check for Core Language and Platform Support. The vast majority of common languages such as Java, Python, Perl, Ruby, PHP, Go, Rust, and so forth support modern ARM architectures. Likewise, major frameworks such as Django, Spring, Hadoop, Apache Spark, and many more run on ARM. More niche languages and frameworks may not have as robust support. If your language or crucial framework is dependent on x86, you may not be able to run your application on the A1 instance type.
  2. Identify all third party libraries and dependencies. All non-trivial applications rely on third party libraries to provide essential functionality. These can range from a standard library, to open source libraries, to paid for proprietary libraries. Examine these libraries and determine if they support ARM. In the event that a library is dependent upon a specific architecture, search for an open issue around ARM support or inquire with the vendor as to the roadmap. If possible, investigate alternative libraries if ARM support is not forthcoming.
  3. Identify Porting Path. There are three common strategies for porting. The strategy that applies will depend upon the language being used.
    1. For interpreted and those compiled to bytecode, the first step is to translate runbooks, scripts, AMIs, and templates to install the ARM equivalent of the interpreter or language VM. For instance, installing the ARM version of the JVM or CPython. If installation is done via package manager, no change may be necessary. Subsequently it is necessary to ensure that any native code libraries are replaced with the ARM equivalent. For Java, this would entail swapping out libraries leveraging JNI. For Python, this would entail swapping out CPython C-API based libraries (such as numpy). Once again, if this is done via a package manager such as yum or pip, manual intervention should not be necessary.
    2. In the case of compiled languages such as C/C++, the application will have to be re-compiled for ARM. If your application utilizes any machine specific features or relies on behavior that varies between compilers, it may be necessary to re-write parts of your application. This is discussed in more detail below. If your application follows common standards such as ANSI C and avoids any machine specific dependencies, the majority of effort will be spent in modifying the build process. This will depend upon your build process and will likely involve modifying build configurations, makefiles, configure scripts, or other assets. The binary can either be compiled on an A1 instance or cross compiled. Once a binary has been produced, the deployment process should be adapted to target the A1 instance.
    3. For applications built using platform specific languages and frameworks, which have an ARM alternative, the application will have to be ported to this alternative. By far the most common example of this is the .NET Framework. In order to run on ARM, .NET applications must be ported to .NET Core or to Mono. This will likely entail a non-trivial modification to the application codebase. This is discussed in more detail below.
  4. Test! All tests must be ported over and, if there is insufficient test coverage, it may be necessary to write new tests. This is especially pertinent if you had to recompile your application. A strong test suite should identify any issues arising from machine specific code that behaves incorrectly on the A1 instance type. Perform the usual range of unit testing, acceptance testing, and pre-prod testing.
  5. Update your infrastructure as code resources, such as AWS CloudFormation templates, to provision your application to A1 instances. This will likely be a simple change, modifying the instance type, AMI, and user data to reflect the change to the A1 instance.
  6. Perform a Green/Blue Deployment. Create your new A1 based stack alongside your existing stack and leverage Route 53 weighted routing to route 10% of requests to the new stack. Monitor error rates, user behavior, load, and other critical factors in order to determine the health of the ported application in production. If the application behaves correctly, swap over all traffic to the new stack. Otherwise, reexamine the application and identify the root cause of any errors.

Porting C/C++ Applications to A1 Instances

C and C++ are very portable languages. Indeed, C runs on more architectures than any other language but that is not to say that all C will run on all systems. When porting applications to A1 instances, many of the challenges one might expect do not arise. The AWS Graviton chip is little endian, just like x86 and int, float, double, and other common types are the same size between architectures. This does not, however, guarantee portability. Most commonly, issues porting a C based application arise from aspects of the C standard which are dependent upon the architecture and implementation. Let’s briefly look at some examples of C that are not portable between architectures.

The most frequently discussed issue in porting C from x86 to ARM is the use of the character datatype. This issue arises from the C99 standard which requires the implementation to decide if the char datatype is signed or unsigned. On x86 Linux a char is signed by default. On ARM Linux a char is unsigned. This discrepancy is due to performance, with unsigned char types resulting in more efficient ARM assembly. This can, however, cause issues. Let’s examine the following code listing:

//Code Listing 1
#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
    char c = -1;
    if (c < 0){
        printf("The value of the char is less than 0\n");
    } else {
        printf("The value of the char is greater than 0\n");
    }
    return 0;
}

On an x86 instance (in this case a t3.large) the above code has the expected result – printing “The value of the char is less than 0”. On an A1 instance, it does not. There are mechanisms around this, for example gcc has the -fsigned-char flag which forces all char types to become signed upon compilation. Crucially, a developer must be aware of these types of issues ahead of time. Not all compilers and warn levels will provide appropriate warnings around char signedness (and indeed many other issues arising from architectural differences). Resultantly, without rigorous testing, it is possible to introduce unexpected errors by porting. This makes a comprehensive set of tests for your application an essential part of the porting process.

If your application has only ever been built for a single target environment, (e.g. x86 Linux with gcc) there are potentially unexpected behaviors which will emerge when that application is built for a different architecture or with a different compiler.

The key best practice for ensuring portability of your C applications (and other compiled languages) is to adhere to a standard. Vanilla C99 will ensure the broadest compatibility across architectures and operating systems. A compiler specific standard such as gnu99 will ensure compatibility but can tether you to one compiler.

Static analysis should always be used when building your applications. Static analysis helps to detect bugs, security flaws, and pertinent to our discussion: compatibility issues.

Porting .NET Applications to A1 Instances

Porting a .NET application from a Windows instance to an A1 Linux instance can yield significant cost reductions and is an effective way to economically scale out web apps and other parallelizable workloads.

For all intents and purposes, the .NET Framework only runs on x86 Windows. This limitation does not necessarily prevent running your .NET application on an A1 instance. There are two .NET implementations, .NET Core and .NET Framework. The .NET Framework is the modern evolution of the original .NET release and is tightly coupled to x86 Windows. Meanwhile, .NET Core is a recent open source project, developed by Microsoft, which is decoupled from Windows and runs on a variety of platforms, including ARM Linux. There is one final option, Mono – an open source implementation of the .NET Framework which runs on a variety of architectures.

For greenfield projects .NET Core has become the de facto option as it has a number of advantages over the alternatives. Projects based on .NET Core are cross platform and significantly lighter than .Net Framework and Mono projects – making them far better suited to developing microservices and to running in containers or serverless environments. From version 2.1 onward, .NET Core supports ARM.

For existing projects, .NET Core is the best migration path to containers and to running on A1 instances. There are, however, a number of factors that might prohibit replatforming to .NET Core. These include

• Dependency on Windows specific APIs
• Reliance on features that are only available in .NET Framework such as WPF or Windows Forms. Many of these features are coming to .NET Core as part of .NET Core 3, but at time or writing, this is in preview.
• Use of third-party libraries that do not support .NET Core.
• Use of an unsupported language Currently, .NET Core only supports C#, F#, Visual Studio.

There are a number of tools to help port from .NET Framework to .NET Core. These include the .Net portability analyzer, which will analyze a .NET codebase and determine any factors that might prohibit porting.

Conclusion

The A1 instances can deliver significant cost savings over other instances types and are ideal for scale-out applications such as microservices. In many cases, moving to A1 instances can be easy. Many languages, frameworks, and applications have strong support for ARM. For Python, Java, Ruby, and other open source languages, porting can be trivial. For other applications such as native binary applications or .net applications, there can be some challenges. By examining your application and determining what, if any, x86 dependencies exist you can devise a migration strategy which will enable you to make use of A1 instances.

Learn about hourly-replication in Server Migration Service and the ability to migrate large data volumes

Post Syndicated from Martin Yip original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/learn-about-hourly-replication-in-server-migration-service-and-the-ability-to-migrate-large-data-volumes/

This post courtesy of Shane Baldacchino, AWS Solutions Architect

AWS Server Migration Service (AWS SMS) is an agentless service that makes it easier and faster for you to migrate thousands of on-premises workloads to AWS. AWS SMS allows you to automate, schedule, and track incremental replications of live server volumes, making it easier for you to coordinate large-scale server migrations.

In my previous blog posts, we introduced how you can use AWS Server Migration Service (AWS SMS) to migrate a popular commercial off the shelf software, WordPress into AWS.

For details and a walkthrough on how setup the AWS Server Migration Service, please see the following blog posts for Hyper-V and VMware hypervisors which will guide you through the high level process.

In this article we are going to step it up a few notches and look past common the migration of off-the-shelf software and provide you a pattern on how you can use AWS SMS and some of the recently launched features to migrate a more complicated environment, especially compression and resiliency for replication jobs and the support for data volumes greater than 4TB.

This post covers a migration of a complex internally developed eCommerce system comprising of a polyglot architecture. It is made up a Windows Microsoft IIS presentation tier, Tomcat application tier, and Microsoft SQL Server database tier. All workloads run on-premises as virtual machines in a VMware vCenter 5.5 and ESX 5.5 environment.

This theoretical customer environment has various business and infrastructure requirements.

Application downtime: During any migration activities, the application cannot be offline for more than 2 hours
Licensing: The customer has renewed their Microsoft SQL Server license for an additional 3 years and holds License Mobility with Software Assurance option for Microsoft SQL Server and therefore wants to take advantage of AWS BYOL licensing for Microsoft SQL server and Microsoft Windows Server.
Large data volumes: The Microsoft SQL Server database engine (.mdf, .ldf and .ndf files) consumes 11TB of storage

Walkthrough

Key elements of this migration process are identical to the process outlined in my previous blog posts and for more information on this process, please see the following blog posts Hyper-V and VMware hypervisors, but a high level you will need to.

• Establish your AWS environment.
• Download the SMS Connector from the AWS Management Console.
• Configure AWS SMS and Hypervisor permissions.
• Install and configure the SMS Connector appliance.
• Import your virtual machine inventory and create a replication jobs
• Launch your Amazon EC2 instances and associated NACL’s, Security Groups and AWS Elastic Load Balancers
• Change your DNS records to resolve the custom application to an AWS Elastic Load Balancer.

Before you start, ensure that your source systems OS and vCenter version are supported by AWS. For more information, see the Server Migration Service FAQ.

Planning the Migration

Once you have downloaded and configured the AWS SMS connector with your given Hypervisor you can get started in creating replication jobs.

The artifacts derived from our replication jobs with AWS SMS will be AMI’s (Amazon Machine Images) and as such we do not need to replicate each server individually and that is because we have a three-tier architecture that has commonality between servers with multiple Application and Web servers performing the same function, and as such we can leverage a common AMI and create three replication jobs.

1. Microsoft SQL Server – Database Tier
2. Ubuntu Server – Application Tier
3. IIS Web server – Webserver Tier

Performing the Replication

After validating that the SMS Connector is in a “HEALTHY” state, import your server catalog from your Hypervisor to AWS SMS. This process can take up to a minute.

Select the three servers (Microsoft SQL Server, Ubuntu Server, IIS Web server) to migrate and choose Create replication job. AWS SMS now supports creating replications jobs with frequencies as short as 1 hour, and as such to ensure our business RTO (Recovery Time Objective) of 2 hours is met we will create our replication jobs with a frequency of 1 hour. This will minimize the risk of any delta updates during the cutover windows not completing.

Given the businesses existing licensing investment in Microsoft SQL Server, they will leverage these the BYOL (Bring Your Own License) offering when creating the Microsoft SQL Server replication job.

The AWS SMS console guides you through the process. The time that the initial replication task takes to complete is dependent on available bandwidth and the size of your virtual machines.

After the initial seed replication, network bandwidth requirement is minimized as AWS SMS replicates only incremental changes occurring on the VM.

The progress updates from AWS SMS are automatically sent to AWS Migration Hub so that you can track tasks in progress.

AWS Migration Hub provides a single location to track the progress of application migrations across multiple AWS and partner solutions. In this post, we are using AWS SMS as a mechanism to migrate the virtual machines (VMs) and track them via AWS Migration Hub.

Migration Hub and AWS SMS are both free. You pay only for the cost of the individual migration tools that you use, and any resources being consumed on AWS

The dashboard reflects any status changes that occur in the linked services. You can see from the following image that two servers are complete whilst another is in progress.

Using Migration Hub, you can view the migration progress of all applications. This allows you to quickly get progress updates across all of your migrations, easily identify and troubleshoot any issues, and reduce the overall time and effort spent on your migration projects.

After validating that the SMS Connector

Testing Your Replicated Instances

Thirty hours after creating the replication jobs, notification was received via AWS SNS (Simple Notification Service) that all 3 replication jobs have completed. During the 30-hour replication window the customers ISP experienced downtime and sporadic flapping of the link, but this was negated by the network auto-recovery feature of SMS. It recovered and resumed replication without any intervention.

With the replication tasks being complete. The artifact created by AWS SMS is a custom AMI that you can use to deploy an EC2 instance. Follow the usual process to launch your EC2 instance, noting that you may need to replace any host-based firewalls with security groups and NACLs and any hardware based load balancers with Elastic Load Balancing to achieve fault tolerance, scalability, performance and security.

As this environment is a 3-tier architecture with commonality been tiers (Application and Presentation Tier) we can create during the EC2 Launch process an ASG (Auto Scaling Group) to ensure that deployed capacity matches user demand. The ASG will be based on the custom AMI’s generated by the replication jobs.

When you create an EC2 instance, ensure that you pick the most suitable EC2 instance type and size to match your performance and cost requirements.

While your new EC2 instances are a replica of your on-premises VM, you should always validate that applications are functioning. How you do this differs on an application-by-application basis. You can use a combination of approaches, such as editing a local host file and testing your application, SSH, RDP and Telnet.

For our Windows Presentation and database tier, I can RDP in to my systems and validate IIS 8.0 and other services are functioning correctly.

For our Ubuntu Application tier, we can SSH in to perform validation.

Post validation of each individual server we can now continue to test the application end to end. This is because our systems have been instantiated inside a VPC with no route back to our on-premises environment which allows us to test functionality without the risk of communication back to our production application.

After validation of systems it is now time to cut over, plan your runbook accordingly to ensure you either eliminate or minimize application disruption.

Cutting Over

As the replication window specified in AWS SMS replication jobs was 1 hour, there were hourly AMI’s created that provide delta updates since the initial seed replication was performed. The customer verified the stack by executing the previously created runbook using the latest AMIs, and verified the application behaved as expected.

After another round of testing, the customer decided to plan the cutover on the coming Saturday at midnight, by announcing a two-hour scheduled maintenance window. During the cutover window, the customer took the application offline, shutdown Microsoft SQL Server instance and performed an on-demand sync of all systems.

This generate a new versioned AMI that contained all on-premise data. The customer then executed the runbook on the new AMI’s. For the application and presentation tier these AMI’s were used in the ASG configuration. After application validation Amazon Route 53 was updated to resolve the application CNAME to the Application Load Balancer CNAME used to load balance traffic to the fleet of IIS servers.

Based on the TTL (Time To Live) of your Amazon Route 53 DNS zone file, end users slowly resolve the application to AWS, in this case within 300 seconds. Once this TTL period had elapsed the customer brought their application back online and exited their maintenance window, with time to spare.

After modifying the Amazon Route 53 Zone Apex, the physical topology now looks as follows with traffic being routed to AWS.

After validation of a successful migration the customer deleted their AWS Server Migration Service replication jobs and began planning to decommission their on-premises resources.

Summary

This is an example pattern on migrate a complex custom polyglot environment in to AWS using AWS migration services, specifically leveraging many of the new features of the AWS SMS service.

Many architectures can be extended to use many of the inherent benefits of AWS, with little effort. For example this article illustrated how AWS Migration Services can be used to migrate complex environments in to AWS and then use native AWS services such as Amazon CloudWatch metrics to drive Auto Scaling policies to ensure deployed capacity matches user demand whilst technologies such as Application Load Balancers can be used to achieve fault tolerance and scalability

Think big and get building!

 

 

AWS Fargate Price Reduction – Up to 50%

Post Syndicated from Nathan Peck original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/aws-fargate-price-reduction-up-to-50/

AWS Fargate is a compute engine that uses containers as its fundamental compute primitive. AWS Fargate runs your application containers for you on demand. You no longer need to provision a pool of instances or manage a Docker daemon or orchestration agent. Because the infrastructure that runs your containers is invisible, you don’t have to worry about whether you have provisioned enough instances to run your containerized workload. You also don’t have to worry about whether you’re using those instances efficiently to avoid paying for resources that you don’t use. You no longer need to do undifferentiated heavy lifting to maintain the infrastructure that runs your containers. AWS Fargate automatically updates and patches underlying resources to keep you safe from vulnerabilities in the underlying operating system and software. AWS Fargate uses an on-demand pricing model that charges per vCPU and per GB of memory reserved per second, with a 1-minute minimum.

At re:Invent 2018 we announced Firecracker, an open source virtualization technology that is purpose-built for creating and managing secure, multi-tenant containers and functions-based services. Firecracker enables you to deploy workloads in lightweight virtual machines called microVMs. These microVMs can initiate code faster, with less overhead. Innovations such as these allow us to improve the efficiency of Fargate and help us pass on cost savings to customers.

Effective January 7th, 2019 Fargate pricing per vCPU per second is being reduced by 20%, and pricing per GB of memory per second is being reduced by 65%. Depending on the ratio of CPU to memory that you’re allocating for your containers, you could see an overall price reduction of anywhere from 35% to 50%.

The following table shows the price reduction for each built-in launch configuration.

vCPUGB MemoryEffective Price Cut
0.250.5-35.00%
0.251-42.50%
0.252-50.00%
0.51-35.00%
0.52-42.50%
0.53-47.00%
0.54-50.00%
12-35.00%
13-39.30%
14-42.50%
15-45.00%
16-47.00%
17-48.60%
18-50.00%
24-35.00%
25-37.30%
26-39.30%
27-41.00%
28-42.50%
29-43.80%
210-45.00%
211-46.10%
212-47.00%
213-47.90%
214-48.60%
215-49.30%
216-50.00%
48-35.00%
49-36.20%
410-37.30%
411-38.30%
412-39.30%
413-40.20%
414-41.00%
415-41.80%
416-42.50%
417-43.20%
418-43.80%
419-44.40%
420-45.00%
421-45.50%
422-46.10%
423-46.50%
424-47.00%
425-47.40%
426-47.90%
427-48.30%
428-48.60%
429-49.00%
430-49.30%

Many engineering organizations such as Turner Broadcasting System, Veritone, and Catalytic have already been using AWS Fargate to achieve significant infrastructure cost savings for batch jobs, cron jobs, and other on-and-off workloads. Running a cluster of instances at all times to run your containers constantly incurs cost, but AWS Fargate stops charging when your containers stop.

With these new price reductions, AWS Fargate also enables significant savings for containerized web servers, API services, and background queue consumers run by organizations like KPMG, CBS, and Product Hunt. If your application is currently running on large EC2 instances that peak at 10-20% CPU utilization, consider migrating to containers in AWS Fargate. Containers give you more granularity to provision the exact amount of CPU and memory that your application needs. You no longer pay for instance resources that your application doesn’t use. If a sudden spike of traffic causes your application to require more resources you still have the ability to rapidly scale your application out by adding more containers, or scale your application up by launching larger containers.

AWS Fargate lets you focus on building your containerized application without worrying about the infrastructure. This encompasses not just the infrastructure capacity provisioning, monitoring, and maintenance but also the infrastructure price. Implementing Firecracker in AWS Fargate is just part of our journey to keep making AWS Fargate faster, more powerful, and more efficient. Running your containers in AWS Fargate allows you to benefit from these improvements without any manual intervention required on your part.

AWS Fargate has achieved SOC, PCI, HIPAA BAA, ISO, MTCS, C5, and ENS High compliance certification, and has a 99.99% SLA. You can get started with AWS Fargate in 13 AWS Regions around the world.

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – January AWS Online Tech Talks

Post Syndicated from Robin Park original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/learn-about-aws-services-solutions-january-aws-online-tech-talks/

AWS Tech Talks

Happy New Year! Join us this January to learn about AWS services and solutions. The AWS Online Tech Talks are live, online presentations that cover a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. These tech talks, led by AWS solutions architects and engineers, feature technical deep dives, live demonstrations, customer examples, and Q&A with AWS experts. Register Now!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks this month:

Containers

January 22, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTDeep Dive Into AWS Cloud Map: Service Discovery for All Your Cloud Resources – Learn how to increase your application availability with AWS Cloud Map, a new service that lets you discover all your cloud resources.

Data Lakes & Analytics

January 22, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PT– Increase Your Data Engineering Productivity Using Amazon EMR Notebooks – Learn how to develop analytics and data processing applications faster with Amazon EMR Notebooks.

Enterprise & Hybrid

January 29, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTBuild Better Workloads with the AWS Well-Architected Framework and Tool – Learn how to apply architectural best practices to guide your cloud migration.

IoT

January 29, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTHow To Visually Develop IoT Applications with AWS IoT Things Graph – See how easy it is to build IoT applications by visually connecting devices & web services.

Mobile

January 21, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuild Secure, Offline, and Real Time Enabled Mobile Apps Using AWS AppSync and AWS Amplify – Learn how to easily build secure, cloud-connected data-driven mobile apps using AWS Amplify, GraphQL, and mobile-optimized AWS services.

Networking

January 30, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTImprove Your Application’s Availability and Performance with AWS Global Accelerator – Learn how to accelerate your global latency-sensitive applications by routing traffic across AWS Regions.

Robotics

January 29, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTUsing AWS RoboMaker Simulation for Real World Applications – Learn how AWS RoboMaker simulation works and how you can get started with your own projects.

Security, Identity & Compliance

January 23, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTCustomer Showcase: How Dow Jones Uses AWS to Create a Secure Perimeter Around Its Web Properties – Learn tips and tricks from a real-life example on how to be in control of your cloud security and automate it on AWS.

January 30, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTIntroducing AWS Key Management Service Custom Key Store – Learn how you can generate, store, and use your KMS keys in hardware security modules (HSMs) that you control.

Serverless

January 31, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PT Nested Applications: Accelerate Serverless Development Using AWS SAM and the AWS Serverless Application Repository – Learn how to compose nested applications using the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM), SAM CLI, and the AWS Serverless Application Repository.

January 31, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTDeep Dive Into Lambda Layers and the Lambda Runtime API – Learn how to use Lambda Layers to enable re-use and sharing of code, and how you can build and test Layers locally using the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM).

Storage

January 28, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTThe Amazon S3 Storage Classes – Learn about the Amazon S3 Storage Classes and how to use them to optimize your storage resources.

January 30, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTDeep Dive on Amazon FSx for Windows File Server: Running Windows on AWS – Learn how to deploy Amazon FSx for Windows File Server in some of the most common use cases.

Optimizing a Lift-and-Shift for Security

Post Syndicated from Jonathan Shapiro-Ward original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/optimizing-a-lift-and-shift-for-security/

This is the third and final blog within a three-part series that examines how to optimize lift-and-shift workloads. A lift-and-shift is a common approach for migrating to AWS, whereby you move a workload from on-prem with little or no modification. This third blog examines how lift-and-shift workloads can benefit from an improved security posture with no modification to the application codebase. (Read about optimizing a lift-and-shift for performance and for cost effectiveness.)

Moving to AWS can help to strengthen your security posture by eliminating many of the risks present in on-premise deployments. It is still essential to consider how to best use AWS security controls and mechanisms to ensure the security of your workload. Security can often be a significant concern in lift-and-shift workloads, especially for legacy workloads where modern encryption and security features may not present. By making use of AWS security features you can significantly improve the security posture of a lift-and-shift workload, even if it lacks native support for modern security best practices.

Adding TLS with Application Load Balancers

Legacy applications are often the subject of a lift-and-shift. Such migrations can help reduce risks by moving away from out of date hardware but security risks are often harder to manage. Many legacy applications leverage HTTP or other plaintext protocols that are vulnerable to all manner of attacks. Often, modifying a legacy application’s codebase to implement TLS is untenable, necessitating other options.

One comparatively simple approach is to leverage an Application Load Balancer or a Classic Load Balancer to provide SSL offloading. In this scenario, the load balancer would be exposed to users, while the application servers that only support plaintext protocols will reside within a subnet which is can only be accessed by the load balancer. The load balancer would perform the decryption of all traffic destined for the application instance, forwarding the plaintext traffic to the instances. This allows  you to use encryption on traffic between the client and the load balancer, leaving only internal communication between the load balancer and the application in plaintext. Often this approach is sufficient to meet security requirements, however, in more stringent scenarios it is never acceptable for traffic to be transmitted in plaintext, even if within a secured subnet. In this scenario, a sidecar can be used to eliminate plaintext traffic ever traversing the network.

Improving Security and Configuration Management with Sidecars

One approach to providing encryption to legacy applications is to leverage what’s often termed the “sidecar pattern.” The sidecar pattern entails a second process acting as a proxy to the legacy application. The legacy application only exposes its services via the local loopback adapter and is thus accessible only to the sidecar. In turn the sidecar acts as an encrypted proxy, exposing the legacy application’s API to external consumers via TLS. As unencrypted traffic between the sidecar and the legacy application traverses the loopback adapter, it never traverses the network. This approach can help add encryption (or stronger encryption) to legacy applications when it’s not feasible to modify the original codebase. A common approach to implanting sidecars is through container groups such as pod in EKS or a task in ECS.

Implementing the Sidecar Pattern With Containers

Figure 1: Implementing the Sidecar Pattern With Containers

Another use of the sidecar pattern is to help legacy applications leverage modern cloud services. A common example of this is using a sidecar to manage files pertaining to the legacy application. This could entail a number of options including:

  • Having the sidecar dynamically modify the configuration for a legacy application based upon some external factor, such as the output of Lambda function, SNS event or DynamoDB write.
  • Having the sidecar write application state to a cache or database. Often applications will write state to the local disk. This can be problematic for autoscaling or disaster recovery, whereby having the state easily accessible to other instances is advantages. To facilitate this, the sidecar can write state to Amazon S3, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Elasticache or Amazon RDS.

A sidecar requires customer development, but it doesn’t require any modification of the lift-and-shifted application. A sidecar treats the application as a blackbox and interacts with it via its API, configuration file, or other standard mechanism.

Automating Security

A lift-and-shift can achieve a significantly stronger security posture by incorporating elements of DevSecOps. DevSecOps is a philosophy that argues that everyone is responsible for security and advocates for automation all parts of the security process. AWS has a number of services which can help implement a DevSecOps strategy. These services include:

  • Amazon GuardDuty: a continuous monitoring system which analyzes AWS CloudTrail Events, Amazon VPC Flow Log and DNS Logs. GuardDuty can detect threats and trigger an automated response.
  • AWS Shield: a managed DDOS protection services
  • AWS WAF: a managed Web Application Firewall
  • AWS Config: a service for assessing, tracking, and auditing changes to AWS configuration

These services can help detect security problems and implement a response in real time, achieving a significantly strong posture than traditional security strategies. You can build a DevSecOps strategy around a lift-and-shift workload using these services, without having to modify the lift-and-shift application.

Conclusion

There are many opportunities for taking advantage of AWS services and features to improve a lift-and-shift workload. Without any alteration to the application you can strengthen your security posture by utilizing AWS security services and by making small environmental and architectural changes that can help alleviate the challenges of legacy workloads.

About the author

Dr. Jonathan Shapiro-Ward is an AWS Solutions Architect based in Toronto. He helps customers across Canada to transform their businesses and build industry leading cloud solutions. He has a background in distributed systems and big data and holds a PhD from the University of St Andrews.

Optimizing a Lift-and-Shift for Cost Effectiveness and Ease of Management

Post Syndicated from Jonathan Shapiro-Ward original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/optimizing-a-lift-and-shift-for-cost/

Lift-and-shift is the process of migrating a workload from on premise to AWS with little or no modification. A lift-and-shift is a common route for enterprises to move to the cloud, and can be a transitionary state to a more cloud native approach. This is the second blog post in a three-part series which investigates how to optimize a lift-and-shift workload. The first post is about performance.

A key concern that many customers have with a lift-and-shift is cost. If you move an application as is  from on-prem to AWS, is there any possibility for meaningful cost savings? By employing AWS services, in lieu of self-managed EC2 instances, and by leveraging cloud capability such as auto scaling, there is potential for significant cost savings. In this blog post, we will discuss a number of AWS services and solutions that you can leverage with minimal or no change to your application codebase in order to significantly reduce management costs and overall Total Cost of Ownership (TCO).

Automate

Even if you can’t modify your application, you can change the way you deploy your application. The adopting-an-infrastructure-as-code approach can vastly improve the ease of management of your application, thereby reducing cost. By templating your application through Amazon CloudFormation, Amazon OpsWorks, or Open Source tools you can make deploying and managing your workloads a simple and repeatable process.

As part of the lift-and-shift process, rationalizing the workload into a set of templates enables less time to spent in the future deploying and modifying the workload. It enables the easy creation of dev/test environments, facilitates blue-green testing, opens up options for DR, and gives the option to roll back in the event of error. Automation is the single step which is most conductive to improving ease of management.

Reserved Instances and Spot Instances

A first initial consideration around cost should be the purchasing model for any EC2 instances. Reserved Instances (RIs) represent a 1-year or 3-year commitment to EC2 instances and can enable up to 75% cost reduction (over on demand) for steady state EC2 workloads. They are ideal for 24/7 workloads that must be continually in operation. An application requires no modification to make use of RIs.

An alternative purchasing model is EC2 spot. Spot instances offer unused capacity available at a significant discount – up to 90%. Spot instances receive a two-minute warning when the capacity is required back by EC2 and can be suspended and resumed. Workloads which are architected for batch runs – such as analytics and big data workloads – often require little or no modification to make use of spot instances. Other burstable workloads such as web apps may require some modification around how they are deployed.

A final alternative is on-demand. For workloads that are not running in perpetuity, on-demand is ideal. Workloads can be deployed, used for as long as required, and then terminated. By leveraging some simple automation (such as AWS Lambda and CloudWatch alarms), you can schedule workloads to start and stop at the open and close of business (or at other meaningful intervals). This typically requires no modification to the application itself. For workloads that are not 24/7 steady state, this can provide greater cost effectiveness compared to RIs and more certainty and ease of use when compared to spot.

Amazon FSx for Windows File Server

Amazon FSx for Windows File Server provides a fully managed Windows filesystem that has full compatibility with SMB and DFS and full AD integration. Amazon FSx is an ideal choice for lift-and-shift architectures as it requires no modification to the application codebase in order to enable compatibility. Windows based applications can continue to leverage standard, Windows-native protocols to access storage with Amazon FSx. It enables users to avoid having to deploy and manage their own fileservers – eliminating the need for patching, automating, and managing EC2 instances. Moreover, it’s easy to scale and minimize costs, since Amazon FSx offers a pay-as-you-go pricing model.

Amazon EFS

Amazon Elastic File System (EFS) provides high performance, highly available multi-attach storage via NFS. EFS offers a drop-in replacement for existing NFS deployments. This is ideal for a range of Linux and Unix usecases as well as cross-platform solutions such as Enterprise Java applications. EFS eliminates the need to manage NFS infrastructure and simplifies storage concerns. Moreover, EFS provides high availability out of the box, which helps to reduce single points of failure and avoids the need to manually configure storage replication. Much like Amazon FSx, EFS enables customers to realize cost improvements by moving to a pay-as-you-go pricing model and requires a modification of the application.

Amazon MQ

Amazon MQ is a managed message broker service that provides compatibility with JMS, AMQP, MQTT, OpenWire, and STOMP. These are amongst the most extensively used middleware and messaging protocols and are a key foundation of enterprise applications. Rather than having to manually maintain a message broker, Amazon MQ provides a performant, highly available managed message broker service that is compatible with existing applications.

To use Amazon MQ without any modification, you can adapt applications that leverage a standard messaging protocol. In most cases, all you need to do is update the application’s MQ endpoint in its configuration. Subsequently, the Amazon MQ service handles the heavy lifting of operating a message broker, configuring HA, fault detection, failure recovery, software updates, and so forth. This offers a simple option for reducing management overhead and improving the reliability of a lift-and-shift architecture. What’s more is that applications can migrate to Amazon MQ without the need for any downtime, making this an easy and effective way to improve a lift-and-shift.

You can also use Amazon MQ to integrate legacy applications with modern serverless applications. Lambda functions can subscribe to MQ topics and trigger serverless workflows, enabling compatibility between legacy and new workloads.

Integrating Lift-and-Shift Workloads with Lambda via Amazon MQ

Figure 1: Integrating Lift-and-Shift Workloads with Lambda via Amazon MQ

Amazon Managed Streaming Kafka

Lift-and-shift workloads which include a streaming data component are often built around Apache Kafka. There is a certain amount of complexity involved in operating a Kafka cluster which incurs management and operational expense. Amazon Kinesis is a managed alternative to Apache Kafka, but it is not a drop-in replacement. At re:Invent 2018, we announced the launch of Amazon Managed Streaming Kafka (MSK) in public preview. MSK provides a managed Kafka deployment with pay-as-you-go pricing and an acts as a drop-in replacement in existing Kafka workloads. MSK can help reduce management costs and improve cost efficiency and is ideal for lift-and-shift workloads.

Leveraging S3 for Static Web Hosting

A significant portion of any web application is static content. This includes videos, image, text, and other content that changes seldom, if ever. In many lift-and-shifted applications, web servers are migrated to EC2 instances and host all content – static and dynamic. Hosting static content from an EC2 instance incurs a number of costs including the instance, EBS volumes, and likely, a load balancer. By moving static content to S3, you can significantly reduce the amount of compute required to host your web applications. In many cases, this change is non-disruptive and can be done at the DNS or CDN layer, requiring no change to your application.

Reducing Web Hosting Costs with S3 Static Web Hosting

Figure 2: Reducing Web Hosting Costs with S3 Static Web Hosting

Conclusion

There are numerous opportunities for reducing the cost of a lift-and-shift. Without any modification to the application, lift-and-shift workloads can benefit from cloud-native features. By using AWS services and features, you can significantly reduce the undifferentiated heavy lifting inherent in on-prem workloads and reduce resources and management overheads.

About the author

Dr. Jonathan Shapiro-Ward is an AWS Solutions Architect based in Toronto. He helps customers across Canada to transform their businesses and build industry leading cloud solutions. He has a background in distributed systems and big data and holds a PhD from the University of St Andrews.

Optimizing a Lift-and-Shift for Performance

Post Syndicated from Jonathan Shapiro-Ward original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/optimizing-a-lift-and-shift-for-performance/

Many organizations begin their cloud journey with a lift-and-shift of applications from on-premise to AWS. This approach involves migrating software deployments with little, or no, modification. A lift-and-shift avoids a potentially expensive application rewrite but can result in a less optimal workload that a cloud native solution. For many organizations, a lift-and-shift is a transitional stage to an eventual cloud native solution, but there are some applications that can’t feasibly be made cloud-native such as legacy systems or proprietary third-party solutions. There are still clear benefits of moving these workloads to AWS, but how can they be best optimized?

In this blog series post, we’ll look at different approaches for optimizing a black box lift-and-shift. We’ll consider how we can significantly improve a lift-and-shift application across three perspectives: performance, cost, and security. We’ll show that without modifying the application we can integrate services and features that will make a lift-and-shift workload cheaper, faster, more secure, and more reliable. In this first blog, we’ll investigate how a lift-and-shift workload can have improved performance through leveraging AWS features and services.

Performance gains are often a motivating factor behind a cloud migration. On-premise systems may suffer from performance bottlenecks owing to legacy infrastructure or through capacity issues. When performing a lift-and-shift, how can you improve performance? Cloud computing is famous for enabling horizontally scalable architectures but many legacy applications don’t support this mode of operation. Traditional business applications are often architected around a fixed number of servers and are unable to take advantage of horizontal scalability. Even if a lift-and-shift can’t make use of auto scaling groups and horizontal scalability, you can achieve significant performance gains by moving to AWS.

Scaling Up

The easiest alternative to scale up to compute is vertical scalability. AWS provides the widest selection of virtual machine types and the largest machine types. Instances range from small, burstable t3 instances series all the way to memory optimized x1 series. By leveraging the appropriate instance, lift-and-shifts can benefit from significant performance. Depending on your workload, you can also swap out the instances used to power your workload to better meet demand. For example, on days in which you anticipate high load you could move to more powerful instances. This could be easily automated via a Lambda function.

The x1 family of instances offers considerable CPU, memory, storage, and network performance and can be used to accelerate applications that are designed to maximize single machine performance. The x1e.32xlarge instance, for example, offers 128 vCPUs, 4TB RAM, and 14,000 Mbps EBS bandwidth. This instance is ideal for high performance in-memory workloads such as real time financial risk processing or SAP Hana.

Through selecting the appropriate instance types and scaling that instance up and down to meet demand, you can achieve superior performance and cost effectiveness compared to running a single static instance. This affords lift-and-shift workloads far greater efficiency that their on-prem counterparts.

Placement Groups and C5n Instances

EC2 Placement groups determine how you deploy instances to underlying hardware. One can either choose to cluster instances into a low latency group within a single AZ or spread instances across distinct underlying hardware. Both types of placement groups are useful for optimizing lift-and-shifts.

The spread placement group is valuable in applications that rely on a small number of critical instances. If you can’t modify your application  to leverage auto scaling, liveness probes, or failover, then spread placement groups can help reduce the risk of simultaneous failure while improving the overall reliability of the application.

Cluster placement groups help improve network QoS between instances. When used in conjunction with enhanced networking, cluster placement groups help to ensure low latency, high throughput, and high network packets per second. This is beneficial for chatty applications and any application that leveraged physical co-location for performance on-prem.

There is no additional charge for using placement groups.

You can extend this approach further with C5n instances. These instances offer 100Gbps networking and can be used in placement group for the most demanding networking intensive workloads. Using both placement groups and the C5n instances require no modification to your application, only to how it is deployed – making it a strong solution for providing network performance to lift-and-shift workloads.

Leverage Tiered Storage to Optimize for Price and Performance

AWS offers a range of storage options, each with its own performance characteristics and price point. Through leveraging a combination of storage types, lift-and-shifts can achieve the performance and availability requirements in a price effective manner. The range of storage options include:

Amazon EBS is the most common storage service involved with lift-and-shifts. EBS provides block storage that can be attached to EC2 instances and formatted with a typical file system such as NTFS or ext4. There are several different EBS types, ranging from inexpensive magnetic storage to highly performant provisioned IOPS SSDs. There are also storage-optimized instances that offer high performance EBS access and NVMe storage. By utilizing the appropriate type of EBS volume and instance, a compromise of performance and price can be achieved. RAID offers a further option to optimize EBS. EBS utilizes RAID 1 by default, providing replication at no additional cost, however an EC2 instance can apply other RAID levels. For instance, you can apply RAID 0 over a number of EBS volumes in order to improve storage performance.

In addition to EBS, EC2 instances can utilize the EC2 instance store. The instance store provides ephemeral direct attached storage to EC2 instances. The instance store is included with the EC2 instance and provides a facility to store non-persistent data. This makes it ideal for temporary files that an application produces, which require performant storage. Both EBS and the instance store are expose to the EC2 instance as block level devices, and the OS can use its native management tools to format and mount these volumes as per a traditional disk – requiring no significant departure from the on prem configuration. In several instance types including the C5d and P3d are equipped with local NVMe storage which can support extremely IO intensive workloads.

Not all workloads require high performance storage. In many cases finding a compromise between price and performance is top priority. Amazon S3 provides highly durable, object storage at a significantly lower price point than block storage. S3 is ideal for a large number of use cases including content distribution, data ingestion, analytics, and backup. S3, however, is accessible via a RESTful API and does not provide conventional file system semantics as per EBS. This may make S3 less viable for applications that you can’t easily modify, but there are still options for using S3 in such a scenario.

An option for leveraging S3 is AWS Storage Gateway. Storage Gateway is a virtual appliance than can be run on-prem or on EC2. The Storage Gateway appliance can operate in three configurations: file gateway, volume gateway and tape gateway. File gateway provides an NFS interface, Volume Gateway provides an iSCSI interface, and Tape Gateway provides an iSCSI virtual tape library interface. This allows files, volumes, and tapes to be exposed to an application host through conventional protocols with the Storage Gateway appliance persisting data to S3. This allows an application to be agnostic to S3 while leveraging typical enterprise storage protocols.

Using S3 Storage via Storage Gateway

Figure 1: Using S3 Storage via Storage Gateway

Conclusion

A lift-and-shift can achieve significant performance gains on AWS by making use of a range of instance types, storage services, and other features. Even without any modification to the application, lift-and-shift workloads can benefit from cutting edge compute, network, and IO which can help realize significant, meaningful performance gains.

About the author

Dr. Jonathan Shapiro-Ward is an AWS Solutions Architect based in Toronto. He helps customers across Canada to transform their businesses and build industry leading cloud solutions. He has a background in distributed systems and big data and holds a PhD from the University of St Andrews.