Tag Archives: IOT

Democratizing LoRaWAN and IoT with The Things Network

Post Syndicated from Annik Stahl original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/democratizing-lorawan-iot-with-the-things-network/

With the Internet of Things (IoT), what happens to your thing when there’s no internet? Johan Stokking, co-founder of The Things Network and The Things Industries, along with Matt Yanchyshyn from AWS, dig into this.

About The Things Network and The Things Industries

The Things Network is a community project building a global IoT data network in more than 84 countries. Its devices connect to community-maintained gateways, which can communicate over very long distances and last on a single alkaline battery for up to 5-10 years, thanks to the LoRaWAN protocol. The Things Network’s commercial wing, The Things Industries, built a platform using AWS IoT that allows device data to be collected and processed in the cloud using multiple AWS services.

In this special long-format episode of This Is My Architecture, learn how The Things Network and The Things Industries are helping both hobbyists and businesses connect low-power, long-range devices to the cloud. You’ll learn about:

  • The Things Industries’ architecture
  • How Netcetera is leveraging The Things Network for air quality monitoring in Skopje, North Macedonia
  • How Decentlab builds high-quality, long-lasting LoRaWAN devices that work with The Things Network to track environmental conditions

You’ll also get a feel for the community at a local meetup.

Check out more This Is My Architecture video series.

Build an IoT device with Ubuntu Appliance and Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-an-iot-device-with-ubuntu-appliance-and-raspberry-pi/

The new Ubuntu Appliance portfolio provides free images to help you turn your Raspberry Pi into an IoT device: just install them to your SD card and you have all the software you need to make a media server, get started with home automation, and more. Canonical’s Rhys Davies is here to tell us all about it.

We are delighted to announce the new Ubuntu Appliance portfolio. Together with NextCloud, AdGuard, Plex, Mosquitto and openHAB, we have created the first in a new class of Ubuntu derivatives. Ubuntu Appliances are software-defined projects that enable users to download everything they need to turn a Raspberry Pi into a device that does one thing – beautifully.

The Ubuntu Appliance mission is to enable you to build your own secure, self-updating, single-purpose devices. Tell us what you want to see next, or let’s talk about turning your project into the next Ubuntu Appliance in Discourse. For now, we are excited to bring these initial appliances to your attention.

The initial portfolio of five

  • Plex Media Server allows its users to organise and stream their own collection of movies, TV, music, podcasts and more from one place.
  • Mosquitto is a lightweight open source MQTT message broker, for use on all devices from low power single board computers to full-scale industrial grade servers.
  • OpenHAB is a pluggable architecture that allows users to design rules for automating their home, with time- and event-based triggers, scripts, actions, notifications and voice control.
  • AdGuard Home blocks annoying banners, pop-ups and video ads to make web surfing faster, safer and more comfortable.
  • NextCloud is an on-premise content collaboration platform that allows users to host their own private cloud at home or in the office.

How it all works

Head over to the Ubuntu Appliances website, click the appliance you would like, select download, follow the instructions, and away you go. Once you get to this stage, there are links to tutorials and documentation written by the upstream project themselves, so you can get next steps from the horse’s mouth. If you run into any bother let us know with a new topic and we’ll get on it.

But why bother?

The problem we are trying to solve is to do with the fragmentation in IoT. We want to give publishers and developers a platform to get their software in the hands of their users and into their devices. We work with them to securely bundle the OS, their applications and configurations into a single download that is available for anyone to turn a Raspberry Pi into a dedicated device. You can go to the portfolio and download as many of the appliances as you like and start using them today.

How to add your project to the Ubuntu Appliance portfolio

All of this gives a stage and a secure, production-grade base to projects. There are no restrictions on who can make an Ubuntu Appliance; all you need is an application that runs on a Raspberry Pi or another certified board, and to let us know what you’ve got so we can help you over the line. If you need more information, head to our community page where you’ll find the rules and the exact steps to become featured as an Ubuntu Appliance.

Try them out!

All that’s left to say is to try them out. All five of the initial appliances work on Raspberry Pi, so if you have one, you can get started. And if you don’t have one – maybe your Raspberry Pi is still in the post – then you can also ‘try before you Pi’: install the appliance in a virtual machine and see what you think.

The list of appliances is already growing. This launch marks the first five appliances, but we are already working with developers on the next wave and are looking for more. Start with these ones and go to our discourse to tell us what you think.

Thanks for having me, Raspberry Pi <3

The post Build an IoT device with Ubuntu Appliance and Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Design your own Internet of Things with HackSpace magazine

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/design-your-own-internet-of-things-with-hackspace-magazine/

In issue 31 of HackSpace magazine, out today, PJ Evans looks at DIY smart homes and homemade Internet of Things devices.

In the last decade, various companies have come up with ‘smart’ versions of almost everything. Microcontrollers have been unceremoniously crowbarred into devices that had absolutely no need for microcontrollers, and often tied to phone apps or web services that are hard to use and don’t work well with other products.

Put bluntly, the commercial world has struggled to deliver an ecosystem of useful smart products. However, the basic principle behind the connected world is good – by connecting together sensors, we can understand our local environment and control it to make our lives better. That could be as simple as making sure the plants are correctly watered, or something far more complex.

The simple fact is that we each lead different lives, and we each want different things out of our smart homes. This is why companies have struggled to create a useful smart home system, but it’s also why we, as makers, are perfectly placed to build our own. Let’s dive in and take a look at one way of doing this – using the TICK Stack – but there are many more, and we’ll explore a few alternatives later on.

Many of our projects create data, sometimes a lot of it. This could be temperature, humidity, light, position, speed, or anything else that we can measure electronically. To be useful, that data needs to be turned into information. A list of numbers doesn’t tell you a lot without careful study, but a line graph based on those numbers can show important information in an instant. Often makers will happily write scripts to produce charts and other types of infographics, but now open-source software allows anyone to log data to a database, generate dashboards of graphs, and even trigger alerts and scripts based on the incoming data. There are several solutions out there, so we’re going to focus on just one: a suite of products from InfluxData collectively known as the TICK Stack.

InfluxDB

The ‘I’ in TICK is the database that stores your precious data. InfluxDB is a time series database. It differs from regular SQL databases as it always indexes based on the time stamp of the incoming data. You can use a regular SQL database if you wish (and we’ll show you how later), but what makes InfluxDB compelling for logging data is not only its simplicity, but also its data-management features and built-in web-based API interface. Getting data into InfluxDB can be as easy as a web post, which places it within the reach of most internet-capable microcontrollers.

Kapacitor

Next up is our ‘K’. Kapacitor is a complex data processing engine that acts on data coming into your InfluxDB. It has several purposes, but the common use is to generate alerts based on data readings. Kapacitor supports a wide range of alert ‘endpoints’, from sending a simple email to alerting notification services like Pushover, or posting a message to the ubiquitous Slack. Multiple alerts to multiple destinations can be configured, and what constitutes an alert status is up to you. More advanced uses of Kapacitor include machine learning and anomaly detection.

Chronograf

The problem with Kapacitor is the configuration. It’s a lot of work with config files and the command line. Thoughtfully, InfluxData has created Chronograf, a graphical user interface to both Kapacitor and InfluxDB. If you prefer to keep away from the command line, you can query and manage your databases here as well as set up alerts, metrics that trigger an alert, and the configurations for the various handlers. This is all presented through a web app that you can access from anywhere on your network. You can also build ‘Dashboards’ – collections of charts displayed on a single page based on your InfluxDB data.

Telegraf

Finally, our ’T’ in TICK. One of the most common uses for time series databases is measuring computer performance. Telegraf provides the link between the machine it is installed on and InfluxDB. After a simple install, Telegraf will start logging all kinds of data about its host machine to your InfluxDB installation. Memory usage, CPU temperatures and load, disk space, and network performance can all be logged to your database and charted using Chronograf. This is more due to the Stack’s more common use for monitoring servers, but it’s still useful for making sure the brains of our network-of-things is working properly. If you get a problem, Kapacitor can not only trigger alerts but also user-defined scripts that may be able to remedy the situation.

Get HackSpace magazine issue 31 — out today

HackSpace magazine issue 31: on sale now!

You can read the rest of HackSpace magazine’s DIY IoT feature in issue 31, out today and available online from the Raspberry Pi Press online store. You can also download issue 31 for free.

The post Design your own Internet of Things with HackSpace magazine appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

TMA Special: Connecting Taza Chocolate’s Legacy Equipment to the Cloud

Post Syndicated from Todd Escalona original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/tma-special-connecting-taza-chocolates-legacy-equipment-to-the-cloud/

As a “bean to bar” chocolate manufacturer, Taza Chocolate uses traditional stone ground mills for the production of its famous chocolate discs. The analog, mid-century machines that the company imported from Central America were never built to connect to the cloud.

Along comes Tulip Interfaces, an AWS Industrial Software Competency Partner that makes the human and machine interaction easier by replacing paper processes with digital automation. Tulip retrofitted Taza’s legacy equipment with Internet of Things (IoT) sensors and connected it back to the AWS cloud.

Taza’s AWS cloud integration begins with Tulip’s own physical gateway that connects systems and machinery on the plant floor. Tulip then deploys IoT sensors to the machinery and passes outputs to the AWS cloud using an encrypted web socket where Tulip’s Kubernetes workers, managed by Kops, automatically schedule services across highly available instances and processes requests.

All job completion data is then fed to an Amazon RDS Multi-AZ PostgreSQL database that allows Taza to run visualizations and analytics for more insight using Prometheus and Garfana. In addition, all of the application definition metadata is contained in a MongoDB database service running on Amazon Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2) instances, which in return is VPC-peered with Kubernetes clusters. On top of this backend, Tulip uses a player application to stream metrics in near real-time that are displayed on the dashboard down on the shop floor and can be easily examined in order to help guide their operations and foster continuous improvements efforts to manufacturing operations.

Taza has realized many benefits from monitoring machine availability, performance, ambient conditions as well as overall process enhancements.

In this special, on-site This is My Architecture video, AWS Solutions Architect Evangelist Todd Escalona takes us on his journey through the Taza Chocolate factory where he meets with Taza’s Director of Manufacturing, Rich Moran, and Tulip’s DevOps lead, John Defreitas, to further explore how Tulip enables Taza Chocolate’s legacy equipment for cloud-based plant automation.

*Check out more This Is My Architecture video series.

Building an AWS IoT Core device using AWS Serverless and an ESP32

Post Syndicated from Moheeb Zara original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-an-aws-iot-core-device-using-aws-serverless-and-an-esp32/

Using a simple Arduino sketch, an AWS Serverless Application Repository application, and a microcontroller, you can build a basic serverless workflow for communicating with an AWS IoT Core device.

A microcontroller is a programmable chip and acts as the brain of an electronic device. It has input and output pins for reading and writing on digital or analog components. Those components could be sensors, relays, actuators, or various other devices. It can be used to build remote sensors, home automation products, robots, and much more. The ESP32 is a powerful low-cost microcontroller with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth built in and is used this walkthrough.

The Arduino IDE, a lightweight development environment for hardware, now includes support for the ESP32. There is a large collection of community and officially supported libraries, from addressable LED strips to spectral light analysis.

The following walkthrough demonstrates connecting an ESP32 to AWS IoT Core to allow it to publish and subscribe to topics. This means that the device can send any arbitrary information, such as sensor values, into AWS IoT Core while also being able to receive commands.

Solution overview

This post walks through deploying an application from the AWS Serverless Application Repository. This allows an AWS IoT device to be messaged using a REST endpoint powered by Amazon API Gateway and AWS Lambda. The AWS SAR application also configures an AWS IoT rule that forwards any messages published by the device to a Lambda function that updates an Amazon DynamoDB table, demonstrating basic bidirectional communication.

The last section explores how to build an IoT project with real-world application. By connecting a thermal printer module and modifying a few lines of code in the example firmware, the ESP32 device becomes an AWS IoT–connected printer.

All of this can be accomplished within the AWS Free Tier, which is necessary for the following instructions.

An example of an AWS IoT project using an ESP32, AWS IoT Core, and an Arduino thermal printer

An example of an AWS IoT project using an ESP32, AWS IoT Core, and an Arduino thermal printer.

Required steps

To complete the walkthrough, follow these steps:

  • Create an AWS IoT device.
  • Install and configure the Arduino IDE.
  • Configure and flash an ESP32 IoT device.
  • Deploying the lambda-iot-rule AWS SAR application.
  • Monitor and test.
  • Create an IoT thermal printer.

Creating an AWS IoT device

To communicate with the ESP32 device, it must connect to AWS IoT Core with device credentials. You must also specify the topics it has permissions to publish and subscribe on.

  1. In the AWS IoT console, choose Register a new thing, Create a single thing.
  2. Name the new thing. Use this exact name later when configuring the ESP32 IoT device. Leave the remaining fields set to their defaults. Choose Next.
  3.  Choose Create certificate. Only the thing cert, private key, and Amazon Root CA 1 downloads are necessary for the ESP32 to connect. Download and save them somewhere secure, as they are used when programming the ESP32 device.
  4. Choose Activate, Attach a policy.
  5. Skip adding a policy, and choose Register Thing.
  6. In the AWS IoT console side menu, choose Secure, Policies, Create a policy.
  7. Name the policy Esp32Policy. Choose the Advanced tab.
  8. Paste in the following policy template.
    {
      "Version": "2012-10-17",
      "Statement": [
        {
          "Effect": "Allow",
          "Action": "iot:Connect",
          "Resource": "arn:aws:iot:REGION:ACCOUNT_ID:client/THINGNAME"
        },
        {
          "Effect": "Allow",
          "Action": "iot:Subscribe",
          "Resource": "arn:aws:iot:REGION:ACCOUNT_ID:topicfilter/esp32/sub"
        },
    	{
          "Effect": "Allow",
          "Action": "iot:Receive",
          "Resource": "arn:aws:iot:REGION:ACCOUNT_ID:topic/esp32/sub"
        },
        {
          "Effect": "Allow",
          "Action": "iot:Publish",
          "Resource": "arn:aws:iot:REGION:ACCOUNT_ID:topic/esp32/pub"
        }
      ]
    }
  9. Replace REGION with the matching AWS Region you’re currently operating in. This can be found on the top right corner of the AWS console window.
  10.  Replace ACCOUNT_ID with your own, which can be found in Account Settings.
  11. Replace THINGNAME with the name of your device.
  12. Choose Create.
  13. In the AWS IoT console, choose Secure, Certification. Select the one created for your device and choose Actions, Attach policy.
  14. Choose Esp32Policy, Attach.

Your AWS IoT device is now configured to have permission to connect to AWS IoT Core. It can also publish to the topic esp32/pub and subscribe to the topic esp32/sub. For more information on securing devices, see AWS IoT Policies.

Installing and configuring the Arduino IDE

The Arduino IDE is an open-source development environment for programming microcontrollers. It supports a continuously growing number of platforms including most ESP32-based modules. It must be installed along with the ESP32 board definitions, MQTT library, and ArduinoJson library.

  1. Download the Arduino installer for the desired operating system.
  2. Start Arduino and open the Preferences window.
  3. For Additional Board Manager URLs, add
    https://dl.espressif.com/dl/package_esp32_index.json.
  4. Choose Tools, Board, Boards Manager.
  5. Search esp32 and install the latest version.
  6. Choose Sketch, Include Library, Manage Libraries.
  7. Search MQTT, and install the latest version by Joel Gaehwiler.
  8. Repeat the library installation process for ArduinoJson.

The Arduino IDE is now installed and configured with all the board definitions and libraries needed for this walkthrough.

Configuring and flashing an ESP32 IoT device

A collection of various ESP32 development boards.

A collection of various ESP32 development boards.

For this section, you need an ESP32 device. To check if your board is compatible with the Arduino IDE, see the boards.txt file. The following code connects to AWS IoT Core securely using MQTT, a publish and subscribe messaging protocol.

This project has been tested on the following devices:

  1. Install the required serial drivers for your device. Some boards use different USB/FTDI chips for interfacing. Here are the most commonly used with links to drivers.
  2. Open the Arduino IDE and choose File, New to create a new sketch.
  3. Add a new tab and name it secrets.h.
  4. Paste the following into the secrets file.
    #include <pgmspace.h>
    
    #define SECRET
    #define THINGNAME ""
    
    const char WIFI_SSID[] = "";
    const char WIFI_PASSWORD[] = "";
    const char AWS_IOT_ENDPOINT[] = "xxxxx.amazonaws.com";
    
    // Amazon Root CA 1
    static const char AWS_CERT_CA[] PROGMEM = R"EOF(
    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----
    )EOF";
    
    // Device Certificate
    static const char AWS_CERT_CRT[] PROGMEM = R"KEY(
    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----
    )KEY";
    
    // Device Private Key
    static const char AWS_CERT_PRIVATE[] PROGMEM = R"KEY(
    -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
    -----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
    )KEY";
  5. Enter the name of your AWS IoT thing, as it is in the console, in the field THINGNAME.
  6. To connect to Wi-Fi, add the SSID and PASSWORD of the desired network. Note: The network name should not include spaces or special characters.
  7. The AWS_IOT_ENDPOINT can be found from the Settings page in the AWS IoT console.
  8. Copy the Amazon Root CA 1, Device Certificate, and Device Private Key to their respective locations in the secrets.h file.
  9. Choose the tab for the main sketch file, and paste the following.
    #include "secrets.h"
    #include <WiFiClientSecure.h>
    #include <MQTTClient.h>
    #include <ArduinoJson.h>
    #include "WiFi.h"
    
    // The MQTT topics that this device should publish/subscribe
    #define AWS_IOT_PUBLISH_TOPIC   "esp32/pub"
    #define AWS_IOT_SUBSCRIBE_TOPIC "esp32/sub"
    
    WiFiClientSecure net = WiFiClientSecure();
    MQTTClient client = MQTTClient(256);
    
    void connectAWS()
    {
      WiFi.mode(WIFI_STA);
      WiFi.begin(WIFI_SSID, WIFI_PASSWORD);
    
      Serial.println("Connecting to Wi-Fi");
    
      while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED){
        delay(500);
        Serial.print(".");
      }
    
      // Configure WiFiClientSecure to use the AWS IoT device credentials
      net.setCACert(AWS_CERT_CA);
      net.setCertificate(AWS_CERT_CRT);
      net.setPrivateKey(AWS_CERT_PRIVATE);
    
      // Connect to the MQTT broker on the AWS endpoint we defined earlier
      client.begin(AWS_IOT_ENDPOINT, 8883, net);
    
      // Create a message handler
      client.onMessage(messageHandler);
    
      Serial.print("Connecting to AWS IOT");
    
      while (!client.connect(THINGNAME)) {
        Serial.print(".");
        delay(100);
      }
    
      if(!client.connected()){
        Serial.println("AWS IoT Timeout!");
        return;
      }
    
      // Subscribe to a topic
      client.subscribe(AWS_IOT_SUBSCRIBE_TOPIC);
    
      Serial.println("AWS IoT Connected!");
    }
    
    void publishMessage()
    {
      StaticJsonDocument<200> doc;
      doc["time"] = millis();
      doc["sensor_a0"] = analogRead(0);
      char jsonBuffer[512];
      serializeJson(doc, jsonBuffer); // print to client
    
      client.publish(AWS_IOT_PUBLISH_TOPIC, jsonBuffer);
    }
    
    void messageHandler(String &topic, String &payload) {
      Serial.println("incoming: " + topic + " - " + payload);
    
    //  StaticJsonDocument<200> doc;
    //  deserializeJson(doc, payload);
    //  const char* message = doc["message"];
    }
    
    void setup() {
      Serial.begin(9600);
      connectAWS();
    }
    
    void loop() {
      publishMessage();
      client.loop();
      delay(1000);
    }
  10. Choose File, Save, and give your project a name.

Flashing the ESP32

  1. Plug the ESP32 board into a USB port on the computer running the Arduino IDE.
  2. Choose Tools, Board, and then select the matching type of ESP32 module. In this case, a Sparkfun ESP32 Thing was used.
  3. Choose Tools, Port, and then select the matching port for your device.
  4. Choose Upload. Arduino reads Done uploading when the upload is successful.
  5. Choose the magnifying lens icon to open the Serial Monitor. Set the baud rate to 9600.

Keep the Serial Monitor open. When connected to Wi-Fi and then AWS IoT Core, any messages received on the topic esp32/sub are logged to this console. The device is also now publishing to the topic esp32/pub.

The topics are set at the top of the sketch. When changing or adding topics, remember to add permissions in the device policy.

// The MQTT topics that this device should publish/subscribe
#define AWS_IOT_PUBLISH_TOPIC   "esp32/pub"
#define AWS_IOT_SUBSCRIBE_TOPIC "esp32/sub"

Within this sketch, the relevant functions are publishMessage() and messageHandler().

The publishMessage() function creates a JSON object with the current time in milliseconds and the analog value of pin A0 on the device. It then publishes this JSON object to the topic esp32/pub.

void publishMessage()
{
  StaticJsonDocument<200> doc;
  doc["time"] = millis();
  doc["sensor_a0"] = analogRead(0);
  char jsonBuffer[512];
  serializeJson(doc, jsonBuffer); // print to client

  client.publish(AWS_IOT_PUBLISH_TOPIC, jsonBuffer);
}

The messageHandler() function prints out the topic and payload of any message from a subscribed topic. To see all the ways to parse JSON messages in Arduino, see the deserializeJson() example.

void messageHandler(String &topic, String &payload) {
  Serial.println("incoming: " + topic + " - " + payload);

//  StaticJsonDocument<200> doc;
//  deserializeJson(doc, payload);
//  const char* message = doc["message"];
}

Additional topic subscriptions can be added within the connectAWS() function by adding another line similar to the following.

// Subscribe to a topic
  client.subscribe(AWS_IOT_SUBSCRIBE_TOPIC);

  Serial.println("AWS IoT Connected!");

Deploying the lambda-iot-rule AWS SAR application

Now that an ESP32 device has been connected to AWS IoT, the following steps walk through deploying an AWS Serverless Application Repository application. This is a base for building serverless integration with a physical device.

  1. On the lambda-iot-rule AWS Serverless Application Repository application page, make sure that the Region is the same as the AWS IoT device.
  2. Choose Deploy.
  3. Under Application settings, for PublishTopic, enter esp32/sub. This is the topic to which the ESP32 device is subscribed. It receives messages published to this topic. Likewise, set SubscribeTopic to esp32/pub, the topic on which the device publishes.
  4. Choose Deploy.
  5. When creation of the application is complete, choose Test app to navigate to the application page. Keep this page open for the next section.

Monitoring and testing

At this stage, two Lambda functions, a DynamoDB table, and an AWS IoT rule have been deployed. The IoT rule forwards messages on topic esp32/pub to TopicSubscriber, a Lambda function, which inserts the messages on to the DynamoDB table.

  1. On the application page, under Resources, choose MyTable. This is the DynamoDB table that the TopicSubscriber Lambda function updates.
  2. Choose Items. If the ESP32 device is still active and connected, messages that it has published appear here.

The TopicPublisher Lambda function is invoked by the API Gateway endpoint and publishes to the AWS IoT topic esp32/sub.

1.     On the application page, find the Application endpoint.

2.     To test that the TopicPublisher function is working, enter the following into a terminal or command-line utility, replacing ENDPOINT with the URL from above.

curl -d '{"text":"Hello world!"}' -H "Content-Type: application/json" -X POST https://ENDPOINT/publish

Upon success, the request returns a copy of the message.

Back in the Serial Monitor, the message published to the topic esp32/sub prints out.

Creating an IoT thermal printer

With the completion of the previous steps, the ESP32 device currently logs incoming messages to the serial console.

The following steps demonstrate how the code can be modified to use incoming messages to interact with a peripheral component. This is done by wiring a thermal printer to the ESP32 in order to physically print messages. The REST endpoint from the previous section can be used as a webhook in third-party applications to interact with this device.

A wiring diagram depicting an ESP32 connected to a thermal printer.

A wiring diagram depicting an ESP32 connected to a thermal printer.

  1. Follow the product instructions for powering, wiring, and installing the correct Arduino library.
  2. Ensure that the thermal printer is working by holding the power button on the printer while connecting the power. A sample receipt prints. On that receipt, the default baud rate is specified as either 9600 or 19200.
  3. In the Arduino code from earlier, include the following lines at the top of the main sketch file. The second line defines what interface the thermal printer is connected to. &Serial2 is used to set the third hardware serial interface on the ESP32. For this example, the pins on the Sparkfun ESP32 Thing, GPIO16/GPIO17, are used for RX/TX respectively.
    #include "Adafruit_Thermal.h"
    
    Adafruit_Thermal printer(&Serial2);
  4. Replace the setup() function with the following to initialize the printer on device bootup. Change the baud rate of Serial2.begin() to match what is specified in the test print. The default is 19200.
    void setup() {
      Serial.begin(9600);
    
      // Start the thermal printer
      Serial2.begin(19200);
      printer.begin();
      printer.setSize('S');
    
      connectAWS();
    }
    
  5. Replace the messageHandler() function with the following. On any incoming message, it parses the JSON and prints the message on the thermal printer.
    void messageHandler(String &topic, String &payload) {
      Serial.println("incoming: " + topic + " - " + payload);
    
      // deserialize json
      StaticJsonDocument<200> doc;
      deserializeJson(doc, payload);
      String message = doc["message"];
    
      // Print the message on the thermal printer
      printer.println(message);
      printer.feed(2);
    }
  6. Choose Upload.
  7. After the firmware has successfully uploaded, open the Serial Monitor to confirm that the board has connected to AWS IoT.
  8. Enter the following into a command-line utility, replacing ENDPOINT, as in the previous section.
    curl -d '{"message": "Hello World!"}' -H "Content-Type: application/json" -X POST https://ENDPOINT/publish

If successful, the device prints out the message “Hello World” from the attached thermal printer. This is a fully serverless IoT printer that can be triggered remotely from a webhook. As an example, this can be used with GitHub Webhooks to print a physical readout of events.

Conclusion

Using a simple Arduino sketch, an AWS Serverless Application Repository application, and a microcontroller, this post demonstrated how to build a basic serverless workflow for communicating with a physical device. It also showed how to expand that into an IoT thermal printer with real-world applications.

With the use of AWS serverless, advanced compute and extensibility can be added to an IoT device, from machine learning to translation services and beyond. By using the Arduino programming environment, the vast collection of open-source libraries, projects, and code examples open up a world of possibilities. The next step is to explore what can be done with an Arduino and the capabilities of AWS serverless. The sample Arduino code for this project and more can be found at this GitHub repository.

IoT ugly Christmas sweaters

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/iot-ugly-christmas-sweaters/

If there’s one thing we Brits love, it’s an ugly Christmas sweater. Jim Bennett, a Senior Cloud Advocate at Microsoft, has taken his ugly sweater game to the next level by adding IoT-controlled, Twitter-connected LEDs thanks to a Raspberry Pi Zero.

IoT is Fun for Everyone! (Ugly Sweater Edition)

An Ugly Sweater is great-but what’s even better (https://aka.ms/IoTShow/UglySweater) is an IoT-enabled Ugly Sweater. In this episode of the IoT Show, Olivier Bloch is joined by Jim Bennett, a Senior Cloud Advocate at Microsoft. Jim has built an Ugly Sweater using Azure IoT Central, Microsoft’s IoT app platform, and a Raspberry Pi Zero.

Jim upgraded his ugly sweater to become IoT-compatible using Microsoft’s IoT app platform Azure IoT Central, Adafruit’s programmable NeoPixel LED Dots Strand and, of course, our sweet baby, the Raspberry Pi Zero W.

After sewing the LED strand into the ugly sweater and connecting it to Raspberry Pi Zero, Jim was able to control the colour of the LEDs. Taking it one step further, he then built a list of commands within Azure IoT Central and linked the Raspberry Pi Zero to a Twitter account to create the IoT element of the project.

Watch the video above for full details on the project, and find all the code on Github.

The post IoT ugly Christmas sweaters appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

AWS Architecture Monthly Magazine: Manufacturing

Post Syndicated from Annik Stahl original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/aws-architecture-monthly-magazine-manufacturing/

Architecture Monthly Magazine - Nov-Dec 2019

For more than 25 years, Amazon has designed and manufactured smart products and distributed billions of products through its globally connected distribution network using cutting edge automation, machine learning and AI, and robotics, with AWS at its core. From product design to smart factory and smart products, AWS helps leading manufacturers transform their manufacturing operations with the most comprehensive and advanced set of cloud solutions available today, while taking advantage of the highest level of security.

In this Manufacturing-themed end-of-year issue of the AWS Architecture Monthly magazine, Steve Blackwell, AWS Manufacturing Tech Leader, talks about how manufacturers can experiment with and take advantage of emerging technologies using three main architectural patterns: demand forecasting, smart factories, and extending the manufacturing value chain with smart products.

In This Issue

We’ve assembled architectural best practices about Manufacturing from all over AWS, and we’ve made sure that a broad audience can appreciate it. Note that this will be our last issue of the year. We’ll be back in January with highlights and insights about AWS re:Invent 2019 (December 2-6 in Las Vegas).

  • Case Study: iRobot Ready to Unlock the Next Generation of Smart Homes Using the AWS Cloud
  • Ask an Expert: Steve Blackwell, Manufacturing Tech Leader
  • Blog Post: Reinventing the IoT Platform for Discrete Manufacturers
  • Solution: Smart Product Solution
  • AWS Coffee Break: IoT Helps Manufacturing Hit the Right Note
  • Whitepaper: Practical Ways To Achieve Smarter, Faster, and More Responsive Operations
  • Reference Architecture: EDA on AWS with IBM Spectrum LSF

How to Access the Magazine

We hope you’re enjoying Architecture Monthly, and we’d like to hear from you—leave us star rating and comment on the Amazon Kindle Newsstand page or contact us anytime at [email protected].

FogHorn: Edge-to-Edge Communication and Deep Learning

Post Syndicated from Annik Stahl original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/foghorn-edge-to-edge-communication-and-deep-learning/

FogHorn is an intelligent Internet of Things ( IoT) edge solution that delivers data processing and real-time inference where data is created. Referring to itself as “the only ‘real’ edge intelligence solution in the market today,”  FogHorn is powered by a hyper-efficient Complex Event Processor (CEP) and delivers comprehensive data enrichment and real-time analytics on high volumes, varieties, and velocities of streaming sensor data, and is optimized for constrained compute footprints and limited connectivity.

Andrea Sabet, AWS Solutions Architect speaks with Ramya Ravichandar, Vice President of Products at Foghorn to talk about how FogHorn integrates with IoT MQTT for edge-to-edge communication as well as Amazon SageMaker for deep learning model deployment. The edgefication process involves running inference with real-time streaming data against a trained deep learning model. Drifts in the model accuracy trigger a callback to SageMaker for retraining.

*Check out more This Is My Architecture video series.

 

Visualizing Sensor Data in Amazon QuickSight

Post Syndicated from James Beswick original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/visualizing-sensor-data-in-amazon-quicksight/

This post is courtesy of Moheeb Zara, Developer Advocate, AWS Serverless

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a term used wherever physical devices are networked in some meaningful connected way. Often, this takes the form of sensor data collection and analysis. As the number of devices and size of data scales, it can become costly and difficult to keep up with demand.

Using AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM), you can reduce the cost and time to market of an IoT solution. This guide demonstrates how to collect and visualize data from a low-cost, Wi-Fi connected IoT device using a variety of AWS services. Much of this can be accomplished within the AWS Free Usage Tier, which is necessary for the following instructions.

Services used

The following services are used in this example:

What’s covered in this post?

This post covers:

  • Connecting an Arduino MKR 1010 Wi-Fi device to AWS IoT Core.
  • Forwarding messages from an AWS IoT Core topic stream to a Lambda function.
  • Using a Kinesis Data Firehose delivery stream to store data in S3.
  • Analyzing and visualizing data stored in S3 using Amazon QuickSight.

Connect the device to AWS IoT Core using MQTT

The Arduino MKR 1010 is a low-cost, Wi-Fi enabled, IoT device, shown in the following image.

An Arduino MKR 1010 Wi-Fi microcontroller

Its analog and digital input and output pins can be used to read sensors or to write to actuators. Arduino provides a detailed guide on how to securely connect this device to AWS IoT Core. The following steps build upon it to push arbitrary sensor data to a topic stream and ultimately visualize that data using Amazon QuickSight.

  1. Start by following this comprehensive guide to using an Arduino MKR 1010 with AWS IoT Core. Upon completion, your device is connected to AWS IoT Core using MQTT (Message Queuing Telemetry Transport), a protocol for publishing and subscribing to messages using topics.
  2. In the Arduino IDE, choose File, Sketch, Include Library, and Manage Libraries.
  3. In the window that opens, search for ArduinoJson and select the library by Benoit Blanchon. Choose install.

4. Add #include <ArduinoJson.h> to the top of your sketch from the Arduino guide.

5. Modify the publishMessage() function with this code. It publishes a JSON message with two keys: time (ms) and the current value read from the first analog pin.

void publishMessage() {  
  Serial.println("Publishing message");

  // send message, the Print interface can be used to set the message contents
  mqttClient.beginMessage("arduino/outgoing");
  
  // create json message to send
  StaticJsonDocument<200> doc;
  doc["time"] = millis();
  doc["sensor_a0"] = analogRead(0);
  serializeJson(doc, mqttClient); // print to client
  
  mqttClient.endMessage();
}

6. Save and upload the sketch to your board.

Create a Kinesis Firehose delivery stream

Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose is a service that reliably loads streaming data into data stores, data lakes, and analytics tools. Amazon QuickSight requires a data store to create visualizations of the sensor data. This simple Kinesis Data Firehose delivery stream continuously uploads data to an S3 storage bucket. The next sections cover how to add records to this stream using a Lambda function.

  1. In the Kinesis Data Firehose console, create a new delivery stream, called SensorDataStream.
  2. Leave the default source as a Direct PUT or other sources and choose Next.
  3. On the next screen, leave all the default values and choose Next.
  4. Select Amazon S3 as the destination and create a new bucket with a unique name. This is where records are continuously uploaded so that they can be used by Amazon QuickSight.
  5. On the next screen, choose Create New IAM Role, Allow. This gives the Firehose delivery stream permission to upload to S3.
  6. Review and then choose Create Delivery Stream.

It can take some time to fully create the stream. In the meantime, continue on to the next section.

Invoking Lambda using AWS IoT Core rules

Using AWS IoT Core rules, you can forward messages from devices to a Lambda function, which can perform actions such as uploading to an Amazon DynamoDB table or an S3 bucket, or running data against various Amazon Machine Learning services. In this case, the function transforms and adds a message to the Kinesis Data Firehose delivery stream, which then adds that data to S3.

AWS IoT Core rules use the MQTT topic stream to trigger interactions with other AWS services. An AWS IoT Core rule is created by using an SQL statement, a topic filter, and a rule action. The Arduino example publishes messages every five seconds on the topic arduino/outgoing. The following instructions show how to consume those messages with a Lambda function.

Create a Lambda function

Before creating an AWS IoT Core rule, you need a Lambda function to consume forwarded messages.

  1. In the AWS Lambda console, choose Create function.
  2. Name the function ArduinoConsumeMessage.
  3. For Runtime, choose Author From Scratch, Node.js10.x. For Execution role, choose Create a new role with basic Lambda permissions. Choose Create.
  4. On the Execution role card, choose View the ArduinoConsumeMessage-role-xxxx on the IAM console.
  5. Choose Attach Policies. Then, search for and select AmazonKinesisFirehoseFullAccess.
  6. Choose Attach Policy. This applies the necessary permissions to add records to the Firehose delivery stream.
  7. In the Lambda console, in the Designer card, select the function name.
  8. Paste the following in the code editor, replacing SensorDataStream with the name of your own Firehose delivery stream. Choose Save.
const AWS = require('aws-sdk')

const firehose = new AWS.Firehose()
const StreamName = "SensorDataStream"

exports.handler = async (event) => {
    
    console.log('Received IoT event:', JSON.stringify(event, null, 2))
    
    let payload = {
        time: new Date(event.time),
        sensor_value: event.sensor_a0
    }
    
    let params = {
            DeliveryStreamName: StreamName,
            Record: { 
                Data: JSON.stringify(payload)
            }
        }
        
    return await firehose.putRecord(params).promise()

}

Create an AWS IoT Core rule

To create an AWS IoT Core rule, follow these steps.

  1. In the AWS IoT console, choose Act.
  2. Choose Create.
  3. For Rule query statement, copy and paste SELECT * FROM 'arduino/outgoing’. This subscribes to the outgoing message topic used in the Arduino example.
  4. Choose Add action, Send a message to a Lambda function, Configure action.
  5. Select the function created in the last set of instructions.
  6. Choose Create rule.

At this stage, any message published to the arduino/outgoing topic forwards to the ArduinoConsumeMessage Lambda function, which transforms and puts the payload on the Kinesis Data Firehose stream and also logs the message to Amazon CloudWatch. If you’ve connected an Arduino device to AWS IoT Core, it publishes to that topic every five seconds.

The following steps show how to test functionality using the AWS IoT console.

  1. In the AWS IoT console, choose Test.
  2. For Publish, enter the topic arduino/outgoing .
  3. Enter the following test payload:
    {
      “time”: 1567023375013,  
      “sensor_a0”: 456
    }
  4. Choose Publish to topic.
  5. Navigate back to your Lambda function.
  6. Choose Monitoring, View logs in CloudWatch.
  7. Select a log item to view the message contents, as shown in the following screenshot.

Visualizing data with Amazon QuickSight

To visualize data with Amazon QuickSight, follow these steps.

  1. In the Amazon QuickSight console, sign up.
  2. Choose Manage Data, New Data Set. Select S3 as the data source.
  3. A manifest file is necessary for Amazon QuickSight to be able to fetch data from your S3 bucket. Copy the following into a file named manifest.json. Replace YOUR-BUCKET-NAME with the name of the bucket created for the Firehose delivery stream.
    {
       "fileLocations":[
          {
             "URIPrefixes":[
                "s3://YOUR-BUCKET-NAME/"
             ]
          }
       ],
       "globalUploadSettings":{
          "format":"JSON"
       }
    }
  4. Upload the manifest.json file.
  5. Choose Connect, then Visualize. You may have to give Amazon QuickSight explicit permissions to your S3 bucket.
  6. Finally, design the Amazon QuickSight visualizations in the drag and drop editor. Drag the two available fields into the center card to generate a Sum of Sensor_value by Time visual.

Conclusion

This post demonstrated visualizing data from a securely connected remote IoT device. This was achieved by connecting an Arduino to AWS IoT Core using MQTT, forwarding messages from the topic stream to Lambda using IoT Core rules, putting records on an Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose delivery stream, and using Amazon QuickSight to visualize the data stored within an S3 bucket.

With these building blocks, it is possible to implement highly scalable and customizable IoT data collection, analysis, and visualization. With the use of other AWS services, you can build a full end-to-end platform for an IoT product that can reliably handle volume. To further explore how hardware and AWS Serverless can work together, visit the Amazon Web Services page on Hackster.

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – September AWS Online Tech Talks

Post Syndicated from Jenny Hang original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/learn-about-aws-services-solutions-september-aws-online-tech-talks/

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – September AWS Online Tech Talks

AWS Tech Talks

Join us this September to learn about AWS services and solutions. The AWS Online Tech Talks are live, online presentations that cover a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. These tech talks, led by AWS solutions architects and engineers, feature technical deep dives, live demonstrations, customer examples, and Q&A with AWS experts. Register Now!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks this month:

 

Compute:

September 23, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuild Your Hybrid Cloud Architecture with AWS – Learn about the extensive range of services AWS offers to help you build a hybrid cloud architecture best suited for your use case.

September 26, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTSelf-Hosted WordPress: It’s Easier Than You Think – Learn how you can easily build a fault-tolerant WordPress site using Amazon Lightsail.

October 3, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTLower Costs by Right Sizing Your Instance with Amazon EC2 T3 General Purpose Burstable Instances – Get an overview of T3 instances, understand what workloads are ideal for them, and understand how the T3 credit system works so that you can lower your EC2 instance costs today.

 

Containers:

September 26, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTDevelop a Web App Using Amazon ECS and AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) – Learn how to build your first app using CDK and AWS container services.

 

Data Lakes & Analytics:

September 26, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBest Practices for Provisioning Amazon MSK Clusters and Using Popular Apache Kafka-Compatible Tooling – Learn best practices on running Apache Kafka production workloads at a lower cost on Amazon MSK.

 

Databases:

September 25, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTWhat’s New in Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility) – Learn what’s new in Amazon DocumentDB, a fully managed MongoDB compatible database service designed from the ground up to be fast, scalable, and highly available.

October 3, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBest Practices for Enterprise-Class Security, High-Availability, and Scalability with Amazon ElastiCache – Learn about new enterprise-friendly Amazon ElastiCache enhancements like customer managed key and online scaling up or down to make your critical workloads more secure, scalable and available.

 

DevOps:

October 1, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PT – CI/CD for Containers: A Way Forward for Your DevOps Pipeline – Learn how to build CI/CD pipelines using AWS services to get the most out of the agility afforded by containers.

 

Enterprise & Hybrid:

September 24, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM PT Virtual Workshop: How to Monitor and Manage Your AWS Costs – Learn how to visualize and manage your AWS cost and usage in this virtual hands-on workshop.

October 2, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PT – Accelerate Cloud Adoption and Reduce Operational Risk with AWS Managed Services – Learn how AMS accelerates your migration to AWS, reduces your operating costs, improves security and compliance, and enables you to focus on your differentiating business priorities.

 

IoT:

September 25, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTComplex Monitoring for Industrial with AWS IoT Data Services – Learn how to solve your complex event monitoring challenges with AWS IoT Data Services.

 

Machine Learning:

September 23, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTTraining Machine Learning Models Faster – Learn how to train machine learning models quickly and with a single click using Amazon SageMaker.

September 30, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTUsing Containers for Deep Learning Workflows – Learn how containers can help address challenges in deploying deep learning environments.

October 3, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM PTVirtual Workshop: Getting Hands-On with Machine Learning and Ready to Race in the AWS DeepRacer League – Join DeClercq Wentzel, Senior Product Manager for AWS DeepRacer, for a presentation on the basics of machine learning and how to build a reinforcement learning model that you can use to join the AWS DeepRacer League.

 

AWS Marketplace:

September 30, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTAdvancing Software Procurement in a Containerized World – Learn how to deploy applications faster with third-party container products.

 

Migration:

September 24, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTApplication Migrations Using AWS Server Migration Service (SMS) – Learn how to use AWS Server Migration Service (SMS) for automating application migration and scheduling continuous replication, from your on-premises data centers or Microsoft Azure to AWS.

 

Networking & Content Delivery:

September 25, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuilding Highly Available and Performant Applications using AWS Global Accelerator – Learn how to build highly available and performant architectures for your applications with AWS Global Accelerator, now with source IP preservation.

September 30, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTAWS Office Hours: Amazon CloudFront – Just getting started with Amazon CloudFront and [email protected]? Get answers directly from our experts during AWS Office Hours.

 

Robotics:

October 1, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTRobots and STEM: AWS RoboMaker and AWS Educate Unite! – Come join members of the AWS RoboMaker and AWS Educate teams as we provide an overview of our education initiatives and walk you through the newly launched RoboMaker Badge.

 

Security, Identity & Compliance:

October 1, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTDeep Dive on Running Active Directory on AWS – Learn how to deploy Active Directory on AWS and start migrating your windows workloads.

 

Serverless:

October 2, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTDeep Dive on Amazon EventBridge – Learn how to optimize event-driven applications, and use rules and policies to route, transform, and control access to these events that react to data from SaaS apps.

 

Storage:

September 24, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTOptimize Your Amazon S3 Data Lake with S3 Storage Classes and Management Tools – Learn how to use the Amazon S3 Storage Classes and management tools to better manage your data lake at scale and to optimize storage costs and resources.

October 2, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTThe Great Migration to Cloud Storage: Choosing the Right Storage Solution for Your Workload – Learn more about AWS storage services and identify which service is the right fit for your business.

 

 

The world’s first Raspberry Pi-powered Twitter-activated jelly bean-pooping unicorn

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-powered-twitter-activated-jelly-bean-pooping-unicorn/

When eight-year-old Tru challenged the Kids Invent Stuff team to build a sparkly, pooping, rainbow unicorn electric vehicle, they did exactly that. And when Kids Invent Stuff, also known as Ruth and Shawn, got in contact with Estefannie Explains it All, their unicorn ended up getting an IoT upgrade…because obviously.

You tweet and the Unicorn poops candy! | Kids Invent Stuff

We bring kids’ inventions to life and this month we teamed up with fellow youtube Estefannie (from Estefannie Explains It All https://www.youtube.com/user/estefanniegg SHE IS EPIC!) to modify Tru’s incredible sweet pooping unicorn to be activated by the internet! Featuring the AMAZING Allen Pan https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVS89U86PwqzNkK2qYNbk5A (Thanks Allen for your filming and tweeting!)

Kids Invent Stuff

If you’re looking for an exciting, wholesome, wonderful YouTube channel suitable for the whole family, look no further than Kids Invent Stuff. Challenging kids to imagine wonderful inventions based on monthly themes, channel owners Ruth and Shawn then make these kids’ ideas a reality. Much like the Astro Pi Challenge, Kids Invent Stuff is one of those things we adults wish existed when we were kids. We’re not jealous, we’re just…OK, we’re definitely jealous.

ANYWAY, when eight-year-old Tru’s sparkly, pooping, rainbow unicorn won the channel’s ‘crazy new vehicle’ challenge, the team got to work, and the result is magical.

Riding an ELECTRIC POOPING UNICORN! | Kids Invent Stuff

We built 8-year-old Tru’s sparkly, pooping, rainbow unicorn electric vehicle and here’s what happened when we drove it for the first time and pooped out some jelly beans! A massive THANK YOU to our challenge sponsor The Big Bang Fair: https://www.thebigbangfair.co.uk The Big Bang Fair is the UK’s biggest celebration of STEM for young people!

But could a sparkly, pooping, rainbow unicorn electric vehicle ever be enough? Is anything ever enough if it’s not connected to the internet? Of course not. And that’s where Estefannie came in.

At Maker Central in Birmingham earlier this year, the two YouTube teams got together to realise their shared IoT dream.

They ran out of chairs for their panel, so Allen had to improvise

With the help of a Raspberry Pi Zero W connected to the relay built into the unicorn, the team were able to write code that combs through Twitter, looking for mentions of @mythicalpoops. A positive result triggers the Raspberry Pi to activate the relay, and the unicorn lifts its tail to shoot jelly beans at passers-by.

You can definitely tell this project was invented by an eight-year-old, and we love it!

IoT unicorn

As you can see in the video above, the IoT upgrades to the unicorn allow Twitter users to control when the mythical beast poops its jelly beans. There are rumours that the unicorn may be coming to live with us at Pi Towers, but if these turn out to be true, we’ll ensure that this function is turned off. So no tweeting the unicorn!

You know what to do

Be sure to subscribe to both Kids Invent Stuff and Estefannie Explains It All on YouTube. They’re excellent makers producing wonderful content, and we know you’ll love them.

How to milk a unicorn

The post The world’s first Raspberry Pi-powered Twitter-activated jelly bean-pooping unicorn appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

IoT community sprinkler system using Raspberry Pi | The MagPi issue 83

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/iot-community-sprinkler-system-using-raspberry-pi-the-magpi-issue-83/

Saving water, several thousand lawns at a time: The MagPi magazine takes a look at the award-winning IoT sprinkler system of Coolest Projects USA participant Adarsh Ambati.

At any Coolest Projects event, you’re bound to see incredible things built by young makers. At Coolest Projects USA, we had the chance to talk to Adarsh Ambati about his community sprinkler and we were, frankly, amazed.

“The extreme, record-breaking drought in California inspired me to think of innovative ways to save water,” Adarsh tells us. “While going to school in the rain one day, I saw one of my neighbours with their sprinklers on, creating run-offs. Through research, I found that 25% of the water used in an average American household is wasted each day due to overwatering and inefficient watering methods. Thus, I developed a sprinkler system that is compliant with water regulations, to cost-effectively save water for entire neighbourhoods using a Raspberry Pi, moisture sensors, PyOWM (weather database), and by utilising free social media networks like Twitter.”

Efficient watering

In California, it’s very hot year round, so if you want a lush, green lawn you need to keep the grass watered. The record-breaking drought Adarsh was referring to resulted in extreme limitations on how much you could water your grass. The problem is, unless you have a very expensive sprinkler system, it’s easy to water the grass when it doesn’t need to be.

“The goal of my project is to save water wasted during general-purpose landscape irrigation of an entire neighbourhood by building a moisture sensor-based smart sprinkler system that integrates real-time weather forecast data to provide only optimum levels of water required,” Adarsh explains. “It will also have Twitter capabilities that will be able to publish information about when and how long to turn on the sprinklers, through the social networks. The residents in the community will subscribe to this information by following an account on Twitter, and utilise it to prevent water wasted during general-purpose landscaping and stay compliant with water regulations imposed in each area.”

Using the Raspberry Pi, Adarsh was able to build a prototype for about $50 — a lot cheaper than smart sprinklers you can currently buy on the market.

“I piloted it with ten homes, so the cost per home is around $5,” he reveals. “But since it has the potential to serve an entire community, the cost per home can be a few cents. For example, there are about 37000 residents in Almaden Valley, San Jose (where I live). If there is an average of two to four residents per home, there should be 9250 to 18500 homes. If I strategically place ten such prototypes, the cost per house would be five cents or less.”

Massive saving

Adarsh continues, “Based on two months of data, 83% of the water used for outdoor landscape watering can be saved. The average household in northern California uses 100 gallons of water for outdoor landscaping on a daily basis. The ten homes in my pilot had the potential to save roughly 50000 gallons over a two-month period, or 2500 gallons per month per home. At $0.007 per gallon, the savings equate to $209 per year, per home. For Almaden Valley alone, we have the potential to save around $2m to $4m per year!”

The results from Adarsh’s test were presented to the San Jose City Council, and they were so impressed they’re now considering putting similar systems in their public grass areas. Oh, and he also won the Hardware project category at Coolest Projects USA.

The MagPi magazine #83

This article is from today’s brand-new issue of The MagPi, the official Raspberry Pi magazine. Buy it from all good newsagents, subscribe to pay less per issue and support our work, or download the free PDF to give it a try first.

The post IoT community sprinkler system using Raspberry Pi | The MagPi issue 83 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

AWS Security releases IoT security whitepaper

Post Syndicated from Momena Cheema original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-security-releases-iot-security-whitepaper/

We’ve published a whitepaper, Securing Internet of Things (IoT) with AWS, to help you understand and address data security as it relates to your IoT devices and the data generated by them. The whitepaper is intended for a broad audience who is interested in learning about AWS IoT security capabilities at a service-specific level and for compliance, security, and public policy professionals.

IoT technologies connect devices and people in a multitude of ways and are used across industries. For example, IoT can help manage thermostats remotely across buildings in a city, efficiently control hundreds of wind turbines, or operate autonomous vehicles more safely. With all of the different types of devices and the data they transmit, security is a top concern.

The specific challenges using IoT technologies present has piqued the interest of governments worldwide who are currently assessing what, if any, new regulatory requirements should take shape to keep pace with IoT innovation and the general problem of securing data. This whitepaper uses a specific example to cover recent developments published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the United Kingdom’s Code of Practice that are specific to IoT.

If you have questions or want to learn more, contact your account executive, or leave a comment below.

Want more AWS Security how-to content, news, and feature announcements? Follow us on Twitter.

Author photo

Momena Cheema

Momena is passionate about evangelizing the security and privacy capabilities of AWS services through the lens of global emerging technology and trends, such as Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, and machine learning through written content, workshops, talks, and educational campaigns. Her goal is to bring the security and privacy benefits of the cloud to customers across industries in both public and private sectors.

Build a security camera with Raspberry Pi and OpenCV

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-security-camera-opencv/

Tired of opening the refrigerator only to find that your favourite snack is missing? Get video evidence of sneaky fridge thieves sent to your phone, with Adrian Rosebeck’s Raspberry Pi security camera project.

Building a Raspberry Pi security camera with OpenCV

Learn how to build a IoT + Raspberry Pi security camera using OpenCV and computer vision. Send TXT/MMS message notifications, images, and video clips when the security camera is triggered. Full tutorial (including code) here: https://www.pyimagesearch.com/2019/03/25/building-a-raspberry-pi-security-camera-with-opencv

Protecting hummus

Adrian loves hummus. And, as you can see from my author bio, so do I. So it wasn’t hard for me to relate to Adrian’s story about his college roommates often stealing his cherished chickpea dip.

Garlic dessert

“Of course, back then I wasn’t as familiar with computer vision and OpenCV as I am now,” he explains on his blog. “Had I known what I do at present, I would have built a Raspberry Pi security camera to capture the hummus heist in action!”

Raspberry Pi security camera

So, in homage to his time as an undergrad, Adrian decided to finally build that security camera for his fridge, despite now only needing to protect his hummus from his wife. And to build it, he opted to use OpenCV, a Raspberry Pi, and a Raspberry Pi Camera Module.

Adrian’s camera is an IoT project: it not only captures footage but also uses Twillo to send that footage, via a cloud service (AWS), to a smartphone.

Because the content of your fridge lives in the dark when you’re not inspecting it, the code for capturing video footage detects light and dark, and records everything that occurs between the fridge door opening and closing. “You could also deploy this inside a mailbox that opens/closes,” suggests Adrian.

Get the code and more

Adrian provides all the code for the project on his blog, pyimagesearch, with a full explanation of why each piece of code is used — thanks, Adrian!

For more from Adrian, check out his brilliant deep learning projects: a fully functional Pokémon Pokédex and Santa Detector.

The post Build a security camera with Raspberry Pi and OpenCV appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

AWS Online Tech Talks – June 2018

Post Syndicated from Devin Watson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-june-2018/

AWS Online Tech Talks – June 2018

Join us this month to learn about AWS services and solutions. New this month, we have a fireside chat with the GM of Amazon WorkSpaces and our 2nd episode of the “How to re:Invent” series. We’ll also cover best practices, deep dives, use cases and more! Join us and register today!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks featured this month:

 

Analytics & Big Data

June 18, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTGet Started with Real-Time Streaming Data in Under 5 Minutes – Learn how to use Amazon Kinesis to capture, store, and analyze streaming data in real-time including IoT device data, VPC flow logs, and clickstream data.
June 20, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT – Insights For Everyone – Deploying Data across your Organization – Learn how to deploy data at scale using AWS Analytics and QuickSight’s new reader role and usage based pricing.

 

AWS re:Invent
June 13, 2018 | 05:00 PM – 05:30 PM PTEpisode 2: AWS re:Invent Breakout Content Secret Sauce – Hear from one of our own AWS content experts as we dive deep into the re:Invent content strategy and how we maintain a high bar.
Compute

June 25, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTAccelerating Containerized Workloads with Amazon EC2 Spot Instances – Learn how to efficiently deploy containerized workloads and easily manage clusters at any scale at a fraction of the cost with Spot Instances.

June 26, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTEnsuring Your Windows Server Workloads Are Well-Architected – Get the benefits, best practices and tools on running your Microsoft Workloads on AWS leveraging a well-architected approach.

 

Containers
June 25, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTRunning Kubernetes on AWS – Learn about the basics of running Kubernetes on AWS including how setup masters, networking, security, and add auto-scaling to your cluster.

 

Databases

June 18, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTOracle to Amazon Aurora Migration, Step by Step – Learn how to migrate your Oracle database to Amazon Aurora.
DevOps

June 20, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTSet Up a CI/CD Pipeline for Deploying Containers Using the AWS Developer Tools – Learn how to set up a CI/CD pipeline for deploying containers using the AWS Developer Tools.

 

Enterprise & Hybrid
June 18, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTDe-risking Enterprise Migration with AWS Managed Services – Learn how enterprise customers are de-risking cloud adoption with AWS Managed Services.

June 19, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLaunch AWS Faster using Automated Landing Zones – Learn how the AWS Landing Zone can automate the set up of best practice baselines when setting up new

 

AWS Environments

June 21, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLeading Your Team Through a Cloud Transformation – Learn how you can help lead your organization through a cloud transformation.

June 21, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTEnabling New Retail Customer Experiences with Big Data – Learn how AWS can help retailers realize actual value from their big data and deliver on differentiated retail customer experiences.

June 28, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTFireside Chat: End User Collaboration on AWS – Learn how End User Compute services can help you deliver access to desktops and applications anywhere, anytime, using any device.
IoT

June 27, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTAWS IoT in the Connected Home – Learn how to use AWS IoT to build innovative Connected Home products.

 

Machine Learning

June 19, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntegrating Amazon SageMaker into your Enterprise – Learn how to integrate Amazon SageMaker and other AWS Services within an Enterprise environment.

June 21, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTBuilding Text Analytics Applications on AWS using Amazon Comprehend – Learn how you can unlock the value of your unstructured data with NLP-based text analytics.

 

Management Tools

June 20, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTOptimizing Application Performance and Costs with Auto Scaling – Learn how selecting the right scaling option can help optimize application performance and costs.

 

Mobile
June 25, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDrive User Engagement with Amazon Pinpoint – Learn how Amazon Pinpoint simplifies and streamlines effective user engagement.

 

Security, Identity & Compliance

June 26, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUnderstanding AWS Secrets Manager – Learn how AWS Secrets Manager helps you rotate and manage access to secrets centrally.
June 28, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUsing Amazon Inspector to Discover Potential Security Issues – See how Amazon Inspector can be used to discover security issues of your instances.

 

Serverless

June 19, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTProductionize Serverless Application Building and Deployments with AWS SAM – Learn expert tips and techniques for building and deploying serverless applications at scale with AWS SAM.

 

Storage

June 26, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDeep Dive: Hybrid Cloud Storage with AWS Storage Gateway – Learn how you can reduce your on-premises infrastructure by using the AWS Storage Gateway to connecting your applications to the scalable and reliable AWS storage services.
June 27, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTChanging the Game: Extending Compute Capabilities to the Edge – Discover how to change the game for IIoT and edge analytics applications with AWS Snowball Edge plus enhanced Compute instances.
June 28, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTBig Data and Analytics Workloads on Amazon EFS – Get best practices and deployment advice for running big data and analytics workloads on Amazon EFS.

MagPi 70: Home automation with Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-70-home-automation/

Hey folks, Rob here! It’s the last Thursday of the month, and that means it’s time for a brand-new The MagPi. Issue 70 is all about home automation using your favourite microcomputer, the Raspberry Pi.

Cover of The MagPi 70 — Raspberry Pi home automation and tech upcycling

Home automation in this month’s The MagPi!

Raspberry Pi home automation

We think home automation is an excellent use of the Raspberry Pi, hiding it around your house and letting it power your lights and doorbells and…fish tanks? We show you how to do all of that, and give you some excellent tips on how to add even more automation to your home in our ten-page cover feature.

Upcycle your life

Our other big feature this issue covers upcycling, the hot trend of taking old electronics and making them better than new with some custom code and a tactically placed Raspberry Pi. For this feature, we had a chat with Martin Mander, upcycler extraordinaire, to find out his top tips for hacking your old hardware.

Article on upcycling in The MagPi 70 — Raspberry Pi home automation and tech upcycling

Upcycling is a lot of fun

But wait, there’s more!

If for some reason you want even more content, you’re in luck! We have some fun tutorials for you to try, like creating a theremin and turning a Babbage into an IoT nanny cam. We also continue our quest to make a video game in C++. Our project showcase is headlined by the Teslonda on page 28, a Honda/Tesla car hybrid that is just wonderful.

Diddyborg V2 review in The MagPi 70 — Raspberry Pi home automation and tech upcycling

We review PiBorg’s latest robot

All this comes with our definitive reviews and the community section where we celebrate you, our amazing community! You’re all good beans

Teslonda article in The MagPi 70 — Raspberry Pi home automation and tech upcycling

An amazing, and practical, Raspberry Pi project

Get The MagPi 70

Issue 70 is available today from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. If you live in the US, head over to your local Barnes & Noble or Micro Center in the next few days for a print copy. You can also get the new issue online from our store, or digitally via our Android and iOS apps. And don’t forget, there’s always the free PDF as well.

New subscription offer!

Want to support the Raspberry Pi Foundation and the magazine? We’ve launched a new way to subscribe to the print version of The MagPi: you can now take out a monthly £4 subscription to the magazine, effectively creating a rolling pre-order system that saves you money on each issue.

The MagPi subscription offer — Raspberry Pi home automation and tech upcycling

You can also take out a twelve-month print subscription and get a Pi Zero W plus case and adapter cables absolutely free! This offer does not currently have an end date.

That’s it for today! See you next month.

Animated GIF: a door slides open and Captain Picard emerges hesitantly

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Project Floofball and more: Pi pet stuff

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/project-floofball-pi-pet-stuff/

It’s a public holiday here today (yes, again). So, while we indulge in the traditional pastime of barbecuing stuff (ourselves, mainly), here’s a little trove of Pi projects that cater for our various furry friends.

Project Floofball

Nicole Horward created Project Floofball for her hamster, Harold. It’s an IoT hamster wheel that uses a Raspberry Pi and a magnetic door sensor to log how far Harold runs.

Project Floofball: an IoT hamster wheel

An IoT Hamsterwheel using a Raspberry Pi and a magnetic door sensor, to see how far my hamster runs.

You can follow Harold’s runs in real time on his ThingSpeak channel, and you’ll find photos of the build on imgur. Nicole’s Python code, as well as her template for the laser-cut enclosure that houses the wiring and LCD display, are available on the hamster wheel’s GitHub repo.

A live-streaming pet feeder

JaganK3 used to work long hours that meant he couldn’t be there to feed his dog on time. He found that he couldn’t buy an automated feeder in India without paying a lot to import one, so he made one himself. It uses a Raspberry Pi to control a motor that turns a dispensing valve in a hopper full of dry food, giving his dog a portion of food at set times.

A transparent cylindrical hopper of dry dog food, with a motor that can turn a dispensing valve at the lower end. The motor is connected to a Raspberry Pi in a plastic case. Hopper, motor, Pi, and wiring are all mounted on a board on the wall.

He also added a web cam for live video streaming, because he could. Find out more in JaganK3’s Instructable for his pet feeder.

Shark laser cat toy

Sam Storino, meanwhile, is using a Raspberry Pi to control a laser-pointer cat toy with a goshdarned SHARK (which is kind of what I’d expect from the guy who made the steampunk-looking cat feeder a few weeks ago). The idea is to keep his cats interested and active within the confines of a compact city apartment.

Raspberry Pi Automatic Cat Laser Pointer Toy

Post with 52 votes and 7004 views. Tagged with cat, shark, lasers, austin powers, raspberry pi; Shared by JeorgeLeatherly. Raspberry Pi Automatic Cat Laser Pointer Toy

If I were a cat, I would definitely be entirely happy with this. Find out more on Sam’s website.

And there’s more

Michel Parreno has written a series of articles to help you monitor and feed your pet with Raspberry Pi.

All of these makers are generous in acknowledging the tutorials and build logs that helped them with their projects. It’s lovely to see the Raspberry Pi and maker community working like this, and I bet their projects will inspire others too.

Now, if you’ll excuse me. I’m late for a barbecue.

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HackSpace magazine 7: Internet of Everything

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hackspace-magazine-7-internet-of-everything/

We’re usually averse to buzzwords at HackSpace magazine, but not this month: in issue 7, we’re taking a deep dive into the Internet of Things.HackSpace magazine issue 7 cover

Internet of Things (IoT)

To many people, IoT is a shady term used by companies to sell you something you already own, but this time with WiFi; to us, it’s a way to make our builds smarter, more useful, and more connected. In HackSpace magazine #7, you can join us on a tour of the boards that power IoT projects, marvel at the ways in which other makers are using IoT, and get started with your first IoT project!

Awesome projects

DIY retro computing: this issue, we’re taking our collective hat off to Spencer Owen. He stuck his home-brew computer on Tindie thinking he might make a bit of beer money — now he’s paying the mortgage with his making skills and inviting others to build modules for his machine. And if that tickles your fancy, why not take a crack at our Z80 tutorial? Get out your breadboard, assemble your jumper wires, and prepare to build a real-life computer!

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

Shameless patriotism: combine Lego, Arduino, and the car of choice for 1960 gold bullion thieves, and you’ve got yourself a groovy weekend project. We proudly present to you one man’s epic quest to add LED lights (controllable via a smartphone!) to his daughter’s LEGO Mini Cooper.

Makerspaces

Patriotism intensifies: for the last 200-odd years, the Black Country has been a hotbed of making. Urban Hax, based in Walsall, is the latest makerspace to show off its riches in the coveted Space of the Month pages. Every space has its own way of doing things, but not every space has a portrait of Rob Halford on the wall. All hail!

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

Diversity: advice on diversity often boils down to ‘Be nice to people’, which might feel more vague than actionable. This is where we come in to help: it is truly worth making the effort to give people of all backgrounds access to your makerspace, so we take a look at why it’s nice to be nice, and at the ways in which one makerspace has put niceness into practice — with great results.

And there’s more!

We also show you how to easily calculate the size and radius of laser-cut gears, use a bank of LEDs to etch PCBs in your own mini factory, and use chemistry to mess with your lunch menu.

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7
Helen Steer inside HackSpace magazine issue 7
Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

All this plus much, much more waits for you in HackSpace magazine issue 7!

Get your copy of HackSpace magazine

If you like the sound of that, you can find HackSpace magazine in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and independent newsagents in the UK. If you live in the US, check out your local Barnes & Noble, Fry’s, or Micro Center next week. We’re also shipping to stores in Australia, Hong Kong, Canada, Singapore, Belgium, and Brazil, so be sure to ask your local newsagent whether they’ll be getting HackSpace magazine.

And if you can’t get to the shops, fear not: you can subscribe from £4 an issue from our online shop. And if you’d rather try before you buy, you can always download the free PDF. Happy reading, and happy making!

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Raspberry Jam Cameroon #PiParty

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-jam-cameroon-piparty/

Earlier this year on 3 and 4 March, communities around the world held Raspberry Jam events to celebrate Raspberry Pi’s sixth birthday. We sent out special birthday kits to participating Jams — it was amazing to know the kits would end up in the hands of people in parts of the world very far from Raspberry Pi HQ in Cambridge, UK.

The Raspberry Jam Camer team: Damien Doumer, Eyong Etta, Loïc Dessap and Lionel Sichom, aka Lionel Tellem

Preparing for the #PiParty

One birthday kit went to Yaoundé, the capital of Cameroon. There, a team of four students in their twenties — Lionel Sichom (aka Lionel Tellem), Eyong Etta, Loïc Dessap, and Damien Doumer — were organising Yaoundé’s first Jam, called Raspberry Jam Camer, as part of the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend. The team knew one another through their shared interests and skills in electronics, robotics, and programming. Damien explains in his blog post about the Jam that they planned ahead for several activities for the Jam based on their own projects, so they could be confident of having a few things that would definitely be successful for attendees to do and see.

Show-and-tell at Raspberry Jam Cameroon

Loïc presented a Raspberry Pi–based, Android app–controlled robot arm that he had built, and Lionel coded a small video game using Scratch on Raspberry Pi while the audience watched. Damien demonstrated the possibilities of Windows 10 IoT Core on Raspberry Pi, showing how to install it, how to use it remotely, and what you can do with it, including building a simple application.

Loïc Dessap, wearing a Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend T-shirt, sits at a table with a robot arm, a laptop with a Pi sticker and other components. He is making an adjustment to his set-up.

Loïc showcases the prototype robot arm he built

There was lots more too, with others discussing their own Pi projects and talking about the possibilities Raspberry Pi offers, including a Pi-controlled drone and car. Cake was a prevailing theme of the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend around the world, and Raspberry Jam Camer made sure they didn’t miss out.

A round pink-iced cake decorated with the words "Happy Birthday RBP" and six candles, on a table beside Raspberry Pi stickers, Raspberry Jam stickers and Raspberry Jam fliers

Yay, birthday cake!!

A big success

Most visitors to the Jam were secondary school students, while others were university students and graduates. The majority were unfamiliar with Raspberry Pi, but all wanted to learn about Raspberry Pi and what they could do with it. Damien comments that the fact most people were new to Raspberry Pi made the event more interactive rather than creating any challenges, because the visitors were all interested in finding out about the little computer. The Jam was an all-round success, and the team was pleased with how it went:

What I liked the most was that we sensitized several people about the Raspberry Pi and what one can be capable of with such a small but powerful device. — Damien Doumer

The Jam team rounded off the event by announcing that this was the start of a Raspberry Pi community in Yaoundé. They hope that they and others will be able to organise more Jams and similar events in the area to spread the word about what people can do with Raspberry Pi, and to help them realise their ideas.

The Raspberry Jam Camer team, wearing Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend T-shirts, pose with young Jam attendees outside their venue

Raspberry Jam Camer gets the thumbs-up

The Raspberry Pi community in Cameroon

In a French-language interview about their Jam, the team behind Raspberry Jam Camer said they’d like programming to become the third official language of Cameroon, after French and English; their aim is to to popularise programming and digital making across Cameroonian society. Neither of these fields is very familiar to most people in Cameroon, but both are very well aligned with the country’s ambitions for development. The team is conscious of the difficulties around the emergence of information and communication technologies in the Cameroonian context; in response, they are seizing the opportunities Raspberry Pi offers to give children and young people access to modern and constantly evolving technology at low cost.

Thanks to Lionel, Eyong, Damien, and Loïc, and to everyone who helped put on a Jam for the Big Birthday Weekend! Remember, anyone can start a Jam at any time — and we provide plenty of resources to get you started. Check out the Guidebook, the Jam branding pack, our specially-made Jam activities online (in multiple languages), printable worksheets, and more.

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All Systems Go! 2018 CfP Open

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/all-systems-go-2018-cfp-open.html

The All Systems Go! 2018 Call for Participation is Now Open!

The Call for Participation (CFP) for All Systems Go!
2018
is now open. We’d like to invite you
to submit your proposals for consideration to the CFP submission
site
.

ASG image

The CFP will close on July 30th. Notification of acceptance and
non-acceptance will go out within 7 days of the closing of the CFP.

All topics relevant to foundational open-source Linux technologies are
welcome. In particular, however, we are looking for proposals
including, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Low-level container executors and infrastructure
  • IoT and embedded OS infrastructure
  • BPF and eBPF filtering
  • OS, container, IoT image delivery and updating
  • Building Linux devices and applications
  • Low-level desktop technologies
  • Networking
  • System and service management
  • Tracing and performance measuring
  • IPC and RPC systems
  • Security and Sandboxing

While our focus is definitely more on the user-space side of things,
talks about kernel projects are welcome, as long as they have a clear
and direct relevance for user-space.

For more information please visit our conference
website
!