Tag Archives: AWS IoT

AWS Architecture Monthly Magazine: Agriculture

Post Syndicated from Annik Stahl original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/aws-architecture-monthly-magazine-agriculture/

Architecture Monthly Magazine cover - AgricultureIn this month’s issue of AWS Architecture Monthly, Worldwide Tech Lead for Agriculture, Karen Hildebrand (who’s also a fourth generation farmer) refers to agriculture as “the connective tissue our world needs to survive.” As our expert for August’s Agriculture issue, she also talks about what role cloud will play in future development efforts in this industry and why developing personal connections with our AWS agriculture customers is one of the most important aspects of our jobs.

You’ll also buzz through the world of high tech beehives, milk the information about data analytics-savvy cows, and see what the reference architecture of a Smart Farm looks like.

In August’s issue Agriculture issue

  • Ask an Expert: Karen Hildebrand, AWS WW Agriculture Tech Leader
  • Customer Success Story: Tine & Crayon: Revolutionizing the Norwegian Dairy Industry Using Machine Learning on AWS
  • Blog Post: Beewise Combines IoT and AI to Offer an Automated Beehive
  • Reference Architecture:Smart Farm: Enabling Sensor, Computer Vision, and Edge Inference in Agriculture
  • Customer Success Story: Farmobile: Empowering the Agriculture Industry Through Data
  • Blog Post: The Cow Collar Wearable: How Halter benefits from FreeRTOS
  • Related Videos: DuPont, mPrest & Netafirm, and Veolia

Survey opportunity

This month, we’re also asking you to take a 10-question survey about your experiences with this magazine. The survey is hosted by an external company (Qualtrics), so the below survey button doesn’t lead to our website. Please note that AWS will own the data gathered from this survey, and we will not share the results we collect with survey respondents. Your responses to this survey will be subject to Amazon’s Privacy Notice. Please take a few moments to give us your opinions.

How to access the magazine

We hope you’re enjoying Architecture Monthly, and we’d like to hear from you—leave us star rating and comment on the Amazon Kindle Newsstand page or contact us anytime at aws-architectur[email protected].

ICYMI: Serverless Q2 2020

Post Syndicated from Moheeb Zara original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q2-2020/

Welcome to the 10th edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share all of the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

In case you missed our last ICYMI, checkout what happened last quarter here.

AWS Lambda

AWS Lambda functions can now mount an Amazon Elastic File System (EFS). EFS is a scalable and elastic NFS file system storing data within and across multiple Availability Zones (AZ) for high availability and durability. In this way, you can use a familiar file system interface to store and share data across all concurrent execution environments of one, or more, Lambda functions. EFS supports full file system access semantics, such as strong consistency and file locking.

Using different EFS access points, each Lambda function can access different paths in a file system, or use different file system permissions. You can share the same EFS file system with Amazon EC2 instances, containerized applications using Amazon ECS and AWS Fargate, and on-premises servers.

Learn how to create an Amazon EFS-mounted Lambda function using the AWS Serverless Application Model in Sessions With SAM Episode 10.

With our recent launch of .NET Core 3.1 AWS Lambda runtime, we’ve also released version 2.0.0 of the PowerShell module AWSLambdaPSCore. The new version now supports PowerShell 7.

Amazon EventBridge

At AWS re:Invent 2019, we introduced a preview of Amazon EventBridge schema registry and discovery. This is a way to store the structure of the events (the schema) in a central location. It can simplify using events in your code by generating the code to process them for Java, Python, and TypeScript. In April, we announced general availability of EventBridge Schema Registry.

We also added support for resource policies. Resource policies allow sharing of schema repository across different AWS accounts and organizations. In this way, developers on different teams can search for and use any schema that another team has added to the shared registry.

Ben Smith, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, published a guide on how to capture user events and monitor user behavior using the Amazon EventBridge partner integration with Auth0. This enables better insight into your application to help deliver a more customized experience for your users.

AWS Step Functions

In May, we launched a new AWS Step Functions service integration with AWS CodeBuild. CodeBuild is a fully managed continuous integration service that compiles source code, runs tests, and produces packages that are ready for deployment. Now, during the execution of a state machine, you can start or stop a build, get build report summaries, and delete past build executions records.

With the new AWS CodePipeline support to invoke Step Functions you can customize your delivery pipeline with choices, external validations, or parallel tasks. Each of those tasks can now call CodeBuild to create a custom build following specific requirements. Learn how to build a continuous integration workflow with Step Functions and AWS CodeBuild.

Rob Sutter, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, has published a video series on Step Functions. We’ve compiled a playlist on YouTube to help you on your serverless journey.

AWS Amplify

The AWS Amplify Framework announced in April that they have rearchitected the Amplify UI component library to enable JavaScript developers to easily add authentication scenarios to their web apps. The authentication components include numerous improvements over previous versions. These include the ability to automatically sign in users after sign-up confirmation, better customization, and improved accessibility.

Amplify also announced the availability of Amplify Framework iOS and Amplify Framework Android libraries and tools. These help mobile application developers to easily build secure and scalable cloud-powered applications. Previously, mobile developers relied on a combination of tools and SDKS along with the Amplify CLI to create and manage a backend.

These new native libraries are oriented around use-cases, such as authentication, data storage and access, machine learning predictions etc. They provide a declarative interface that enables you to programmatically apply best practices with abstractions.

A mono-repository is a repository that contains more than one logical project, each in its own repository. Monorepo support is now available for the AWS Amplify Console, allowing developers to connect Amplify Console to a sub-folder in your mono-repository. Learn how to set up continuous deployment and hosting on a monorepo with the Amplify Console.

Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra)

Amazon Managed Apache Cassandra Service (MCS) is now generally available under the new name: Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra). Amazon Keyspaces is built on Apache Cassandra and can be used as a fully managed serverless database. Your applications can read and write data from Amazon Keyspaces using your existing Cassandra Query Language (CQL) code, with little or no changes. Danilo Poccia explains how to use Amazon Keyspace with API Gateway and Lambda in this launch post.

AWS Glue

In April we extended AWS Glue jobs, based on Apache Spark, to run continuously and consume data from streaming platforms such as Amazon Kinesis Data Streams and Apache Kafka (including the fully-managed Amazon MSK). Learn how to manage a serverless extract, transform, load (ETL) pipeline with Glue in this guide by Danilo Poccia.

Serverless posts

Our team is always working to build and write content to help our customers better understand all our serverless offerings. Here is a list of the latest published to the AWS Compute Blog this quarter.

Introducing the new serverless LAMP stack

Ben Smith, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, introduces the Serverless LAMP stack. He explains how to use serverless technologies with PHP. Learn about the available tools, frameworks and strategies to build serverless applications, and why now is the right time to start.

 

Building a location-based, scalable, serverless web app

James Beswick, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, walks through building a location-based, scalable, serverless web app. Ask Around Me is an example project that allows users to ask questions within a geofence to create an engaging community driven experience.

Building well-architected serverless applications

Julian Wood, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, published two blog series on building well-architected serverless applications. Learn how to better understand application health and lifecycle management.

Device hacking with serverless

Go beyond the browser with these creative and physical projects. Moheeb Zara, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, published several serverless powered device hacks, all using off the shelf parts.

April

May

June

Tech Talks and events

We hold AWS Online Tech Talks covering serverless topics throughout the year. You can find these in the serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page. We also regularly join in on podcasts, and record short videos you can find to learn in quick bite-sized chunks.

Here are the highlights from Q2.

Innovator Island Workshop

Learn how to build a complete serverless web application for a popular theme park called Innovator Island. James Beswick created a video series to walk you through this popular workshop at your own pace.

Serverless First Function

In May, we held a new virtual event series, the Serverless-First Function, to help you and your organization get the most out of the cloud. The first event, on May 21, included sessions from Amazon CTO, Dr. Werner Vogels, and VP of Serverless at AWS, David Richardson. The second event, May 28, was packed with sessions with our AWS Serverless Developer Advocate team. Catch up on the AWS Twitch channel.

Live streams

The AWS Serverless Developer Advocate team hosts several weekly livestreams on the AWS Twitch channel covering a wide range of topics. You can catch up on all our past content, including workshops, on the AWS Serverless YouTube channel.

Eric Johnson hosts “Sessions with SAM” every Thursday at 10AM PST. Each week, Eric shows how to use SAM to solve different serverless challenges. He explains how to use SAM templates to build powerful serverless applications. Catch up on the last few episodes.

James Beswick, AWS Serverless Developer Advocate, has compiled a round-up of all his content from Q2. He has plenty of videos ranging from beginner to advanced topics.

AWS Serverless Heroes

We’re pleased to welcome Kyuhyun Byun and Serkan Özal to the growing list of AWS Serverless Heroes. The AWS Hero program is a selection of worldwide experts that have been recognized for their positive impact within the community. They share helpful knowledge and organize events and user groups. They’re also contributors to numerous open-source projects in and around serverless technologies.

Still looking for more?

The Serverless landing page has much more information. The Lambda resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more getting started tutorials.

Follow the AWS Serverless team on our new LinkedIn page we share all the latest news and events. You can also follow all of us on Twitter to see latest news, follow conversations, and interact with the team.

Chris Munns: @chrismunns
Eric Johnson: @edjgeek
James Beswick: @jbesw
Moheeb Zara: @virgilvox
Ben Smith: @benjamin_l_s
Rob Sutter: @rts_rob
Julian Wood: @julian_wood

IoT All the Things (Ask Me Anything Edition)

Post Syndicated from Annik Stahl original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/iot-all-the-things-ask-me-anything-edition/

Join AWS Internet of Things (IoT) experts as they walk you through building IoT applications with AWS live on Twitch. Along the way, AWS IoT customers and partners will co-host, share best tips and tricks, and make sure all of your questions are answered. By the end of each episode, you’ll learn how to build IoT applications across industrial, connected home, and everything in between.

In this special episode, our hosts, Rudy Chetty and Wale Oladehin, go all out in an ask-me-anything style and dive into audience-prompted topics including IoT operations, IoT best practices, device management, mobile development, analytics, and more. From AWS IoT Greengrass to AWS IoT SiteWise to AWS IoT Analytics, get ready to IoT All the Things across a wide range of IoT software and services in our Season 2, Episode 4 “IoT All the Things, AMA Edition.”

When we asked Rudy about his experience filming this special episode, he had this to say:

“I love the spontaneity of live-streaming. It’s a really interesting space to be able to be challenged by customers through questions. You never know what you’ll be asked, and you have to be on your toes constantly, so to speak. Case in point: I never thought I’d be discussing weevils and how to detect them in rice silos but that’s exactly what a customer asked about. Furthermore, it’s fascinating to not only be able to dive into a solution with them, but also see what use cases they dream up for AWS IoT.”

Check out more IoT All the Things videos on Twitch.

Building a Raspberry Pi telepresence robot using serverless: Part 2

Post Syndicated from Moheeb Zara original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-a-raspberry-pi-telepresence-robot-using-serverless-part-2/

The deployed web frontend and the robot it controls.

The deployed web frontend and the robot it controls.

In a previous post, I show how to build a telepresence robot using serverless technologies and a Raspberry Pi. The result is a robot that transmits live video using Amazon Kinesis Video Streams with WebRTC. It can be driven remotely via an AWS Lambda function using an Amazon API Gateway REST endpoint.

This post walks through deploying a web interface to view the live stream and control the robot. The application is built using AWS Amplify and Vue.js. Amplify is a development framework that makes it easy to add authentication, hosting, and other AWS resources. It also provides a pipeline for deploying web applications.

I use the Amplify Command Line Interface (CLI) to create an authentication flow for user sign-in using Amazon Cognito. I then show how to set up an authorizer in API Gateway so that only authenticated users can drive the robot. An AWS Identity Access and Management (IAM) role sets permissions so users can assume access to Kinesis Video Streams to view the live video feed. The web application is then configured and run locally for testing. Finally, using the Amplify CLI, I show how to add hosting and publish a production ready web application.

Prerequisites

You need the following to complete the project:

Amplify CLI and project setup

An architecture diagram showing the client relationship between the AWS resources deployed by Amplify.

The Amplify CLI allows you to create and manage resource on AWS. With the libraries and UI components provided by the Amplify Framework, you can build powerful applications using a variety of cloud services.

The web interface for the telepresence robot is built using Amplify Vue.js components for user registration and sign-in. Download the application and use the Amplify CLI to configure resources for the web application.

To install and configure Amplify on the frontend web application, refer to the project set-up instructions on the GitHub project.

Creating an API Gateway authorizer

In the first guide, API Gateway is used to create a REST endpoint to send commands to the robot. Currently, the endpoint accepts requests without any authentication. To ensure that only authenticated users can control the robot, you must create an authorizer for the API.

The backend resources deployed by the Amplify web application include a Cognito User Pool. This is a user directory that provides sign-up and sign-in services, user profiles, and identity providers. The following instructions demonstrate how to configure an authorizer on API Gateway that verifies access using a user pool.

  1. Navigate to the Amazon API Gateway console.
  2. Choose the API created in the first guide for driving the robot.
  3. Choose Authorizers from the menu.
  4. Choose Create New Authorizer. Choose Cognito for Type and select the user pool created by the Amplify CLI. Set Token Source to Authorization.
  5. Choose Create.
  6. Choose Resources from the menu.
  7. Choose POST, Method Request.
  8. Set Authorization to the newly created authorizer.

Adding permissions

The web application loads a component for viewing video from the robot over a WebRTC connection. WebRTC is a protocol for negotiating peer to peer data connections by using a signaling channel.

The previous guide configured the robot to use a Kinesis Video Signaling Channel. Users signed into the web application must assume some permissions for Kinesis Video Streams to access the signaling channel.

When the Amplify CLI deploys an authentication flow, it creates a role in IAM. Cognito uses this role to assume permissions for a user pool based on matching conditions.

This Trust Relationship on the authRole controls when the role’s permissions are assumed. In this case, on a matching “authenticated” user from the identity pool.

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Federated": "cognito-identity.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity",
      "Condition": {
        "StringEquals": {
          "cognito-identity.amazonaws.com:aud": "us-west-2:12345e-9548-4a5a-b44c-12345677"
        },
        "ForAnyValue:StringLike": {
          "cognito-identity.amazonaws.com:amr": "authenticated"
        }
      }
    }
  ]
}

Follow these steps to attach Kinesis Video Streams permissions to the authRole.

  1. Navigate to the IAM console.
  2. Choose Roles from the menu.
  3. Use the search bar to find “authRole”. It is prefixed by the stack name associated with the Amplify deployment. Choose it from the list.
  4. Choose Add inline policy.
  5. Select the JSON tab and paste in the following. In the Resource property, replace <RobotName> with the name of the robot created in the first guide.
    {
        "Version": "2012-10-17",
        "Statement": [
            {
                "Sid": "VisualEditor0",
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": [
                    "kinesisvideo:GetSignalingChannelEndpoint",
                    "kinesisvideo:ConnectAsMaster",
                    "kinesisvideo:GetIceServerConfig",
                    "kinesisvideo:ConnectAsViewer",
                    "kinesisvideo:DescribeSignalingChannel"
                ],
                "Resource": "arn:aws:kinesisvideo:*:*:channel/<RobotName>/*"
            }
        ]
    }
    
  6. Choose Review Policy.
  7. Choose Create Policy.

Configuring the application

The authorizer allows authenticated users to invoke the Lambda function through API Gateway. The permissions set on the authRole control access to the live video. The web application must know the endpoint for sending commands and the Kinesis Video Signaling Channel to use for the robot.

This information is configured in web-app/src/main.js. It requires a file named config.json to let the application know which endpoint and signaling channel to use.

  1. Inside the application folder aws-serverless-telepresence-robot/web-app/src, create a new file named config.json.
    {
      "endpoint": "",
      "channelARN": ""
    }
  2. Replace endpoint with the Invoke URL of the robot API. This can be found in API Gateway console under Stages, Prod. It can also be found under Outputs in the AWS CloudFormation stack created by the aws-serverless-telepresence-robot serverless application from the first guide.
  3. Replace channelARN with the ARN of your robot’s signaling channel. This can be found in the Amazon Kinesis Video Streams console under Signaling channels.

Running the application

You can build and run the application locally for testing purposes. It still uses the backend deployed in the cloud. Do this before publishing to production:

  1. Inside the web-app directory, run the following command:
    npm run serve
  2. Navigate to the locally hosted application at http://localhost:8080
  3. Follow the onscreen steps to create a new account.
  4. Choose Start Video. If the robot is active, a WebRTC connection is made and live video is displayed.
  5. Use the onscreen arrow buttons to drive the robot.

Deploying a hosted application

Amplify makes it easy to deploy a hosted application. The following commands configure and deploy hosting resources in Amazon S3 and Amazon CloudFront. This allows you to securely and quickly deploy your application for production use.

  1. Inside aws-serverless-telepresence-robot/web-app, run the following. When prompted, select PROD, this configures the application to deploy using S3 and CloudFront.
    amplify add hosting
  2. Finally, this command builds and publishes all the backend and frontend resources for your Amplify project. On completion, it provides a URL to the hosted web application. Note, it can take a while for the CloudFront distribution to deploy.
    amplify publish

Conclusion

In this post, I show how to build a web interface for remotely viewing and controlling the robot. This is done using AWS Amplify, Vue.js, and a previously deployed serverless application.

With a few commands, the Amplify CLI is used to configure backend resources for a web frontend. Cognito is used as an identity provider. An Authorizer is created for an API Gateway endpoint, allowing authenticated users to send commands to the robot from the frontend. An IAM Role with a trusted relationship with the Cognito User Pool is given permissions to use Kinesis Video Signaling Channels, which are passed to the authenticated users. This allows the web frontend to open a live video connection to the telepresence robot using WebRTC.

Once run and tested locally, I showed how the Amplify CLI can streamline configuring hosting and deployment of a production web application using S3 and CloudFront. The summation of this is a custom-built telepresence robot with a web application for viewing and operating securely, all done without managed servers.

The principles used in this project can be applied towards a variety of use cases. Use this to build out a fleet of remote vehicles to monitor factories or for personal home security. You can create a community for users to experience environments remotely. The interface Vue component can also easily be modified for custom commands sent to the application running on the robot.

Building a Raspberry Pi telepresence robot using serverless: Part 1

Post Syndicated from Moheeb Zara original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-a-raspberry-pi-telepresence-robot-using-serverless-part-1/

A Pimoroni STS-Pi Robot Kit connected to AWS for remote control and viewing.

A Pimoroni STS-Pi Robot Kit connected to AWS for remote control and viewing.

A telepresence robot allows you to explore remote environments from the comfort of your home through live stream video and remote control. These types of robots can improve the lives of the disabled, elderly, or those that simply cannot be with their coworkers or loved ones in person. Some are used to explore off-world terrain and others for search and rescue.

This guide walks through building a simple telepresence robot using a Pimoroni STS-PI Raspberry Pi robot kit. A Raspberry Pi is a small low-cost device that runs Linux. Add-on modules for Raspberry Pi are called “hats”. You can substitute this kit with any mobile platform that uses two motors wired to an Adafruit Motor Hat or a Pimoroni Explorer Hat.

The sample serverless application uses AWS Lambda and Amazon API Gateway to create a REST API for driving the robot. A Python application running on the robot uses AWS IoT Core to receive drive commands and authenticate with Amazon Kinesis Video Streams with WebRTC using an IoT Credentials Provider. In the next blog I walk through deploying a web frontend to both view the livestream and control the robot via the API.

Prerequisites

You need the following to complete the project:

A Pimoroni STS-Pi robot kit, Explorer Hat, Raspberry Pi, camera, and battery.

A Pimoroni STS-Pi robot kit, Explorer Hat, Raspberry Pi, camera, and battery.

Estimated Cost: $120

There are three major parts to this project. First deploy the serverless backend using the AWS Serverless Application Repository. Then assemble the robot and run an installer on the Raspberry Pi. Finally, configure and run the Python application on the robot to confirm it can be driven through the API and is streaming video.

Deploy the serverless application

In this section, use the Serverless Application Repository to deploy the backend resources for the robot. The resources to deploy are defined using the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM), an open-source framework for building serverless applications using AWS CloudFormation. To deeper understand how this application is built, look at the SAM template in the GitHub repository.

An architecture diagram of the AWS IoT and Amazon Kinesis Video Stream resources of the deployed application.

The Python application that runs on the robot requires permissions to connect as an IoT Thing and subscribe to messages sent to a specific topic on the AWS IoT Core message broker. The following policy is created in the SAM template:

RobotIoTPolicy:
      Type: "AWS::IoT::Policy"
      Properties:
        PolicyName: !Sub "${RobotName}Policy"
        PolicyDocument:
          Version: "2012-10-17"
          Statement:
            - Effect: Allow
              Action:
                - iot:Connect
                - iot:Subscribe
                - iot:Publish
                - iot:Receive
              Resource:
                - !Sub "arn:aws:iot:*:*:topicfilter/${RobotName}/action"
                - !Sub "arn:aws:iot:*:*:topic/${RobotName}/action"
                - !Sub "arn:aws:iot:*:*:topic/${RobotName}/telemetry"
                - !Sub "arn:aws:iot:*:*:client/${RobotName}"

To transmit video, the Python application runs the amazon-kinesis-video-streams-webrtc-sdk-c sample in a subprocess. Instead of using separate credentials to authenticate with Kinesis Video Streams, a Role Alias policy is created so that IoT credentials can be used.

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Action": [
        "iot:Connect",
        "iot:AssumeRoleWithCertificate"
      ],
      "Resource": "arn:aws:iot:Region:AccountID:rolealias/robot-camera-streaming-role-alias",
      "Effect": "Allow"
    }
  ]
}

When the above policy is attached to a certificate associated with an IoT Thing, it can assume the following role:

 KVSCertificateBasedIAMRole:
      Type: 'AWS::IAM::Role'
      Properties:
        AssumeRolePolicyDocument:
          Version: '2012-10-17'
          Statement:
          - Effect: 'Allow'
            Principal:
              Service: 'credentials.iot.amazonaws.com'
            Action: 'sts:AssumeRole'
        Policies:
        - PolicyName: !Sub "KVSIAMPolicy-${AWS::StackName}"
          PolicyDocument:
            Version: '2012-10-17'
            Statement:
            - Effect: Allow
              Action:
                - kinesisvideo:ConnectAsMaster
                - kinesisvideo:GetSignalingChannelEndpoint
                - kinesisvideo:CreateSignalingChannel
                - kinesisvideo:GetIceServerConfig
                - kinesisvideo:DescribeSignalingChannel
              Resource: "arn:aws:kinesisvideo:*:*:channel/${credentials-iot:ThingName}/*"

This role grants access to connect and transmit video over WebRTC using the Kinesis Video Streams signaling channel deployed by the serverless application. An architecture diagram of the API endpoint in the deployed application.

A deployed API Gateway endpoint, when called with valid JSON, invokes a Lambda function that publishes to an IoT message topic, RobotName/action. The Python application on the robot subscribes to this topic and drives the motors based on any received message that maps to a command.

  1. Navigate to the aws-serverless-telepresence-robot application in the Serverless Application Repository.
  2. Choose Deploy.
  3. On the next page, under Application Settings, fill out the parameter, RobotName.
  4. Choose Deploy.
  5. Once complete, choose View CloudFormation Stack.
  6. Select the Outputs tab. Copy the ApiURL and the EndpointURL for use when configuring the robot.

Create and download the AWS IoT device certificate

The robot requires an AWS IoT root CA (fetched by the install script), certificate, and private key to authenticate with AWS IoT Core. The certificate and private key are not created by the serverless application since they can only be downloaded on creation. Create a new certificate and attach the IoT policy and Role Alias policy deployed by the serverless application.

  1. Navigate to the AWS IoT Core console.
  2. Choose Manage, Things.
  3. Choose the Thing that corresponds with the name of the robot.
  4. Under Security, choose Create certificate.
  5. Choose Activate.
  6. Download the Private Key and Thing Certificate. Save these securely, as this is the only time you can download this certificate.
  7. Choose Attach Policy.
  8. Two policies are created and must be attached. From the list, select
    <RobotName>Policy
    AliasPolicy-<AppName>
  9. Choose Done.

Flash an operating system to an SD card

The Raspberry Pi single-board Linux computer uses an SD card as the main file system storage. Raspbian Buster Lite is an officially supported Debian Linux operating system that must be flashed to an SD card. Balena.io has created an application called balenaEtcher for the sole purpose of accomplishing this safely.

  1. Download the latest version of Raspbian Buster Lite.
  2. Download and install balenaEtcher.
  3. Insert the SD card into your computer and run balenaEtcher.
  4. Choose the Raspbian image. Choose Flash to burn the image to the SD card.
  5. When flashing is complete, balenaEtcher dismounts the SD card.

Configure Wi-Fi and SSH headless

Typically, a keyboard and monitor are used to configure Wi-Fi or to access the command line on a Raspberry Pi. Since it is on a mobile platform, configure the Raspberry Pi to connect to a Wi-Fi network and enable remote access headless by adding configuration files to the SD card.

  1. Re-insert the SD card to your computer so that it shows as volume boot.
  2. Create a file in the boot volume of the SD card named wpa_supplicant.conf.
  3. Paste in the following contents, substituting your Wi-Fi credentials.
    ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/wpa_supplicant GROUP=netdev
            update_config=1
            country=<Insert country code here>
    
            network={
             ssid="<Name of your WiFi>"
             psk="<Password for your WiFi>"
            }

  4. Create an empty file without a file extension in the boot volume named ssh. At boot, the Raspbian operating system looks for this file and enables remote access if it exists. This can be done from a command line:
    cd path/to/volume/boot
    touch ssh

  5. Safely eject the SD card from your computer.

Assemble the robot

For this section, you can use the Pimoroni STS-Pi robot kit with a Pimoroni Explorer Hat, along with a Raspberry Pi Model 3 B+ or newer, and a camera module. Alternatively, you can use any two motor robot platform that uses the Explorer Hat or Adafruit Motor Hat.

  1. Follow the instructions in this video to assemble the Pimoroni STS-Pi robot kit.
  2. Place the SD card in the Raspberry Pi.
  3. Since the installation may take some time, power the Raspberry Pi using a USB 5V power supply connected to a wall plug rather than a battery.

Connect remotely using SSH

Use your computer to gain remote command line access of the Raspberry Pi using SSH. Both devices must be on the same network.

  1. Open a terminal application with SSH installed. It is already built into Linux and Mac OS, to enable SSH on Windows follow these instructions.
  2. Enter the following to begin a secure shell session as user pi on the default local hostname raspberrypi, which resolves to the IP address of the device using MDNS:
  3. If prompted to add an SSH key to the list of known hosts, type yes.
  4. When prompted for a password, type raspberry. This is the default password and can be changed using the raspi-config utility.
  5. Upon successful login, you now have shell access to your Raspberry Pi device.

Enable the camera using raspi-config

A built-in utility, raspi-config, provides an easy to use interface for configuring Raspbian. You must enable the camera module, along with I2C, a serial bus used for communicating with the motor driver.

  1. In an open SSH session, type the following to open the raspi-config utility:
    sudo raspi-config

  2. Using the arrows, choose Interfacing Options.
  3. Choose Camera. When prompted, choose Yes to enable the camera module.
  4. Repeat the process to enable the I2C interface.
  5. Select Finish and reboot.

Run the install script

An installer script is provided for building and installing the Kinesis Video Stream WebRTC producer, AWSIoTPythonSDK and Pimoroni Explorer Hat Python libraries. Upon completion, it creates a directory with the following structure:

├── /home/pi/Projects/robot
│  └── main.py // The main Python application
│  └── config.json // Parameters used by main.py
│  └── kvsWebrtcClientMasterGstSample //Kinesis Video Stream producer
│  └── /certs
│     └── cacert.pem // Amazon SFSRootCAG2 Certificate Authority
│     └── certificate.pem // AWS IoT certificate placeholder
│     └── private.pem.key // AWS IoT private key placeholder
  1. Open an SSH session on the Raspberry Pi.
  2. (Optional) If using the Adafruit Motor Hat, run this command, otherwise the script defaults to the Pimoroni Explorer Hat.
    export MOTOR_DRIVER=adafruit  

  3. Run the following command to fetch and execute the installer script.
    wget -O - https://raw.githubusercontent.com/aws-samples/aws-serverless-telepresence-robot/master/scripts/install.sh | bash

  4. While the script installs, proceed to the next section.

Configure the code

The Python application on the robot subscribes to AWS IoT Core to receive messages. It requires the certificate and private key created for the IoT thing to authenticate. These files must be copied to the directory where the Python application is stored on the Raspberry Pi.

It also requires the IoT Credentials endpoint is added to the file config.json to assume permissions necessary to transmit video to Amazon Kinesis Video Streams.

  1. Open an SSH session on the Raspberry Pi.
  2. Open the certificate.pem file with the nano text editor and paste in the contents of the certificate downloaded earlier.
    cd/home/pi/Projects/robot/certs
    nano certificate.pem

  3. Press CTRL+X and then Y to save the file.
  4. Repeat the process with the private.key.pem file.
    nano private.key.pem

  5. Open the config.json file.
    cd/home/pi/Projects/robot
    nano config.json

  6. Provide the following information:
    IOT_THINGNAME: The name of your robot, as set in the serverless application.
    IOT_CORE_ENDPOINT: This is found under the Settings page in the AWS IoT Core console.
    IOT_GET_CREDENTIAL_ENDPOINT: Provided by the serverless application.
    ROLE_ALIAS: This is already set to match the Role Alias deployed by the serverless application.
    AWS_DEFAULT_REGION: Corresponds to the Region the application is deployed in.
  7. Save the file using CTRL+X and Y.
  8. To start the robot, run the command:
    python3 main.py

  9. To stop the script, press CTRL+C.

View the Kinesis video stream

The following steps create a WebRTC connection with the robot to view the live stream.

  1. Navigate to the Amazon Kinesis Video Streams console.
  2. Choose Signaling channels from the left menu.
  3. Choose the channel that corresponds with the name of your robot.
  4. Open the Media Playback card.
  5. After a moment, a WebRTC peer to peer connection is negotiated and live video is displayed.
    An animated gif demonstrating a live video stream from the robot.

Sending drive commands

The serverless backend includes an Amazon API Gateway REST endpoint that publishes JSON messages to the Python script on the robot.

The robot expects a message:

{ “action”: <direction> }

Where direction can be “forward”, “backwards”, “left”, or “right”.

  1. While the Python script is running on the robot, open another terminal window.
  2. Run this command to tell the robot to drive forward. Replace <API-URL> using the endpoint listed under Outputs in the CloudFormation stack for the serverless application.
    curl -d '{"action":"forward"}' -H "Content-Type: application/json" -X POST https://<API-URL>/publish

    An animated gif demonstrating the robot being driven from a REST request.

Conclusion

In this post, I show how to build and program a telepresence robot with remote control and a live video feed in the cloud. I did this by installing a Python application on a Raspberry Pi robot and deploying a serverless application.

The Python application uses AWS IoT credentials to receive remote commands from the cloud and transmit live video using Kinesis Video Streams with WebRTC. The serverless application deploys a REST endpoint using API Gateway and a Lambda function. Any application that can connect to the endpoint can drive the robot.

In part two, I build on this project by deploying a web interface for the robot using AWS Amplify.

A preview of the web frontend built in the next blog.

A preview of the web frontend built in the next blog.

 

 

AWS Online Tech Talks – June 2018

Post Syndicated from Devin Watson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-june-2018/

AWS Online Tech Talks – June 2018

Join us this month to learn about AWS services and solutions. New this month, we have a fireside chat with the GM of Amazon WorkSpaces and our 2nd episode of the “How to re:Invent” series. We’ll also cover best practices, deep dives, use cases and more! Join us and register today!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks featured this month:

 

Analytics & Big Data

June 18, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTGet Started with Real-Time Streaming Data in Under 5 Minutes – Learn how to use Amazon Kinesis to capture, store, and analyze streaming data in real-time including IoT device data, VPC flow logs, and clickstream data.
June 20, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT – Insights For Everyone – Deploying Data across your Organization – Learn how to deploy data at scale using AWS Analytics and QuickSight’s new reader role and usage based pricing.

 

AWS re:Invent
June 13, 2018 | 05:00 PM – 05:30 PM PTEpisode 2: AWS re:Invent Breakout Content Secret Sauce – Hear from one of our own AWS content experts as we dive deep into the re:Invent content strategy and how we maintain a high bar.
Compute

June 25, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTAccelerating Containerized Workloads with Amazon EC2 Spot Instances – Learn how to efficiently deploy containerized workloads and easily manage clusters at any scale at a fraction of the cost with Spot Instances.

June 26, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTEnsuring Your Windows Server Workloads Are Well-Architected – Get the benefits, best practices and tools on running your Microsoft Workloads on AWS leveraging a well-architected approach.

 

Containers
June 25, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTRunning Kubernetes on AWS – Learn about the basics of running Kubernetes on AWS including how setup masters, networking, security, and add auto-scaling to your cluster.

 

Databases

June 18, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTOracle to Amazon Aurora Migration, Step by Step – Learn how to migrate your Oracle database to Amazon Aurora.
DevOps

June 20, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTSet Up a CI/CD Pipeline for Deploying Containers Using the AWS Developer Tools – Learn how to set up a CI/CD pipeline for deploying containers using the AWS Developer Tools.

 

Enterprise & Hybrid
June 18, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTDe-risking Enterprise Migration with AWS Managed Services – Learn how enterprise customers are de-risking cloud adoption with AWS Managed Services.

June 19, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLaunch AWS Faster using Automated Landing Zones – Learn how the AWS Landing Zone can automate the set up of best practice baselines when setting up new

 

AWS Environments

June 21, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLeading Your Team Through a Cloud Transformation – Learn how you can help lead your organization through a cloud transformation.

June 21, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTEnabling New Retail Customer Experiences with Big Data – Learn how AWS can help retailers realize actual value from their big data and deliver on differentiated retail customer experiences.

June 28, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTFireside Chat: End User Collaboration on AWS – Learn how End User Compute services can help you deliver access to desktops and applications anywhere, anytime, using any device.
IoT

June 27, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTAWS IoT in the Connected Home – Learn how to use AWS IoT to build innovative Connected Home products.

 

Machine Learning

June 19, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntegrating Amazon SageMaker into your Enterprise – Learn how to integrate Amazon SageMaker and other AWS Services within an Enterprise environment.

June 21, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTBuilding Text Analytics Applications on AWS using Amazon Comprehend – Learn how you can unlock the value of your unstructured data with NLP-based text analytics.

 

Management Tools

June 20, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTOptimizing Application Performance and Costs with Auto Scaling – Learn how selecting the right scaling option can help optimize application performance and costs.

 

Mobile
June 25, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDrive User Engagement with Amazon Pinpoint – Learn how Amazon Pinpoint simplifies and streamlines effective user engagement.

 

Security, Identity & Compliance

June 26, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUnderstanding AWS Secrets Manager – Learn how AWS Secrets Manager helps you rotate and manage access to secrets centrally.
June 28, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUsing Amazon Inspector to Discover Potential Security Issues – See how Amazon Inspector can be used to discover security issues of your instances.

 

Serverless

June 19, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTProductionize Serverless Application Building and Deployments with AWS SAM – Learn expert tips and techniques for building and deploying serverless applications at scale with AWS SAM.

 

Storage

June 26, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDeep Dive: Hybrid Cloud Storage with AWS Storage Gateway – Learn how you can reduce your on-premises infrastructure by using the AWS Storage Gateway to connecting your applications to the scalable and reliable AWS storage services.
June 27, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTChanging the Game: Extending Compute Capabilities to the Edge – Discover how to change the game for IIoT and edge analytics applications with AWS Snowball Edge plus enhanced Compute instances.
June 28, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTBig Data and Analytics Workloads on Amazon EFS – Get best practices and deployment advice for running big data and analytics workloads on Amazon EFS.

AWS IoT 1-Click – Use Simple Devices to Trigger Lambda Functions

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-iot-1-click-use-simple-devices-to-trigger-lambda-functions/

We announced a preview of AWS IoT 1-Click at AWS re:Invent 2017 and have been refining it ever since, focusing on simplicity and a clean out-of-box experience. Designed to make IoT available and accessible to a broad audience, AWS IoT 1-Click is now generally available, along with new IoT buttons from AWS and AT&T.

I sat down with the dev team a month or two ago to learn about the service so that I could start thinking about my blog post. During the meeting they gave me a pair of IoT buttons and I started to think about some creative ways to put them to use. Here are a few that I came up with:

Help Request – Earlier this month I spent a very pleasant weekend at the HackTillDawn hackathon in Los Angeles. As the participants were hacking away, they occasionally had questions about AWS, machine learning, Amazon SageMaker, and AWS DeepLens. While we had plenty of AWS Solution Architects on hand (decked out in fashionable & distinctive AWS shirts for easy identification), I imagined an IoT button for each team. Pressing the button would alert the SA crew via SMS and direct them to the proper table.

Camera ControlTim Bray and I were in the AWS video studio, prepping for the first episode of Tim’s series on AWS Messaging. Minutes before we opened the Twitch stream I realized that we did not have a clean, unobtrusive way to ask the camera operator to switch to a closeup view. Again, I imagined that a couple of IoT buttons would allow us to make the request.

Remote Dog Treat Dispenser – My dog barks every time a stranger opens the gate in front of our house. While it is great to have confirmation that my Ring doorbell is working, I would like to be able to press a button and dispense a treat so that Luna stops barking!

Homes, offices, factories, schools, vehicles, and health care facilities can all benefit from IoT buttons and other simple IoT devices, all managed using AWS IoT 1-Click.

All About AWS IoT 1-Click
As I said earlier, we have been focusing on simplicity and a clean out-of-box experience. Here’s what that means:

Architects can dream up applications for inexpensive, low-powered devices.

Developers don’t need to write any device-level code. They can make use of pre-built actions, which send email or SMS messages, or write their own custom actions using AWS Lambda functions.

Installers don’t have to install certificates or configure cloud endpoints on newly acquired devices, and don’t have to worry about firmware updates.

Administrators can monitor the overall status and health of each device, and can arrange to receive alerts when a device nears the end of its useful life and needs to be replaced, using a single interface that spans device types and manufacturers.

I’ll show you how easy this is in just a moment. But first, let’s talk about the current set of devices that are supported by AWS IoT 1-Click.

Who’s Got the Button?
We’re launching with support for two types of buttons (both pictured above). Both types of buttons are pre-configured with X.509 certificates, communicate to the cloud over secure connections, and are ready to use.

The AWS IoT Enterprise Button communicates via Wi-Fi. It has a 2000-click lifetime, encrypts outbound data using TLS, and can be configured using BLE and our mobile app. It retails for $19.99 (shipping and handling not included) and can be used in the United States, Europe, and Japan.

The AT&T LTE-M Button communicates via the LTE-M cellular network. It has a 1500-click lifetime, and also encrypts outbound data using TLS. The device and the bundled data plan is available an an introductory price of $29.99 (shipping and handling not included), and can be used in the United States.

We are very interested in working with device manufacturers in order to make even more shapes, sizes, and types of devices (badge readers, asset trackers, motion detectors, and industrial sensors, to name a few) available to our customers. Our team will be happy to tell you about our provisioning tools and our facility for pushing OTA (over the air) updates to large fleets of devices; you can contact them at [email protected].

AWS IoT 1-Click Concepts
I’m eager to show you how to use AWS IoT 1-Click and the buttons, but need to introduce a few concepts first.

Device – A button or other item that can send messages. Each device is uniquely identified by a serial number.

Placement Template – Describes a like-minded collection of devices to be deployed. Specifies the action to be performed and lists the names of custom attributes for each device.

Placement – A device that has been deployed. Referring to placements instead of devices gives you the freedom to replace and upgrade devices with minimal disruption. Each placement can include values for custom attributes such as a location (“Building 8, 3rd Floor, Room 1337”) or a purpose (“Coffee Request Button”).

Action – The AWS Lambda function to invoke when the button is pressed. You can write a function from scratch, or you can make use of a pair of predefined functions that send an email or an SMS message. The actions have access to the attributes; you can, for example, send an SMS message with the text “Urgent need for coffee in Building 8, 3rd Floor, Room 1337.”

Getting Started with AWS IoT 1-Click
Let’s set up an IoT button using the AWS IoT 1-Click Console:

If I didn’t have any buttons I could click Buy devices to get some. But, I do have some, so I click Claim devices to move ahead. I enter the device ID or claim code for my AT&T button and click Claim (I can enter multiple claim codes or device IDs if I want):

The AWS buttons can be claimed using the console or the mobile app; the first step is to use the mobile app to configure the button to use my Wi-Fi:

Then I scan the barcode on the box and click the button to complete the process of claiming the device. Both of my buttons are now visible in the console:

I am now ready to put them to use. I click on Projects, and then Create a project:

I name and describe my project, and click Next to proceed:

Now I define a device template, along with names and default values for the placement attributes. Here’s how I set up a device template (projects can contain several, but I just need one):

The action has two mandatory parameters (phone number and SMS message) built in; I add three more (Building, Room, and Floor) and click Create project:

I’m almost ready to ask for some coffee! The next step is to associate my buttons with this project by creating a placement for each one. I click Create placements to proceed. I name each placement, select the device to associate with it, and then enter values for the attributes that I established for the project. I can also add additional attributes that are peculiar to this placement:

I can inspect my project and see that everything looks good:

I click on the buttons and the SMS messages appear:

I can monitor device activity in the AWS IoT 1-Click Console:

And also in the Lambda Console:

The Lambda function itself is also accessible, and can be used as-is or customized:

As you can see, this is the code that lets me use {{*}}include all of the placement attributes in the message and {{Building}} (for example) to include a specific placement attribute.

Now Available
I’ve barely scratched the surface of this cool new service and I encourage you to give it a try (or a click) yourself. Buy a button or two, build something cool, and let me know all about it!

Pricing is based on the number of enabled devices in your account, measured monthly and pro-rated for partial months. Devices can be enabled or disabled at any time. See the AWS IoT 1-Click Pricing page for more info.

To learn more, visit the AWS IoT 1-Click home page or read the AWS IoT 1-Click documentation.

Jeff;

 

Amazon Sumerian – Now Generally Available

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-sumerian-now-generally-available/

We announced Amazon Sumerian at AWS re:Invent 2017. As you can see from Tara‘s blog post (Presenting Amazon Sumerian: An Easy Way to Create VR, AR, and 3D Experiences), Sumerian does not require any specialized programming or 3D graphics expertise. You can build VR, AR, and 3D experiences for a wide variety of popular hardware platforms including mobile devices, head-mounted displays, digital signs, and web browsers.

I’m happy to announce that Sumerian is now generally available. You can create realistic virtual environments and scenes without having to acquire or master specialized tools for 3D modeling, animation, lighting, audio editing, or programming. Once built, you can deploy your finished creation across multiple platforms without having to write custom code or deal with specialized deployment systems and processes.

Sumerian gives you a web-based editor that you can use to quickly and easily create realistic, professional-quality scenes. There’s a visual scripting tool that lets you build logic to control how objects and characters (Sumerian Hosts) respond to user actions. Sumerian also lets you create rich, natural interactions powered by AWS services such as Amazon Lex, Polly, AWS Lambda, AWS IoT, and Amazon DynamoDB.

Sumerian was designed to work on multiple platforms. The VR and AR apps that you create in Sumerian will run in browsers that supports WebGL or WebVR and on popular devices such as the Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, and those powered by iOS or Android.

During the preview period, we have been working with a broad spectrum of customers to put Sumerian to the test and to create proof of concept (PoC) projects designed to highlight an equally broad spectrum of use cases, including employee education, training simulations, field service productivity, virtual concierge, design and creative, and brand engagement. Fidelity Labs (the internal R&D unit of Fidelity Investments), was the first to use a Sumerian host to create an engaging VR experience. Cora (the host) lives within a virtual chart room. She can display stock quotes, pull up company charts, and answer questions about a company’s performance. This PoC uses Amazon Polly to implement text to speech and Amazon Lex for conversational chatbot functionality. Read their blog post and watch the video inside to see Cora in action:

Now that Sumerian is generally available, you have the power to create engaging AR, VR, and 3D experiences of your own. To learn more, visit the Amazon Sumerian home page and then spend some quality time with our extensive collection of Sumerian Tutorials.

Jeff;

 

AWS Online Tech Talks – May and Early June 2018

Post Syndicated from Devin Watson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-may-and-early-june-2018/

AWS Online Tech Talks – May and Early June 2018  

Join us this month to learn about some of the exciting new services and solution best practices at AWS. We also have our first re:Invent 2018 webinar series, “How to re:Invent”. Sign up now to learn more, we look forward to seeing you.

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks featured this month:

Analytics & Big Data

May 21, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Integrating Amazon Elasticsearch with your DevOps Tooling – Learn how you can easily integrate Amazon Elasticsearch Service into your DevOps tooling and gain valuable insight from your log data.

May 23, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTData Warehousing and Data Lake Analytics, Together – Learn how to query data across your data warehouse and data lake without moving data.

May 24, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTData Transformation Patterns in AWS – Discover how to perform common data transformations on the AWS Data Lake.

Compute

May 29, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT – Creating and Managing a WordPress Website with Amazon Lightsail – Learn about Amazon Lightsail and how you can create, run and manage your WordPress websites with Amazon’s simple compute platform.

May 30, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTAccelerating Life Sciences with HPC on AWS – Learn how you can accelerate your Life Sciences research workloads by harnessing the power of high performance computing on AWS.

Containers

May 24, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT – Building Microservices with the 12 Factor App Pattern on AWS – Learn best practices for building containerized microservices on AWS, and how traditional software design patterns evolve in the context of containers.

Databases

May 21, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTHow to Migrate from Cassandra to Amazon DynamoDB – Get the benefits, best practices and guides on how to migrate your Cassandra databases to Amazon DynamoDB.

May 23, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT5 Hacks for Optimizing MySQL in the Cloud – Learn how to optimize your MySQL databases for high availability, performance, and disaster resilience using RDS.

DevOps

May 23, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT.NET Serverless Development on AWS – Learn how to build a modern serverless application in .NET Core 2.0.

Enterprise & Hybrid

May 22, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTHybrid Cloud Customer Use Cases on AWS – Learn how customers are leveraging AWS hybrid cloud capabilities to easily extend their datacenter capacity, deliver new services and applications, and ensure business continuity and disaster recovery.

IoT

May 31, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTUsing AWS IoT for Industrial Applications – Discover how you can quickly onboard your fleet of connected devices, keep them secure, and build predictive analytics with AWS IoT.

Machine Learning

May 22, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUsing Apache Spark with Amazon SageMaker – Discover how to use Apache Spark with Amazon SageMaker for training jobs and application integration.

May 24, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntroducing AWS DeepLens – Learn how AWS DeepLens provides a new way for developers to learn machine learning by pairing the physical device with a broad set of tutorials, examples, source code, and integration with familiar AWS services.

Management Tools

May 21, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTGaining Better Observability of Your VMs with Amazon CloudWatch – Learn how CloudWatch Agent makes it easy for customers like Rackspace to monitor their VMs.

Mobile

May 29, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT – Deep Dive on Amazon Pinpoint Segmentation and Endpoint Management – See how segmentation and endpoint management with Amazon Pinpoint can help you target the right audience.

Networking

May 31, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTMaking Private Connectivity the New Norm via AWS PrivateLink – See how PrivateLink enables service owners to offer private endpoints to customers outside their company.

Security, Identity, & Compliance

May 30, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT – Introducing AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority (CA) – Learn how AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) Private Certificate Authority (CA), a managed private CA service, helps you easily and securely manage the lifecycle of your private certificates.

June 1, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntroducing AWS Firewall Manager – Centrally configure and manage AWS WAF rules across your accounts and applications.

Serverless

May 22, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTBuilding API-Driven Microservices with Amazon API Gateway – Learn how to build a secure, scalable API for your application in our tech talk about API-driven microservices.

Storage

May 30, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTAccelerate Productivity by Computing at the Edge – Learn how AWS Snowball Edge support for compute instances helps accelerate data transfers, execute custom applications, and reduce overall storage costs.

June 1, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLearn to Build a Cloud-Scale Website Powered by Amazon EFS – Technical deep dive where you’ll learn tips and tricks for integrating WordPress, Drupal and Magento with Amazon EFS.

 

 

 

 

Serverless Architectures with AWS Lambda: Overview and Best Practices

Post Syndicated from Andrew Baird original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/serverless-architectures-with-aws-lambda-overview-and-best-practices/

For some organizations, the idea of “going serverless” can be daunting. But with an understanding of best practices – and the right tools — many serverless applications can be fully functional with only a few lines of code and little else.

Examples of fully-serverless-application use cases include:

  • Web or mobile backends – Create fully-serverless, mobile applications or websites by creating user-facing content in a native mobile application or static web content in an S3 bucket. Then have your front-end content integrate with Amazon API Gateway as a backend service API. Lambda functions will then execute the business logic you’ve written for each of the API Gateway methods in your backend API.
  • Chatbots and virtual assistants – Build new serverless ways to interact with your customers, like customer support assistants and bots ready to engage customers on your company-run social media pages. The Amazon Alexa Skills Kit (ASK) and Amazon Lex have the ability to apply natural-language understanding to user-voice and freeform-text input so that a Lambda function you write can intelligently respond and engage with them.
  • Internet of Things (IoT) backends – AWS IoT has direct-integration for device messages to be routed to and processed by Lambda functions. That means you can implement serverless backends for highly secure, scalable IoT applications for uses like connected consumer appliances and intelligent manufacturing facilities.

Using AWS Lambda as the logic layer of a serverless application can enable faster development speed and greater experimentation – and innovation — than in a traditional, server-based environment.

We recently published the “Serverless Architectures with AWS Lambda: Overview and Best Practices” whitepaper to provide the guidance and best practices you need to write better Lambda functions and build better serverless architectures.

Once you’ve finished reading the whitepaper, below are a couple additional resources I recommend as your next step:

  1. If you would like to better understand some of the architecture pattern possibilities for serverless applications: Thirty Serverless Architectures in 30 Minutes (re:Invent 2017 video)
  2. If you’re ready to get hands-on and build a sample serverless application: AWS Serverless Workshops (GitHub Repository)
  3. If you’ve already built a serverless application and you’d like to ensure your application has been Well Architected: The Serverless Application Lens: AWS Well Architected Framework (Whitepaper)

About the Author

 

Andrew Baird is a Sr. Solutions Architect for AWS. Prior to becoming a Solutions Architect, Andrew was a developer, including time as an SDE with Amazon.com. He has worked on large-scale distributed systems, public-facing APIs, and operations automation.

AWS Online Tech Talks – April & Early May 2018

Post Syndicated from Betsy Chernoff original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-april-early-may-2018/

We have several upcoming tech talks in the month of April and early May. Come join us to learn about AWS services and solution offerings. We’ll have AWS experts online to help answer questions in real-time. Sign up now to learn more, we look forward to seeing you.

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

April & early May — 2018 Schedule

Compute

April 30, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTBest Practices for Running Amazon EC2 Spot Instances with Amazon EMR (300) – Learn about the best practices for scaling big data workloads as well as process, store, and analyze big data securely and cost effectively with Amazon EMR and Amazon EC2 Spot Instances.

May 1, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTHow to Bring Microsoft Apps to AWS (300) – Learn more about how to save significant money by bringing your Microsoft workloads to AWS.

May 2, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTDeep Dive on Amazon EC2 Accelerated Computing (300) – Get a technical deep dive on how AWS’ GPU and FGPA-based compute services can help you to optimize and accelerate your ML/DL and HPC workloads in the cloud.

Containers

April 23, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTNew Features for Building Powerful Containerized Microservices on AWS (300) – Learn about how this new feature works and how you can start using it to build and run modern, containerized applications on AWS.

Databases

April 23, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTElastiCache: Deep Dive Best Practices and Usage Patterns (200) – Learn about Redis-compatible in-memory data store and cache with Amazon ElastiCache.

April 25, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTIntro to Open Source Databases on AWS (200) – Learn how to tap the benefits of open source databases on AWS without the administrative hassle.

DevOps

April 25, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTDebug your Container and Serverless Applications with AWS X-Ray in 5 Minutes (300) – Learn how AWS X-Ray makes debugging your Container and Serverless applications fun.

Enterprise & Hybrid

April 23, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTAn Overview of Best Practices of Large-Scale Migrations (300) – Learn about the tools and best practices on how to migrate to AWS at scale.

April 24, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDeploy your Desktops and Apps on AWS (300) – Learn how to deploy your desktops and apps on AWS with Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon AppStream 2.0

IoT

May 2, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTHow to Easily and Securely Connect Devices to AWS IoT (200) – Learn how to easily and securely connect devices to the cloud and reliably scale to billions of devices and trillions of messages with AWS IoT.

Machine Learning

April 24, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Automate for Efficiency with Amazon Transcribe and Amazon Translate (200) – Learn how you can increase the efficiency and reach your operations with Amazon Translate and Amazon Transcribe.

April 26, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Perform Machine Learning at the IoT Edge using AWS Greengrass and Amazon Sagemaker (200) – Learn more about developing machine learning applications for the IoT edge.

Mobile

April 30, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTOffline GraphQL Apps with AWS AppSync (300) – Come learn how to enable real-time and offline data in your applications with GraphQL using AWS AppSync.

Networking

May 2, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Taking Serverless to the Edge (300) – Learn how to run your code closer to your end users in a serverless fashion. Also, David Von Lehman from Aerobatic will discuss how they used [email protected] to reduce latency and cloud costs for their customer’s websites.

Security, Identity & Compliance

April 30, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTAmazon GuardDuty – Let’s Attack My Account! (300) – Amazon GuardDuty Test Drive – Practical steps on generating test findings.

May 3, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTProtect Your Game Servers from DDoS Attacks (200) – Learn how to use the new AWS Shield Advanced for EC2 to protect your internet-facing game servers against network layer DDoS attacks and application layer attacks of all kinds.

Serverless

April 24, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTTips and Tricks for Building and Deploying Serverless Apps In Minutes (200) – Learn how to build and deploy apps in minutes.

Storage

May 1, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTBuilding Data Lakes That Cost Less and Deliver Results Faster (300) – Learn how Amazon S3 Select And Amazon Glacier Select increase application performance by up to 400% and reduce total cost of ownership by extending your data lake into cost-effective archive storage.

May 3, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTIntegrating On-Premises Vendors with AWS for Backup (300) – Learn how to work with AWS and technology partners to build backup & restore solutions for your on-premises, hybrid, and cloud native environments.

New – Machine Learning Inference at the Edge Using AWS Greengrass

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-machine-learning-inference-at-the-edge-using-aws-greengrass/

What happens when you combine the Internet of Things, Machine Learning, and Edge Computing? Before I tell you, let’s review each one and discuss what AWS has to offer.

Internet of Things (IoT) – Devices that connect the physical world and the digital one. The devices, often equipped with one or more types of sensors, can be found in factories, vehicles, mines, fields, homes, and so forth. Important AWS services include AWS IoT Core, AWS IoT Analytics, AWS IoT Device Management, and Amazon FreeRTOS, along with others that you can find on the AWS IoT page.

Machine Learning (ML) – Systems that can be trained using an at-scale dataset and statistical algorithms, and used to make inferences from fresh data. At Amazon we use machine learning to drive the recommendations that you see when you shop, to optimize the paths in our fulfillment centers, fly drones, and much more. We support leading open source machine learning frameworks such as TensorFlow and MXNet, and make ML accessible and easy to use through Amazon SageMaker. We also provide Amazon Rekognition for images and for video, Amazon Lex for chatbots, and a wide array of language services for text analysis, translation, speech recognition, and text to speech.

Edge Computing – The power to have compute resources and decision-making capabilities in disparate locations, often with intermittent or no connectivity to the cloud. AWS Greengrass builds on AWS IoT, giving you the ability to run Lambda functions and keep device state in sync even when not connected to the Internet.

ML Inference at the Edge
Today I would like to toss all three of these important new technologies into a blender! You can now perform Machine Learning inference at the edge using AWS Greengrass. This allows you to use the power of the AWS cloud (including fast, powerful instances equipped with GPUs) to build, train, and test your ML models before deploying them to small, low-powered, intermittently-connected IoT devices running in those factories, vehicles, mines, fields, and homes that I mentioned.

Here are a few of the many ways that you can put Greengrass ML Inference to use:

Precision Farming – With an ever-growing world population and unpredictable weather that can affect crop yields, the opportunity to use technology to increase yields is immense. Intelligent devices that are literally in the field can process images of soil, plants, pests, and crops, taking local corrective action and sending status reports to the cloud.

Physical Security – Smart devices (including the AWS DeepLens) can process images and scenes locally, looking for objects, watching for changes, and even detecting faces. When something of interest or concern arises, the device can pass the image or the video to the cloud and use Amazon Rekognition to take a closer look.

Industrial Maintenance – Smart, local monitoring can increase operational efficiency and reduce unplanned downtime. The monitors can run inference operations on power consumption, noise levels, and vibration to flag anomalies, predict failures, detect faulty equipment.

Greengrass ML Inference Overview
There are several different aspects to this new AWS feature. Let’s take a look at each one:

Machine Learning ModelsPrecompiled TensorFlow and MXNet libraries, optimized for production use on the NVIDIA Jetson TX2 and Intel Atom devices, and development use on 32-bit Raspberry Pi devices. The optimized libraries can take advantage of GPU and FPGA hardware accelerators at the edge in order to provide fast, local inferences.

Model Building and Training – The ability to use Amazon SageMaker and other cloud-based ML tools to build, train, and test your models before deploying them to your IoT devices. To learn more about SageMaker, read Amazon SageMaker – Accelerated Machine Learning.

Model Deployment – SageMaker models can (if you give them the proper IAM permissions) be referenced directly from your Greengrass groups. You can also make use of models stored in S3 buckets. You can add a new machine learning resource to a group with a couple of clicks:

These new features are available now and you can start using them today! To learn more read Perform Machine Learning Inference.

Jeff;

 

EU Compliance Update: AWS’s 2017 C5 Assessment

Post Syndicated from Oliver Bell original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/eu-compliance-update-awss-2017-c5-assessment/

C5 logo

AWS has completed its 2017 assessment against the Cloud Computing Compliance Controls Catalog (C5) information security and compliance program. Bundesamt für Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik (BSI)—Germany’s national cybersecurity authority—established C5 to define a reference standard for German cloud security requirements. With C5 (as well as with IT-Grundschutz), customers in German member states can use the work performed under this BSI audit to comply with stringent local requirements and operate secure workloads in the AWS Cloud.

Continuing our commitment to Germany and the AWS European Regions, AWS has added 16 services to this year’s scope:

The English version of the C5 report is available through AWS Artifact. The German version of the report will be available through AWS Artifact in the coming weeks.

– Oliver

AWS IoT, Greengrass, and Machine Learning for Connected Vehicles at CES

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-iot-greengrass-and-machine-learning-for-connected-vehicles-at-ces/

Last week I attended a talk given by Bryan Mistele, president of Seattle-based INRIX. Bryan’s talk provided a glimpse into the future of transportation, centering around four principle attributes, often abbreviated as ACES:

Autonomous – Cars and trucks are gaining the ability to scan and to make sense of their environments and to navigate without human input.

Connected – Vehicles of all types have the ability to take advantage of bidirectional connections (either full-time or intermittent) to other cars and to cloud-based resources. They can upload road and performance data, communicate with each other to run in packs, and take advantage of traffic and weather data.

Electric – Continued development of battery and motor technology, will make electrics vehicles more convenient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly.

Shared – Ride-sharing services will change usage from an ownership model to an as-a-service model (sound familiar?).

Individually and in combination, these emerging attributes mean that the cars and trucks we will see and use in the decade to come will be markedly different than those of the past.

On the Road with AWS
AWS customers are already using our AWS IoT, edge computing, Amazon Machine Learning, and Alexa products to bring this future to life – vehicle manufacturers, their tier 1 suppliers, and AutoTech startups all use AWS for their ACES initiatives. AWS Greengrass is playing an important role here, attracting design wins and helping our customers to add processing power and machine learning inferencing at the edge.

AWS customer Aptiv (formerly Delphi) talked about their Automated Mobility on Demand (AMoD) smart vehicle architecture in a AWS re:Invent session. Aptiv’s AMoD platform will use Greengrass and microservices to drive the onboard user experience, along with edge processing, monitoring, and control. Here’s an overview:

Another customer, Denso of Japan (one of the world’s largest suppliers of auto components and software) is using Greengrass and AWS IoT to support their vision of Mobility as a Service (MaaS). Here’s a video:

AWS at CES
The AWS team will be out in force at CES in Las Vegas and would love to talk to you. They’ll be running demos that show how AWS can help to bring innovation and personalization to connected and autonomous vehicles.

Personalized In-Vehicle Experience – This demo shows how AWS AI and Machine Learning can be used to create a highly personalized and branded in-vehicle experience. It makes use of Amazon Lex, Polly, and Amazon Rekognition, but the design is flexible and can be used with other services as well. The demo encompasses driver registration, login and startup (including facial recognition), voice assistance for contextual guidance, personalized e-commerce, and vehicle control. Here’s the architecture for the voice assistance:

Connected Vehicle Solution – This demo shows how a connected vehicle can combine local and cloud intelligence, using edge computing and machine learning at the edge. It handles intermittent connections and uses AWS DeepLens to train a model that responds to distracted drivers. Here’s the overall architecture, as described in our Connected Vehicle Solution:

Digital Content Delivery – This demo will show how a customer uses a web-based 3D configurator to build and personalize their vehicle. It will also show high resolution (4K) 3D image and an optional immersive AR/VR experience, both designed for use within a dealership.

Autonomous Driving – This demo will showcase the AWS services that can be used to build autonomous vehicles. There’s a 1/16th scale model vehicle powered and driven by Greengrass and an overview of a new AWS Autonomous Toolkit. As part of the demo, attendees drive the car, training a model via Amazon SageMaker for subsequent on-board inferencing, powered by Greengrass ML Inferencing.

To speak to one of my colleagues or to set up a time to see the demos, check out the Visit AWS at CES 2018 page.

Some Resources
If you are interested in this topic and want to learn more, the AWS for Automotive page is a great starting point, with discussions on connected vehicles & mobility, autonomous vehicle development, and digital customer engagement.

When you are ready to start building a connected vehicle, the AWS Connected Vehicle Solution contains a reference architecture that combines local computing, sophisticated event rules, and cloud-based data processing and storage. You can use this solution to accelerate your own connected vehicle projects.

Jeff;

Now Available: New Digital Training to Help You Learn About AWS Big Data Services

Post Syndicated from Sara Snedeker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/now-available-new-digital-training-to-help-you-learn-about-aws-big-data-services/

AWS Training and Certification recently released free digital training courses that will make it easier for you to build your cloud skills and learn about using AWS Big Data services. This training includes courses like Introduction to Amazon EMR and Introduction to Amazon Athena.

You can get free and unlimited access to more than 100 new digital training courses built by AWS experts at aws.training. It’s easy to access training related to big data. Just choose the Analytics category on our Find Training page to browse through the list of courses. You can also use the keyword filter to search for training for specific AWS offerings.

Recommended training

Just getting started, or looking to learn about a new service? Check out the following digital training courses:

Introduction to Amazon EMR (15 minutes)
Covers the available tools that can be used with Amazon EMR and the process of creating a cluster. It includes a demonstration of how to create an EMR cluster.

Introduction to Amazon Athena (10 minutes)
Introduces the Amazon Athena service along with an overview of its operating environment. It covers the basic steps in implementing Athena and provides a brief demonstration.

Introduction to Amazon QuickSight (10 minutes)
Discusses the benefits of using Amazon QuickSight and how the service works. It also includes a demonstration so that you can see Amazon QuickSight in action.

Introduction to Amazon Redshift (10 minutes)
Walks you through Amazon Redshift and its core features and capabilities. It also includes a quick overview of relevant use cases and a short demonstration.

Introduction to AWS Lambda (10 minutes)
Discusses the rationale for using AWS Lambda, how the service works, and how you can get started using it.

Introduction to Amazon Kinesis Analytics (10 minutes)
Discusses how Amazon Kinesis Analytics collects, processes, and analyzes streaming data in real time. It discusses how to use and monitor the service and explores some use cases.

Introduction to Amazon Kinesis Streams (15 minutes)
Covers how Amazon Kinesis Streams is used to collect, process, and analyze real-time streaming data to create valuable insights.

Introduction to AWS IoT (10 minutes)
Describes how the AWS Internet of Things (IoT) communication architecture works, and the components that make up AWS IoT. It discusses how AWS IoT works with other AWS services and reviews a case study.

Introduction to AWS Data Pipeline (10 minutes)
Covers components like tasks, task runner, and pipeline. It also discusses what a pipeline definition is, and reviews the AWS services that are compatible with AWS Data Pipeline.

Go deeper with classroom training

Want to learn more? Enroll in classroom training to learn best practices, get live feedback, and hear answers to your questions from an instructor.

Big Data on AWS (3 days)
Introduces you to cloud-based big data solutions such as Amazon EMR, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Kinesis, and the rest of the AWS big data platform.

Data Warehousing on AWS (3 days)
Introduces you to concepts, strategies, and best practices for designing a cloud-based data warehousing solution, and demonstrates how to collect, store, and prepare data for the data warehouse.

Building a Serverless Data Lake (1 day)
Teaches you how to design, build, and operate a serverless data lake solution with AWS services. Includes topics such as ingesting data from any data source at large scale, storing the data securely and durably, using the right tool to process large volumes of data, and understanding the options available for analyzing the data in near-real time.

More training coming in 2018

We’re always evaluating and expanding our training portfolio, so stay tuned for more training options in the new year. You can always visit us at aws.training to explore our latest offerings.

AWS Training & Certification Update – Free Digital Training + Certified Cloud Practitioner Exam

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-training-certification-update-free-digital-training-certified-cloud-practitioner-exam/

We recently made some updates to AWS Training and Certification to make it easier for you to build your cloud skills and to learn about many of the new services that we launched at AWS re:Invent.

Free AWS Digital Training
You can now find over 100 new digital training classes at aws.training, all with unlimited access at no charge.

The courses were built by AWS experts and allow you to learn AWS at your own pace, helping you to build foundational knowledge for dozens of AWS services and solutions. You can also access some more advanced training on Machine Learning and Storage.

Here are some of the new digital training topics:

You can browse through the available topics, enroll in one that interests you, watch it, and track your progress by looking at your transcript:

AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner
Our newest certification exam, AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner, lets you validate your overall understanding of the AWS Cloud with an industry-recognized credential. It covers four domains: cloud concepts, security, technology, and billing and pricing. We recommend that you have at least six months of experience (or equivalent training) with the AWS Cloud in any role, including technical, managerial, sales, purchasing, or financial.

To help you prepare for this exam, take our new AWS Cloud Practitioner Essentials course , one of the new AWS digital training courses. This course will give you an overview of cloud concepts, AWS services, security, architecture, pricing, and support. In addition to helping you validate your overall understanding of the AWS Cloud, AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner also serves as a new prerequisite option for the Big Data Specialty and Advanced Networking Specialty certification exams.

Go For It!
I’d like to encourage you to check out aws.training and to enroll in our free digital training in order to learn more about AWS and our newest services. You can strengthen your skills, add to your knowledge base, and set a goal of earning your AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner certification in the new year.

Jeff;