Tag Archives: AWS X-Ray

Spring 2018 AWS SOC Reports are Now Available with 11 Services Added in Scope

Post Syndicated from Chris Gile original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/spring-2018-aws-soc-reports-are-now-available-with-11-services-added-in-scope/

Since our last System and Organization Control (SOC) audit, our service and compliance teams have been working to increase the number of AWS Services in scope prioritized based on customer requests. Today, we’re happy to report 11 services are newly SOC compliant, which is a 21 percent increase in the last six months.

With the addition of the following 11 new services, you can now select from a total of 62 SOC-compliant services. To see the full list, go to our Services in Scope by Compliance Program page:

• Amazon Athena
• Amazon QuickSight
• Amazon WorkDocs
• AWS Batch
• AWS CodeBuild
• AWS Config
• AWS OpsWorks Stacks
• AWS Snowball
• AWS Snowball Edge
• AWS Snowmobile
• AWS X-Ray

Our latest SOC 1, 2, and 3 reports covering the period from October 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018 are now available. The SOC 1 and 2 reports are available on-demand through AWS Artifact by logging into the AWS Management Console. The SOC 3 report can be downloaded here.

Finally, prospective customers can read our SOC 1 and 2 reports by reaching out to AWS Compliance.

Want more AWS Security news? Follow us on Twitter.

AWS Online Tech Talks – April & Early May 2018

Post Syndicated from Betsy Chernoff original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-april-early-may-2018/

We have several upcoming tech talks in the month of April and early May. Come join us to learn about AWS services and solution offerings. We’ll have AWS experts online to help answer questions in real-time. Sign up now to learn more, we look forward to seeing you.

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

April & early May — 2018 Schedule

Compute

April 30, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTBest Practices for Running Amazon EC2 Spot Instances with Amazon EMR (300) – Learn about the best practices for scaling big data workloads as well as process, store, and analyze big data securely and cost effectively with Amazon EMR and Amazon EC2 Spot Instances.

May 1, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTHow to Bring Microsoft Apps to AWS (300) – Learn more about how to save significant money by bringing your Microsoft workloads to AWS.

May 2, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTDeep Dive on Amazon EC2 Accelerated Computing (300) – Get a technical deep dive on how AWS’ GPU and FGPA-based compute services can help you to optimize and accelerate your ML/DL and HPC workloads in the cloud.

Containers

April 23, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTNew Features for Building Powerful Containerized Microservices on AWS (300) – Learn about how this new feature works and how you can start using it to build and run modern, containerized applications on AWS.

Databases

April 23, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTElastiCache: Deep Dive Best Practices and Usage Patterns (200) – Learn about Redis-compatible in-memory data store and cache with Amazon ElastiCache.

April 25, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTIntro to Open Source Databases on AWS (200) – Learn how to tap the benefits of open source databases on AWS without the administrative hassle.

DevOps

April 25, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTDebug your Container and Serverless Applications with AWS X-Ray in 5 Minutes (300) – Learn how AWS X-Ray makes debugging your Container and Serverless applications fun.

Enterprise & Hybrid

April 23, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTAn Overview of Best Practices of Large-Scale Migrations (300) – Learn about the tools and best practices on how to migrate to AWS at scale.

April 24, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDeploy your Desktops and Apps on AWS (300) – Learn how to deploy your desktops and apps on AWS with Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon AppStream 2.0

IoT

May 2, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTHow to Easily and Securely Connect Devices to AWS IoT (200) – Learn how to easily and securely connect devices to the cloud and reliably scale to billions of devices and trillions of messages with AWS IoT.

Machine Learning

April 24, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Automate for Efficiency with Amazon Transcribe and Amazon Translate (200) – Learn how you can increase the efficiency and reach your operations with Amazon Translate and Amazon Transcribe.

April 26, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Perform Machine Learning at the IoT Edge using AWS Greengrass and Amazon Sagemaker (200) – Learn more about developing machine learning applications for the IoT edge.

Mobile

April 30, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTOffline GraphQL Apps with AWS AppSync (300) – Come learn how to enable real-time and offline data in your applications with GraphQL using AWS AppSync.

Networking

May 2, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Taking Serverless to the Edge (300) – Learn how to run your code closer to your end users in a serverless fashion. Also, David Von Lehman from Aerobatic will discuss how they used [email protected] to reduce latency and cloud costs for their customer’s websites.

Security, Identity & Compliance

April 30, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTAmazon GuardDuty – Let’s Attack My Account! (300) – Amazon GuardDuty Test Drive – Practical steps on generating test findings.

May 3, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTProtect Your Game Servers from DDoS Attacks (200) – Learn how to use the new AWS Shield Advanced for EC2 to protect your internet-facing game servers against network layer DDoS attacks and application layer attacks of all kinds.

Serverless

April 24, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTTips and Tricks for Building and Deploying Serverless Apps In Minutes (200) – Learn how to build and deploy apps in minutes.

Storage

May 1, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTBuilding Data Lakes That Cost Less and Deliver Results Faster (300) – Learn how Amazon S3 Select And Amazon Glacier Select increase application performance by up to 400% and reduce total cost of ownership by extending your data lake into cost-effective archive storage.

May 3, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTIntegrating On-Premises Vendors with AWS for Backup (300) – Learn how to work with AWS and technology partners to build backup & restore solutions for your on-premises, hybrid, and cloud native environments.

How I built a data warehouse using Amazon Redshift and AWS services in record time

Post Syndicated from Stephen Borg original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/how-i-built-a-data-warehouse-using-amazon-redshift-and-aws-services-in-record-time/

This is a customer post by Stephen Borg, the Head of Big Data and BI at Cerberus Technologies.

Cerberus Technologies, in their own words: Cerberus is a company founded in 2017 by a team of visionary iGaming veterans. Our mission is simple – to offer the best tech solutions through a data-driven and a customer-first approach, delivering innovative solutions that go against traditional forms of working and process. This mission is based on the solid foundations of reliability, flexibility and security, and we intend to fundamentally change the way iGaming and other industries interact with technology.

Over the years, I have developed and created a number of data warehouses from scratch. Recently, I built a data warehouse for the iGaming industry single-handedly. To do it, I used the power and flexibility of Amazon Redshift and the wider AWS data management ecosystem. In this post, I explain how I was able to build a robust and scalable data warehouse without the large team of experts typically needed.

In two of my recent projects, I ran into challenges when scaling our data warehouse using on-premises infrastructure. Data was growing at many tens of gigabytes per day, and query performance was suffering. Scaling required major capital investment for hardware and software licenses, and also significant operational costs for maintenance and technical staff to keep it running and performing well. Unfortunately, I couldn’t get the resources needed to scale the infrastructure with data growth, and these projects were abandoned. Thanks to cloud data warehousing, the bottleneck of infrastructure resources, capital expense, and operational costs have been significantly reduced or have totally gone away. There is no more excuse for allowing obstacles of the past to delay delivering timely insights to decision makers, no matter how much data you have.

With Amazon Redshift and AWS, I delivered a cloud data warehouse to the business very quickly, and with a small team: me. I didn’t have to order hardware or software, and I no longer needed to install, configure, tune, or keep up with patches and version updates. Instead, I easily set up a robust data processing pipeline and we were quickly ingesting and analyzing data. Now, my data warehouse team can be extremely lean, and focus more time on bringing in new data and delivering insights. In this post, I show you the AWS services and the architecture that I used.

Handling data feeds

I have several different data sources that provide everything needed to run the business. The data includes activity from our iGaming platform, social media posts, clickstream data, marketing and campaign performance, and customer support engagements.

To handle the diversity of data feeds, I developed abstract integration applications using Docker that run on Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS) and feed data to Amazon Kinesis Data Streams. These data streams can be used for real time analytics. In my system, each record in Kinesis is preprocessed by an AWS Lambda function to cleanse and aggregate information. My system then routes it to be stored where I need on Amazon S3 by Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose. Suppose that you used an on-premises architecture to accomplish the same task. A team of data engineers would be required to maintain and monitor a Kafka cluster, develop applications to stream data, and maintain a Hadoop cluster and the infrastructure underneath it for data storage. With my stream processing architecture, there are no servers to manage, no disk drives to replace, and no service monitoring to write.

Setting up a Kinesis stream can be done with a few clicks, and the same for Kinesis Firehose. Firehose can be configured to automatically consume data from a Kinesis Data Stream, and then write compressed data every N minutes to Amazon S3. When I want to process a Kinesis data stream, it’s very easy to set up a Lambda function to be executed on each message received. I can just set a trigger from the AWS Lambda Management Console, as shown following.

I also monitor the duration of function execution using Amazon CloudWatch and AWS X-Ray.

Regardless of the format I receive the data from our partners, I can send it to Kinesis as JSON data using my own formatters. After Firehose writes this to Amazon S3, I have everything in nearly the same structure I received but compressed, encrypted, and optimized for reading.

This data is automatically crawled by AWS Glue and placed into the AWS Glue Data Catalog. This means that I can immediately query the data directly on S3 using Amazon Athena or through Amazon Redshift Spectrum. Previously, I used Amazon EMR and an Amazon RDS–based metastore in Apache Hive for catalog management. Now I can avoid the complexity of maintaining Hive Metastore catalogs. Glue takes care of high availability and the operations side so that I know that end users can always be productive.

Working with Amazon Athena and Amazon Redshift for analysis

I found Amazon Athena extremely useful out of the box for ad hoc analysis. Our engineers (me) use Athena to understand new datasets that we receive and to understand what transformations will be needed for long-term query efficiency.

For our data analysts and data scientists, we’ve selected Amazon Redshift. Amazon Redshift has proven to be the right tool for us over and over again. It easily processes 20+ million transactions per day, regardless of the footprint of the tables and the type of analytics required by the business. Latency is low and query performance expectations have been more than met. We use Redshift Spectrum for long-term data retention, which enables me to extend the analytic power of Amazon Redshift beyond local data to anything stored in S3, and without requiring me to load any data. Redshift Spectrum gives me the freedom to store data where I want, in the format I want, and have it available for processing when I need it.

To load data directly into Amazon Redshift, I use AWS Data Pipeline to orchestrate data workflows. I create Amazon EMR clusters on an intra-day basis, which I can easily adjust to run more or less frequently as needed throughout the day. EMR clusters are used together with Amazon RDS, Apache Spark 2.0, and S3 storage. The data pipeline application loads ETL configurations from Spring RESTful services hosted on AWS Elastic Beanstalk. The application then loads data from S3 into memory, aggregates and cleans the data, and then writes the final version of the data to Amazon Redshift. This data is then ready to use for analysis. Spark on EMR also helps with recommendations and personalization use cases for various business users, and I find this easy to set up and deliver what users want. Finally, business users use Amazon QuickSight for self-service BI to slice, dice, and visualize the data depending on their requirements.

Each AWS service in this architecture plays its part in saving precious time that’s crucial for delivery and getting different departments in the business on board. I found the services easy to set up and use, and all have proven to be highly reliable for our use as our production environments. When the architecture was in place, scaling out was either completely handled by the service, or a matter of a simple API call, and crucially doesn’t require me to change one line of code. Increasing shards for Kinesis can be done in a minute by editing a stream. Increasing capacity for Lambda functions can be accomplished by editing the megabytes allocated for processing, and concurrency is handled automatically. EMR cluster capacity can easily be increased by changing the master and slave node types in Data Pipeline, or by using Auto Scaling. Lastly, RDS and Amazon Redshift can be easily upgraded without any major tasks to be performed by our team (again, me).

In the end, using AWS services including Kinesis, Lambda, Data Pipeline, and Amazon Redshift allows me to keep my team lean and highly productive. I eliminated the cost and delays of capital infrastructure, as well as the late night and weekend calls for support. I can now give maximum value to the business while keeping operational costs down. My team pushed out an agile and highly responsive data warehouse solution in record time and we can handle changing business requirements rapidly, and quickly adapt to new data and new user requests.


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Deploy a Data Warehouse Quickly with Amazon Redshift, Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL and Tableau Server and Top 8 Best Practices for High-Performance ETL Processing Using Amazon Redshift.


About the Author

Stephen Borg is the Head of Big Data and BI at Cerberus Technologies. He has a background in platform software engineering, and first became involved in data warehousing using the typical RDBMS, SQL, ETL, and BI tools. He quickly became passionate about providing insight to help others optimize the business and add personalization to products. He is now the Head of Big Data and BI at Cerberus Technologies.

 

 

 

Sharing Secrets with AWS Lambda Using AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/sharing-secrets-with-aws-lambda-using-aws-systems-manager-parameter-store/

This post courtesy of Roberto Iturralde, Sr. Application Developer- AWS Professional Services

Application architects are faced with key decisions throughout the process of designing and implementing their systems. One decision common to nearly all solutions is how to manage the storage and access rights of application configuration. Shared configuration should be stored centrally and securely with each system component having access only to the properties that it needs for functioning.

With AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store, developers have access to central, secure, durable, and highly available storage for application configuration and secrets. Parameter Store also integrates with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), allowing fine-grained access control to individual parameters or branches of a hierarchical tree.

This post demonstrates how to create and access shared configurations in Parameter Store from AWS Lambda. Both encrypted and plaintext parameter values are stored with only the Lambda function having permissions to decrypt the secrets. You also use AWS X-Ray to profile the function.

Solution overview

This example is made up of the following components:

  • An AWS SAM template that defines:
    • A Lambda function and its permissions
    • An unencrypted Parameter Store parameter that the Lambda function loads
    • A KMS key that only the Lambda function can access. You use this key to create an encrypted parameter later.
  • Lambda function code in Python 3.6 that demonstrates how to load values from Parameter Store at function initialization for reuse across invocations.

Launch the AWS SAM template

To create the resources shown in this post, you can download the SAM template or choose the button to launch the stack. The template requires one parameter, an IAM user name, which is the name of the IAM user to be the admin of the KMS key that you create. In order to perform the steps listed in this post, this IAM user will need permissions to execute Lambda functions, create Parameter Store parameters, administer keys in KMS, and view the X-Ray console. If you have these privileges in your IAM user account you can use your own account to complete the walkthrough. You can not use the root user to administer the KMS keys.

SAM template resources

The following sections show the code for the resources defined in the template.
Lambda function

ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev:
    Type: 'AWS::Serverless::Function'
    Properties:
      FunctionName: 'ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev'
      Description: 'Integrating lambda with Parameter Store'
      Handler: 'lambda_function.lambda_handler'
      Role: !GetAtt ParameterStoreBlogFunctionRoleDev.Arn
      CodeUri: './code'
      Environment:
        Variables:
          ENV: 'dev'
          APP_CONFIG_PATH: 'parameterStoreBlog'
          AWS_XRAY_TRACING_NAME: 'ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev'
      Runtime: 'python3.6'
      Timeout: 5
      Tracing: 'Active'

  ParameterStoreBlogFunctionRoleDev:
    Type: AWS::IAM::Role
    Properties:
      AssumeRolePolicyDocument:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Statement:
          -
            Effect: Allow
            Principal:
              Service:
                - 'lambda.amazonaws.com'
            Action:
              - 'sts:AssumeRole'
      ManagedPolicyArns:
        - 'arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole'
      Policies:
        -
          PolicyName: 'ParameterStoreBlogDevParameterAccess'
          PolicyDocument:
            Version: '2012-10-17'
            Statement:
              -
                Effect: Allow
                Action:
                  - 'ssm:GetParameter*'
                Resource: !Sub 'arn:aws:ssm:${AWS::Region}:${AWS::AccountId}:parameter/dev/parameterStoreBlog*'
        -
          PolicyName: 'ParameterStoreBlogDevXRayAccess'
          PolicyDocument:
            Version: '2012-10-17'
            Statement:
              -
                Effect: Allow
                Action:
                  - 'xray:PutTraceSegments'
                  - 'xray:PutTelemetryRecords'
                Resource: '*'

In this YAML code, you define a Lambda function named ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev using the SAM AWS::Serverless::Function type. The environment variables for this function include the ENV (dev) and the APP_CONFIG_PATH where you find the configuration for this app in Parameter Store. X-Ray tracing is also enabled for profiling later.

The IAM role for this function extends the AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole by adding IAM policies that grant the function permissions to write to X-Ray and get parameters from Parameter Store, limited to paths under /dev/parameterStoreBlog*.
Parameter Store parameter

SimpleParameter:
    Type: AWS::SSM::Parameter
    Properties:
      Name: '/dev/parameterStoreBlog/appConfig'
      Description: 'Sample dev config values for my app'
      Type: String
      Value: '{"key1": "value1","key2": "value2","key3": "value3"}'

This YAML code creates a plaintext string parameter in Parameter Store in a path that your Lambda function can access.
KMS encryption key

ParameterStoreBlogDevEncryptionKeyAlias:
    Type: AWS::KMS::Alias
    Properties:
      AliasName: 'alias/ParameterStoreBlogKeyDev'
      TargetKeyId: !Ref ParameterStoreBlogDevEncryptionKey

  ParameterStoreBlogDevEncryptionKey:
    Type: AWS::KMS::Key
    Properties:
      Description: 'Encryption key for secret config values for the Parameter Store blog post'
      Enabled: True
      EnableKeyRotation: False
      KeyPolicy:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Id: 'key-default-1'
        Statement:
          -
            Sid: 'Allow administration of the key & encryption of new values'
            Effect: Allow
            Principal:
              AWS:
                - !Sub 'arn:aws:iam::${AWS::AccountId}:user/${IAMUsername}'
            Action:
              - 'kms:Create*'
              - 'kms:Encrypt'
              - 'kms:Describe*'
              - 'kms:Enable*'
              - 'kms:List*'
              - 'kms:Put*'
              - 'kms:Update*'
              - 'kms:Revoke*'
              - 'kms:Disable*'
              - 'kms:Get*'
              - 'kms:Delete*'
              - 'kms:ScheduleKeyDeletion'
              - 'kms:CancelKeyDeletion'
            Resource: '*'
          -
            Sid: 'Allow use of the key'
            Effect: Allow
            Principal:
              AWS: !GetAtt ParameterStoreBlogFunctionRoleDev.Arn
            Action:
              - 'kms:Encrypt'
              - 'kms:Decrypt'
              - 'kms:ReEncrypt*'
              - 'kms:GenerateDataKey*'
              - 'kms:DescribeKey'
            Resource: '*'

This YAML code creates an encryption key with a key policy with two statements.

The first statement allows a given user (${IAMUsername}) to administer the key. Importantly, this includes the ability to encrypt values using this key and disable or delete this key, but does not allow the administrator to decrypt values that were encrypted with this key.

The second statement grants your Lambda function permission to encrypt and decrypt values using this key. The alias for this key in KMS is ParameterStoreBlogKeyDev, which is how you reference it later.

Lambda function

Here I walk you through the Lambda function code.

import os, traceback, json, configparser, boto3
from aws_xray_sdk.core import patch_all
patch_all()

# Initialize boto3 client at global scope for connection reuse
client = boto3.client('ssm')
env = os.environ['ENV']
app_config_path = os.environ['APP_CONFIG_PATH']
full_config_path = '/' + env + '/' + app_config_path
# Initialize app at global scope for reuse across invocations
app = None

class MyApp:
    def __init__(self, config):
        """
        Construct new MyApp with configuration
        :param config: application configuration
        """
        self.config = config

    def get_config(self):
        return self.config

def load_config(ssm_parameter_path):
    """
    Load configparser from config stored in SSM Parameter Store
    :param ssm_parameter_path: Path to app config in SSM Parameter Store
    :return: ConfigParser holding loaded config
    """
    configuration = configparser.ConfigParser()
    try:
        # Get all parameters for this app
        param_details = client.get_parameters_by_path(
            Path=ssm_parameter_path,
            Recursive=False,
            WithDecryption=True
        )

        # Loop through the returned parameters and populate the ConfigParser
        if 'Parameters' in param_details and len(param_details.get('Parameters')) > 0:
            for param in param_details.get('Parameters'):
                param_path_array = param.get('Name').split("/")
                section_position = len(param_path_array) - 1
                section_name = param_path_array[section_position]
                config_values = json.loads(param.get('Value'))
                config_dict = {section_name: config_values}
                print("Found configuration: " + str(config_dict))
                configuration.read_dict(config_dict)

    except:
        print("Encountered an error loading config from SSM.")
        traceback.print_exc()
    finally:
        return configuration

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    global app
    # Initialize app if it doesn't yet exist
    if app is None:
        print("Loading config and creating new MyApp...")
        config = load_config(full_config_path)
        app = MyApp(config)

    return "MyApp config is " + str(app.get_config()._sections)

Beneath the import statements, you import the patch_all function from the AWS X-Ray library, which you use to patch boto3 to create X-Ray segments for all your boto3 operations.

Next, you create a boto3 SSM client at the global scope for reuse across function invocations, following Lambda best practices. Using the function environment variables, you assemble the path where you expect to find your configuration in Parameter Store. The class MyApp is meant to serve as an example of an application that would need its configuration injected at construction. In this example, you create an instance of ConfigParser, a class in Python’s standard library for handling basic configurations, to give to MyApp.

The load_config function loads the all the parameters from Parameter Store at the level immediately beneath the path provided in the Lambda function environment variables. Each parameter found is put into a new section in ConfigParser. The name of the section is the name of the parameter, less the base path. In this example, the full parameter name is /dev/parameterStoreBlog/appConfig, which is put in a section named appConfig.

Finally, the lambda_handler function initializes an instance of MyApp if it doesn’t already exist, constructing it with the loaded configuration from Parameter Store. Then it simply returns the currently loaded configuration in MyApp. The impact of this design is that the configuration is only loaded from Parameter Store the first time that the Lambda function execution environment is initialized. Subsequent invocations reuse the existing instance of MyApp, resulting in improved performance. You see this in the X-Ray traces later in this post. For more advanced use cases where configuration changes need to be received immediately, you could implement an expiry policy for your configuration entries or push notifications to your function.

To confirm that everything was created successfully, test the function in the Lambda console.

  1. Open the Lambda console.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Functions.
  3. In the Functions pane, filter to ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev to find the function created by the SAM template earlier. Open the function name to view its details.
  4. On the top right of the function detail page, choose Test. You may need to create a new test event. The input JSON doesn’t matter as this function ignores the input.

After running the test, you should see output similar to the following. This demonstrates that the function successfully fetched the unencrypted configuration from Parameter Store.

Create an encrypted parameter

You currently have a simple, unencrypted parameter and a Lambda function that can access it.

Next, you create an encrypted parameter that only your Lambda function has permission to use for decryption. This limits read access for this parameter to only this Lambda function.

To follow along with this section, deploy the SAM template for this post in your account and make your IAM user name the KMS key admin mentioned earlier.

  1. In the Systems Manager console, under Shared Resources, choose Parameter Store.
  2. Choose Create Parameter.
    • For Name, enter /dev/parameterStoreBlog/appSecrets.
    • For Type, select Secure String.
    • For KMS Key ID, choose alias/ParameterStoreBlogKeyDev, which is the key that your SAM template created.
    • For Value, enter {"secretKey": "secretValue"}.
    • Choose Create Parameter.
  3. If you now try to view the value of this parameter by choosing the name of the parameter in the parameters list and then choosing Show next to the Value field, you won’t see the value appear. This is because, even though you have permission to encrypt values using this KMS key, you do not have permissions to decrypt values.
  4. In the Lambda console, run another test of your function. You now also see the secret parameter that you created and its decrypted value.

If you do not see the new parameter in the Lambda output, this may be because the Lambda execution environment is still warm from the previous test. Because the parameters are loaded at Lambda startup, you need a fresh execution environment to refresh the values.

Adjust the function timeout to a different value in the Advanced Settings at the bottom of the Lambda Configuration tab. Choose Save and test to trigger the creation of a new Lambda execution environment.

Profiling the impact of querying Parameter Store using AWS X-Ray

By using the AWS X-Ray SDK to patch boto3 in your Lambda function code, each invocation of the function creates traces in X-Ray. In this example, you can use these traces to validate the performance impact of your design decision to only load configuration from Parameter Store on the first invocation of the function in a new execution environment.

From the Lambda function details page where you tested the function earlier, under the function name, choose Monitoring. Choose View traces in X-Ray.

This opens the X-Ray console in a new window filtered to your function. Be aware of the time range field next to the search bar if you don’t see any search results.
In this screenshot, I’ve invoked the Lambda function twice, one time 10.3 minutes ago with a response time of 1.1 seconds and again 9.8 minutes ago with a response time of 8 milliseconds.

Looking at the details of the longer running trace by clicking the trace ID, you can see that the Lambda function spent the first ~350 ms of the full 1.1 sec routing the request through Lambda and creating a new execution environment for this function, as this was the first invocation with this code. This is the portion of time before the initialization subsegment.

Next, it took 725 ms to initialize the function, which includes executing the code at the global scope (including creating the boto3 client). This is also a one-time cost for a fresh execution environment.

Finally, the function executed for 65 ms, of which 63.5 ms was the GetParametersByPath call to Parameter Store.

Looking at the trace for the second, much faster function invocation, you see that the majority of the 8 ms execution time was Lambda routing the request to the function and returning the response. Only 1 ms of the overall execution time was attributed to the execution of the function, which makes sense given that after the first invocation you’re simply returning the config stored in MyApp.

While the Traces screen allows you to view the details of individual traces, the X-Ray Service Map screen allows you to view aggregate performance data for all traced services over a period of time.

In the X-Ray console navigation pane, choose Service map. Selecting a service node shows the metrics for node-specific requests. Selecting an edge between two nodes shows the metrics for requests that traveled that connection. Again, be aware of the time range field next to the search bar if you don’t see any search results.

After invoking your Lambda function several more times by testing it from the Lambda console, you can view some aggregate performance metrics. Look at the following:

  • From the client perspective, requests to the Lambda service for the function are taking an average of 50 ms to respond. The function is generating ~1 trace per minute.
  • The function itself is responding in an average of 3 ms. In the following screenshot, I’ve clicked on this node, which reveals a latency histogram of the traced requests showing that over 95% of requests return in under 5 ms.
  • Parameter Store is responding to requests in an average of 64 ms, but note the much lower trace rate in the node. This is because you only fetch data from Parameter Store on the initialization of the Lambda execution environment.

Conclusion

Deduplication, encryption, and restricted access to shared configuration and secrets is a key component to any mature architecture. Serverless architectures designed using event-driven, on-demand, compute services like Lambda are no different.

In this post, I walked you through a sample application accessing unencrypted and encrypted values in Parameter Store. These values were created in a hierarchy by application environment and component name, with the permissions to decrypt secret values restricted to only the function needing access. The techniques used here can become the foundation of secure, robust configuration management in your enterprise serverless applications.

AWS Adds 16 More Services to Its PCI DSS Compliance Program

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-adds-16-more-services-to-its-pci-dss-compliance-program/

PCI logo

AWS has added 16 more AWS services to its Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) compliance program, giving you more options, flexibility, and functionality to process and store sensitive payment card data in the AWS Cloud. The services were audited by Coalfire to ensure that they meet strict PCI DSS standards.

The newly compliant AWS services are:

AWS now offers 58 services that are officially PCI DSS compliant, giving administrators more service options for implementing a PCI-compliant cardholder environment.

For more information about the AWS PCI DSS compliance program, see Compliance ResourcesAWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program, and PCI DSS Compliance.

– Chad Woolf

Instrumenting Web Apps Using AWS X-Ray

Post Syndicated from Bharath Kumar original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/instrumenting-web-apps-using-aws-x-ray/

This post was written by James Bowman, Software Development Engineer, AWS X-Ray

AWS X-Ray helps developers analyze and debug distributed applications and underlying services in production. You can identify and analyze root-causes of performance issues and errors, understand customer impact, and extract statistical aggregations (such as histograms) for optimization.

In this blog post, I will provide a step-by-step walkthrough for enabling X-Ray tracing in the Go programming language. You can use these steps to add X-Ray tracing to any distributed application.

Revel: A web framework for the Go language

This section will assist you with designing a guestbook application. Skip to “Instrumenting with AWS X-Ray” section below if you already have a Go language application.

Revel is a web framework for the Go language. It facilitates the rapid development of web applications by providing a predefined framework for controllers, views, routes, filters, and more.

To get started with Revel, run revel new github.com/jamesdbowman/guestbook. A project base is then copied to $GOPATH/src/github.com/jamesdbowman/guestbook.

$ tree -L 2
.
├── README.md
├── app
│ ├── controllers
│ ├── init.go
│ ├── routes
│ ├── tmp
│ └── views
├── conf
│ ├── app.conf
│ └── routes
├── messages
│ └── sample.en
├── public
│ ├── css
│ ├── fonts
│ ├── img
│ └── js
└── tests
└── apptest.go

Writing a guestbook application

A basic guestbook application can consist of just two routes: one to sign the guestbook and another to list all entries.
Let’s set up these routes by adding a Book controller, which can be routed to by modifying ./conf/routes.

./app/controllers/book.go:
package controllers

import (
    "math/rand"
    "time"

    "github.com/aws/aws-sdk-go/aws"
    "github.com/aws/aws-sdk-go/aws/endpoints"
    "github.com/aws/aws-sdk-go/aws/session"
    "github.com/aws/aws-sdk-go/service/dynamodb"
    "github.com/aws/aws-sdk-go/service/dynamodb/dynamodbattribute"
    "github.com/revel/revel"
)

const TABLE_NAME = "guestbook"
const SUCCESS = "Success.\n"
const DAY = 86400

var letters = []rune("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ")

func init() {
    rand.Seed(time.Now().UnixNano())
}

// randString returns a random string of len n, used for DynamoDB Hash key.
func randString(n int) string {
    b := make([]rune, n)
    for i := range b {
        b[i] = letters[rand.Intn(len(letters))]
    }
    return string(b)
}

// Book controls interactions with the guestbook.
type Book struct {
    *revel.Controller
    ddbClient *dynamodb.DynamoDB
}

// Signature represents a user's signature.
type Signature struct {
    Message string
    Epoch   int64
    ID      string
}

// ddb returns the controller's DynamoDB client, instatiating a new client if necessary.
func (c Book) ddb() *dynamodb.DynamoDB {
    if c.ddbClient == nil {
        sess := session.Must(session.NewSession(&aws.Config{
            Region: aws.String(endpoints.UsWest2RegionID),
        }))
        c.ddbClient = dynamodb.New(sess)
    }
    return c.ddbClient
}

// Sign allows users to sign the book.
// The message is to be passed as application/json typed content, listed under the "message" top level key.
func (c Book) Sign() revel.Result {
    var s Signature

    err := c.Params.BindJSON(&s)
    if err != nil {
        return c.RenderError(err)
    }
    now := time.Now()
    s.Epoch = now.Unix()
    s.ID = randString(20)

    item, err := dynamodbattribute.MarshalMap(s)
    if err != nil {
        return c.RenderError(err)
    }

    putItemInput := &dynamodb.PutItemInput{
        TableName: aws.String(TABLE_NAME),
        Item:      item,
    }
    _, err = c.ddb().PutItem(putItemInput)
    if err != nil {
        return c.RenderError(err)
    }

    return c.RenderText(SUCCESS)
}

// List allows users to list all signatures in the book.
func (c Book) List() revel.Result {
    scanInput := &dynamodb.ScanInput{
        TableName: aws.String(TABLE_NAME),
        Limit:     aws.Int64(100),
    }
    res, err := c.ddb().Scan(scanInput)
    if err != nil {
        return c.RenderError(err)
    }

    messages := make([]string, 0)
    for _, v := range res.Items {
        messages = append(messages, *(v["Message"].S))
    }
    return c.RenderJSON(messages)
}

./conf/routes:
POST /sign Book.Sign
GET /list Book.List

Creating the resources and testing

For the purposes of this blog post, the application will be run and tested locally. We will store and retrieve messages from an Amazon DynamoDB table. Use the following AWS CLI command to create the guestbook table:

aws dynamodb create-table --region us-west-2 --table-name "guestbook" --attribute-definitions AttributeName=ID,AttributeType=S AttributeName=Epoch,AttributeType=N --key-schema AttributeName=ID,KeyType=HASH AttributeName=Epoch,KeyType=RANGE --provisioned-throughput ReadCapacityUnits=5,WriteCapacityUnits=5

Now, let’s test our sign and list routes. If everything is working correctly, the following result appears:

$ curl -d '{"message":"Hello from cURL!"}' -H "Content-Type: application/json" http://localhost:9000/book/sign
Success.
$ curl http://localhost:9000/book/list
[
  "Hello from cURL!"
]%

Integrating with AWS X-Ray

Download and run the AWS X-Ray daemon

The AWS SDKs emit trace segments over UDP on port 2000. (This port can be configured.) In order for the trace segments to make it to the X-Ray service, the daemon must listen on this port and batch the segments in calls to the PutTraceSegments API.
For information about downloading and running the X-Ray daemon, see the AWS X-Ray Developer Guide.

Installing the AWS X-Ray SDK for Go

To download the SDK from GitHub, run go get -u github.com/aws/aws-xray-sdk-go/... The SDK will appear in the $GOPATH.

Enabling the incoming request filter

The first step to instrumenting an application with AWS X-Ray is to enable the generation of trace segments on incoming requests. The SDK conveniently provides an implementation of http.Handler which does exactly that. To ensure incoming web requests travel through this handler, we can modify app/init.go, adding a custom function to be run on application start.

import (
    "github.com/aws/aws-xray-sdk-go/xray"
    "github.com/revel/revel"
)

...

func init() {
  ...
    revel.OnAppStart(installXRayHandler)
}

func installXRayHandler() {
    revel.Server.Handler = xray.Handler(xray.NewFixedSegmentNamer("GuestbookApp"), revel.Server.Handler)
}

The application will now emit a segment for each incoming web request. The service graph appears:

You can customize the name of the segment to make it more descriptive by providing an alternate implementation of SegmentNamer to xray.Handler. For example, you can use xray.NewDynamicSegmentNamer(fallback, pattern) in place of the fixed namer. This namer will use the host name from the incoming web request (if it matches pattern) as the segment name. This is often useful when you are trying to separate different instances of the same application.

In addition, HTTP-centric information such as method and URL is collected in the segment’s http subsection:

"http": {
    "request": {
        "url": "/book/list",
        "method": "GET",
        "user_agent": "curl/7.54.0",
        "client_ip": "::1"
    },
    "response": {
        "status": 200
    }
},

Instrumenting outbound calls

To provide detailed performance metrics for distributed applications, the AWS X-Ray SDK needs to measure the time it takes to make outbound requests. Trace context is passed to downstream services using the X-Amzn-Trace-Id header. To draw a detailed and accurate representation of a distributed application, outbound call instrumentation is required.

AWS SDK calls

The AWS X-Ray SDK for Go provides a one-line AWS client wrapper that enables the collection of detailed per-call metrics for any AWS client. We can modify the DynamoDB client instantiation to include this line:

// ddb returns the controller's DynamoDB client, instatiating a new client if necessary.
func (c Book) ddb() *dynamodb.DynamoDB {
    if c.ddbClient == nil {
        sess := session.Must(session.NewSession(&aws.Config{
            Region: aws.String(endpoints.UsWest2RegionID),
        }))
        c.ddbClient = dynamodb.New(sess)
        xray.AWS(c.ddbClient.Client) // add subsegment-generating X-Ray handlers to this client
    }
    return c.ddbClient
}

We also need to ensure that the segment generated by our xray.Handler is passed to these AWS calls so that the X-Ray SDK knows to which segment these generated subsegments belong. In Go, the context.Context object is passed throughout the call path to achieve this goal. (In most other languages, some variant of ThreadLocal is used.) AWS clients provide a *WithContext method variant for each AWS operation, which we need to switch to:

_, err = c.ddb().PutItemWithContext(c.Request.Context(), putItemInput)
    res, err := c.ddb().ScanWithContext(c.Request.Context(), scanInput)

We now see much more detail in the Timeline view of the trace for the sign and list operations:

We can use this detail to help diagnose throttling on our DynamoDB table. In the following screenshot, the purple in the DynamoDB service graph node indicates that our table is underprovisioned. The red in the GuestbookApp node indicates that the application is throwing faults due to this throttling.

HTTP calls

Although the guestbook application does not make any non-AWS outbound HTTP calls in its current state, there is a similar one-liner to wrap HTTP clients that make outbound requests. xray.Client(c *http.Client) wraps an existing http.Client (or nil if you want to use a default HTTP client). For example:

resp, err := ctxhttp.Get(ctx, xray.Client(nil), "https://aws.amazon.com/")

Instrumenting local operations

X-Ray can also assist in measuring the performance of local compute operations. To see this in action, let’s create a custom subsegment inside the randString method:


// randString returns a random string of len n, used for DynamoDB Hash key.
func randString(ctx context.Context, n int) string {
    xray.Capture(ctx, "randString", func(innerCtx context.Context) {
        b := make([]rune, n)
        for i := range b {
            b[i] = letters[rand.Intn(len(letters))]
        }
        s := string(b)
    })
    return s
}

// we'll also need to change the callsite

s.ID = randString(c.Request.Context(), 20)

Summary

By now, you are an expert on how to instrument X-Ray for your Go applications. Instrumenting X-Ray with your applications is an easy way to analyze and debug performance issues and understand customer impact. Please feel free to give any feedback or comments below.

For more information about advanced configuration of the AWS X-Ray SDK for Go, see the AWS X-Ray SDK for Go in the AWS X-Ray Developer Guide and the aws/aws-xray-sdk-go GitHub repository.

For more information about some of the advanced X-Ray features such as histograms, annotations, and filter expressions, see the Analyzing Performance for Amazon Rekognition Apps Written on AWS Lambda Using AWS X-Ray blog post.

Using Amazon CloudWatch and Amazon SNS to Notify when AWS X-Ray Detects Elevated Levels of Latency, Errors, and Faults in Your Application

Post Syndicated from Bharath Kumar original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/using-amazon-cloudwatch-and-amazon-sns-to-notify-when-aws-x-ray-detects-elevated-levels-of-latency-errors-and-faults-in-your-application/

AWS X-Ray helps developers analyze and debug production applications built using microservices or serverless architectures and quantify customer impact. With X-Ray, you can understand how your application and its underlying services are performing and identify and troubleshoot the root cause of performance issues and errors. You can use these insights to identify issues and opportunities for optimization.

In this blog post, I will show you how you can use Amazon CloudWatch and Amazon SNS to get notified when X-Ray detects high latency, errors, and faults in your application. Specifically, I will show you how to use this sample app to get notified through an email or SMS message when your end users observe high latencies or server-side errors when they use your application. You can customize the alarms and events by updating the sample app code.

Sample App Overview

The sample app uses the X-Ray GetServiceGraph API to get the following information:

  • Aggregated response time.
  • Requests that failed with 4xx status code (errors).
  • 429 status code (throttle).
  • 5xx status code (faults).
Sample app architecture

Overview of sample app architecture

Getting started

The sample app uses AWS CloudFormation to deploy the required resources.
To install the sample app:

  1. Run git clone to get the sample app.
  2. Update the JSON file in the Setup folder with threshold limits and notification details.
  3. Run the install.py script to install the sample app.

For more information about the installation steps, see the readme file on GitHub.

You can update the app configuration to include your phone number or email to get notified when your application in X-Ray breaches the latency, error, and fault limits you set in the configuration. If you prefer to not provide your phone number and email, then you can use the CloudWatch alarm deployed by the sample app to monitor your application in X-Ray.

The sample app deploys resources with the sample app namespace you provided during setup. This enables you to have multiple sample apps in the same region.

CloudWatch rules

The sample app uses two CloudWatch rules:

  1. SCHEDULEDLAMBDAFOR-sample_app_name to trigger at regular intervals the AWS Lambda function that queries the GetServiceGraph API.
  2. XRAYALERTSFOR-sample_app_name to look for published CloudWatch events that match the pattern defined in this rule.
CloudWatch Rules for sample app

CloudWatch rules created for the sample app

CloudWatch alarms

If you did not provide your phone number or email in the JSON file, the sample app uses a CloudWatch alarm named XRayCloudWatchAlarm-sample_app_name in combination with the CloudWatch event that you can use for monitoring.

CloudWatch Alarm for sample app

CloudWatch alarm created for the sample app

Amazon SNS messages

The sample app creates two SNS topics:

  • sample_app_name-cloudwatcheventsnstopic to send out an SMS message when the CloudWatch event matches a pattern published from the Lambda function.
  • sample_app_name-cloudwatchalarmsnstopic to send out an email message when the CloudWatch alarm goes into an ALARM state.
Amazon SNS for sample app

Amazon SNS created for the sample app

Getting notifications

The CloudWatch event looks for the following matching pattern:

{
  "detail-type": [
    "XCW Notification for Alerts"
  ],
  "source": [
    "<sample_app_name>-xcw.alerts"
  ]
}

The event then invokes an SNS topic that sends out an SMS message.

SMS in sample app

SMS that is sent when CloudWatch Event invokes Amazon SNS topic

The CloudWatch alarm looks for the TriggeredRules metric that is published whenever the CloudWatch event matches the event pattern. It goes into the ALARM state whenever TriggeredRules > 0 for the specified evaluation period and invokes an SNS topic that sends an email message.

Email sent in sample app

Email that is sent when CloudWatch Alarm goes to ALARM state

Stopping notifications

If you provided your phone number or email address, but would like to stop getting notified, change the SUBSCRIBE_TO_EMAIL_SMS environment variable in the Lambda function to No. Then, go to the Amazon SNS console and delete the subscriptions. You can still monitor your application for elevated levels of latency, errors, and faults by using the CloudWatch console.

Lambda environment variable in sample app

Change environment variable in Lambda

 

Delete subscription in SNS for sample app

Delete subscriptions to stop getting notified

Uninstalling the sample app

To uninstall the sample app, run the uninstall.py script in the Setup folder.

Extending the sample app

The sample app notifes you when when X-Ray detects high latency, errors, and faults in your application. You can extend it to provide more value for your use cases (for example, to perform an action on a resource when the state of a CloudWatch alarm changes).

To summarize, after this set up you will be able to get notified through Amazon SNS when X-Ray detects high latency, errors and faults in your application.

I hope you found this information about setting up alarms and alerts for your application in AWS X-Ray helpful. Feel free to leave questions or other feedback in the comments. Feel free to learn more about AWS X-Ray, Amazon SNS and Amazon CloudWatch

About the Author

Bharath Kumar is a Sr.Product Manager with AWS X-Ray. He has developed and launched mobile games, web applications on microservices and serverless architecture.

AWS Updated Its ISO Certifications and Now Has 67 Services Under ISO Compliance

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-updated-its-iso-certifications-and-now-has-67-services-under-iso-compliance/

ISO logo

AWS has updated its certifications against ISO 9001, ISO 27001, ISO 27017, and ISO 27018 standards, bringing the total to 67 services now under ISO compliance. We added the following 29 services this cycle:

Amazon Aurora Amazon S3 Transfer Acceleration AWS [email protected]
Amazon Cloud Directory Amazon SageMaker AWS Managed Services
Amazon CloudWatch Logs Amazon Simple Notification Service AWS OpsWorks Stacks
Amazon Cognito Auto Scaling AWS Shield
Amazon Connect AWS Batch AWS Snowball Edge
Amazon Elastic Container Registry AWS CodeBuild AWS Snowmobile
Amazon Inspector AWS CodeCommit AWS Step Functions
Amazon Kinesis Data Streams AWS CodeDeploy AWS Systems Manager (formerly Amazon EC2 Systems Manager)
Amazon Macie AWS CodePipeline AWS X-Ray
Amazon QuickSight AWS IoT Core

For the complete list of services under ISO compliance, see AWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program.

AWS maintains certifications through extensive audits of its controls to ensure that information security risks that affect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of company and customer information are appropriately managed.

You can download copies of the AWS ISO certificates that contain AWS’s in-scope services and Regions, and use these certificates to jump-start your own certification efforts:

AWS does not increase service costs in any AWS Region as a result of updating its certifications.

To learn more about compliance in the AWS Cloud, see AWS Cloud Compliance.

– Chad

Managing AWS Lambda Function Concurrency

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/managing-aws-lambda-function-concurrency/

One of the key benefits of serverless applications is the ease in which they can scale to meet traffic demands or requests, with little to no need for capacity planning. In AWS Lambda, which is the core of the serverless platform at AWS, the unit of scale is a concurrent execution. This refers to the number of executions of your function code that are happening at any given time.

Thinking about concurrent executions as a unit of scale is a fairly unique concept. In this post, I dive deeper into this and talk about how you can make use of per function concurrency limits in Lambda.

Understanding concurrency in Lambda

Instead of diving right into the guts of how Lambda works, here’s an appetizing analogy: a magical pizza.
Yes, a magical pizza!

This magical pizza has some unique properties:

  • It has a fixed maximum number of slices, such as 8.
  • Slices automatically re-appear after they are consumed.
  • When you take a slice from the pizza, it does not re-appear until it has been completely consumed.
  • One person can take multiple slices at a time.
  • You can easily ask to have the number of slices increased, but they remain fixed at any point in time otherwise.

Now that the magical pizza’s properties are defined, here’s a hypothetical situation of some friends sharing this pizza.

Shawn, Kate, Daniela, Chuck, Ian and Avleen get together every Friday to share a pizza and catch up on their week. As there is just six of them, they can easily all enjoy a slice of pizza at a time. As they finish each slice, it re-appears in the pizza pan and they can take another slice again. Given the magical properties of their pizza, they can continue to eat all they want, but with two very important constraints:

  • If any of them take too many slices at once, the others may not get as much as they want.
  • If they take too many slices, they might also eat too much and get sick.

One particular week, some of the friends are hungrier than the rest, taking two slices at a time instead of just one. If more than two of them try to take two pieces at a time, this can cause contention for pizza slices. Some of them would wait hungry for the slices to re-appear. They could ask for a pizza with more slices, but then run the same risk again later if more hungry friends join than planned for.

What can they do?

If the friends agreed to accept a limit for the maximum number of slices they each eat concurrently, both of these issues are avoided. Some could have a maximum of 2 of the 8 slices, or other concurrency limits that were more or less. Just so long as they kept it at or under eight total slices to be eaten at one time. This would keep any from going hungry or eating too much. The six friends can happily enjoy their magical pizza without worry!

Concurrency in Lambda

Concurrency in Lambda actually works similarly to the magical pizza model. Each AWS Account has an overall AccountLimit value that is fixed at any point in time, but can be easily increased as needed, just like the count of slices in the pizza. As of May 2017, the default limit is 1000 “slices” of concurrency per AWS Region.

Also like the magical pizza, each concurrency “slice” can only be consumed individually one at a time. After consumption, it becomes available to be consumed again. Services invoking Lambda functions can consume multiple slices of concurrency at the same time, just like the group of friends can take multiple slices of the pizza.

Let’s take our example of the six friends and bring it back to AWS services that commonly invoke Lambda:

  • Amazon S3
  • Amazon Kinesis
  • Amazon DynamoDB
  • Amazon Cognito

In a single account with the default concurrency limit of 1000 concurrent executions, any of these four services could invoke enough functions to consume the entire limit or some part of it. Just like with the pizza example, there is the possibility for two issues to pop up:

  • One or more of these services could invoke enough functions to consume a majority of the available concurrency capacity. This could cause others to be starved for it, causing failed invocations.
  • A service could consume too much concurrent capacity and cause a downstream service or database to be overwhelmed, which could cause failed executions.

For Lambda functions that are launched in a VPC, you have the potential to consume the available IP addresses in a subnet or the maximum number of elastic network interfaces to which your account has access. For more information, see Configuring a Lambda Function to Access Resources in an Amazon VPC. For information about elastic network interface limits, see Network Interfaces section in the Amazon VPC Limits topic.

One way to solve both of these problems is applying a concurrency limit to the Lambda functions in an account.

Configuring per function concurrency limits

You can now set a concurrency limit on individual Lambda functions in an account. The concurrency limit that you set reserves a portion of your account level concurrency for a given function. All of your functions’ concurrent executions count against this account-level limit by default.

If you set a concurrency limit for a specific function, then that function’s concurrency limit allocation is deducted from the shared pool and assigned to that specific function. AWS also reserves 100 units of concurrency for all functions that don’t have a specified concurrency limit set. This helps to make sure that future functions have capacity to be consumed.

Going back to the example of the consuming services, you could set throttles for the functions as follows:

Amazon S3 function = 350
Amazon Kinesis function = 200
Amazon DynamoDB function = 200
Amazon Cognito function = 150
Total = 900

With the 100 reserved for all non-concurrency reserved functions, this totals the account limit of 1000.

Here’s how this works. To start, create a basic Lambda function that is invoked via Amazon API Gateway. This Lambda function returns a single “Hello World” statement with an added sleep time between 2 and 5 seconds. The sleep time simulates an API providing some sort of capability that can take a varied amount of time. The goal here is to show how an API that is underloaded can reach its concurrency limit, and what happens when it does.
To create the example function

  1. Open the Lambda console.
  2. Choose Create Function.
  3. For Author from scratch, enter the following values:
    1. For Name, enter a value (such as concurrencyBlog01).
    2. For Runtime, choose Python 3.6.
    3. For Role, choose Create new role from template and enter a name aligned with this function, such as concurrencyBlogRole.
  4. Choose Create function.
  5. The function is created with some basic example code. Replace that code with the following:

import time
from random import randint
seconds = randint(2, 5)

def lambda_handler(event, context):
time.sleep(seconds)
return {"statusCode": 200,
"body": ("Hello world, slept " + str(seconds) + " seconds"),
"headers":
{
"Access-Control-Allow-Headers": "Content-Type,X-Amz-Date,Authorization,X-Api-Key,X-Amz-Security-Token",
"Access-Control-Allow-Methods": "GET,OPTIONS",
}}

  1. Under Basic settings, set Timeout to 10 seconds. While this function should only ever take up to 5-6 seconds (with the 5-second max sleep), this gives you a little bit of room if it takes longer.

  1. Choose Save at the top right.

At this point, your function is configured for this example. Test it and confirm this in the console:

  1. Choose Test.
  2. Enter a name (it doesn’t matter for this example).
  3. Choose Create.
  4. In the console, choose Test again.
  5. You should see output similar to the following:

Now configure API Gateway so that you have an HTTPS endpoint to test against.

  1. In the Lambda console, choose Configuration.
  2. Under Triggers, choose API Gateway.
  3. Open the API Gateway icon now shown as attached to your Lambda function:

  1. Under Configure triggers, leave the default values for API Name and Deployment stage. For Security, choose Open.
  2. Choose Add, Save.

API Gateway is now configured to invoke Lambda at the Invoke URL shown under its configuration. You can take this URL and test it in any browser or command line, using tools such as “curl”:


$ curl https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01
Hello world, slept 2 seconds

Throwing load at the function

Now start throwing some load against your API Gateway + Lambda function combo. Right now, your function is only limited by the total amount of concurrency available in an account. For this example account, you might have 850 unreserved concurrency out of a full account limit of 1000 due to having configured a few concurrency limits already (also the 100 concurrency saved for all functions without configured limits). You can find all of this information on the main Dashboard page of the Lambda console:

For generating load in this example, use an open source tool called “hey” (https://github.com/rakyll/hey), which works similarly to ApacheBench (ab). You test from an Amazon EC2 instance running the default Amazon Linux AMI from the EC2 console. For more help with configuring an EC2 instance, follow the steps in the Launch Instance Wizard.

After the EC2 instance is running, SSH into the host and run the following:


sudo yum install go
go get -u github.com/rakyll/hey

“hey” is easy to use. For these tests, specify a total number of tests (5,000) and a concurrency of 50 against the API Gateway URL as follows(replace the URL here with your own):


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01

The output from “hey” tells you interesting bits of information:


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01

Summary:
Total: 381.9978 secs
Slowest: 9.4765 secs
Fastest: 0.0438 secs
Average: 3.2153 secs
Requests/sec: 13.0891
Total data: 140024 bytes
Size/request: 28 bytes

Response time histogram:
0.044 [1] |
0.987 [2] |
1.930 [0] |
2.874 [1803] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
3.817 [1518] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
4.760 [719] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
5.703 [917] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
6.647 [13] |
7.590 [14] |
8.533 [9] |
9.477 [4] |

Latency distribution:
10% in 2.0224 secs
25% in 2.0267 secs
50% in 3.0251 secs
75% in 4.0269 secs
90% in 5.0279 secs
95% in 5.0414 secs
99% in 5.1871 secs

Details (average, fastest, slowest):
DNS+dialup: 0.0003 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0332 secs
DNS-lookup: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0046 secs
req write: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0005 secs
resp wait: 3.2149 secs, 0.0438 secs, 9.4472 secs
resp read: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0004 secs

Status code distribution:
[200] 4997 responses
[502] 3 responses

You can see a helpful histogram and latency distribution. Remember that this Lambda function has a random sleep period in it and so isn’t entirely representational of a real-life workload. Those three 502s warrant digging deeper, but could be due to Lambda cold-start timing and the “second” variable being the maximum of 5, causing the Lambda functions to time out. AWS X-Ray and the Amazon CloudWatch logs generated by both API Gateway and Lambda could help you troubleshoot this.

Configuring a concurrency reservation

Now that you’ve established that you can generate this load against the function, I show you how to limit it and protect a backend resource from being overloaded by all of these requests.

  1. In the console, choose Configure.
  2. Under Concurrency, for Reserve concurrency, enter 25.

  1. Click on Save in the top right corner.

You could also set this with the AWS CLI using the Lambda put-function-concurrency command or see your current concurrency configuration via Lambda get-function. Here’s an example command:


$ aws lambda get-function --function-name concurrencyBlog01 --output json --query Concurrency
{
"ReservedConcurrentExecutions": 25
}

Either way, you’ve set the Concurrency Reservation to 25 for this function. This acts as both a limit and a reservation in terms of making sure that you can execute 25 concurrent functions at all times. Going above this results in the throttling of the Lambda function. Depending on the invoking service, throttling can result in a number of different outcomes, as shown in the documentation on Throttling Behavior. This change has also reduced your unreserved account concurrency for other functions by 25.

Rerun the same load generation as before and see what happens. Previously, you tested at 50 concurrency, which worked just fine. By limiting the Lambda functions to 25 concurrency, you should see rate limiting kick in. Run the same test again:


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01

While this test runs, refresh the Monitoring tab on your function detail page. You see the following warning message:

This is great! It means that your throttle is working as configured and you are now protecting your downstream resources from too much load from your Lambda function.

Here is the output from a new “hey” command:


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01
Summary:
Total: 379.9922 secs
Slowest: 7.1486 secs
Fastest: 0.0102 secs
Average: 1.1897 secs
Requests/sec: 13.1582
Total data: 164608 bytes
Size/request: 32 bytes

Response time histogram:
0.010 [1] |
0.724 [3075] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
1.438 [0] |
2.152 [811] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
2.866 [11] |
3.579 [566] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
4.293 [214] |∎∎∎
5.007 [1] |
5.721 [315] |∎∎∎∎
6.435 [4] |
7.149 [2] |

Latency distribution:
10% in 0.0130 secs
25% in 0.0147 secs
50% in 0.0205 secs
75% in 2.0344 secs
90% in 4.0229 secs
95% in 5.0248 secs
99% in 5.0629 secs

Details (average, fastest, slowest):
DNS+dialup: 0.0004 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0537 secs
DNS-lookup: 0.0002 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0184 secs
req write: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0016 secs
resp wait: 1.1892 secs, 0.0101 secs, 7.1038 secs
resp read: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0005 secs

Status code distribution:
[502] 3076 responses
[200] 1924 responses

This looks fairly different from the last load test run. A large percentage of these requests failed fast due to the concurrency throttle failing them (those with the 0.724 seconds line). The timing shown here in the histogram represents the entire time it took to get a response between the EC2 instance and API Gateway calling Lambda and being rejected. It’s also important to note that this example was configured with an edge-optimized endpoint in API Gateway. You see under Status code distribution that 3076 of the 5000 requests failed with a 502, showing that the backend service from API Gateway and Lambda failed the request.

Other uses

Managing function concurrency can be useful in a few other ways beyond just limiting the impact on downstream services and providing a reservation of concurrency capacity. Here are two other uses:

  • Emergency kill switch
  • Cost controls

Emergency kill switch

On occasion, due to issues with applications I’ve managed in the past, I’ve had a need to disable a certain function or capability of an application. By setting the concurrency reservation and limit of a Lambda function to zero, you can do just that.

With the reservation set to zero every invocation of a Lambda function results in being throttled. You could then work on the related parts of the infrastructure or application that aren’t working, and then reconfigure the concurrency limit to allow invocations again.

Cost controls

While I mentioned how you might want to use concurrency limits to control the downstream impact to services or databases that your Lambda function might call, another resource that you might be cautious about is money. Setting the concurrency throttle is another way to help control costs during development and testing of your application.

You might want to prevent against a function performing a recursive action too quickly or a development workload generating too high of a concurrency. You might also want to protect development resources connected to this function from generating too much cost, such as APIs that your Lambda function calls.

Conclusion

Concurrent executions as a unit of scale are a fairly unique characteristic about Lambda functions. Placing limits on how many concurrency “slices” that your function can consume can prevent a single function from consuming all of the available concurrency in an account. Limits can also prevent a function from overwhelming a backend resource that isn’t as scalable.

Unlike monolithic applications or even microservices where there are mixed capabilities in a single service, Lambda functions encourage a sort of “nano-service” of small business logic directly related to the integration model connected to the function. I hope you’ve enjoyed this post and configure your concurrency limits today!

Latency Distribution Graph in AWS X-Ray

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/latency-distribution-graph-in-aws-x-ray/

We’re continuing to iterate on the AWS X-Ray service based on customer feedback and today we’re excited to release a set of tools to help you quickly dive deep on latencies in your applications. Visual Node and Edge latency distribution graphs are shown in a handy new “Service Details” side bar in your X-Ray Service Map.

The X-Ray service graph gives you a visual representation of services and their interactions over a period of time that you select. The nodes represent services and the edges between the nodes represent calls between the services. The nodes and edges each have a set of statistics associated with them. While the visualizations provided in the service map are useful for estimating the average latency in an application they don’t help you to dive deep on specific issues. Most of the time issues occur at statistical outliers. To alleviate this X-Ray computes histograms like the one above help you solve those 99th percentile bugs.

To see a Response Distribution for a Node just click on it in the service graph. You can also click on the edges between the nodes to see the Response Distribution from the viewpoint of the calling service.

The team had a few interesting problems to solve while building out this feature and I wanted to share a bit of that with you now! Given the large number of traces an app can produce it’s not a great idea (for your browser) to plot every single trace client side. Instead most plotting libraries, when dealing with many points, use approximations and bucketing to get a network and performance friendly histogram. If you’ve used monitoring software in the past you’ve probably seen as you zoom in on the data you get higher fidelity. The interesting thing about the latencies coming in from X-Ray is that they vary by several orders of magnitude.

If the latencies were distributed between strictly 0s and 1s you could easily just create 10 buckets of 100 milliseconds. If your apps are anything like mine there’s a lot of interesting stuff happening in the outliers, so it’s beneficial to have more fidelity at 1% and 99% than it is at 50%. The problem with fixed bucket sizes is that they’re not necessarily giving you an accurate summary of data. So X-Ray, for now, uses dynamic bucket sizing based on the t-digests algorithm by Ted Dunning and Otmar Ertl. One of the distinct advantages of this algorithm over other approximation algorithms is its accuracy and precision at extremes (where most errors typically are).

An additional advantage of X-Ray over other monitoring software is the ability to measure two perspectives of latency simultaneously. Developers almost always have some view into the server side latency from their application logs but with X-Ray you can examine latency from the view of each of the clients, services, and microservices that you’re interacting with. You can even dive deeper by adding additional restrictions and queries on your selection. You can identify the specific users and clients that are having issues at that 99th percentile.

This info has already been available in API calls to GetServiceGraph as ResponseTimeHistogram but now we’re exposing it in the console as well to make it easier for customers to consume. For more information check out the documentation here.

Randall

AWS Lambda Support for AWS X-Ray

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-lambda-support-for-aws-x-ray/

Today we’re announcing general availability of AWS Lambda support for AWS X-Ray. As you may already know from Jeff’s GA POST, X-Ray is an AWS service for analyzing the execution and performance behavior of distributed applications. Traditional debugging methods don’t work so well for microservice based applications, in which there are multiple, independent components running on different services. X-Ray allows you to rapidly diagnose errors, slowdowns, and timeouts by breaking down the latency in your applications. I’ll demonstrate how you can use X-Ray in your own applications in just a moment by walking us through building and analyzing a simple Lambda based application.

If you just want to get started right away you can easily turn on X-Ray for your existing Lambda functions by navigating to your function’s configuration page and enabling tracing:

Or in the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) by updating the functions’s tracing-config (Be sure to pass in a --function-name as well):

$ aws lambda update-function-configuration --tracing-config '{"Mode": "Active"}'

When tracing mode is active Lambda will attempt to trace your function (unless explicitly told not to trace by an upstream service). Otherwise, your function will only be traced if it is explicitly told to do so by an upstream service. Once tracing is enabled, you’ll start generating traces and you’ll get a visual representation of the resources in your application and the connections (edges) between them. One thing to note is that the X-Ray daemon does consume some of your Lambda function’s resources. If you’re getting close to your memory limit Lambda will try to kill the X-Ray daemon to avoid throwing an out-of-memory error.

Let’s test this new integration out by building a quick application that uses a few different services.


As twenty-something with a smartphone I have a lot of pictures selfies (10000+!) and I thought it would be great to analyze all of them. We’ll write a simple Lambda function with the Java 8 runtime that responds to new images uploaded into an Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) bucket. We’ll use Amazon Rekognition on the photos and store the detected labels in Amazon DynamoDB.

service map

First, let’s define a few quick X-Ray vocabulary words: subsegments, segments, and traces. Got that? X-Ray is easy to understand if you remember that subsegments and segments make up traces which X-Ray processes to generate service graphs. Service graphs make a nice visual representation we can see above (with different colors indicating various request responses). The compute resources that run your applications send data about the work they’re doing in the form of segments. You can add additional annotations about that data and more granular timing of your code by creating subsgements. The path of a request through your application is tracked with a trace. A trace collects all the segments generated by a single request. That means you can easily trace Lambda events coming in from S3 all the way to DynamoDB and understand where errors and latencies are cropping up.

So, we’ll create an S3 bucket called selfies-bucket, a DynamoDB table called selfies-table, and a Lambda function. We’ll add a trigger to our Lambda function for the S3 bucket on ObjectCreated:All events. Our Lambda function code will be super simple and you can look at it in it’s entirety here. With no code changes we can enable X-Ray in our Java function by including the aws-xray-sdk and aws-xray-sdk-recorder-aws-sdk-instrumentor packages in our JAR.

Let’s trigger some photo uploads and get a look at the traces in X-Ray.

We’ve got some data! We can click on one of these individual traces for a lot of detailed information on our invocation.

In the first AWS::Lambda segmet we see the dwell time of the function, how long it spent waiting to execute, followed by the number of execution attempts.

In the second AWS::Lambda::Function segment there are a few possible subsegments:

  • The inititlization subsegment includes all of the time spent before your function handler starts executing
  • The outbound service calls
  • Any of your custom subsegments (these are really easy to add)

Hmm, it seems like there’s a bit of an issue on the DynamoDB side. We can even dive deeper and get the full exception stacktrace by clicking on the error icon. You can see we’ve been throttled by DynamoDB because we’re out of write capacity units. Luckily we can add more with just a few clicks or a quick API call. As we do that we’ll see more and more green on our service map!

The X-Ray SDKs make it super easy to emit data to X-Ray, but you don’t have to use them to talk to the X-Ray daemon. For Python, you can check out this library from rackspace called fleece. The X-Ray service is full of interesting stuff and the best place to learn more is by hopping over to the documentation. I’ve been using it for my @awscloudninja bot and it’s working great! Just keep in mind that this isn’t an official library and isn’t supported by AWS.

Personally, I’m really excited to use X-Ray in all of my upcoming projects because it really will save me some time and effort debugging and operating. I look forward to seeing what our customers can build with it as well. If you come up with any cool tricks or hacks please let me know!

– Randall

AWS San Francisco Summit – Summary of Launches and Announcements

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-san-francisco-summit-summary-of-launches-and-announcements/

Many of my colleagues are in San Francisco for today’s AWS Summit. Here’s a summary of what we announced from the main stage and in the breakout sessions:

New Services

Newly Available

New Features

Jeff;

 

AWS X-Ray Update – General Availability, Including Lambda Integration

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-x-ray-update-general-availability-including-lambda-integration/

I first told you about AWS X-Ray at AWS re:Invent in my post, AWS X-Ray – See Inside Your Distributed Application. X-Ray allows you to trace requests made to your application as execution traverses Amazon EC2 instances, Amazon ECS containers, microservices, AWS database services, and AWS messaging services. It is designed for development and production use, and can handle simple three-tier applications as well as applications composed of thousands of microservices. As I showed you last year, X-Ray helps you to perform end-to-end tracing of requests, record a representative sample of the traces, see a map of the services and the trace data, and to analyze performance issues and errors. This helps you understand how your application and its underlying services are performing so you can identify and address the root cause of issues.

You can take a look at the full X-Ray walk-through in my earlier post to learn more.

We launched X-Ray in preview form at re:Invent and invited interested developers and architects to start using it. Today we are making the service generally available, with support in the US East (Northern Virginia), US West (Northern California), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), EU (Ireland), EU (Frankfurt), South America (São Paulo), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Sydney), and Asia Pacific (Mumbai) Regions.

New Lambda Integration (Preview)
During the preview period we fine-tuned the service and added AWS Lambda integration, which we are launching today in preview form. Now, Lambda developers can use X-Ray to gain visibility into their function executions and performance. Previously, Lambda customers who wanted to understand their application’s latency breakdown, diagnose slowdowns, or troubleshoot timeouts had to rely on custom logging and analysis.

In order to make use of this new integration, you simply ensure that the functions of interest have execution roles that gives the functions permission to write to X-Ray, and then enable tracing on a function-by-function basis (when you create new functions using the console, the proper permissions are assigned automatically). Then you use the X-Ray service map to see how your requests flow through your Lambda functions, EC2 instances, ECS containers, and so forth. You can identify the services and resources of interest, zoom in, examine detailed timing information, and then remedy the issue.

Each call to a Lambda function generates two or more nodes in the X-Ray map:

Lambda Service – This node represents the time spent within Lambda itself.

User Function – This node represents the execution time of the Lambda function.

Downstream Service Calls – These nodes represent any calls that the Lambda function makes to other services.

To learn more, read Using X-Ray with Lambda.

Now Available
We will begin to charge for the usage of X-Ray on May 1, 2017.

Pricing is based on the number of traces that you record, and the number that you analyze (each trace represent a request made to your application). You can record 100,000 traces and retrieve or scan 1,000,000 traces every month at no charge. Beyond that, you pay $5 for every million traces that you record and $0.50 for every million traces that you retrieve for analysis, with more info available on the AWS X-Ray Pricing page. You can visit the AWS Billing Console to see how many traces you have recorded or accessed (data collection began on March 1, 2017).

Check out AWS X-Ray and the new Lambda integration today and let me know what you think!

Jeff;