Tag Archives: Whitepaper

The Five Ws episode 2: Data Classification whitepaper

Post Syndicated from Jana Kay original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/the-five-ws-episode-2-data-classification-whitepaper/

AWS whitepapers are a great way to expand your knowledge of the cloud. Authored by Amazon Web Services (AWS) and the AWS community, they provide in-depth content that often addresses specific customer situations.

We’re featuring some of our whitepapers in a new video series, The Five Ws. These short videos outline the who, what, when, where, and why of each whitepaper so you can decide whether to dig into it further.

The second whitepaper we’re featuring is Data Classification: Secure Cloud Adoption. This paper provides insight into data classification categories for organizations to consider when moving data to the cloud—and how implementing a data classification program can simplify cloud adoption and management. It outlines a process to build a data classification program, shares examples of data and the corresponding category the data may fall into, and outlines practices and models currently implemented by global first movers and early adopters. The paper also includes data classification and privacy considerations. Note: It’s important to use internationally recognized standards and frameworks when developing your own data classification rules. For more details on the Five Ws of Data Classification: Security Cloud Adoption, check out the video.

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Author

Jana Kay

Since 2018, Jana Kay has been a cloud security strategist with the AWS Security Growth Strategies team. She develops innovative ways to help AWS customers achieve their objectives, such as security table top exercises and other strategic initiatives. Previously, she was a cyber, counter-terrorism, and Middle East expert for 16 years in the Pentagon’s Office of the Secretary of Defense.

Introducing the Security at the Edge: Core Principles whitepaper

Post Syndicated from Maddie Bacon original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/introducing-the-security-at-the-edge-core-principles-whitepaper/

Amazon Web Services (AWS) recently released the Security at the Edge: Core Principles whitepaper. Today’s business leaders know that it’s critical to ensure that both the security of their environments and the security present in traditional cloud networks are extended to workloads at the edge. The whitepaper provides security executives the foundations for implementing a defense in depth strategy for security at the edge by addressing three areas of edge security:

  • AWS services at AWS edge locations
  • How those services and others can be used to implement the best practices outlined in the design principles of the AWS Well-Architected Framework Security Pillar
  • Additional AWS edge services, which customers can use to help secure their edge environments or expand operations into new, previously unsupported environments

Together, these elements offer core principles for designing a security strategy at the edge, and demonstrate how AWS services can provide a secure environment extending from the core cloud to the edge of the AWS network and out to customer edge devices and endpoints. You can find more information in the Security at the Edge: Core Principles whitepaper.

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Author

Maddie Bacon

Maddie (she/her) is a technical writer for AWS Security with a passion for creating meaningful content. She previously worked as a security reporter and editor at TechTarget and has a BA in Mathematics. In her spare time, she enjoys reading, traveling, and all things Harry Potter.

Author

Jana Kay

Since 2018, Jana has been a cloud security strategist with the AWS Security Growth Strategies team. She develops innovative ways to help AWS customers achieve their objectives, such as security table top exercises and other strategic initiatives. Previously, she was a cyber, counter-terrorism, and Middle East expert for 16 years in the Pentagon’s Office of the Secretary of Defense.

Updated whitepaper available: Encrypting File Data with Amazon Elastic File System

Post Syndicated from Joe Travaglini original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/updated-whitepaper-available-encrypting-file-data-with-amazon-elastic-file-system/

We’re sharing an update to the Encrypting File Data with Amazon Elastic File System whitepaper to provide customers with guidance on enforcing encryption of data at rest and in transit in Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS). Amazon EFS provides simple, scalable, highly available, and highly durable shared file systems in the cloud. The file systems you create by using Amazon EFS are elastic, which allows them to grow and shrink automatically as you add and remove data. They can grow to petabytes in size, distributing data across an unconstrained number of storage servers in multiple Availability Zones.

Read the updated whitepaper to learn about best practices for encrypting Amazon EFS. Learn how to enforce encryption at rest while you create an Amazon EFS file system in the AWS Management Console and in the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), and how to enforce encryption of data in transit at the client connection layer by using AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM).

Download and read the updated whitepaper.

If you have questions or want to learn more, contact your account executive or contact AWS Support. If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below.

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Author

Joseph Travaglini

For over four years, Joe has been a product manager on the Amazon Elastic File System team, responsible for the Amazon EFS security and compliance roadmap, and a product lead for the launch of EFS Infrequent Access. Prior to joining the Amazon EFS team, Joe was Director of Products at Sqrrl, a cybersecurity analytics startup acquired by AWS in 2018.

Author

Peter Buonora

Pete is a Principal Solutions Architect for AWS, with a focus on enterprise cloud strategy and information security. Pete has worked with the largest customers of AWS to accelerate their cloud adoption and improve their overall security posture.

Author

Siva Rajamani

Siva is a Boston-based Enterprise Solutions Architect for AWS. He enjoys working closely with customers and supporting their digital transformation and AWS adoption journey. His core areas of focus are security, serverless computing, and application integration.

Updated whitepaper available: “Navigating GDPR Compliance on AWS”

Post Syndicated from Carmela Gambardella original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/updated-whitepaper-available-navigating-gdpr-compliance-on-aws/

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation 2016/679 (GDPR) safeguards EU citizens’ fundamental right to privacy and to personal data protection. In order to make local regulations coherent and homogeneous, the GDPR introduces and defines stringent new standards in terms of compliance, security and data protection.

The updated version of our Navigating GDPR Compliance on AWS whitepaper (.pdf) explains the role that AWS plays in your GDPR compliance process and shows how AWS can help your organization accelerate the process of aligning your compliance programs to the GDPR by using AWS cloud services.

AWS compliance, data protection, and security experts work with customers across the world to help them run workloads in the AWS Cloud, including customers who must operate within GDPR requirements. AWS teams also review what AWS is responsible for to make sure that our operations comply with the requirements of the GDPR so that customers can continue to use AWS services. The whitepaper provides guidelines to better orient you to the wide variety of AWS security offerings and to help you identify the service that best suits your GDPR compliance needs.

If you have feedback about this blog post, please submit comments in the Comments section below.

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Author photo

Carmela Gambardella

Carmela graduated in Computer Science at the Federico II University of Naples, Italy. She has worked in a variety of roles at large IT companies, including as a software engineer, security consultant, and security solutions architect. Her areas of interest include data protection, security and compliance, application security, and software engineering. In April 2018, she joined the AWS Public Sector Solution Architects team in Italy.

Author photo

Giuseppe Russo

Giuseppe is a Security Assurance Manager for AWS in Italy. He has a Master’s Degree in Computer Science with a specialization in cryptography, security and coding theory. Giuseppe is s a seasoned information security practitioner with many years of experience engaging key stakeholders, developing guidelines, and influencing the security market on strategic topics such as privacy and critical infrastructure protection.

Singapore financial services: new resources for customer side of the shared responsibility model

Post Syndicated from Darran Boyd original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/singapore-financial-services-new-resources-for-customer-side-of-shared-responsibility-model/

Based on customer feedback, we’ve updated our AWS User Guide to Financial Services Regulations and Guidelines in Singapore whitepaper, as well as our AWS Monetary Authority of Singapore Technology Risk Management Guidelines (MAS TRM Guidelines) Workbook, which is available for download via AWS Artifact. Both resources now include considerations and best practices for the customer portion of the AWS Shared Responsibility Model.

The whitepaper provides considerations for financial institutions as they assess their responsibilities when using AWS services with regard to the MAS Outsourcing Guidelines, MAS TRM Guidelines, and Association of Banks in Singapore (ABS) Cloud Computing Implementation Guide.

The MAS TRM Workbook provides best practices for the customer portion of the AWS Shared Responsibility Model—that is, guidance on how you can manage security in the AWS Cloud. The guidance and best practices are sourced from the AWS Well-Architected Framework.

The Well-Architected Framework helps you understand the pros and cons of decisions you make while building systems on AWS. By using the Framework, you will learn architectural best practices for designing and operating reliable, secure, efficient, and cost-effective systems in the cloud. It provides a way for you to consistently measure your architectures against best practices and identify areas for improvement. The process for reviewing an architecture is a constructive conversation about architectural decisions, and is not an audit mechanism. We believe that having well-architected systems greatly increases the likelihood of business success. For more information, see the AWS Well-Architected homepage.

The compliance controls provided by the workbook also continue to address the AWS side of the Shared Responsibility Model (security of the AWS Cloud).

View the updated whitepaper here, or download the updated AWS MAS TRM Guidelines Workbook via AWS Artifact.

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Boyd author photo

Darran Boyd

Darran is a Principal Security Solutions Architect at AWS, responsible for helping remove security blockers for our customers and accelerating their journey to the AWS Cloud. Darran’s focus and passion is to deliver strategic security initiatives that un-lock and enable our customers at scale across the financial services industry and beyond… Cx0 to <code>

New Whitepaper: Active Directory Domain Services on AWS

Post Syndicated from Vinod Madabushi original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/new-whitepaper-active-directory-domain-services-on-aws/

The cloud is now at the center of most Enterprise IT strategies. As such, a well-planned move to the cloud can result in immediate business payoff. To achieve such success, it’s important that you adopt Microsoft Active Directory (AD), the foundation of many large enterprise Windows and .NET applications in a secure, scalable, and highly available manner within the AWS Cloud.

AWS offers flexible options for running AD, so as a customer it’s essential to select an architecture well-suited to support your applications. AWS offers a fully managed option called AWS Managed Active Directory, which enables your directory-aware workloads to use Managed Active Directory in AWS. You can also run Active Directory on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) and manage both the EC2 Instances and Active Directory, which provides the flexibility needed to extend an existing Active Directory domain to the AWS infrastructure.

In this regard, we are very excited to release Active Directory Domain Services for AWS Whitepaper. This Active Directory whitepaper describes best practices for running Active Directory on AWS, including different architectural approaches for running AWS Managed AD and Active Directory on EC2 Instances. In addition, this document discusses the design considerations, security, network connectivity, and multi-region deployment of Active Directory for both scenarios.

Read the whitepaper: Active Directory on AWS.

About the author

Vinod MadabushiVinod Madabushi is an Enterprise Solutions Architect and subject matter expert in Microsoft technologies, including Active Directory. He works with customers on building highly available, scalable, and resilient applications on AWS Cloud. He’s passionate about solving technology challenges and helping customers with their cloud journey.

 

AWS Resources Addressing Argentina’s Personal Data Protection Law and Disposition No. 11/2006

Post Syndicated from Leandro Bennaton original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-and-resources-addressing-argentinas-personal-data-protection-law-and-disposition-no-112006/

We have two new resources to help customers address their data protection requirements in Argentina. These resources specifically address the needs outlined under the Personal Data Protection Law No. 25.326, as supplemented by Regulatory Decree No. 1558/2001 (“PDPL”), including Disposition No. 11/2006. For context, the PDPL is an Argentine federal law that applies to the protection of personal data, including during transfer and processing.

A new webpage focused on data privacy in Argentina features FAQs, helpful links, and whitepapers that provide an overview of PDPL considerations, as well as our security assurance frameworks and international certifications, including ISO 27001, ISO 27017, and ISO 27018. You’ll also find details about our Information Request Report and the high bar of security at AWS data centers.

Additionally, we’ve released a new workbook that offers a detailed mapping as to how customers can operate securely under the Shared Responsibility Model while also aligning with Disposition No. 11/2006. The AWS Disposition 11/2006 Workbook can be downloaded from the Argentina Data Privacy page or directly from this link. Both resources are also available in Spanish from the Privacidad de los datos en Argentina page.

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Protecting your API using Amazon API Gateway and AWS WAF — Part I

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/protecting-your-api-using-amazon-api-gateway-and-aws-waf-part-i/

This post courtesy of Thiago Morais, AWS Solutions Architect

When you build web applications or expose any data externally, you probably look for a platform where you can build highly scalable, secure, and robust REST APIs. As APIs are publicly exposed, there are a number of best practices for providing a secure mechanism to consumers using your API.

Amazon API Gateway handles all the tasks involved in accepting and processing up to hundreds of thousands of concurrent API calls, including traffic management, authorization and access control, monitoring, and API version management.

In this post, I show you how to take advantage of the regional API endpoint feature in API Gateway, so that you can create your own Amazon CloudFront distribution and secure your API using AWS WAF.

AWS WAF is a web application firewall that helps protect your web applications from common web exploits that could affect application availability, compromise security, or consume excessive resources.

As you make your APIs publicly available, you are exposed to attackers trying to exploit your services in several ways. The AWS security team published a whitepaper solution using AWS WAF, How to Mitigate OWASP’s Top 10 Web Application Vulnerabilities.

Regional API endpoints

Edge-optimized APIs are endpoints that are accessed through a CloudFront distribution created and managed by API Gateway. Before the launch of regional API endpoints, this was the default option when creating APIs using API Gateway. It primarily helped to reduce latency for API consumers that were located in different geographical locations than your API.

When API requests predominantly originate from an Amazon EC2 instance or other services within the same AWS Region as the API is deployed, a regional API endpoint typically lowers the latency of connections. It is recommended for such scenarios.

For better control around caching strategies, customers can use their own CloudFront distribution for regional APIs. They also have the ability to use AWS WAF protection, as I describe in this post.

Edge-optimized API endpoint

The following diagram is an illustrated example of the edge-optimized API endpoint where your API clients access your API through a CloudFront distribution created and managed by API Gateway.

Regional API endpoint

For the regional API endpoint, your customers access your API from the same Region in which your REST API is deployed. This helps you to reduce request latency and particularly allows you to add your own content delivery network, as needed.

Walkthrough

In this section, you implement the following steps:

  • Create a regional API using the PetStore sample API.
  • Create a CloudFront distribution for the API.
  • Test the CloudFront distribution.
  • Set up AWS WAF and create a web ACL.
  • Attach the web ACL to the CloudFront distribution.
  • Test AWS WAF protection.

Create the regional API

For this walkthrough, use an existing PetStore API. All new APIs launch by default as the regional endpoint type. To change the endpoint type for your existing API, choose the cog icon on the top right corner:

After you have created the PetStore API on your account, deploy a stage called “prod” for the PetStore API.

On the API Gateway console, select the PetStore API and choose Actions, Deploy API.

For Stage name, type prod and add a stage description.

Choose Deploy and the new API stage is created.

Use the following AWS CLI command to update your API from edge-optimized to regional:

aws apigateway update-rest-api \
--rest-api-id {rest-api-id} \
--patch-operations op=replace,path=/endpointConfiguration/types/EDGE,value=REGIONAL

A successful response looks like the following:

{
    "description": "Your first API with Amazon API Gateway. This is a sample API that integrates via HTTP with your demo Pet Store endpoints", 
    "createdDate": 1511525626, 
    "endpointConfiguration": {
        "types": [
            "REGIONAL"
        ]
    }, 
    "id": "{api-id}", 
    "name": "PetStore"
}

After you change your API endpoint to regional, you can now assign your own CloudFront distribution to this API.

Create a CloudFront distribution

To make things easier, I have provided an AWS CloudFormation template to deploy a CloudFront distribution pointing to the API that you just created. Click the button to deploy the template in the us-east-1 Region.

For Stack name, enter RegionalAPI. For APIGWEndpoint, enter your API FQDN in the following format:

{api-id}.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com

After you fill out the parameters, choose Next to continue the stack deployment. It takes a couple of minutes to finish the deployment. After it finishes, the Output tab lists the following items:

  • A CloudFront domain URL
  • An S3 bucket for CloudFront access logs
Output from CloudFormation

Output from CloudFormation

Test the CloudFront distribution

To see if the CloudFront distribution was configured correctly, use a web browser and enter the URL from your distribution, with the following parameters:

https://{your-distribution-url}.cloudfront.net/{api-stage}/pets

You should get the following output:

[
  {
    "id": 1,
    "type": "dog",
    "price": 249.99
  },
  {
    "id": 2,
    "type": "cat",
    "price": 124.99
  },
  {
    "id": 3,
    "type": "fish",
    "price": 0.99
  }
]

Set up AWS WAF and create a web ACL

With the new CloudFront distribution in place, you can now start setting up AWS WAF to protect your API.

For this demo, you deploy the AWS WAF Security Automations solution, which provides fine-grained control over the requests attempting to access your API.

For more information about deployment, see Automated Deployment. If you prefer, you can launch the solution directly into your account using the following button.

For CloudFront Access Log Bucket Name, add the name of the bucket created during the deployment of the CloudFormation stack for your CloudFront distribution.

The solution allows you to adjust thresholds and also choose which automations to enable to protect your API. After you finish configuring these settings, choose Next.

To start the deployment process in your account, follow the creation wizard and choose Create. It takes a few minutes do finish the deployment. You can follow the creation process through the CloudFormation console.

After the deployment finishes, you can see the new web ACL deployed on the AWS WAF console, AWSWAFSecurityAutomations.

Attach the AWS WAF web ACL to the CloudFront distribution

With the solution deployed, you can now attach the AWS WAF web ACL to the CloudFront distribution that you created earlier.

To assign the newly created AWS WAF web ACL, go back to your CloudFront distribution. After you open your distribution for editing, choose General, Edit.

Select the new AWS WAF web ACL that you created earlier, AWSWAFSecurityAutomations.

Save the changes to your CloudFront distribution and wait for the deployment to finish.

Test AWS WAF protection

To validate the AWS WAF Web ACL setup, use Artillery to load test your API and see AWS WAF in action.

To install Artillery on your machine, run the following command:

$ npm install -g artillery

After the installation completes, you can check if Artillery installed successfully by running the following command:

$ artillery -V
$ 1.6.0-12

As the time of publication, Artillery is on version 1.6.0-12.

One of the WAF web ACL rules that you have set up is a rate-based rule. By default, it is set up to block any requesters that exceed 2000 requests under 5 minutes. Try this out.

First, use cURL to query your distribution and see the API output:

$ curl -s https://{distribution-name}.cloudfront.net/prod/pets
[
  {
    "id": 1,
    "type": "dog",
    "price": 249.99
  },
  {
    "id": 2,
    "type": "cat",
    "price": 124.99
  },
  {
    "id": 3,
    "type": "fish",
    "price": 0.99
  }
]

Based on the test above, the result looks good. But what if you max out the 2000 requests in under 5 minutes?

Run the following Artillery command:

artillery quick -n 2000 --count 10  https://{distribution-name}.cloudfront.net/prod/pets

What you are doing is firing 2000 requests to your API from 10 concurrent users. For brevity, I am not posting the Artillery output here.

After Artillery finishes its execution, try to run the cURL request again and see what happens:

 

$ curl -s https://{distribution-name}.cloudfront.net/prod/pets

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<HTML><HEAD><META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<TITLE>ERROR: The request could not be satisfied</TITLE>
</HEAD><BODY>
<H1>ERROR</H1>
<H2>The request could not be satisfied.</H2>
<HR noshade size="1px">
Request blocked.
<BR clear="all">
<HR noshade size="1px">
<PRE>
Generated by cloudfront (CloudFront)
Request ID: [removed]
</PRE>
<ADDRESS>
</ADDRESS>
</BODY></HTML>

As you can see from the output above, the request was blocked by AWS WAF. Your IP address is removed from the blocked list after it falls below the request limit rate.

Conclusion

In this first part, you saw how to use the new API Gateway regional API endpoint together with Amazon CloudFront and AWS WAF to secure your API from a series of attacks.

In the second part, I will demonstrate some other techniques to protect your API using API keys and Amazon CloudFront custom headers.

Fedora Atomic Workstation becomes Team Silverblue

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/753293/rss

There is a new initiative in the Fedora community based on what used to be
called “Fedora Atomic Workstation”. From this
whitepaper [PDF]
: “The descriptive name for this product is ​
image-mode container-based Fedora Workstation based on rpm-ostree, which is
clear but terrible for branding. Therefore, we call it Team Silverblue.
The long-term goal for this effort is to transform Fedora Workstation into
an image-based system where applications are separate from the OS and
updates are atomic.

Serverless Architectures with AWS Lambda: Overview and Best Practices

Post Syndicated from Andrew Baird original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/serverless-architectures-with-aws-lambda-overview-and-best-practices/

For some organizations, the idea of “going serverless” can be daunting. But with an understanding of best practices – and the right tools — many serverless applications can be fully functional with only a few lines of code and little else.

Examples of fully-serverless-application use cases include:

  • Web or mobile backends – Create fully-serverless, mobile applications or websites by creating user-facing content in a native mobile application or static web content in an S3 bucket. Then have your front-end content integrate with Amazon API Gateway as a backend service API. Lambda functions will then execute the business logic you’ve written for each of the API Gateway methods in your backend API.
  • Chatbots and virtual assistants – Build new serverless ways to interact with your customers, like customer support assistants and bots ready to engage customers on your company-run social media pages. The Amazon Alexa Skills Kit (ASK) and Amazon Lex have the ability to apply natural-language understanding to user-voice and freeform-text input so that a Lambda function you write can intelligently respond and engage with them.
  • Internet of Things (IoT) backends – AWS IoT has direct-integration for device messages to be routed to and processed by Lambda functions. That means you can implement serverless backends for highly secure, scalable IoT applications for uses like connected consumer appliances and intelligent manufacturing facilities.

Using AWS Lambda as the logic layer of a serverless application can enable faster development speed and greater experimentation – and innovation — than in a traditional, server-based environment.

We recently published the “Serverless Architectures with AWS Lambda: Overview and Best Practices” whitepaper to provide the guidance and best practices you need to write better Lambda functions and build better serverless architectures.

Once you’ve finished reading the whitepaper, below are a couple additional resources I recommend as your next step:

  1. If you would like to better understand some of the architecture pattern possibilities for serverless applications: Thirty Serverless Architectures in 30 Minutes (re:Invent 2017 video)
  2. If you’re ready to get hands-on and build a sample serverless application: AWS Serverless Workshops (GitHub Repository)
  3. If you’ve already built a serverless application and you’d like to ensure your application has been Well Architected: The Serverless Application Lens: AWS Well Architected Framework (Whitepaper)

About the Author

 

Andrew Baird is a Sr. Solutions Architect for AWS. Prior to becoming a Solutions Architect, Andrew was a developer, including time as an SDE with Amazon.com. He has worked on large-scale distributed systems, public-facing APIs, and operations automation.

RDS for Oracle: Extending Outbound Network Access to use SSL/TLS

Post Syndicated from Surya Nallu original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/rds-for-oracle-extending-outbound-network-access-to-use-ssltls/

In December 2016, we launched the Outbound Network Access functionality for Amazon RDS for Oracle, enabling customers to use their RDS for Oracle database instances to communicate with external web endpoints using the utl_http and utl tcp packages, and sending emails through utl_smtp. We extended the functionality by adding the option of using custom DNS servers, allowing such outbound network accesses to make use of any DNS server a customer chooses to use. These releases enabled HTTP, TCP and SMTP communication originating out of RDS for Oracle instances – limited to non-secure (non-SSL) mediums.

To overcome the limitation over SSL connections, we recently published a whitepaper, that guides through the process of creating customized Oracle wallet bundles on your RDS for Oracle instances. By making use of such wallets, you can now extend the Outbound Network Access capability to have external communications happen over secure (SSL/TLS) connections. This opens up new use cases for your RDS for Oracle instances.

With the right set of certificates imported into your RDS for Oracle instances (through Oracle wallets), your database instances can now:

  • Communicate with a HTTPS endpoint: Using utl_http, access a resource such as https://status.aws.amazon.com/robots.txt
  • Download files from Amazon S3 securely: Using a presigned URL from Amazon S3, you can now download any file over SSL
  • Extending Oracle Database links to use SSL: Database links between RDS for Oracle instances can now use SSL as long as the instances have the SSL option installed
  • Sending email over SMTPS:
    • You can now integrate with Amazon SES to send emails from your database instances and any other generic SMTPS with which the provider can be integrated

These are just a few high-level examples of new use cases that have opened up with the whitepaper. As a reminder, always ensure to have best security practices in place when making use of Outbound Network Access (detailed in the whitepaper).

About the Author

Surya Nallu is a Software Development Engineer on the Amazon RDS for Oracle team.

Security of Cloud HSMBackups

Post Syndicated from Balaji Iyer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/security-of-cloud-hsmbackups/

Today, our customers use AWS CloudHSM to meet corporate, contractual and regulatory compliance requirements for data security by using dedicated Hardware Security Module (HSM) instances within the AWS cloud. CloudHSM delivers all the benefits of traditional HSMs including secure generation, storage, and management of cryptographic keys used for data encryption that are controlled and accessible only by you.

As a managed service, it automates time-consuming administrative tasks such as hardware provisioning, software patching, high availability, backups and scaling for your sensitive and regulated workloads in a cost-effective manner. Backup and restore functionality is the core building block enabling scalability, reliability and high availability in CloudHSM.

You should consider using AWS CloudHSM if you require:

  • Keys stored in dedicated, third-party validated hardware security modules under your exclusive control
  • FIPS 140-2 compliance
  • Integration with applications using PKCS#11, Java JCE, or Microsoft CNG interfaces
  • High-performance in-VPC cryptographic acceleration (bulk crypto)
  • Financial applications subject to PCI regulations
  • Healthcare applications subject to HIPAA regulations
  • Streaming video solutions subject to contractual DRM requirements

We recently released a whitepaper, “Security of CloudHSM Backups” that provides in-depth information on how backups are protected in all three phases of the CloudHSM backup lifecycle process: Creation, Archive, and Restore.

About the Author

Balaji Iyer is a senior consultant in the Professional Services team at Amazon Web Services. In this role, he has helped several customers successfully navigate their journey to AWS. His specialties include architecting and implementing highly-scalable distributed systems, operational security, large scale migrations, and leading strategic AWS initiatives.

Leveraging AWS Marketplace Partner Storage Solutions for Microsoft

Post Syndicated from islawson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/leveraging-aws-marketplace-partner-storage-solutions-for-microsoft/

Designing a cloud storage solution to accommodate traditional enterprise software such as Microsoft SharePoint can be challenging. Microsoft SharePoint is complex and demands a lot of the underlying storage that’s used for its many databases and content repositories. To ensure that the selected storage platform can accommodate the availability, connectivity, and performance requirements recommended by Microsoft you need to use third-party storage solutions that build on and extend the functionality and performance of AWS storage services.

An appropriate storage solution for Microsoft SharePoint needs to provide data redundancy, high availability, fault tolerance, strong encryption, standard connectivity protocols, point-in-time data recovery, compression, ease of management, directory integration, and support.

AWS Marketplace is uniquely positioned as a procurement channel to find a third-party storage product that provides the additional technology layered on top of AWS storage services. The third-party storage products are provided and maintained by industry newcomers with born-in-the-cloud solutions as well as existing industry leaders. They include many mainstream storage products that are already familiar and commonly deployed in enterprises.

We recently released the “Leveraging AWS Marketplace Storage Solutions for Microsoft SharePoint” whitepaper to walk through the deployment and configuration of SoftNAS Cloud NAS, an AWS Marketplace third-party storage product that provides secure, highly available, redundant, and fault-tolerant storage to the Microsoft SharePoint collaboration suite.

About the Author

Israel Lawson is a senior solutions architect on the AWS Marketplace team.

WordPress: Best Practices on AWS

Post Syndicated from Paul Lewis original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/wordpress-best-practices-on-aws/

As most of you already know, WordPress is a popular open-source blogging platform and content management system (CMS) based on PHP and MySQL. AWS customers deploy everything from simple blogs to high-traffic, complex websites.

We have recently updated the “WordPress: Best Practices on AWS” whitepaper to incorporate new AWS services and the latest best practices and thinking. In the updated whitepaper we cover creating a simple deployment with a single server, which is a great starting point for those new to WordPress, or those looking for a cost-efficient solution for development and test environments.

We also look at to separate out the various components of a typical WordPress website in order to improve performance, resiliency, and cost efficiency, culminating in a highly available, multi-server, scalable architecture like the one illustrated below.

The elastic deployment outlined in the whitepaper is very closely related to the reference architecture for deploying WordPress on AWS, which is available on GitHub.

About the Author

Paul is a Solutions Architect in the New Economies and Startup practice in the UK. He’s been tinkering with WordPress websites for almost 10 years, and has a special interest in container technologies.