Tag Archives: codewhisperer

Introducing Amazon CodeWhisperer for command line

Post Syndicated from Brendan Falk original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/introducing-amazon-codewhisperer-for-command-line/

The command line is used by over thirty million engineers to write, build, run, debug, and deploy software. However, despite how critical it is to the software development process, the command line is notoriously hard to use. Its output is terse, its interface is from the 1970s, and it offers no hints about the ‘right way’ to use it. With tens of thousands of command line applications (called command-line interfaces or CLIs), it’s almost impossible to remember the correct input syntax. The command line’s lack of input validation also means typos can cause unnecessary errors, security risks, and even production outages. It’s no wonder that most software engineers find the command line an error-prone and often frustrating experience.

Announcing Amazon CodeWhisperer for command line
Amazon CodeWhisperer for command line is a new set of capabilities and integrations for AI-powered productivity tool, Amazon CodeWhisperer, that makes software developers more productive in the command line. CodeWhisperer for command line modernizes the command line with features such personalized code completions, inline documentation, and AI natural-language-to-code translation. You don’t need to change the tools you use to start benefiting from CodeWhisperer for command line: it integrates directly with your existing tools, such as iTerm2 or the VS Code embedded terminal.

IDE-style completions for 500+ CLIs
CodeWhisperer for command line adds IDE-style completions for hundreds of popular CLIs like as Git, npm, Docker, MongoDB Atlas, and the AWS CLI. These typeahead completions increase your productivity by reducing the time spent typing repetitive or boilerplate commands. Inline documentation helps you understand CLI functionality without context-switching to the browser and interrupting your workflow.

Previously, typing a CLI command like git and hitting tab either wouldn’t show you any completions or would show an incomplete list of completions in a clunky interface without descriptions. Now, you can type git and see all the git subcommands, options, and arguments with descriptions, ordered by usage recency. You can also type cd to see a list of all your directories, npm install to see a list of all the node packages available to install, or aws to see a list of all the AWS CLI subcommands.

Demo of CodeWhisperer for command line CLI completion functionality showing a user getting autocompletions for cd and popular git subcommands, options, and arguments


Natural language-to-bash translation

CLI completions are great for tasks where you already know how to do something and just want to move faster. But what do you do when you’re trying to solve a problem and you’re not 100% sure how? Enter: cw ai!

The cw ai command lets you write a natural language instruction and CodeWhisperer will translate it to an instantly executable shell code snippet. For instance, imagine you want to copy a file from your local machine to Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3). You would write “copy all files in my current directory to s3” and CodeWhisperer will output aws s3 cp . s3://$BUCKET_NAME --recursive — now all you need to do is choose an S3 bucket. Natural language to bash translation is perfect for those workflows you occasionally have to do, but always forget the correct bash syntax like reversing a git commit, finding strings inside files with grep, or compressing files with tar. And just like with CLI completions, cw ai translator works great with the AWS CLI.

CodeWhisperer for command line demo showing a user typing the `cw ai` command, asking to copy all the files in their current directory to S3, and getting the correct command as output


Get started

CodeWhisperer for command line is available on macOS for all major shells (bash, zsh, and fish) and major terminal emulators such as Terminal, iTerm2, Hyper, and the built-in terminals in Visual Studio Code and JetBrains.

To get started, visit aws.amazon.com/codewhisperer/resources

How to use Amazon CodeWhisperer using Okta as an external IdP

Post Syndicated from Chetan Makvana original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/how-to-use-amazon-codewhisperer-using-okta-as-an-external-idp/

Customers using Amazon CodeWhisperer often want to enable their developers to sign in using existing identity providers (IdP), such as Okta. CodeWhisperer provides support for authentication either through AWS Builder Id or AWS IAM Identity Center. AWS Builder ID is a personal profile for builders. It is designed for individual developers, particularly when working on personal projects or in cases when organization does not authenticate to AWS using the IAM Identity Center. IAM Identity Center is better suited for enterprise developers who use CodeWhisperer as employees of organizations that have an AWS account. The IAM Identity Center authentication method expands the capabilities of IAM by centralizing user administration and access control. Many customers prefer using Okta as their external IdP for Single Sign-On (SSO). They aim to leverage their existing Okta credentials to seamlessly access CodeWhisperer. To achieve this, customers utilize the IAM Identity Center authentication method.

Trained on billions of lines of Amazon and open-source code, CodeWhisperer is an AI coding companion that helps developers write code by generating real-time whole-line and full-function code suggestions in their Integrated Development Environments (IDEs). CodeWhisperer comes in two tiers—the Individual Tier is free for individual use, and the Professional Tier offers administrative features, like SSO and IAM Identity Center integration, policy control for referenced code suggestions, and higher limits on security scanning. Customers enable the professional tier of CodeWhisperer for their developers for a business use. When using CodeWhisperer with the professional tier, developers should authenticate with the IAM Identity Center. We will also soon introduce the Enterprise Tier, offering the additional capability to customize CodeWhisperer to generate more relevant recommendations by making it aware of your internal libraries, APIs, best practices, and architectural patterns.

In this blog, we will show you how to set up Okta as an external IdP for IAM Identity Center and enable access to CodeWhisperer using existing Okta credentials.

How it works

The flow for accessing CodeWhisperer through the IAM Identity Center involves the authentication of Okta users using Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0 authentication.

Architecture Diagram for sign-in process

Figure 1: Architecture diagram for sign-in process

The sign-in process follows these steps:

  1. IAM Identity Center synchronizes users and groups information from Okta into IAM Identity Center using the System for Cross-domain Identity Management (SCIM) v2.0 protocol.
  2. Developer with an Okta account connects to CodeWhisperer through IAM Identity Center.
  3. If the developer isn’t already authenticated, they will be redirected to the Okta account login. The developer will sign in using their Okta credentials.
  4. If the sign-in is successful, Okta processes the request and sends a SAML response containing the developer’s identity and authentication status to IAM Identity Center.
  5. If the SAML response is valid and the developer is authenticated, IAM Identity Center grants access to CodeWhisperer.
  6. The developer can now securely access and use CodeWhisperer.

Prerequisites

For this walkthrough, you should have the following prerequisites:

Configure Okta as an external IdP with IAM Identity Center

Step 1: Enable IAM Identity Center in Okta

  1. In the Okta Admin Console, Navigate to the Applications Tab > Applications.
  2. Browse App Catalog for the AWS IAM Identity Center app and Select Add Integration.
In Okta’s App Integration Catalog, the option to select the AWS IAM Identity Center App

Figure 2: Okta’s App Integration Catalog

  1. Provide a name for the App Integration, using the Application label. Example: “Demo_AWS IAM Identity Center”.
  2. Navigate to the Sign On tab for the “Demo_AWS IAM Identity Center” app .
  3. Under SAML Signing Certificates, select View IdP Metadata from the Actions drop-down menu and Save the contents as metadata.xml
Under SAML Signing Certificates, the option to select View IdP Metadata from the Actions drop-down menu and Save the contents as metadata.xml.

Figure 3: SAML Signing Certificates Page

Step 2: Configure Okta as an external IdP in IAM Identity Center

  1. In IAM Identity Center Console, navigate to Dashboard.
  2. Select Choose your identity source.
In IAM Identity Center Console, Dashboard tab displays the option to select Recommended setup steps with Choose your Identity source as Step 1

Figure 4: IAM Identity Center Console

  1. Under Identity source, select Change identity source from the Actions drop-down menu
  2. On the next page, select External identity provider, then click Next.
  3. Configure the external identity provider:
    • IdP SAML metadata: Click Choose file to upload Okta’s IdP SAML metadata you saved in the previous section Step 6.
    • Make a copy of the AWS access portal sign-in URL, IAM Identity Center ACS URL, and IAM Identity Center issuer URL values. You’ll need these values later on.
    • Click Next.
  1. Review the list of changes. Once you are ready to proceed, type ACCEPT, then click Change identity source.

Step 3: Configure Okta with IAM Identity Center Sign On details

  1. In Okta, select the Sign On tab IAM Identity Center SAML app, then click Edit:
    • Enter AWS IAM Identity Center SSO ACS URL and AWS IAM Identity Center SSO issuer URL values that you copied in previous section step 5b into the corresponding fields.
    • Application username format: Select one of the options from the drop-down menu.
  1. Click Save.

Step 4: Enable provisioning in IAM Identity Center

  1. In IAM Identity Center Console, choose Settings in the left navigation pane.
  2. On the Settings page, locate the Automatic provisioning information box, and then choose Enable. This immediately enables automatic provisioning in IAM Identity Center and displays the necessary SCIM endpoint and access token information.
Under IAM Identity Center settings, the option to enable automatic provisioning.

Figure 5: IAM Identity Center Settings for Automatic provisioning

  1. In the Inbound automatic provisioning dialog box, copy each of the values for the following options. You will need to paste these in later when you configure provisioning in Okta.
    • SCIM endpoint
    • Access token
  2. Choose Close.

Step 5: Configure provisioning in Okta

  1. In a separate browser window, log in to the Okta admin portal and navigate to the IAM Identity Center app.
  2. On the IAM Identity Center app page, choose the Provisioning tab, and then choose Integration.
  3. Choose Configure API Integration and then select the check box next to Enable API integration to enable provisioning.
  4. Paste SCIM endpoint copied in previous step into the Base URL field. Make sure that you remove the trailing forward slash at the end of the URL.
  5. Paste Access token copied in previous step into the API Token field.
  6. Choose Test API Credentials to verify the credentials entered are valid.
  7. Choose Save.
  8. Under Settings, choose To App, choose Edit, and then select the Enable check box for each of the Provisioning Features you want to enable.
  9. Choose Save.

Step 6: Assign access for groups in Okta

  1. In the Okta admin console, navigate to the IAM Identity Center app page, choose the Assignments tab.
  2. In the Assignments page, choose Assign, and then choose Assign to Groups.
  3. Choose the Okta group or groups that you want to assign access to the IAM Identity Center app. Choose Assign, choose Save and Go Back, and then choose Done. This starts provisioning the users in the group into the IAM Identity Center.
  4. Repeat step 3 for all groups that you want to provide access.
  5. Choose the Push Groups tab. Choose the Okta group or groups that you chose in the previous step.
  6. Then choose Save. The group status changes to Active after the group and its members have successfully been pushed to IAM Identity Center.

    CodeWhisperer Settings page displays option to add groups with access.

    Figure 7: Amazon CodeWhisperer Settings Page

Step 7: Provide access to CodeWhisperer

  1. In the CodeWhisperer Console, under Settings add the groups which require access to CodeWhisperer.

    CodeWhisperer Settings page displays option to add groups with access.

    Figure 7: Amazon CodeWhisperer Settings Page

Set up AWS Toolkit with IAM Identity Center

To use CodeWhisperer, you will now set up the AWS Toolkit within integrated development environments (IDE) to establish authentication with the IAM Identity Center.

In IDE, steps to set up AWS Toolkit with IAM Identity Center

Figure 8: Set up AWS Toolkit with IAM Identity Center

  1. In the IDE, open the AWS extension panel and click Start button under Developer Tools > CodeWhisperer.
  2. In the resulting pane, expand the section titled Have a Professional Tier subscription? Sign in with IAM Identity Center.
  3. Enter the IAM Identity Center URL you previously copied into the Start URL field.
  4. Set the region to us-east-1 and click Sign in button.
  5. Click Copy Code and Proceed to copy the code from the resulting pop-up.
  6. When prompted by the Do you want Code to open the external website? pop-up, click Open.
  7. Paste the code copied in Step 5 and click Next.
  8. Enter your Okta credentials and click Sign in.
  9. Click Allow to grant AWS Toolkit to access your data.
  10. When the connection is complete, a notification indicates that it is safe to close your browser. Close the browser tab and return to IDE.
  11. Depending on your preference, select Yes if you wish to continue using IAM Identity Center with CodeWhisperer while using current AWS profile, else select No.
  12. You are now all set to use CodeWhisperer from within IDE, authenticated with your Okta credentials.

Test Configuration

If you have successfully completed the previous step, you will see the code suggested by CodeWhisperer.

 In IDE, steps to test CodeWhisperer configuration

Figure 9: Test Step Configurations

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to leverage existing Okta credential to access Amazon CodeWhisperer via the IAM Identity Center integration. The post walked through the steps detailing the process of setting up Okta as an external IdP with the IAM Identity Center. You then configured the AWS Toolkit to establish an authenticated connection to AWS using Okta credentials, enabling you to access the CodeWhisperer Professional Tier.

About the authors:

Chetan Makvana

Chetan Makvana is a senior solutions architect working with global systems integrators at AWS. He works with AWS partners and customers to provide them with architectural guidance for building scalable architecture and execute strategies to drive adoption of AWS services. He is a technology enthusiast and a builder with a core area of interest on serverless and DevOps. Outside of work, he enjoys binge-watching, traveling and music.

Balachander Keelapudi

Balachander Keelapudi is a senior solutions architect working with AWS customers to provide them with architectural guidance for building scalable architecture and execute strategies to drive adoption of AWS services. He is a technology enthusiast and a builder with a core area of interest on DevSecOps and Observability. Outside of work, he enjoys biking and going on hiking with his family.

Introducing Amazon CodeWhisperer Dashboard and CloudWatch Metrics

Post Syndicated from Karthik Rao original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/introducing-amazon-codewhisperer-dashboard-and-cloudwatch-metrics/

Amazon CodeWhisperer is an AI coding companion that helps improve developer productivity by offering contextualized code snippets, or suggestions, generated based on coding context and natural language prompts to help developers build software quickly, responsibly, and securely. For enterprise customers, CodeWhisperer offers a Professional tier that adds administrative features, like SSO and IAM Identity Center integration, policy control for code suggestions with references to open-source code, and higher limits on security scanning.

When I work with individual developers, they immediately recognize the productivity gains CodeWhisperer offers. However, it can be difficult to measure that same impact across the entire organization. Enterprise customers have requested to understand how many of their developers use CodeWhisperer, how often they use it, and how often they accept the suggestions that CodeWhisperer offers. This is now possible via the CodeWhisperer Dashboard and metics that CodeWhisperer sends to Amazon CloudWatch enabling enterprises to measure the impact of CodeWhisperer.

In this post, I will walk through the new metrics and dashboard options. Note that these features are only available in CodeWhisperer Professional. If you have not configured CodeWhisperer Professional, you can follow the instructions in the CodeWhisperer User Guide. For the remainder of this post, I will assume that you have configured CodeWhisperer Professional are logged into the AWS Console as a CodeWhisperer Administrator. Note that when using the CodeWhisperer Professional, CodeWhisperer does not collect your content for service improvement purposes.

Using the CodeWhisperer Dashboard

CodeWhisperer now includes a dashboard, shown in the following image, to help enterprises understand how developers are benefiting from CodeWhisperer. This dashboard is designed to answer the most common questions.

The CodeWhisperer Dashboard in the AWS Console

The CodeWhisperer Dashboard includes the following sections:

User activity: The User activity section includes the active subscriptions and daily active users. Active subscriptions indicate how many CodeWhisperer seats you have provisioned, while daily active users indicate how many of those seats are used on a daily basis.

Code impact: The Lines of code generated by CodeWhisperer indicates how many lines of code were suggested by CodeWhisperer and accepted by your developers. The percentage of code written by CodeWhisperer indicates how much of your total code is made up of suggestions from CodeWhisperer. This is a great indication of the value your developers are gaining from the service. Accepted suggestions with references indicates the number of suggestions from CodeWhisperer that developers accepted which are based on open-source projects, the references to which CodeWhisperer makes available to you.

Security scans: CodeWhisperer security scan is a tool that helps identify security vulnerabilities in your developers’ code. The data shown indicates how many scans your developers have run in their Integrated Development Environment (IDE).

Using CloudWatch Metrics

While the CodeWhisperer Dashboard will address the most common questions, CodeWhisperer records additional data that may be of interest. CodeWhisperer records these as Amazon CloudWatch metrics, allowing you to create alarms, and custom dashboards. CodeWhisperer records CloudWatch metrics with various levels of granularity.

First, CodeWhisperer records a few high-level metrics as shown in the following image. Most of these already appear on the Dashboard, including the SubscriptionCount, ActiveUsers and Invocations. However, it is still useful to have them in CloudWatch so you can set alarms and build your own dashboards. In the following image, I show the weekly invocation count over the past two months.

CloudWatch metric showing the weekly invocation count over the past two months

Diving a little deeper, you may want to understand how CodeWhisperer is used for specific languages. For example, I may want to understand how CodeWhisperer benefits the front-end developers, who use JavaScript, and compare that with the back-end developer, who use Python. I can do this by leveraging the Programming Language dimension as shown in the following image.

CloudWatch metrics comparing Python and JavaScript

Finally, if you want to dive even deeper, you could can use the more granular CompletionType, ProgrammingLanguage, SuggestionState dimension. CompletionType can either be BLOCK or LINE. Depending on your use case, CodeWhisperer may generate an entire function block in one suggestion or provide line-by-line suggestion. SuggestionState can be ACCEPT indicating that the user accepted the suggestion, REJECT indicating the user rejected the suggestion, or DISCARD indicating that CodeWhisperer did not make the suggestion.

I could use these metric on their own, but it is often even more powerful to use CloudWatch Math Metric to calculate custom metrics. For example, in the following image, I calculate the accept rate for JavaScript suggestions by dividing the sum of accepted suggestions by the total number of accepted and rejected suggestions.

CloudWatch metics showing the accept rate

CodeWhisperer Customizations

Swami Sivasubramanian recently announced Amazon CodeWhisperer customization capability to generate more relevant code suggestions informed by your organization’s code base. This capability uses the latest model and context customization techniques and is now available in preview. With this capability, CodeWhisperer has added additional CloudWatch metrics that let you focus on your customizations. In addition, you can filter the CodeWhisperer dashboard by customization, as shown in the following image.

CodeWhisperer Dashboard showing the customizations dropdown list

Of course, you can also filter by customization in CloudWatch. CodeWhisperer publishes additional metrics that include the CustomizationARN dimension. You can use these new metrics to gather details on how your customizations are performing. For example, in the following image, I am graphing the accepted suggestions for Java for my CodeWhisperer customization. I can use this to understand how well the custom version of CodeWhisperer is performing and look for opportunities to improve my customizations.

CloudWatch metric showing a customization

If you did not get the desired performance improvement, consider increasing the data size and data quality for the customization.

Custom Dashboards

While CloudWatch metrics are interesting on their own, you may want to create a custom dashboard that displays multiple metrics on the screen at once. For example, I would like to see the accept rate and percent of code Written by CodeWhisperer for each of the languages my team uses. These include Python, Java, JavaScript and TypeScript. In the following, image have combined each of these on a single dashboard so I track it once place.

CloudWatch dashboard showing a dozen metrics

You can download the source for this dashboard in JSON format. If you would like to create your own dashboard, you can learn more by reading, Creating a CloudWatch Dashboard in the CloudWatch documentation. Alternatively, you can see an example of creating a custom CodeWhisperer Dashboard using CDK in this GitHub repository.

Conclusion

In the past, it was difficult to measure CodeWhisperer’s impact across the entire organization. CodeWhisperer now support CloudWatch Metrics along with a new CodeWhisperer Dashboard that provides insightful data about how your developers use the service. These new features provide the tools to understand how your organization is benefitting from CodeWhisperer. You can read more in the CodeWhisperer Documentation.

About the Author

Karthik Rao

Karthik Rao is a Software Engineer with Amazon CodeWhisperer. He works on building and maintaining scalable distributed systems. Outside of work, he can be found hiking and snowboarding.

Optimize software development with Amazon CodeWhisperer

Post Syndicated from Dhaval Shah original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/optimize-software-development-with-amazon-codewhisperer/

Businesses differentiate themselves by delivering new capabilities to their customers faster. They must leverage automation to accelerate their software development by optimizing code quality, improving performance, and ensuring their software meets security/compliance requirements. Trained on billions of lines of Amazon and open-source code, Amazon CodeWhisperer is an AI coding companion that helps developers write code by generating real-time whole-line and full-function code suggestions in their IDEs. Amazon CodeWhisperer has two tiers: the individual tier is free for individual use, and the professional tier provides administrative capabilities for organizations seeking to grant their developers access to CW. This blog provides a high-level overview of how developers can use CodeWhisperer.

Getting Started

Getting started with CodeWhisperer is straightforward and documented here. After setup, CodeWhisperer integrates with the IDE and provides code suggestions based on comments written in the IDE. Use TAB to accept a suggestion, ESC to reject the suggestion ALT+C (Windows)/Option + C(MAC) to force a suggestion, and left and right arrow keys to switch between suggestions.

CodeWhisperer supports code generation for 15 programming languages. CodeWhisperer can be used in various IDEs like Amazon Sagemaker Studio, Visual Studio Code, AWS Cloud9, AWS Lambda and many JetBrains IDEs. Refer to the Amazon CodeWhisperer documentation for the latest updates on supported languages and IDEs.

Contextual Code Suggestions

CodeWhisperer continuously examines code and comments for contextual code suggestions. It will generate code snippets using this contextual information and the location of your cursor. Illustrated below is an example of a code suggestion from inline comments in Visual Studio Code that demonstrates how CodeWhisperer can provide context-specific code suggestions without requiring the user to manually replace variables or parameters. In the comment, the file and Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) bucket are specified, and CodeWhisperer uses this context to suggest relevant code.

Image depicts a person typing on a computer keyboard, with a code editor window on the screen. The code shows a function for uploading a file from a local directory to an Amazon S3 bucket

CodeWhisperer also supports and recommends writing declarative code and procedural code, such as shell scripting and query languages. The following example shows how CodeWhisperer recommend the blocks of code in a shell script to loop through servers to execute the hostname command and save their response to an output file.

Image is a gif of a person typing on a computer keyboard, with a terminal window on the screen displaying a shell script named 'shell_script.sh.' The code defines a list of servers and outputs the file path. As the person types, the code updates with the output path displayed below.

In the following example, based on the comment, CodeWhisperer suggests Structured Query Language (SQL) code for using common table expression.

"Image is a gif of a person typing on a computer keyboard, with a code editor window on the screen displaying a SQL query. The query uses common table expressions to find the age of a product from an inventory table. As the person types, the query updates with the output displayed below in the form of SQL code. The background is a blurred office environment

CodeWhisperer works with popular Integrated Development Environments (IDEs), for more information on IDE’s supported please refer to CodeWhisperer’s documentation. Illustrated below is CodeWhisperer integrated with AWS Lambda console.

"Image is a gif of a person typing on a computer keyboard, with an AWS Lambda console on the screen. The person is entering a prompt to list all the Amazon S3 buckets. As the person types, the console updates with the output code displayed below, which can be executed to show all the S3 buckets."

Amazon CodeWhisperer is a versatile AI coding assistant that can aid in a variety of tasks, including AWS-related tasks and API integrations, as well as external (non AWS) API integrations. For example, illustrated below is CodeWhisperer suggesting code for Twilio’s APIs.

"Image is a gif of a person typing on a computer keyboard, with an integrated development environment (IDE) on the screen. The person is entering a prompt to write a code that uses the Twilio API to make a voice call. As the person types, the IDE updates with the output function displayed below, which can be executed to make the voice call."

Now that we have seen how CodeWhisperer can help with writing code faster, the next section explores how to use AI responsibly.

Use AI responsibly

Developers often leverage open-source code, however run into challenges of license attribution such as attributing the original authors or maintaining the license text. The challenge lies in properly identifying and attributing the relevant open-source components used within a project. With the abundance of open-source libraries and frameworks available, it can be time-consuming and complex to track and attribute each piece of code accurately. Failure to meet the license attribution requirements can result in legal issues, violation of intellectual property rights, and damage to a developer’s reputation. Code Whisperer’s reference tracking continuously monitors suggested code for similarities with known open-source code, allowing developers to make informed decisions about incorporating it into their project and ensuring proper attribution.

"Image is a gif of a code editor window displaying a counting sort function, with a section of the code highlighted. The highlighted section is the implementation of counting sort by digit, suggested by CodeWhisperer. The gif includes a caption mentioning that the implementation is being referenced from MIT. This showcases the capability of CodeWhisperer's reference tracking."

Shift left application security

CodeWhisperer can scan code for hard-to-find vulnerabilities such as those in the top ten Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP), or those that don’t meet crypto library best practices, AWS internal security best practices, and others. As of this writing, CodeWhisperer supports security scanning in Python, Java, and JavaScript languages. Below is an illustration of identifying the most known CWEs (Common Weakness Enumeration) along with the ability to dive deep into the problematic line of code with a click of a button.

"Image is a gif of a code editor window displaying a code to download a file, with a section of the code highlighted. Below the code, there is an illustration of the identification of the most common Common Weakness Enumerations (CWEs) found in the code. However, it is mentioned that not all CWEs have been identified. Additionally, the illustration showcases the feature of being able to dive deep into the problematic line of code by clicking a button."

In the following example, CodeWhisperer provides file-by-file analysis of CWE’s and highlights the top 10 OWASP CWEs such as Unsensitized input is run as code, Cross-site scripting, Resource leak, Hardcoded credentials, SQL injection, OS command injection and Insecure hashing.

Image displays a screen with a proceeding from CodeWhisperer. The text highlights the file-by-file analysis of Common Weakness Enumerations (CWEs) and emphasizes the top 10 OWASP CWEs. These include CWE-94, CWE-95, and CWE-96, which pertain to the unsanitized input being executed as code. Additionally, CWE-20, CWE-79, and CWE-80 are related to cross-site scripting. Furthermore, CWE-400 and CWE-664 are associated with resource leaks, while CWE-798 relates to hardcoded credentials. CWE-89 refers to SQL injection, and CWE-77, CWE-78, and CWE-88 are connected to OS command injection. Lastly, CWE-327 and CWE-328 relate to insecure hashing.

Generating Test Cases

A good developer always writes tests. CodeWhisperer can help suggest test cases and verify the code’s functionality. CodeWhisperer considers boundary values, edge cases, and other potential issues that may need to be tested. In the example below, a comment referring to using fact_demo() function leads CodeWhisperer to suggest a unit test for fact_demo() while leveraging contextual details.

"Image is a gif displaying a code editor window, with a section of code highlighted. A comment within the code refers to the use of the fact_demo() function. CodeWhisperer is seen suggesting code for unit testing, leveraging contextual details related to the fact_demo() function. The background is a blurred office environment."

Also, CodeWhisperer can simplify creating repetitive code for unit testing. For example, if you need to create sample data using INSERT statements, CodeWhisperer can generate the necessary inserts based on a pattern.

"Image is a gif of a person typing on a computer keyboard, with an integrated development environment (IDE) on the screen. The person is entering a prompt to insert sample users into a table, with details such as username, password, and status. As the person types, CodeWhisperer builds out the insert query for the user. The IDE updates with the output query displayed below, which can be executed to insert the sample users into the table."

CodeWhisperer with Amazon SageMaker Studio and Jupyter Lab

CodeWhisperer works with SageMaker Studio and Jupyter Lab, providing code completion support for Python in code cells. To utilize CodeWhisperer, follow the setup instructions to activate it in Amazon SageMaker Studio and Jupyter Lab. To begin coding, see User actions.
The following illustration showcases CodeWhisperer’s code recommendations in SageMaker Studio. It demonstrates the suggested code based on comments for loading and analyzing a dataset.

"Image is a gif of an illustration showcasing CodeWhisperer's code recommendations in SageMaker Studio. The illustration shows a code editor window with a section of code highlighted. The code pertains to loading and analyzing a dataset. CodeWhisperer is seen providing code recommendations based on comments within the code. The recommendations appear in the form of a pop-up, with suggested changes displayed."

Conclusion

In conclusion, this blog has highlighted the numerous ways in which developers can leverage CodeWhisperer to increase productivity, streamline workflows, and ensure the development of secure code. By adopting Code Whisperer’s AI-powered features, developers can experience enhanced productivity, accelerated learning, and significant time savings.

To take advantage of CodeWhisperer and optimize your coding process, here are the next steps:

1. Visit feature page to learn more about the benefits of CodeWhisperer.

2. Sign up and start using CodeWhisperer.

3. Read about CodeWhisperer success stories

About the Authors

Headshot of a person in a black background with natural experssion

Vamsi Cherukuri

Vamsi Cherukuri is a Senior Technical Account Manager at Amazon Web Services (AWS), leveraging over 15 years of developer experience in Analytics, application modernization, and data platforms. With a passion for technology, Vamsi takes joy in helping customers achieve accelerated business outcomes through their cloud transformation journey. In his free time, he finds peace in the pursuits of running and biking, frequently immersing himself in the thrilling realm of marathons.

Headshot of a person in a black background with a smile wearing a navy blue tshirt with stripes

Dhaval Shah

Dhaval Shah is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS, specializing in Machine Learning. With a strong focus on digital native businesses, he empowers customers to leverage AWS and drive their business growth. As an ML enthusiast, Dhaval is driven by his passion for creating impactful solutions that bring positive change. In his leisure time, he indulges in his love for travel and cherishes quality moments with his family.

Headshot of a person in a black background with a grey shirt and spectables with natural experssion

Nikhil Sharma

Nikhil Sharma is a Solutions Architecture Leader at Amazon Web Services (AWS) where he and his team of Solutions Architects help AWS customers solve critical business challenges using AWS cloud technologies and services.

10 ways to build applications faster with Amazon CodeWhisperer

Post Syndicated from Kris Schultz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/10-ways-to-build-applications-faster-with-amazon-codewhisperer/

Amazon CodeWhisperer is a powerful generative AI tool that gives me coding superpowers. Ever since I have incorporated CodeWhisperer into my workflow, I have become faster, smarter, and even more delighted when building applications. However, learning to use any generative AI tool effectively requires a beginner’s mindset and a willingness to embrace new ways of working.

Best practices for tapping into CodeWhisperer’s power are still emerging. But, as an early explorer, I’ve discovered several techniques that have allowed me to get the most out of this amazing tool. In this article, I’m excited to share these techniques with you, using practical examples to illustrate just how CodeWhisperer can enhance your programming workflow. I’ll explore:

Before we begin

If you would like to try these techniques for yourself, you will need to use a code editor with the AWS Toolkit extension installed. VS Code, AWS Cloud9, and most editors from JetBrains will work. Refer to the CodeWhisperer “Getting Started” resources for setup instructions.

CodeWhisperer will present suggestions automatically as you type. If you aren’t presented with a suggestion, you can always manually trigger a suggestion using the Option + C (Mac) or Alt + C (Windows) shortcut. CodeWhisperer will also sometimes present you with multiple suggestions to choose from. You can press the → and ← keys to cycle through all available suggestions.

The suggestions CodeWhisperer offers are non-deterministic, which means you may receive slightly different suggestions than the ones shown in this article. If you receive a suggestion that doesn’t suit your needs, try cycling through all available suggestions using the arrow keys or try rephrasing any code comment prompts slightly. Even punctuation changes can produce fresh suggestions.

The examples in this article are written in JavaScript and TypeScript. However, the techniques I’ll demonstrate are equally suited to many of the programming languages supported by CodeWhisperer. Now, onto the examples!

Typing less

At the most basic level, CodeWhisperer can be used as a supercharged auto-complete, significantly reducing your typing when writing individual lines or blocks of code. To use CodeWhisperer in this way, just write code as you normally would. CodeWhisperer will make automatic suggestions as you type. Accept suggestions when they’re helpful, and ignore suggestions when they’re not. In my experience, using CodeWhisperer in this way alone reduces my typing by 50% or more.

Generating functions

Automatically generating function bodies from signatures

Skilled programmers use clear, descriptive names for their functions and parameters. If you follow this practice in your own programming, CodeWhisperer will have all the context it needs to implement many functions for you.

After I enter the function signature below, CodeWhisperer generates the function body for me.

User input (JavaScript):

function standardDeviation(numbers)

Result:

function standardDeviation(numbers) {
  let mean = numbers.reduce((a, b) => a + b) / numbers.length;
  let variance =
    numbers.reduce((a, b) => a + Math.pow(b - mean, 2)) / numbers.length;
  return Math.sqrt(variance);
}

Generating functions from comments

Sometimes a good function signature alone isn’t enough to convey the desired behavior of a function. In those cases, you can use a detailed code comment as a prompt to CodeWhisperer. I recommend using your language’s doc comment delimiter when using this technique.

User Input (JavaScript):

/**
 * Given a list that contains some numbers and strings, format them into a string
 * in which the numbers are prepended with "#" and the strings are wrapped in
 * double quotes.
 */

Result:

/**
 * Given a list that contains some numbers and strings, format them into a string
 * in which the numbers are prepended with "#" and the strings are wrapped in
 * double quotes.
 */
function formatList(list) {
  return list
    .map((item) => {
      if (typeof item === "number") {
        return `#${item}`;
      } else {
        return `"${item}"`;
      }
    })
    .join(", ");
}

Generating classes

You can generate full or partial class implementations from a single code comment. The comment should describe the key properties and behaviors of the class. Simple descriptions are often all that is required.

User input (TypeScript):

/**
 * A folder has a name, children, and an optional parent. A child can't be added
 * twice.
 */

Result:

After I write the above block comment, CodeWhisperer provides multiple suggestions, including the following implementation, complete with documentation comments for each method!

/**
 * A folder has a name, children, and an optional parent. A child can't be added
 * twice.
 */
export class Folder {
  name: string;
  children: Folder[];
  parent?: Folder;

  constructor(name: string, parent?: Folder) {
    this.name = name;
    this.children = [];
    this.parent = parent;
  }

  /**
   * Add a child to the folder.
   * @param child The child to add.
   * @returns True if the child was added, false if it was already present.
   */
  addChild(child: Folder): boolean {
    if (this.children.includes(child)) {
      return false;
    }
    this.children.push(child);
    child.parent = this;
    return true;
  }

  /**
   * Remove a child from the folder.
   * @param child The child to remove.
   * @returns True if the child was removed, false if it wasn't present.
   */
  removeChild(child: Folder): boolean {
    const index = this.children.indexOf(child);
    if (index === -1) {
      return false;
    }
    this.children.splice(index, 1);
    child.parent = undefined;
    return true;
  }
}

Implementing algorithms

CodeWhisperer enables you to implement well-known algorithms with ease. Simply tell CodeWhisperer which algorithm you want to apply to a particular coding problem, and it will oblige.

User input (JavaScript):

const actors = [ ... ];

// Sort the actors by age using the merge sort algorithm.

Result:

const actors = [ ... ];

// Sort the actors by age using the merge sort algorithm.
function mergeSort(arr) {
  if (arr.length < 2) {
    return arr;
  }

  const middle = Math.floor(arr.length / 2);
  const left = arr.slice(0, middle);
  const right = arr.slice(middle);

  return merge(mergeSort(left), mergeSort(right));
}

function merge(left, right) {
  const result = [];

  while (left.length && right.length) {
    if (left[0].age < right[0].age) {
      result.push(left.shift());
    } else {
      result.push(right.shift());
    }
  }

  while (left.length) {
    result.push(left.shift());
  }

  while (right.length) {
    result.push(right.shift());
  }

  return result;
}

console.log(mergeSort(actors));

Writing unit tests

CodeWhisperer accelerates the implementation of unit tests. Not only is it able to implement the logic for most of the explicit unit tests I ask for, but it often suggests unit tests for edge cases that hadn’t even occurred to me.

When I want CodeWhisperer to implement a unit test, I start with a declaration of the condition I’m testing and the expected result as in the following example.

User input (JavaScript):

describe("Folder.addChild()", () => {
  it("when adding an existing folder should not add duplicate"

Result:

describe("Folder.addChild()", () => {
  it("when adding an existing folder should not add duplicate", () => {
    const folder = new Folder("root");
    const child = new Folder("child");
    folder.addChild(child);
    folder.addChild(child);
    expect(folder.children.length).toBe(1);
  });
});

After you’ve written a test or two, CodeWhisperer is likely to suggest more tests, even without explicit prompting.

Tip: You’ll notice that my test description includes 1) the function I’m testing, 2) the condition I’m testing, and 3) what I expect the result to be. Following this three-part pattern is a great way to ensure CodeWhisperer has the context it needs to implement high quality test logic.

Creating sample data

One of the delightful discoveries I’ve made is that CodeWhisperer can generate dummy data—or really any code that has a repeating pattern. As an illustration, for the following list I entered only the first “user” object as an example, and CodeWhisperer helpfully continued the pattern.

User input (JavaScript):

const fakeUsers = [
  { name: "User 1", id: "user1" },

Result:

const fakeUsers = [
  { name: "User 1", id: "user1" },
  { name: "User 2", id: "user2" },
  { name: "User 3", id: "user3" },  
  { name: "User 4", id: "user4" },
  { name: "User 5", id: "user5" },
  { name: "User 6", id: "user6" }
]

It even works for generating random but plausible values like the names seen below.

User input (JavaScript):

const fakeUsers = [
  { name: "Sally", id: "user1" },

Result:

const fakeUsers = [
  { name: "Sally", id: "user1" },
  { name: "Bob", id: "user2" },
  { name: "Joe", id: "user3" },
  { name: "Jane", id: "user4" },
  { name: "Jill", id: "user5" },
  { name: "Jack", id: "user6" }
]

Simplifying regular expressions

While CodeWhisperer can’t translate natural language into custom regular expressions (yet), it does know a lot of commonly used regular expressions. This saves you time by putting these regular expressions at your fingertips whenever you need them.

Let’s look at one notoriously complex but common regular expression.

User input (JavaScript):

/**
 * Function that validates whether a string is a valid email address.
 */

Result:

/**
 * Function that validates whether a string is a valid email address.
 */
function validateEmail(email: string): boolean {
  const re =
    /^(([^<>()[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^<>()[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/;
  return re.test(String(email).toLowerCase());
}

Learning third-party code libraries faster

CodeWhisperer helps accelerate my learning when I’m using an unfamiliar library, module, or framework. In the example below, I needed to write a utility function that would take a gzip compressed value coming from an API and translate it into a value that the rest of my code could understand. I knew the “pako” library would help me, but I had no idea how to use it. I just prompted CodeWhisperer with an import statement and a comment describing my goal.

import pako from "pako";

/**
 * Accepts a base64-encoded, gzip-compressed JSON string and returns
 * a parsed JSON object.
 */

Result:

import pako from "pako";

/**
 * Accepts a base64-encoded, gzip-compressed JSON string and returns
 * a parsed JSON object.
 */
export function decodeGzipJson(base64String) {
  const compressed = atob(base64String);
  const uncompressed = pako.inflate(compressed, { to: "string" });
  return JSON.parse(uncompressed);
}

Documenting code

CodeWhisperer is capable of generating docstrings and comments for the code it generates, as well as for your existing code. For example, let’s say I want CodeWhisperer to document the matches() method of this FavoritesFilter TypeScript class I’ve implemented (I’ve omitted some implementation details for brevity).

class FavoritesFilter implements IAssetFilter {
  ...
  matches(asset: Asset): boolean {
    ...
  }
}

I can just type a doc comment delimiter (/** */) immediately above the method name and CodeWhisperer will generate the body of the doc comment for me.

Note: When using CodeWhisperer in this way you may have to manually trigger a suggestion using Option + C (Mac) or Alt + C (Windows).

class FavoritesFilter implements IAssetFilter {
  ...
  /**
   * Determines whether the asset matches the filter.
   */
  matches(asset: Asset): boolean {
    ...
  }
}

Conclusion

I hope the techniques above inspire ideas for how CodeWhisperer can make you a more productive coder. Install CodeWhisperer today to start using these time-saving techniques in your own projects. These examples only scratch the surface. As additional creative minds start applying CodeWhisperer to their daily workflows, I’m sure new techniques and best practices will continue to emerge. If you discover a novel approach that you find useful, post a comment to share what you’ve discovered. Perhaps your technique will make it into a future article and help others in the CodeWhisperer community enhance their superpowers.

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Kris Schultz (he/him)

Kris Schultz has spent over 25 years bringing engaging user experiences to life by combining emerging technologies with world class design. In his role as 3D Specialist Solutions Architect, Kris helps customers leverage AWS services to power 3D applications of all sorts.

Develop a serverless application in Python using Amazon CodeWhisperer

Post Syndicated from Rafael Ramos original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/develop-a-serverless-application-in-python-using-amazon-codewhisperer/

While writing code to develop applications, developers must keep up with multiple programming languages, frameworks, software libraries, and popular cloud services from providers such as AWS. Even though developers can find code snippets on developer communities, to either learn from them or repurpose the code, manually searching for the snippets with an exact or even similar use case is a distracting and time-consuming process. They have to do all of this while making sure that they’re following the correct programming syntax and best coding practices.

Amazon CodeWhisperer, a machine learning (ML) powered coding aide for developers, lets you overcome those challenges. Developers can simply write a comment that outlines a specific task in plain English, such as “upload a file to S3.” Based on this, CodeWhisperer automatically determines which cloud services and public libraries are best-suited for the specified task, it creates the specific code on the fly, and then it recommends the generated code snippets directly in the IDE. And this isn’t about copy-pasting code from the web, but generating code based on the context of your file, such as which libraries and versions you have, as well as the existing code. Moreover, CodeWhisperer seamlessly integrates with your Visual Studio Code and JetBrains IDEs so that you can stay focused and never leave the development environment. At the time of this writing, CodeWhisperer supports Java, Python, JavaScript, C#, and TypeScript.

In this post, we’ll build a full-fledged, event-driven, serverless application for image recognition. With the aid of CodeWhisperer, you’ll write your own code that runs on top of AWS Lambda to interact with Amazon Rekognition, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Simple Notification Service (Amazon SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (Amazon SQS), Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), and third-party HTTP APIs to perform image recognition. The users of the application can interact with it by either sending the URL of an image for processing, or by listing the images and the objects present on each image.

Solution overview

To make our application easier to digest, we’ll split it into three segments:

  1. Image download – The user provides an image URL to the first API. A Lambda function downloads the image from the URL and stores it on an S3 bucket. Amazon S3 automatically sends a notification to an Amazon SNS topic informing that a new image is ready for processing. Amazon SNS then delivers the message to an Amazon SQS queue.
  2. Image recognition – A second Lambda function handles the orchestration and processing of the image. It receives the message from the Amazon SQS queue, sends the image for Amazon Rekognition to process, stores the recognition results on a DynamoDB table, and sends a message with those results as JSON to a second Amazon SNS topic used in section three. A user can list the images and the objects present on each image by calling a second API which queries the DynamoDB table.
  3. 3rd-party integration – The last Lambda function reads the message from the second Amazon SQS queue. At this point, the Lambda function must deliver that message to a fictitious external e-mail server HTTP API that supports only XML payloads. Because of that, the Lambda function converts the JSON message to XML. Lastly, the function sends the XML object via HTTP POST to the e-mail server.

The following diagram depicts the architecture of our application:

Architecture diagram depicting the application architecture. It contains the service icons with the component explained on the text above

Figure 1. Architecture diagram depicting the application architecture. It contains the service icons with the component explained on the text above.

Prerequisites

Before getting started, you must have the following prerequisites:

Configure environment

We already created the scaffolding for the application that we’ll build, which you can find on this Git repository. This application is represented by a CDK app that describes the infrastructure according to the architecture diagram above. However, the actual business logic of the application isn’t provided. You’ll implement it using CodeWhisperer. This means that we already declared using AWS CDK components, such as the API Gateway endpoints, DynamoDB table, and topics and queues. If you’re new to AWS CDK, then we encourage you to go through the CDK workshop later on.

Deploying AWS CDK apps into an AWS environment (a combination of an AWS account and region) requires that you provision resources that the AWS CDK needs to perform the deployment. These resources include an Amazon S3 bucket for storing files and IAM roles that grant permissions needed to perform deployments. The process of provisioning these initial resources is called bootstrapping. The required resources are defined in an AWS CloudFormation stack, called the bootstrap stack, which is usually named CDKToolkit. Like any CloudFormation stack, it appears in the CloudFormation console once it has been deployed.

After cloning the repository, let’s deploy the application (still without the business logic, which we’ll implement later on using CodeWhisperer). For this post, we’ll implement the application in Python. Therefore, make sure that you’re under the python directory. Then, use the cdk bootstrap command to bootstrap an AWS environment for AWS CDK. Replace {AWS_ACCOUNT_ID} and {AWS_REGION} with corresponding values first:

cdk bootstrap aws://{AWS_ACCOUNT_ID}/{AWS_REGION}

For more information about bootstrapping, refer to the documentation.

The last step to prepare your environment is to enable CodeWhisperer on your IDE. See Setting up CodeWhisperer for VS Code or Setting up Amazon CodeWhisperer for JetBrains to learn how to do that, depending on which IDE you’re using.

Image download

Let’s get started by implementing the first Lambda function, which is responsible for downloading an image from the provided URL and storing that image in an S3 bucket. Open the get_save_image.py file from the python/api/runtime/ directory. This file contains an empty Lambda function handler and the needed inputs parameters to integrate this Lambda function.

  • url is the URL of the input image provided by the user,
  • name is the name of the image provided by the user, and
  • S3_BUCKET is the S3 bucket name defined by our application infrastructure.

Write a comment in natural language that describes the required functionality, for example:

# Function to get a file from url

To trigger CodeWhisperer, hit the Enter key after entering the comment and wait for a code suggestion. If you want to manually trigger CodeWhisperer, then you can hit Option + C on MacOS or Alt + C on Windows. You can browse through multiple suggestions (if available) with the arrow keys. Accept a code suggestion by pressing Tab. Discard a suggestion by pressing Esc or typing a character.

For more information on how to work with CodeWhisperer, see Working with CodeWhisperer in VS Code or Working with Amazon CodeWhisperer from JetBrains.

You should get a suggested implementation of a function that downloads a file using a specified URL. The following image shows an example of the code snippet that CodeWhisperer suggests:

Screenshot of the code generated by CodeWhisperer on VS Code. It has a function called get_file_from_url with the implementation suggestion to download a file using the requests lib

Figure 2. Screenshot of the code generated by CodeWhisperer on VS Code. It has a function called get_file_from_url with the implementation suggestion to download a file using the requests lib.

Be aware that CodeWhisperer uses artificial intelligence (AI) to provide code recommendations, and that this is non-deterministic. The result you get in your IDE may be different from the one on the image above. If needed, fine-tune the code, as CodeWhisperer generates the core logic, but you might want to customize the details depending on your requirements.

Let’s try another action, this time to upload the image to an S3 bucket:

# Function to upload image to S3

As a result, CodeWhisperer generates a code snippet similar to the following one:

Screenshot of the code generated by CodeWhisperer on VS Code. It has a function called upload_image with the implementation suggestion to download a file using the requests lib and upload it to S3 using the S3 client

Figure 3. Screenshot of the code generated by CodeWhisperer on VS Code. It has a function called upload_image with the implementation suggestion to download a file using the requests lib and upload it to S3 using the S3 client.

Now that you have the functions with the functionalities to download an image from the web and upload it to an S3 bucket, you can wire up both functions in the Lambda handler function by calling each function with the correct inputs.

Image recognition

Now let’s implement the Lambda function responsible for sending the image to Amazon Rekognition for processing, storing the results in a DynamoDB table, and sending a message with those results as JSON to a second Amazon SNS topic. Open the image_recognition.py file from the python/recognition/runtime/ directory. This file contains an empty Lambda and the needed inputs parameters to integrate this Lambda function.

  • queue_url is the URL of the Amazon SQS queue to which this Lambda function is subscribed,
  • table_name is the name of the DynamoDB table, and
  • topic_arn is the ARN of the Amazon SNS topic to which this Lambda function is published.

Using CodeWhisperer, implement the business logic of the next Lambda function as you did in the previous section. For example, to detect the labels from an image using Amazon Rekognition, write the following comment:

# Detect labels from image with Rekognition

And as a result, CodeWhisperer should give you a code snippet similar to the one in the following image:

Screenshot of the code generated by CodeWhisperer on VS Code. It has a function called detect_labels with the implementation suggestion to use the Rekognition SDK to detect labels on the given image

Figure 4. Screenshot of the code generated by CodeWhisperer on VS Code. It has a function called detect_labels with the implementation suggestion to use the Rekognition SDK to detect labels on the given image.

You can continue generating the other functions that you need to fully implement the business logic of your Lambda function. Here are some examples that you can use:

  • # Save labels to DynamoDB
  • # Publish item to SNS
  • # Delete message from SQS

Following the same approach, open the list_images.py file from the python/recognition/runtime/ directory to implement the logic to list all of the labels from the DynamoDB table. As you did previously, type a comment in plain English:

# Function to list all items from a DynamoDB table

Other frequently used code

Interacting with AWS isn’t the only way that you can leverage CodeWhisperer. You can use it to implement repetitive tasks, such as creating unit tests and converting message formats, or to implement algorithms like sorting and string matching and parsing. The last Lambda function that we’ll implement as part of this post is to convert a JSON payload received from Amazon SQS to XML. Then, we’ll POST this XML to an HTTP endpoint.

Open the send_email.py file from the python/integration/runtime/ directory. This file contains an empty Lambda function handler. An event is a JSON-formatted document that contains data for a Lambda function to process. Type a comment with your intent to get the code snippet:

# Transform json to xml

As CodeWhisperer uses the context of your files to generate code, depending on the imports that you have on your file, you’ll get an implementation such as the one in the following image:

Screenshot of the code generated by CodeWhisperer on VS Code. It has a function called json_to_xml with the implementation suggestion to transform JSON payload into XML payload

Figure 5. Screenshot of the code generated by CodeWhisperer on VS Code. It has a function called json_to_xml with the implementation suggestion to transform JSON payload into XML payload.

Repeat the same process with a comment such as # Send XML string with HTTP POST to get the last function implementation. Note that the email server isn’t part of this implementation. You can mock it, or simply ignore this HTTP POST step. Lastly, wire up both functions in the Lambda handler function by calling each function with the correct inputs.

Deploy and test the application

To deploy the application, run the command cdk deploy --all. You should get a confirmation message, and after a few minutes your application will be up and running on your AWS account. As outputs, the APIStack and RekognitionStack will print the API Gateway endpoint URLs. It will look similar to this example:

Outputs:
...
APIStack.RESTAPIEndpoint01234567 = https://examp1eid0.execute-
api.{your-region}.amazonaws.com/prod/
  1. The first endpoint expects two string parameters: url (the image file URL to download) and name (the target file name that will be stored on the S3 bucket). Use any image URL you like, but remember that you must encode an image URL before passing it as a query string parameter to escape the special characters. Use an online URL encoder of your choice for that. Then, use the curl command to invoke the API Gateway endpoint:
curl -X GET 'https://examp1eid0.execute-api.eu-east-
2.amazonaws.com/prod?url={encoded-image-URL}&amp;name={file-name}'

Replace {encoded-image-URL} and {file-name} with the corresponding values. Also, make sure that you use the correct API endpoint that you’ve noted from the AWS CDK deploy command output as mentioned above.

  1. It will take a few seconds for the processing to happen in the background. Once it’s ready, see what has been stored in the DynamoDB table by invoking the List Images API (make sure that you use the correct URL from the output of your deployed AWS CDK stack):
curl -X GET 'https://examp1eid7.execute-api.eu-east-2.amazonaws.com/prod'

After you’re done, to avoid unexpected charges to your account, make sure that you clean up your AWS CDK stacks. Use the cdk destroy command to delete the stacks.

Conclusion

In this post, we’ve seen how to get a significant productivity boost with the help of ML. With that, as a developer, you can stay focused on your IDE and reduce the time that you spend searching online for code snippets that are relevant for your use case. Writing comments in natural language, you get context-based snippets to implement full-fledged applications. In addition, CodeWhisperer comes with a mechanism called reference tracker, which detects whether a code recommendation might be similar to particular CodeWhisperer training data. The reference tracker lets you easily find and review that reference code and see how it’s used in the context of another project. Lastly, CodeWhisperer provides the ability to run scans on your code (generated by CodeWhisperer as well as written by you) to detect security vulnerabilities.

During the preview period, CodeWhisperer is available to all developers across the world for free. Get started with the free preview on JetBrains, VS Code or AWS Cloud9.

About the author:

Rafael Ramos

Rafael is a Solutions Architect at AWS, where he helps ISVs on their journey to the cloud. He spent over 13 years working as a software developer, and is passionate about DevOps and serverless. Outside of work, he enjoys playing tabletop RPG, cooking and running marathons.

Caroline Gluck

Caroline is an AWS Cloud application architect based in New York City, where she helps customers design and build cloud native data science applications. Caroline is a builder at heart, with a passion for serverless architecture and machine learning. In her spare time, she enjoys traveling, cooking, and spending time with family and friends.

Jason Varghese

Jason is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS guiding enterprise customers on their cloud migration and modernization journeys. He has served in multiple engineering leadership roles and has over 20 years of experience architecting, designing and building scalable software solutions. Jason holds a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering from the University of Oklahoma and an MBA from the University of Central Oklahoma.

Dmitry Balabanov

Dmitry is a Solutions Architect with AWS where he focuses on building reusable assets for customers across multiple industries. With over 15 years of experience in designing, building, and maintaining applications, he still loves learning new things. When not at work, he enjoys paragliding and mountain trekking.