Tag Archives: notifications

Turn your smartphone into a universal remote

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/zero-universal-remote/

Honolulu-based software developer bbtinkerer was tired of never being able to find the TV remote. So he made his own using a Raspberry Pi Zero, and connected it to a web app accessible on his smartphone.

bbtinkerer universal remote Raspberry Pi zero

Finding a remote alternative

“I needed one because the remote in my house tends to go missing a lot,” explains Bernard aka bbtinkerer on the Instructables page for his Raspberry Pi Zero Universal Remote.”If I want the controller, I have to hunt down three people and hope one of them remembers that they took it.”

bbtinkerer universal remote Raspberry Pi zero

For the build, Bernard used a Raspberry Pi Zero, an IR LED and corresponding receiver, Raspbian Lite, and a neat little 3D-printed housing.

bbtinkerer universal remote Raspberry Pi zero
bbtinkerer universal remote Raspberry Pi zero
bbtinkerer universal remote Raspberry Pi zero

First, he soldered a circuit for the LED and resistors on a small piece of perf board. Then he assembled the hardware components. Finally, all he needed to do was to write the code to control his devices (including a tower fan), and to set up the app.

bbtinkerer universal remote Raspberry Pi zero

Bernard employed the Linux Infrared Remote Control (LIRC) package to control the television with the Raspberry Pi Zero, accessing the Zero via SSH. He gives a complete rundown of the installation process on Instructables.

bbtinkerer universal remote Raspberry Pi zero

Setting up a remote’s buttons with LIRC is a simple case of pressing them and naming their functions one by one. You’ll need the remote to set up the system, but after that, feel free to lock it in a drawer and use your smartphone instead.



Finally, Bernard created the web interface using Node.js, and again, because he’s lovely, he published the code for anyone wanting to build their own. Thanks, Bernard!

Life hacks

If you’ve used a Raspberry Pi to build a time-saving life hack like Bernard’s, be sure to share it with us. Other favourites of ours include fridge cameras, phone app doorbell notifications, and Alan’s ocarina home automation system. I’m not sure if this last one can truly be considered a time-saving life hack. It’s still cool though!

The post Turn your smartphone into a universal remote appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Five ‘Fantastic’ Piracy Predictions for 2018

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/five-fantastic-piracy-predictions-for-2018-180101/

On January 1, the TF newsroom often wonders what copyright and piracy news the new year will have in store.

Today we want to give our readers some insight into some of the things that crossed our minds.

Granted, predicting the future isn’t an easy task, but the ‘fantastic’ forecasts below give plenty of food for thought and discussion.

Power Cord Manufacturer Held Liable for Streaming Piracy

Hollywood’s concerns over pirate streaming boxes will reach unprecedented levels this year. After successful cases against box sellers and add-on developers, the major movie studios will take aim at the hardware.

A Chinese power cord manufacturer, believed to be linked to more than half of all the streaming boxes sold throughout the world, will be taken to court.

The movie studios argue that the power-cords are essential to make pirate streaming boxes work. They are therefore liable for contributory copyright infringement and should pay for the billions in losses they are partly responsible for.

Pirate Sites Launch ‘The Pirate Coin’

In 2017 The Pirate Bay added a cryptocoin miner to its website, an example many other pirate sites followed. In the new year, there will be another cryptocurrency innovation that will have an even more profound effect.

After Google Chrome adds its default ad-blocker to the Chrome browser, a coalition of torrent sites will release The Pirate Coin.

With this new cryptocurrency, users can buy all sorts of perks and features on their favorite download and streaming portals. From priority HD streaming, through personalized RSS feeds, to VIP access – Pirate Coins can pay for it all.

The new coin will see mass adoption within a few months and provide a stable income for pirate sites, which no longer see the need for traditional ads.

YouTube Music Label Signs First Artists

For years on end, the major music labels have complained bitterly about YouTube. While the video service earned them millions, they demanded better deals and less piracy.

In 2018, YouTube will run out of patience. The video streaming platform will launch a counter-attack and start its own record label. With a talent pool of millions of aspiring artists among its users, paired with the right algorithms, they are a force to be reckoned with.

After signing the first artists, YouTube will scold the other labels for not giving their musicians the best deals.

Comcast Introduces Torrent Pro Subscription

While there’s still a lot of public outrage against the net neutrality repeal in 2018, torrent users are no longer complaining. After the changes are approved by Congress, Comcast will announce its first non-neutral Internet package.

The Torrent Pro (®) package will allow subscribers to share files via BitTorrent in an optimized network environment.

Their traffic will be routed over separate lanes with optimal connections to India, while minimizing interference from regular Internet users.

The new package comes with a free VPN, of course, to ensure that all transfers take place in a fully encrypted setting without having to worry about false notifications from outsiders.

Pirate Bay Goes All-in on Streaming

The Pirate Bay turns 15 years old in 2018, which is an unprecedented achievement. While the site’s appearance hasn’t changed much since the mid-2000s, technically it has been changed down quite a bit.

The resource-intensive tracker was removed from the site years ago, for example, and shortly after, the .torrent files followed. This made The Pirate Bay more ‘portable’ and easier to operate, the argument was.

In 2018 The Pirate Bay will take things even further. Realizing that torrents are no longer as modern as they once were, TPB will make the switch to streaming, at least for video.

While the site has experimented with streaming browser add-ons in the past, it will implement WebTorrent streaming support in the new year. This means users can stream high-quality videos directly from the TPB website.

The new streaming feature will be released together with an overhaul of the search engine and site navigation, allowing users to follow TV-shows more easily, and see what’s new at a glimpse.

Happy 2018!

Don’t believe in any of the above? Look how accurate we were last year! Don’t forget the salt…

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

Hosting Provider Steadfast Fights to Keep DMCA Safe Harbor

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/hosting-provider-steadfast-fights-to-keep-dmca-safe-harbor-171230/

Last year, adult entertainment publisher ALS Scan dragged several third-party Internet services to court.

The company targeted several companies including CDN provider CloudFlare and the Chicago-based hosting company Steadfast, accusing them of copyright infringement because they offered services to pirate sites.

More than a year has passed and both sides have yet to resolve their differences.

ALS Scan recently asked the court for a partial summary judgment, determining that Steadfast contributed to copyright infringement and that it has no safe harbor protection. If this was granted, the hosting provider would be in serious trouble.

The copyright holder argued that Steadfast refused to shut down the servers of the image sharing platform imagebam.com, which was operated by its client Flixya. ALS Scan sees the site as a repeat offender as it was targeted with dozens of DMCA notices, and accuses Steadfast of turning a blind eye to the situation.

In a new filing submitted this month, Steadfast fiercely denies the allegations. The hosting provider indeed leased servers to Flixya for ten years but says it forwarded all notices to its client.

The hosting company could not address individual infringements, other than shutting down the entire site, which would be disproportionate in their view.

“Steadfast had no ability to terminate services to individual users of Imagebam.com other than unilaterally shutting down the entire server which would have violated the law. Imagebam.com was not a pirate site when it was operated by Flixya,” Steadfast informs the court.

“Steadfast was not a direct infringer; Steadfast’s client Flixya was not a direct infringer. The direct infringers of the ALS content were the users of Flixya’s Imagebam.com website. Discovery has shown that many, if not all the infringers of the ALS content, were actually ALS’s own members who posted ALS content with impunity.”

Interestingly, the users who posted pirated images on the site were ALS Scan’s own customers. According to Steadfast, ALS took absolutely no steps to curb these infringements themselves.

Instead, ALS hired an agent, Steve Easton, to track down infringements on external sites and issue takedown requests. Steadfast received several of these as well, but believes it responded appropriately, even though the notices were not DMCA compliant.

“Once Easton sent his legally insufficient notices to Steadfast, Steadfast immediately forwarded the notices to Flixya. In turn, Flixya disabled access to the allegedly infringing works that were hosted on imagebam.com,” the company writes.

While ALS Claims that imagebam.com was a repeat offender, Steadfast sees things differently. They point out that Flixya is a service provider as well, and that they were the ones who had to address the alleged infringements.

It would certainly not be an “appropriate circumstance” to disconnect the servers of an entire website, not in the way Congress intended the DMCA to work, the hosting provider notes.

“An ‘appropriate circumstance’ to terminate a user does not include terminating a user who follows the law. Here, the facts in the record demonstrate that Flixya did not blatantly infringe copyright,” Steadfast writes.

“Rather, the facts show that Flixya complied with the DMCA. Flixya posted the required DMCA information on its imagebam.com website, had users agree to the terms of service, and informed users that his or her account will be terminated.”

The hosting provider wants the case to be thrown out, but ALS Scan clearly disagrees. According to the copyright holder, Steadfast should have terminated the imagebam.com servers.

“Steadfast maintained its own theory that if its own client was an Internet service provider, Steadfast had no burden to terminate services to its client, or indeed take any action, in response to notifications of infringement,” ALS writes.

“The law is that a service provider must stop providing services to whomever it is providing such services as long as such services materially contribute to infringement.”

It is now up to the court to decide whether Steadfast is indeed liable. If the company loses its safe harbor, this will have implications for the broader hosting industry.

It would essentially mean that large hosting companies are responsible for the infringing content that their clients’ users upload or link to, which could get quite messy.

Steadfast’s response is available here (pdf) and ALS Scan’s reply can be found here (pdf).

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

Piracy Notices Can Mess With Your Thermostat, ISP Warns

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/piracy-notices-can-mess-with-your-thermostat-isp-warns-171224/

Since the early 2000’s copyright holders have been sending ISPs takedown notices, to alert account holders that someone’s been using their connection to share copyrighted material.

The goal of these warnings is to deter people from sharing pirated material in the future.

Internet providers are not legally obliged to forward the notices, but many do. What ISPs are required to do is implement a policy to deal with frequent offenders.

Keeping pirates on board without taking any action can make the ISP liable, as Cox found out the hard way. While this case is currently on appeal, some ISPs have already put stringent measures in place.

Take Armstrong Zoom Internet, for example, which has roughly a million subscribers in the Northeastern part of the U.S. Like many other ISPs it reserves the right to terminate repeat infringers, a policy which it doesn’t hide.

Our attention was caught by a recent letter the company sent to one of its users. The ISP points out that it received multiple copyright infringement notices, urging the customer to stop, or else.

“…please be advised that, if Armstrong receives additional notifications of infringement connected With your Zoom Internet Service, Armstrong will remove you from your current service level and place you at the lowest service level.

“This will allow you to access email, but limit your speeds and affect your ability to upload or download material to the internet or use other file-sharing capabilities.”

Armstrong warning (via)

While reduced Internet speeds are bad enough, there’s another scary prospect. The reduced service level may also prevent subscribers from controlling their thermostat remotely. Not ideal during the winter.

“Please be advised that this may affect other services which you may have connected to your internet service, such as the ability to control your thermostat remotely or video monitoring services.”

Accused pirates who want their full service restored, and regain control over their thermostats, have to answer some copyright questions and read an educational piece about copyright infringement.

When they sign an agreement acknowledging that they have done so, full Internet access is restored. However, if more complaints come in later, the consequences will be more severe.

“…if Armstrong received additional notifications after you sign the Acknowledgement, your Zoom Internet Service will be terminated,” the provider writes.

Getting back in after that is only possible after signing an affidavit, so under penalty of perjury, and by paying a fee.

Only then they will regain full control over their thermostat again.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

Using Amazon CloudWatch and Amazon SNS to Notify when AWS X-Ray Detects Elevated Levels of Latency, Errors, and Faults in Your Application

Post Syndicated from Bharath Kumar original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/using-amazon-cloudwatch-and-amazon-sns-to-notify-when-aws-x-ray-detects-elevated-levels-of-latency-errors-and-faults-in-your-application/

AWS X-Ray helps developers analyze and debug production applications built using microservices or serverless architectures and quantify customer impact. With X-Ray, you can understand how your application and its underlying services are performing and identify and troubleshoot the root cause of performance issues and errors. You can use these insights to identify issues and opportunities for optimization.

In this blog post, I will show you how you can use Amazon CloudWatch and Amazon SNS to get notified when X-Ray detects high latency, errors, and faults in your application. Specifically, I will show you how to use this sample app to get notified through an email or SMS message when your end users observe high latencies or server-side errors when they use your application. You can customize the alarms and events by updating the sample app code.

Sample App Overview

The sample app uses the X-Ray GetServiceGraph API to get the following information:

  • Aggregated response time.
  • Requests that failed with 4xx status code (errors).
  • 429 status code (throttle).
  • 5xx status code (faults).
Sample app architecture

Overview of sample app architecture

Getting started

The sample app uses AWS CloudFormation to deploy the required resources.
To install the sample app:

  1. Run git clone to get the sample app.
  2. Update the JSON file in the Setup folder with threshold limits and notification details.
  3. Run the install.py script to install the sample app.

For more information about the installation steps, see the readme file on GitHub.

You can update the app configuration to include your phone number or email to get notified when your application in X-Ray breaches the latency, error, and fault limits you set in the configuration. If you prefer to not provide your phone number and email, then you can use the CloudWatch alarm deployed by the sample app to monitor your application in X-Ray.

The sample app deploys resources with the sample app namespace you provided during setup. This enables you to have multiple sample apps in the same region.

CloudWatch rules

The sample app uses two CloudWatch rules:

  1. SCHEDULEDLAMBDAFOR-sample_app_name to trigger at regular intervals the AWS Lambda function that queries the GetServiceGraph API.
  2. XRAYALERTSFOR-sample_app_name to look for published CloudWatch events that match the pattern defined in this rule.
CloudWatch Rules for sample app

CloudWatch rules created for the sample app

CloudWatch alarms

If you did not provide your phone number or email in the JSON file, the sample app uses a CloudWatch alarm named XRayCloudWatchAlarm-sample_app_name in combination with the CloudWatch event that you can use for monitoring.

CloudWatch Alarm for sample app

CloudWatch alarm created for the sample app

Amazon SNS messages

The sample app creates two SNS topics:

  • sample_app_name-cloudwatcheventsnstopic to send out an SMS message when the CloudWatch event matches a pattern published from the Lambda function.
  • sample_app_name-cloudwatchalarmsnstopic to send out an email message when the CloudWatch alarm goes into an ALARM state.
Amazon SNS for sample app

Amazon SNS created for the sample app

Getting notifications

The CloudWatch event looks for the following matching pattern:

{
  "detail-type": [
    "XCW Notification for Alerts"
  ],
  "source": [
    "<sample_app_name>-xcw.alerts"
  ]
}

The event then invokes an SNS topic that sends out an SMS message.

SMS in sample app

SMS that is sent when CloudWatch Event invokes Amazon SNS topic

The CloudWatch alarm looks for the TriggeredRules metric that is published whenever the CloudWatch event matches the event pattern. It goes into the ALARM state whenever TriggeredRules > 0 for the specified evaluation period and invokes an SNS topic that sends an email message.

Email sent in sample app

Email that is sent when CloudWatch Alarm goes to ALARM state

Stopping notifications

If you provided your phone number or email address, but would like to stop getting notified, change the SUBSCRIBE_TO_EMAIL_SMS environment variable in the Lambda function to No. Then, go to the Amazon SNS console and delete the subscriptions. You can still monitor your application for elevated levels of latency, errors, and faults by using the CloudWatch console.

Lambda environment variable in sample app

Change environment variable in Lambda

 

Delete subscription in SNS for sample app

Delete subscriptions to stop getting notified

Uninstalling the sample app

To uninstall the sample app, run the uninstall.py script in the Setup folder.

Extending the sample app

The sample app notifes you when when X-Ray detects high latency, errors, and faults in your application. You can extend it to provide more value for your use cases (for example, to perform an action on a resource when the state of a CloudWatch alarm changes).

To summarize, after this set up you will be able to get notified through Amazon SNS when X-Ray detects high latency, errors and faults in your application.

I hope you found this information about setting up alarms and alerts for your application in AWS X-Ray helpful. Feel free to leave questions or other feedback in the comments. Feel free to learn more about AWS X-Ray, Amazon SNS and Amazon CloudWatch

About the Author

Bharath Kumar is a Sr.Product Manager with AWS X-Ray. He has developed and launched mobile games, web applications on microservices and serverless architecture.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 26

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/12/15/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-26/

Welcome to TimeShift

Big news this week: Grafana v5.0 has been merged into master and is available in the nightly builds! We are really excited to share this with the community, and look forward to receiving community feedback (good or bad) on the new features and enhancements. As you see in the video below, there are some big changes that aim to improve workflow, team organization, permissions, and overall user experience. Check out the video below to see it in action, and give it a spin yourself.

  • New Grid Layout Engine: Make it easier to build dashboards and enable more complex layouts
  • Dashboard Folders & Permissions
  • User Teams
  • Improved Dashboard Settings UX
  • Improved Page Design and Navigation

NOTE: That’s actually Torkel Odegaard, creator of Grafana shredding on the soundtrack!


Latest Stable Release

Grafana 4.6.3 is available and includes some bug fixes:

  • Gzip: Fixes bug Gravatar images when gzip was enabled #5952
  • Alert list: Now shows alert state changes even after adding manual annotations on dashboard #99513
  • Alerting: Fixes bug where rules evaluated as firing when all conditions was false and using OR operator. #93183
  • Cloudwatch: CloudWatch no longer display metrics’ default alias #101514, thx @mtanda

Download Grafana 4.6.3 Now


From the Blogosphere

Monitoring MySQL with Prometheus and Grafana: Julien Pivotto (who will be speaking at GrafanaCon EU), gave a great presentation last month on Monitoring MySQL with Prometheus and Grafana. You can also check out his slides.

Monitor your Docker Containers: docker stats doesn’t often give you the level of insight you need to effectively manage your containers. This article discuses how to use cAdvisor, Prometheus and Grafana to get a handle on your Docker performance.

Magento Performance Monitoring with Grafana Dashboards and Alerts: This Christmas-themed post walks you through how to monitor the performance of Magento, start building dashboards, and setup Slack alerts, all while sitting in your rocking chair, sipping eggnog.

Icinga Web2 and Grafana Working Together: This is a follow-up post about displaying service performance data from Icinga2 in Grafana. Now that we know how to list the services on a dashboard, it would be helpful to filter this list so that specific teams can know the status of services they specifically manage.

Setup of sitespeed in AWS with Peter Hedenskog: In this video, Peter Hedenskop from Wikimedia and Stefan Judis set up a video call to go over setting up sitespeed in AWS. They create a fully functional Grafana dashboard, including web performance metrics from Stefan’s personal website running in the cloud.

Deploying Grafana to Access Zabbix in Alibaba Cloud ECS: This article walks you through how to deploy Grafana on Alibaba Cloud ECS to access Zabbix to visualize performance data for your website or application.

Let’s Summarize the Test Results with Grafana Annotations + Prometheus: The engineers of NTT Communications Corporation have created something of an Advent Calendar, with new posts each day. December 14th’s post focused on Grafana’s new annotation functionality via the UI and the API.


New Speakers Added!

We have added new speakers, and talk titles to the lineup at grafanacon.org. Only a few left to include, which should be added in the next few days.

Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and many other topics.

This year we have speakers from Bloomberg, CERN, Tinder, Red Hat, Prometheus, InfluxData, Fastly, Automattic, Percona, and more!

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

This week we have a new plugin for the popular IoT platform DeviceHive, and an update to our own Kubernetes App. To install or update any plugin in an on-prem Grafana instance, use the Grafana-cli tool, or install and update with 1 click on Hosted Grafana.

NEW PLUGIN

DeviceHive is an IOT Platform and now has a data source plugin, which means you can visualize the live commands and notifications from a device.


Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

Kubernetes App – The Grafana Kubernetes App allows you to monitor your Kubernetes cluster’s performance. It includes 4 dashboards, Cluster, Node, Pod/Container and Deployment, and also comes with Intel Snap collectors that are deployed to your cluster to collect health metrics.


Update


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and we’ve heard there were some great talks submitted. There is no need to register; all are welcome.


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove


Ok, ok – This tweet isn’t showing a off a dashboard, but we can’t help but be thrilled when someone post about our poster series. We’ll be working on the fourth poster to be unveiled at GrafanaCon EU!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Let us know what you think about timeShift. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Find an article I haven’t included? Send it my way. Help us make timeShift better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

2017 Holiday Gift Guide — Backblaze Style

Post Syndicated from Yev original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/2017-holiday-gift-guide-backblaze-style/


Here at Backblaze we have a lot of folks who are all about technology. With the holiday season fast approaching, you might have all of your gift buying already finished — but if not, we put together a list of things that the employees here at Backblaze are pretty excited about giving (and/or receiving) this year.

Smart Homes:

It’s no secret that having a smart home is the new hotness, and many of the items below can be used to turbocharge your home’s ascent into the future:

Raspberry Pi
The holidays are all about eating pie — well why not get a pie of a different type for the DIY fan in your life!

Wyze Cam
An inexpensive way to keep a close eye on all your favorite people…and intruders!

Snooz
Have trouble falling asleep? Try this portable white noise machine. Also great for the office!

Amazon Echo Dot
Need a cheap way to keep track of your schedule or play music? The Echo Dot is a great entry into the smart home of your dreams!

Google Wifi
These little fellows make it easy to Wifi-ify your entire home, even if it’s larger than the average shoe box here in Silicon Valley. Google Wifi acts as a mesh router and seamlessly covers your whole dwelling. Have a mansion? Buy more!

Google Home
Like the Amazon Echo Dot, this is the Google variant. It’s more expensive (similar to the Amazon Echo) but has better sound quality and is tied into the Google ecosystem.

Nest Thermostat
This is a smart thermostat. What better way to score points with the in-laws than installing one of these bad boys in their home — and then making it freezing cold randomly in the middle of winter from the comfort of your couch!

Wearables:

Homes aren’t the only things that should be smart. Your body should also get the chance to be all that it can be:

Apple AirPods
You’ve seen these all over the place, and the truth is they do a pretty good job of making sounds appear in your ears.

Bose SoundLink Wireless Headphones
If you like over-the-ear headphones, these noise canceling ones work great, are wireless and lovely. There’s no better way to ignore people this holiday season!

Garmin Fenix 5 Watch
This watch is all about fitness. If you enjoy fitness. This watch is the fitness watch for your fitness needs.

Apple Watch
The Apple Watch is a wonderful gadget that will light up any movie theater this holiday season.

Nokia Steel Health Watch
If you’re into mixing analogue and digital, this is a pretty neat little gadget.

Fossil Smart Watch
This stylish watch is a pretty neat way to dip your toe into smartwatches and activity trackers.

Pebble Time Steel Smart Watch
Some people call this the greatest smartwatch of all time. Those people might be named Yev. This watch is great at sending you notifications from your phone, and not needing to be charged every day. Bellissimo!

Random Goods:

A few of the holiday gift suggestions that we got were a bit off-kilter, but we do have a lot of interesting folks in the office. Hopefully, you might find some of these as interesting as they do:

Wireless Qi Charger
Wireless chargers are pretty great in that you don’t have to deal with dongles. There are even kits to make your electronics “wirelessly chargeable” which is pretty great!

Self-Heating Coffee Mug
Love coffee? Hate lukewarm coffee? What if your coffee cup heated itself? Brilliant!

Yeast Stirrer
Yeast. It makes beer. And bread! Sometimes you need to stir it. What cooler way to stir your yeast than with this industrial stirrer?

Toto Washlet
This one is self explanatory. You know the old rhyme: happy butts, everyone’s happy!

Good luck out there this holiday season!

blog-giftguide-present

The post 2017 Holiday Gift Guide — Backblaze Style appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Implementing Canary Deployments of AWS Lambda Functions with Alias Traffic Shifting

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/implementing-canary-deployments-of-aws-lambda-functions-with-alias-traffic-shifting/

This post courtesy of Ryan Green, Software Development Engineer, AWS Serverless

The concepts of blue/green and canary deployments have been around for a while now and have been well-established as best-practices for reducing the risk of software deployments.

In a traditional, horizontally scaled application, copies of the application code are deployed to multiple nodes (instances, containers, on-premises servers, etc.), typically behind a load balancer. In these applications, deploying new versions of software to too many nodes at the same time can impact application availability as there may not be enough healthy nodes to service requests during the deployment. This aggressive approach to deployments also drastically increases the blast radius of software bugs introduced in the new version and does not typically give adequate time to safely assess the quality of the new version against production traffic.

In such applications, one commonly accepted solution to these problems is to slowly and incrementally roll out application software across the nodes in the fleet while simultaneously verifying application health (canary deployments). Another solution is to stand up an entirely different fleet and weight (or flip) traffic over to the new fleet after verification, ideally with some production traffic (blue/green). Some teams deploy to a single host (“one box environment”), where the new release can bake for some time before promotion to the rest of the fleet. Techniques like this enable the maintainers of complex systems to safely test in production while minimizing customer impact.

Enter Serverless

There is somewhat of an impedance mismatch when mapping these concepts to a serverless world. You can’t incrementally deploy your software across a fleet of servers when there are no servers!* In fact, even the term “deployment” takes on a different meaning with functions as a service (FaaS). In AWS Lambda, a “deployment” can be roughly modeled as a call to CreateFunction, UpdateFunctionCode, or UpdateAlias (I won’t get into the semantics of whether updating configuration counts as a deployment), all of which may affect the version of code that is invoked by clients.

The abstractions provided by Lambda remove the need for developers to be concerned about servers and Availability Zones, and this provides a powerful opportunity to greatly simplify the process of deploying software.
*Of course there are servers, but they are abstracted away from the developer.

Traffic shifting with Lambda aliases

Before the release of traffic shifting for Lambda aliases, deployments of a Lambda function could only be performed in a single “flip” by updating function code for version $LATEST, or by updating an alias to target a different function version. After the update propagates, typically within a few seconds, 100% of function invocations execute the new version. Implementing canary deployments with this model required the development of an additional routing layer, further adding development time, complexity, and invocation latency.
While rolling back a bad deployment of a Lambda function is a trivial operation and takes effect near instantaneously, deployments of new versions for critical functions can still be a potentially nerve-racking experience.

With the introduction of alias traffic shifting, it is now possible to trivially implement canary deployments of Lambda functions. By updating additional version weights on an alias, invocation traffic is routed to the new function versions based on the weight specified. Detailed CloudWatch metrics for the alias and version can be analyzed during the deployment, or other health checks performed, to ensure that the new version is healthy before proceeding.

Note: Sometimes the term “canary deployments” refers to the release of software to a subset of users. In the case of alias traffic shifting, the new version is released to some percentage of all users. It’s not possible to shard based on identity without adding an additional routing layer.

Examples

The simplest possible use of a canary deployment looks like the following:

# Update $LATEST version of function
aws lambda update-function-code --function-name myfunction ….

# Publish new version of function
aws lambda publish-version --function-name myfunction

# Point alias to new version, weighted at 5% (original version at 95% of traffic)
aws lambda update-alias --function-name myfunction --name myalias --routing-config '{"AdditionalVersionWeights" : {"2" : 0.05} }'

# Verify that the new version is healthy
…
# Set the primary version on the alias to the new version and reset the additional versions (100% weighted)
aws lambda update-alias --function-name myfunction --name myalias --function-version 2 --routing-config '{}'

This is begging to be automated! Here are a few options.

Simple deployment automation

This simple Python script runs as a Lambda function and deploys another function (how meta!) by incrementally increasing the weight of the new function version over a prescribed number of steps, while checking the health of the new version. If the health check fails, the alias is rolled back to its initial version. The health check is implemented as a simple check against the existence of Errors metrics in CloudWatch for the alias and new version.

GitHub aws-lambda-deploy repo

Install:

git clone https://github.com/awslabs/aws-lambda-deploy
cd aws-lambda-deploy
export BUCKET_NAME=[YOUR_S3_BUCKET_NAME_FOR_BUILD_ARTIFACTS]
./install.sh

Run:

# Rollout version 2 incrementally over 10 steps, with 120s between each step
aws lambda invoke --function-name SimpleDeployFunction --log-type Tail --payload \
  '{"function-name": "MyFunction",
  "alias-name": "MyAlias",
  "new-version": "2",
  "steps": 10,
  "interval" : 120,
  "type": "linear"
  }' output

Description of input parameters

  • function-name: The name of the Lambda function to deploy
  • alias-name: The name of the alias used to invoke the Lambda function
  • new-version: The version identifier for the new version to deploy
  • steps: The number of times the new version weight is increased
  • interval: The amount of time (in seconds) to wait between weight updates
  • type: The function to use to generate the weights. Supported values: “linear”

Because this runs as a Lambda function, it is subject to the maximum timeout of 5 minutes. This may be acceptable for many use cases, but to achieve a slower rollout of the new version, a different solution is required.

Step Functions workflow

This state machine performs essentially the same task as the simple deployment function, but it runs as an asynchronous workflow in AWS Step Functions. A nice property of Step Functions is that the maximum deployment timeout has now increased from 5 minutes to 1 year!

The step function incrementally updates the new version weight based on the steps parameter, waiting for some time based on the interval parameter, and performing health checks between updates. If the health check fails, the alias is rolled back to the original version and the workflow fails.

For example, to execute the workflow:

export STATE_MACHINE_ARN=`aws cloudformation describe-stack-resources --stack-name aws-lambda-deploy-stack --logical-resource-id DeployStateMachine --output text | cut  -d$'\t' -f3`

aws stepfunctions start-execution --state-machine-arn $STATE_MACHINE_ARN --input '{
  "function-name": "MyFunction",
  "alias-name": "MyAlias",
  "new-version": "2",
  "steps": 10,
  "interval": 120,
  "type": "linear"}'

Getting feedback on the deployment

Because the state machine runs asynchronously, retrieving feedback on the deployment requires polling for the execution status using DescribeExecution or implementing an asynchronous notification (using SNS or email, for example) from the Rollback or Finalize functions. A CloudWatch alarm could also be created to alarm based on the “ExecutionsFailed” metric for the state machine.

A note on health checks and observability

Weighted rollouts like this are considerably more successful if the code is being exercised and monitored continuously. In this example, it would help to have some automation continuously invoking the alias and reporting metrics on these invocations, such as client-side success rates and latencies.

The absence of Lambda Errors metrics used in these examples can be misleading if the function is not getting invoked. It’s also recommended to instrument your Lambda functions with custom metrics, in addition to Lambda’s built-in metrics, that can be used to monitor health during deployments.

Extensibility

These examples could be easily extended in various ways to support different use cases. For example:

  • Health check implementations: CloudWatch alarms, automatic invocations with payload assertions, querying external systems, etc.
  • Weight increase functions: Exponential, geometric progression, single canary step, etc.
  • Custom success/failure notifications: SNS, email, CI/CD systems, service discovery systems, etc.

Traffic shifting with SAM and CodeDeploy

Using the Lambda UpdateAlias operation with additional version weights provides a powerful primitive for you to implement custom traffic shifting solutions for Lambda functions.

For those not interested in building custom deployment solutions, AWS CodeDeploy provides an intuitive turn-key implementation of this functionality integrated directly into the Serverless Application Model. Traffic-shifted deployments can be declared in a SAM template, and CodeDeploy manages the function rollout as part of the CloudFormation stack update. CloudWatch alarms can also be configured to trigger a stack rollback if something goes wrong.

i.e.

MyFunction:
  Type: AWS::Serverless::Function
  Properties:
    FunctionName: MyFunction
    AutoPublishAlias: MyFunctionInvokeAlias
    DeploymentPreference:
      Type: Linear10PercentEvery1Minute
      Role:
        Fn::GetAtt: [ DeploymentRole, Arn ]
      Alarms:
       - { Ref: MyFunctionErrorsAlarm }
...

For more information about using CodeDeploy with SAM, see Automating Updates to Serverless Apps.

Conclusion

It is often the simple features that provide the most value. As I demonstrated in this post, serverless architectures allow the complex deployment orchestration used in traditional applications to be replaced with a simple Lambda function or Step Functions workflow. By allowing invocation traffic to be easily weighted to multiple function versions, Lambda alias traffic shifting provides a simple but powerful feature that I hope empowers you to easily implement safe deployment workflows for your Lambda functions.

AWS Systems Manager – A Unified Interface for Managing Your Cloud and Hybrid Resources

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-systems-manager/

AWS Systems Manager is a new way to manage your cloud and hybrid IT environments. AWS Systems Manager provides a unified user interface that simplifies resource and application management, shortens the time to detect and resolve operational problems, and makes it easy to operate and manage your infrastructure securely at scale. This service is absolutely packed full of features. It defines a new experience around grouping, visualizing, and reacting to problems using features from products like Amazon EC2 Systems Manager (SSM) to enable rich operations across your resources.

As I said above, there are a lot of powerful features in this service and we won’t be able to dive deep on all of them but it’s easy to go to the console and get started with any of the tools.

Resource Groupings

Resource Groups allow you to create logical groupings of most resources that support tagging like: Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) buckets, Elastic Load Balancing balancers, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) instances, Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Amazon Kinesis streams, Amazon Route 53 zones, and more. Previously, you could use the AWS Console to define resource groupings but AWS Systems Manager provides this new resource group experience via a new console and API. These groupings are a fundamental building block of Systems Manager in that they are frequently the target of various operations you may want to perform like: compliance management, software inventories, patching, and other automations.

You start by defining a group based on tag filters. From there you can view all of the resources in a centralized console. You would typically use these groupings to differentiate between applications, application layers, and environments like production or dev – but you can make your own rules about how to use them as well. If you imagine a typical 3 tier web-app you might have a few EC2 instances, an ELB, a few S3 buckets, and an RDS instance. You can define a grouping for that application and with all of those different resources simultaneously.

Insights

AWS Systems Manager automatically aggregates and displays operational data for each resource group through a dashboard. You no longer need to navigate through multiple AWS consoles to view all of your operational data. You can easily integrate your exiting Amazon CloudWatch dashboards, AWS Config rules, AWS CloudTrail trails, AWS Trusted Advisor notifications, and AWS Personal Health Dashboard performance and availability alerts. You can also easily view your software inventories across your fleet. AWS Systems Manager also provides a compliance dashboard allowing you to see the state of various security controls and patching operations across your fleets.

Acting on Insights

Building on the success of EC2 Systems Manager (SSM), AWS Systems Manager takes all of the features of SSM and provides a central place to access them. These are all the same experiences you would have through SSM with a more accesible console and centralized interface. You can use the resource groups you’ve defined in Systems Manager to visualize and act on groups of resources.

Automation


Automations allow you to define common IT tasks as a JSON document that specify a list of tasks. You can also use community published documents. These documents can be executed through the Console, CLIs, SDKs, scheduled maintenance windows, or triggered based on changes in your infrastructure through CloudWatch events. You can track and log the execution of each step in the documents and prompt for additional approvals. It also allows you to incrementally roll out changes and automatically halt when errors occur. You can start executing an automation directly on a resource group and it will be able to apply itself to the resources that it understands within the group.

Run Command

Run Command is a superior alternative to enabling SSH on your instances. It provides safe, secure remote management of your instances at scale without logging into your servers, replacing the need for SSH bastions or remote powershell. It has granular IAM permissions that allow you to restrict which roles or users can run certain commands.

Patch Manager, Maintenance Windows, and State Manager

I’ve written about Patch Manager before and if you manage fleets of Windows and Linux instances it’s a great way to maintain a common baseline of security across your fleet.

Maintenance windows allow you to schedule instance maintenance and other disruptive tasks for a specific time window.

State Manager allows you to control various server configuration details like anti-virus definitions, firewall settings, and more. You can define policies in the console or run existing scripts, PowerShell modules, or even Ansible playbooks directly from S3 or GitHub. You can query State Manager at any time to view the status of your instance configurations.

Things To Know

There’s some interesting terminology here. We haven’t done the best job of naming things in the past so let’s take a moment to clarify. EC2 Systems Manager (sometimes called SSM) is what you used before today. You can still invoke aws ssm commands. However, AWS Systems Manager builds on and enhances many of the tools provided by EC2 Systems Manager and allows those same tools to be applied to more than just EC2. When you see the phrase “Systems Manager” in the future you should think of AWS Systems Manager and not EC2 Systems Manager.

AWS Systems Manager with all of this useful functionality is provided at no additional charge. It is immediately available in all public AWS regions.

The best part about these services is that even with their tight integrations each one is designed to be used in isolation as well. If you only need one component of these services it’s simple to get started with only that component.

There’s a lot more than I could ever document in this post so I encourage you all to jump into the console and documentation to figure out where you can start using AWS Systems Manager.

Randall

A Thanksgiving Carol: How Those Smart Engineers at Twitter Screwed Me

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/11/a-thanksgiving-carol-how-those-smart.html

Thanksgiving Holiday is a time for family and cheer. Well, a time for family. It’s the holiday where we ask our doctor relatives to look at that weird skin growth, and for our geek relatives to fix our computers. This tale is of such computer support, and how the “smart” engineers at Twitter have ruined this for life.

My mom is smart, but not a good computer user. I get my enthusiasm for science and math from my mother, and she has no problem understanding the science of computers. She keeps up when I explain Bitcoin. But she has difficulty using computers. She has this emotional, irrational belief that computers are out to get her.

This makes helping her difficult. Every problem is described in terms of what the computer did to her, not what she did to her computer. It’s the computer that needs to be fixed, instead of the user. When I showed her the “haveibeenpwned.com” website (part of my tips for securing computers), it showed her Tumblr password had been hacked. She swore she never created a Tumblr account — that somebody or something must have done it for her. Except, I was there five years ago and watched her create it.

Another example is how GMail is deleting her emails for no reason, corrupting them, and changing the spelling of her words. She emails the way an impatient teenager texts — all of us in the family know the misspellings are not GMail’s fault. But I can’t help her with this because she keeps her GMail inbox clean, deleting all her messages, leaving no evidence behind. She has only a vague description of the problem that I can’t make sense of.

This last March, I tried something to resolve this. I configured her GMail to send a copy of all incoming messages to a new, duplicate account on my own email server. With evidence in hand, I would then be able solve what’s going on with her GMail. I’d be able to show her which steps she took, which buttons she clicked on, and what caused the weirdness she’s seeing.

Today, while the family was in a state of turkey-induced torpor, my mom brought up a problem with Twitter. She doesn’t use Twitter, she doesn’t have an account, but they keep sending tweets to her phone, about topics like Denzel Washington. And she said something about “peaches” I didn’t understand.

This is how the problem descriptions always start, chaotic, with mutually exclusive possibilities. If you don’t use Twitter, you don’t have the Twitter app installed, so how are you getting Tweets? Over much gnashing of teeth, it comes out that she’s getting emails from Twitter, not tweets, about Denzel Washington — to someone named “Peaches Graham”. Naturally, she can only describe these emails, because she’s already deleted them.

“Ah ha!”, I think. I’ve got the evidence! I’ll just log onto my duplicate email server, and grab the copies to prove to her it was something she did.

I find she is indeed receiving such emails, called “Moments”, about topics trending on Twitter. They are signed with “DKIM”, proving they are legitimate rather than from a hacker or spammer. The only way that can happen is if my mother signed up for Twitter, despite her protestations that she didn’t.

I look further back and find that there were also confirmation messages involved. Back in August, she got a typical Twitter account signup message. I am now seeing a little bit more of the story unfold with this “Peaches Graham” name on the account. It wasn’t my mother who initially signed up for Twitter, but Peaches, who misspelled the email address. It’s one of the reasons why the confirmation process exists, to make sure you spelled your email address correctly.

It’s now obvious my mom accidentally clicked on the [Confirm] button. I don’t have any proof she did, but it’s the only reasonable explanation. Otherwise, she wouldn’t have gotten the “Moments” messages. My mom disputed this, emphatically insisting she never clicked on the emails.

It’s at this point that I made a great mistake, saying:

“This sort of thing just doesn’t happen. Twitter has very smart engineers. What’s the chance they made the mistake here, or…”.

I recognized condescension of words as they came out of my mouth, but dug myself deeper with:

“…or that the user made the error?”

This was wrong to say even if I were right. I have no excuse. I mean, maybe I could argue that it’s really her fault, for not raising me right, but no, this is only on me.

Regardless of what caused the Twitter emails, the problem needs to be fixed. The solution is to take control of the Twitter account by using the password reset feature. I went to the Twitter login page, clicked on “Lost Password”, got the password reset message, and reset the password. I then reconfigured the account to never send anything to my mom again.

But when I logged in I got an error saying the account had not yet been confirmed. I paused. The family dog eyed me in wise silence. My mom hadn’t clicked on the [Confirm] button — the proof was right there. Moreover, it hadn’t been confirmed for a long time, since the account was created in 2011.

I interrogated my mother some more. It appears that this has been going on for years. She’s just been deleting the emails without opening them, both the “Confirmations” and the “Moments”. She made it clear she does it this way because her son (that would be me) instructs her to never open emails she knows are bad. That’s how she could be so certain she never clicked on the [Confirm] button — she never even opens the emails to see the contents.

My mom is a prolific email user. In the last eight months, I’ve received over 10,000 emails in the duplicate mailbox on my server. That’s a lot. She’s technically retired, but she volunteers for several charities, goes to community college classes, and is joining an anti-Trump protest group. She has a daily routine for triaging and processing all the emails that flow through her inbox.

So here’s the thing, and there’s no getting around it: my mom was right, on all particulars. She had done nothing, the computer had done it to her. It’s Twitter who is at fault, having continued to resend that confirmation email every couple months for six years. When Twitter added their controversial “Moments” feature a couple years back, somehow they turned on Notifications for accounts that technically didn’t fully exist yet.

Being right this time means she might be right the next time the computer does something to her without her touching anything. My attempts at making computers seem rational has failed. That they are driven by untrustworthy spirits is now a reasonable alternative.

Those “smart” engineers at Twitter screwed me. Continuing to send confirmation emails for six years is stupid. Sending Notifications to unconfirmed accounts is stupid. Yes, I know at the bottom of the message it gives a “Not my account” selection that she could have clicked on, but it’s small and easily missed. In any case, my mom never saw that option, because she’s been deleting the messages without opening them — for six years.

Twitter can fix their problem, but it’s not going to help mine. Forever more, I’ll be unable to convince my mom that the majority of her problems are because of user error, and not because the computer people are out to get her.

Serverless Automated Cost Controls, Part1

Post Syndicated from Shankar Ramachandran original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/serverless-automated-cost-controls-part1/

This post courtesy of Shankar Ramachandran, Pubali Sen, and George Mao

In line with AWS’s continual efforts to reduce costs for customers, this series focuses on how customers can build serverless automated cost controls. This post provides an architecture blueprint and a sample implementation to prevent budget overruns.

This solution uses the following AWS products:

  • AWS Budgets – An AWS Cost Management tool that helps customers define and track budgets for AWS costs, and forecast for up to three months.
  • Amazon SNS – An AWS service that makes it easy to set up, operate, and send notifications from the cloud.
  • AWS Lambda – An AWS service that lets you run code without provisioning or managing servers.

You can fine-tune a budget for various parameters, for example filtering by service or tag. The Budgets tool lets you post notifications on an SNS topic. A Lambda function that subscribes to the SNS topic can act on the notification. Any programmatically implementable action can be taken.

The diagram below describes the architecture blueprint.

In this post, we describe how to use this blueprint with AWS Step Functions and IAM to effectively revoke the ability of a user to start new Amazon EC2 instances, after a budget amount is exceeded.

Freedom with guardrails

AWS lets you quickly spin up resources as you need them, deploying hundreds or even thousands of servers in minutes. This means you can quickly develop and roll out new applications. Teams can experiment and innovate more quickly and frequently. If an experiment fails, you can always de-provision those servers without risk.

This improved agility also brings in the need for effective cost controls. Your Finance and Accounting department must budget, monitor, and control the AWS spend. For example, this could be a budget per project. Further, Finance and Accounting must take appropriate actions if the budget for the project has been exceeded, for example. Call it “freedom with guardrails” – where Finance wants to give developers freedom, but with financial constraints.

Architecture

This section describes how to use the blueprint introduced earlier to implement a “freedom with guardrails” solution.

  1. The budget for “Project Beta” is set up in Budgets. In this example, we focus on EC2 usage and identify the instances that belong to this project by filtering on the tag Project with the value Beta. For more information, see Creating a Budget.
  2. The budget configuration also includes settings to send a notification on an SNS topic when the usage exceeds 100% of the budgeted amount. For more information, see Creating an Amazon SNS Topic for Budget Notifications.
  3. The master Lambda function receives the SNS notification.
  4. It triggers execution of a Step Functions state machine with the parameters for completing the configured action.
  5. The action Lambda function is triggered as a task in the state machine. The function interacts with IAM to effectively remove the user’s permissions to create an EC2 instance.

This decoupled modular design allows for extensibility.  New actions (serially or in parallel) can be added by simply adding new steps.

Implementing the solution

All the instructions and code needed to implement the architecture have been posted on the Serverless Automated Cost Controls GitHub repo. We recommend that you try this first in a Dev/Test environment.

This implementation description can be broken down into two parts:

  1. Create a solution stack for serverless automated cost controls.
  2. Verify the solution by testing the EC2 fleet.

To tie this back to the “freedom with guardrails” scenario, the Finance department performs a one-time implementation of the solution stack. To simulate resources for Project Beta, the developers spin up the test EC2 fleet.

Prerequisites

There are two prerequisites:

  • Make sure that you have the necessary IAM permissions. For more information, see the section titled “Required IAM permissions” in the README.
  • Define and activate a cost allocation tag with the key Project. For more information, see Using Cost Allocation Tags. It can take up to 12 hours for the tags to propagate to Budgets.

Create resources

The solution stack includes creating the following resources:

  • Three Lambda functions
  • One Step Functions state machine
  • One SNS topic
  • One IAM group
  • One IAM user
  • IAM policies as needed
  • One budget

Two of the Lambda functions were described in the previous section, to a) receive the SNS notification and b) trigger the Step Functions state machine. Another Lambda function is used to create the budget, as a custom AWS CloudFormation resource. The SNS topic connects Budgets with Lambda function A. Lambda function B is configured as a task in Step Functions. A budget for $2 is created which is filtered by Service: EC2 and Tag: Project, Beta. A test IAM group and user is created to enable you to validate this Cost Control Solution.

To create the serverless automated cost control solution stack, choose the button below. It takes few minutes to spin up the stack. You can monitor the progress in the CloudFormation console.

When you see the CREATE_COMPLETE status for the stack you had created, choose Outputs. Copy the following four values that you need later:

  • TemplateURL
  • UserName
  • SignInURL
  • Password

Verify the stack

The next step is to verify the serverless automated cost controls solution stack that you just created. To do this, spin up an EC2 fleet of t2.micro instances, representative of the resources needed for Project Beta, and tag them with Project, Beta.

  1. Browse to the SignInURL, and log in using the UserName and Password values copied on from the stack output.
  2. In the CloudFormation console, choose Create Stack.
  3. For Choose a template, select Choose an Amazon S3 template URL and paste the TemplateURL value from the preceding section. Choose Next.
  4. Give this stack a name, such as “testEc2FleetForProjectBeta”. Choose Next.
  5. On the Specify Details page, enter parameters such as the UserName and Password copied in the previous section. Choose Next.
  6. Ignore any errors related to listing IAM roles. The test user has a minimal set of permissions that is just sufficient to spin up this test stack (in line with security best practices).
  7. On the Options page, choose Next.
  8. On the Review page, choose Create. It takes a few minutes to spin up the stack, and you can monitor the progress in the CloudFormation console. 
  9. When you see the status “CREATE_COMPLETE”, open the EC2 console to verify that four t2.micro instances have been spun up, with the tag of Project, Beta.

The hourly cost for these instances depends on the region in which they are running. On the average (irrespective of the region), you can expect the aggregate cost for this EC2 fleet to exceed the set $2 budget in 48 hours.

Verify the solution

The first step is to identify the test IAM group that was created in the previous section. The group should have “projectBeta” in the name, prepended with the CloudFormation stack name and appended with an alphanumeric string. Verify that the managed policy associated is: “EC2FullAccess”, which indicates that the users in this group have unrestricted access to EC2.

There are two stages of verification for this serverless automated cost controls solution: simulating a notification and waiting for a breach.

Simulated notification

Because it takes at least a few hours for the aggregate cost of the EC2 fleet to breach the set budget, you can verify the solution by simulating the notification from Budgets.

  1. Log in to the SNS console (using your regular AWS credentials).
  2. Publish a message on the SNS topic that has “budgetNotificationTopic” in the name. The complete name is appended by the CloudFormation stack identifier.  
  3. Copy the following text as the body of the notification: “This is a mock notification”.
  4. Choose Publish.
  5. Open the IAM console to verify that the policy for the test group has been switched to “EC2ReadOnly”. This prevents users in this group from creating new instances.
  6. Verify that the test user created in the previous section cannot spin up new EC2 instances.  You can log in as the test user and try creating a new EC2 instance (via the same CloudFormation stack or the EC2 console). You should get an error message indicating that you do not have the necessary permissions.
  7. If you are proceeding to stage 2 of the verification, then you must switch the permissions back to “EC2FullAccess” for the test group, which can be done in the IAM console.

Automatic notification

Within 48 hours, the aggregate cost of the EC2 fleet spun up in the earlier section breaches the budget rule and triggers an automatic notification. This results in the permissions getting switched out, just as in the simulated notification.

Clean up

Use the following steps to delete your resources and stop incurring costs.

  1. Open the CloudFormation console.
  2. Delete the EC2 fleet by deleting the appropriate stack (for example, delete the stack named “testEc2FleetForProjectBeta”).                                               
  3. Next, delete the “costControlStack” stack.                                                                                                                                                    

Conclusion

Using Lambda in tandem with Budgets, you can build Serverless automated cost controls on AWS. Find all the resources (instructions, code) for implementing the solution discussed in this post on the Serverless Automated Cost Controls GitHub repo.

Stay tuned to this series for more tips about building serverless automated cost controls. In the next post, we discuss using smart lighting to influence developer behavior and describe a solution to encourage cost-aware development practices.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

 

The 10 Most Viewed Security-Related AWS Knowledge Center Articles and Videos for November 2017

Post Syndicated from Maggie Burke original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/the-10-most-viewed-security-related-aws-knowledge-center-articles-and-videos-for-november-2017/

AWS Knowledge Center image

The AWS Knowledge Center helps answer the questions most frequently asked by AWS Support customers. The following 10 Knowledge Center security articles and videos have been the most viewed this month. It’s likely you’ve wondered about a few of these topics yourself, so here’s a chance to learn the answers!

  1. How do I create an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy to restrict access for an IAM user, group, or role to a particular Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC)?
    Learn how to apply a custom IAM policy to restrict IAM user, group, or role permissions for creating and managing Amazon EC2 instances in a specified VPC.
  2. How do I use an MFA token to authenticate access to my AWS resources through the AWS CLI?
    One IAM best practice is to protect your account and its resources by using a multi-factor authentication (MFA) device. If you plan use the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) while using an MFA device, you must create a temporary session token.
  3. Can I restrict an IAM user’s EC2 access to specific resources?
    This article demonstrates how to link multiple AWS accounts through AWS Organizations and isolate IAM user groups in their own accounts.
  4. I didn’t receive a validation email for the SSL certificate I requested through AWS Certificate Manager (ACM)—where is it?
    Can’t find your ACM validation emails? Be sure to check the email address to which you requested that ACM send validation emails.
  5. How do I create an IAM policy that has a source IP restriction but still allows users to switch roles in the AWS Management Console?
    Learn how to write an IAM policy that not only includes a source IP restriction but also lets your users switch roles in the console.
  6. How do I allow users from another account to access resources in my account through IAM?
    If you have the 12-digit account number and permissions to create and edit IAM roles and users for both accounts, you can permit specific IAM users to access resources in your account.
  7. What are the differences between a service control policy (SCP) and an IAM policy?
    Learn how to distinguish an SCP from an IAM policy.
  8. How do I share my customer master keys (CMKs) across multiple AWS accounts?
    To grant another account access to your CMKs, create an IAM policy on the secondary account that grants access to use your CMKs.
  9. How do I set up AWS Trusted Advisor notifications?
    Learn how to receive free weekly email notifications from Trusted Advisor.
  10. How do I use AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) encryption context to protect the integrity of encrypted data?
    Encryption context name-value pairs used with AWS KMS encryption and decryption operations provide a method for checking ciphertext authenticity. Learn how to use encryption context to help protect your encrypted data.

The AWS Security Blog will publish an updated version of this list regularly going forward. You also can subscribe to the AWS Knowledge Center Videos playlist on YouTube.

– Maggie

How to Patch, Inspect, and Protect Microsoft Windows Workloads on AWS—Part 2

Post Syndicated from Koen van Blijderveen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-patch-inspect-and-protect-microsoft-windows-workloads-on-aws-part-2/

Yesterday in Part 1 of this blog post, I showed you how to:

  1. Launch an Amazon EC2 instance with an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) role, an Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS) volume, and tags that Amazon EC2 Systems Manager (Systems Manager) and Amazon Inspector use.
  2. Configure Systems Manager to install the Amazon Inspector agent and patch your EC2 instances.

Today in Steps 3 and 4, I show you how to:

  1. Take Amazon EBS snapshots using Amazon EBS Snapshot Scheduler to automate snapshots based on instance tags.
  2. Use Amazon Inspector to check if your EC2 instances running Microsoft Windows contain any common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs).

To catch up on Steps 1 and 2, see yesterday’s blog post.

Step 3: Take EBS snapshots using EBS Snapshot Scheduler

In this section, I show you how to use EBS Snapshot Scheduler to take snapshots of your instances at specific intervals. To do this, I will show you how to:

  • Determine the schedule for EBS Snapshot Scheduler by providing you with best practices.
  • Deploy EBS Snapshot Scheduler by using AWS CloudFormation.
  • Tag your EC2 instances so that EBS Snapshot Scheduler backs up your instances when you want them backed up.

In addition to making sure your EC2 instances have all the available operating system patches applied on a regular schedule, you should take snapshots of the EBS storage volumes attached to your EC2 instances. Taking regular snapshots allows you to restore your data to a previous state quickly and cost effectively. With Amazon EBS snapshots, you pay only for the actual data you store, and snapshots save only the data that has changed since the previous snapshot, which minimizes your cost. You will use EBS Snapshot Scheduler to make regular snapshots of your EC2 instance. EBS Snapshot Scheduler takes advantage of other AWS services including CloudFormation, Amazon DynamoDB, and AWS Lambda to make backing up your EBS volumes simple.

Determine the schedule

As a best practice, you should back up your data frequently during the hours when your data changes the most. This reduces the amount of data you lose if you have to restore from a snapshot. For the purposes of this blog post, the data for my instances changes the most between the business hours of 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Pacific Time. During these hours, I will make snapshots hourly to minimize data loss.

In addition to backing up frequently, another best practice is to establish a strategy for retention. This will vary based on how you need to use the snapshots. If you have compliance requirements to be able to restore for auditing, your needs may be different than if you are able to detect data corruption within three hours and simply need to restore to something that limits data loss to five hours. EBS Snapshot Scheduler enables you to specify the retention period for your snapshots. For this post, I only need to keep snapshots for recent business days. To account for weekends, I will set my retention period to three days, which is down from the default of 15 days when deploying EBS Snapshot Scheduler.

Deploy EBS Snapshot Scheduler

In Step 1 of Part 1 of this post, I showed how to configure an EC2 for Windows Server 2012 R2 instance with an EBS volume. You will use EBS Snapshot Scheduler to take eight snapshots each weekday of your EC2 instance’s EBS volumes:

  1. Navigate to the EBS Snapshot Scheduler deployment page and choose Launch Solution. This takes you to the CloudFormation console in your account. The Specify an Amazon S3 template URL option is already selected and prefilled. Choose Next on the Select Template page.
  2. On the Specify Details page, retain all default parameters except for AutoSnapshotDeletion. Set AutoSnapshotDeletion to Yes to ensure that old snapshots are periodically deleted. The default retention period is 15 days (you will specify a shorter value on your instance in the next subsection).
  3. Choose Next twice to move to the Review step, and start deployment by choosing the I acknowledge that AWS CloudFormation might create IAM resources check box and then choosing Create.

Tag your EC2 instances

EBS Snapshot Scheduler takes a few minutes to deploy. While waiting for its deployment, you can start to tag your instance to define its schedule. EBS Snapshot Scheduler reads tag values and looks for four possible custom parameters in the following order:

  • <snapshot time> – Time in 24-hour format with no colon.
  • <retention days> – The number of days (a positive integer) to retain the snapshot before deletion, if set to automatically delete snapshots.
  • <time zone> – The time zone of the times specified in <snapshot time>.
  • <active day(s)>all, weekdays, or mon, tue, wed, thu, fri, sat, and/or sun.

Because you want hourly backups on weekdays between 9:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. Pacific Time, you need to configure eight tags—one for each hour of the day. You will add the eight tags shown in the following table to your EC2 instance.

Tag Value
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:0900 0900;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1000 1000;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1100 1100;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1200 1200;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1300 1300;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1400 1400;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1500 1500;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1600 1600;3;utc;weekdays

Next, you will add these tags to your instance. If you want to tag multiple instances at once, you can use Tag Editor instead. To add the tags in the preceding table to your EC2 instance:

  1. Navigate to your EC2 instance in the EC2 console and choose Tags in the navigation pane.
  2. Choose Add/Edit Tags and then choose Create Tag to add all the tags specified in the preceding table.
  3. Confirm you have added the tags by choosing Save. After adding these tags, navigate to your EC2 instance in the EC2 console. Your EC2 instance should look similar to the following screenshot.
    Screenshot of how your EC2 instance should look in the console
  4. After waiting a couple of hours, you can see snapshots beginning to populate on the Snapshots page of the EC2 console.Screenshot of snapshots beginning to populate on the Snapshots page of the EC2 console
  5. To check if EBS Snapshot Scheduler is active, you can check the CloudWatch rule that runs the Lambda function. If the clock icon shown in the following screenshot is green, the scheduler is active. If the clock icon is gray, the rule is disabled and does not run. You can enable or disable the rule by selecting it, choosing Actions, and choosing Enable or Disable. This also allows you to temporarily disable EBS Snapshot Scheduler.Screenshot of checking to see if EBS Snapshot Scheduler is active
  1. You can also monitor when EBS Snapshot Scheduler has run by choosing the name of the CloudWatch rule as shown in the previous screenshot and choosing Show metrics for the rule.Screenshot of monitoring when EBS Snapshot Scheduler has run by choosing the name of the CloudWatch rule

If you want to restore and attach an EBS volume, see Restoring an Amazon EBS Volume from a Snapshot and Attaching an Amazon EBS Volume to an Instance.

Step 4: Use Amazon Inspector

In this section, I show you how to you use Amazon Inspector to scan your EC2 instance for common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs) and set up Amazon SNS notifications. To do this I will show you how to:

  • Install the Amazon Inspector agent by using EC2 Run Command.
  • Set up notifications using Amazon SNS to notify you of any findings.
  • Define an Amazon Inspector target and template to define what assessment to perform on your EC2 instance.
  • Schedule Amazon Inspector assessment runs to assess your EC2 instance on a regular interval.

Amazon Inspector can help you scan your EC2 instance using prebuilt rules packages, which are built and maintained by AWS. These prebuilt rules packages tell Amazon Inspector what to scan for on the EC2 instances you select. Amazon Inspector provides the following prebuilt packages for Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2:

  • Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures
  • Center for Internet Security Benchmarks
  • Runtime Behavior Analysis

In this post, I’m focused on how to make sure you keep your EC2 instances patched, backed up, and inspected for common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs). As a result, I will focus on how to use the CVE rules package and use your instance tags to identify the instances on which to run the CVE rules. If your EC2 instance is fully patched using Systems Manager, as described earlier, you should not have any findings with the CVE rules package. Regardless, as a best practice I recommend that you use Amazon Inspector as an additional layer for identifying any unexpected failures. This involves using Amazon CloudWatch to set up weekly Amazon Inspector scans, and configuring Amazon Inspector to notify you of any findings through SNS topics. By acting on the notifications you receive, you can respond quickly to any CVEs on any of your EC2 instances to help ensure that malware using known CVEs does not affect your EC2 instances. In a previous blog post, Eric Fitzgerald showed how to remediate Amazon Inspector security findings automatically.

Install the Amazon Inspector agent

To install the Amazon Inspector agent, you will use EC2 Run Command, which allows you to run any command on any of your EC2 instances that have the Systems Manager agent with an attached IAM role that allows access to Systems Manager.

  1. Choose Run Command under Systems Manager Services in the navigation pane of the EC2 console. Then choose Run a command.
    Screenshot of choosing "Run a command"
  2. To install the Amazon Inspector agent, you will use an AWS managed and provided command document that downloads and installs the agent for you on the selected EC2 instance. Choose AmazonInspector-ManageAWSAgent. To choose the target EC2 instance where this command will be run, use the tag you previously assigned to your EC2 instance, Patch Group, with a value of Windows Servers. For this example, set the concurrent installations to 1 and tell Systems Manager to stop after 5 errors.
    Screenshot of installing the Amazon Inspector agent
  3. Retain the default values for all other settings on the Run a command page and choose Run. Back on the Run Command page, you can see if the command that installed the Amazon Inspector agent executed successfully on all selected EC2 instances.
    Screenshot showing that the command that installed the Amazon Inspector agent executed successfully on all selected EC2 instances

Set up notifications using Amazon SNS

Now that you have installed the Amazon Inspector agent, you will set up an SNS topic that will notify you of any findings after an Amazon Inspector run.

To set up an SNS topic:

  1. In the AWS Management Console, choose Simple Notification Service under Messaging in the Services menu.
  2. Choose Create topic, name your topic (only alphanumeric characters, hyphens, and underscores are allowed) and give it a display name to ensure you know what this topic does (I’ve named mine Inspector). Choose Create topic.
    "Create new topic" page
  3. To allow Amazon Inspector to publish messages to your new topic, choose Other topic actions and choose Edit topic policy.
  4. For Allow these users to publish messages to this topic and Allow these users to subscribe to this topic, choose Only these AWS users. Type the following ARN for the US East (N. Virginia) Region in which you are deploying the solution in this post: arn:aws:iam::316112463485:root. This is the ARN of Amazon Inspector itself. For the ARNs of Amazon Inspector in other AWS Regions, see Setting Up an SNS Topic for Amazon Inspector Notifications (Console). Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) uniquely identify AWS resources across all of AWS.
    Screenshot of editing the topic policy
  5. To receive notifications from Amazon Inspector, subscribe to your new topic by choosing Create subscription and adding your email address. After confirming your subscription by clicking the link in the email, the topic should display your email address as a subscriber. Later, you will configure the Amazon Inspector template to publish to this topic.
    Screenshot of subscribing to the new topic

Define an Amazon Inspector target and template

Now that you have set up the notification topic by which Amazon Inspector can notify you of findings, you can create an Amazon Inspector target and template. A target defines which EC2 instances are in scope for Amazon Inspector. A template defines which packages to run, for how long, and on which target.

To create an Amazon Inspector target:

  1. Navigate to the Amazon Inspector console and choose Get started. At the time of writing this blog post, Amazon Inspector is available in the US East (N. Virginia), US West (N. California), US West (Oregon), EU (Ireland), Asia Pacific (Mumbai), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Sydney), and Asia Pacific (Tokyo) Regions.
  2. For Amazon Inspector to be able to collect the necessary data from your EC2 instance, you must create an IAM service role for Amazon Inspector. Amazon Inspector can create this role for you if you choose Choose or create role and confirm the role creation by choosing Allow.
    Screenshot of creating an IAM service role for Amazon Inspector
  3. Amazon Inspector also asks you to tag your EC2 instance and install the Amazon Inspector agent. You already performed these steps in Part 1 of this post, so you can proceed by choosing Next. To define the Amazon Inspector target, choose the previously used Patch Group tag with a Value of Windows Servers. This is the same tag that you used to define the targets for patching. Then choose Next.
    Screenshot of defining the Amazon Inspector target
  4. Now, define your Amazon Inspector template, and choose a name and the package you want to run. For this post, use the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures package and choose the default duration of 1 hour. As you can see, the package has a version number, so always select the latest version of the rules package if multiple versions are available.
    Screenshot of defining an assessment template
  5. Configure Amazon Inspector to publish to your SNS topic when findings are reported. You can also choose to receive a notification of a started run, a finished run, or changes in the state of a run. For this blog post, you want to receive notifications if there are any findings. To start, choose Assessment Templates from the Amazon Inspector console and choose your newly created Amazon Inspector assessment template. Choose the icon below SNS topics (see the following screenshot).
    Screenshot of choosing an assessment template
  6. A pop-up appears in which you can choose the previously created topic and the events about which you want SNS to notify you (choose Finding reported).
    Screenshot of choosing the previously created topic and the events about which you want SNS to notify you

Schedule Amazon Inspector assessment runs

The last step in using Amazon Inspector to assess for CVEs is to schedule the Amazon Inspector template to run using Amazon CloudWatch Events. This will make sure that Amazon Inspector assesses your EC2 instance on a regular basis. To do this, you need the Amazon Inspector template ARN, which you can find under Assessment templates in the Amazon Inspector console. CloudWatch Events can run your Amazon Inspector assessment at an interval you define using a Cron-based schedule. Cron is a well-known scheduling agent that is widely used on UNIX-like operating systems and uses the following syntax for CloudWatch Events.

Image of Cron schedule

All scheduled events use a UTC time zone, and the minimum precision for schedules is one minute. For more information about scheduling CloudWatch Events, see Schedule Expressions for Rules.

To create the CloudWatch Events rule:

  1. Navigate to the CloudWatch console, choose Events, and choose Create rule.
    Screenshot of starting to create a rule in the CloudWatch Events console
  2. On the next page, specify if you want to invoke your rule based on an event pattern or a schedule. For this blog post, you will select a schedule based on a Cron expression.
  3. You can schedule the Amazon Inspector assessment any time you want using the Cron expression, or you can use the Cron expression I used in the following screenshot, which will run the Amazon Inspector assessment every Sunday at 10:00 P.M. GMT.
    Screenshot of scheduling an Amazon Inspector assessment with a Cron expression
  4. Choose Add target and choose Inspector assessment template from the drop-down menu. Paste the ARN of the Amazon Inspector template you previously created in the Amazon Inspector console in the Assessment template box and choose Create a new role for this specific resource. This new role is necessary so that CloudWatch Events has the necessary permissions to start the Amazon Inspector assessment. CloudWatch Events will automatically create the new role and grant the minimum set of permissions needed to run the Amazon Inspector assessment. To proceed, choose Configure details.
    Screenshot of adding a target
  5. Next, give your rule a name and a description. I suggest using a name that describes what the rule does, as shown in the following screenshot.
  6. Finish the wizard by choosing Create rule. The rule should appear in the Events – Rules section of the CloudWatch console.
    Screenshot of completing the creation of the rule
  7. To confirm your CloudWatch Events rule works, wait for the next time your CloudWatch Events rule is scheduled to run. For testing purposes, you can choose your CloudWatch Events rule and choose Edit to change the schedule to run it sooner than scheduled.
    Screenshot of confirming the CloudWatch Events rule works
  8. Now navigate to the Amazon Inspector console to confirm the launch of your first assessment run. The Start time column shows you the time each assessment started and the Status column the status of your assessment. In the following screenshot, you can see Amazon Inspector is busy Collecting data from the selected assessment targets.
    Screenshot of confirming the launch of the first assessment run

You have concluded the last step of this blog post by setting up a regular scan of your EC2 instance with Amazon Inspector and a notification that will let you know if your EC2 instance is vulnerable to any known CVEs. In a previous Security Blog post, Eric Fitzgerald explained How to Remediate Amazon Inspector Security Findings Automatically. Although that blog post is for Linux-based EC2 instances, the post shows that you can learn about Amazon Inspector findings in other ways than email alerts.

Conclusion

In this two-part blog post, I showed how to make sure you keep your EC2 instances up to date with patching, how to back up your instances with snapshots, and how to monitor your instances for CVEs. Collectively these measures help to protect your instances against common attack vectors that attempt to exploit known vulnerabilities. In Part 1, I showed how to configure your EC2 instances to make it easy to use Systems Manager, EBS Snapshot Scheduler, and Amazon Inspector. I also showed how to use Systems Manager to schedule automatic patches to keep your instances current in a timely fashion. In Part 2, I showed you how to take regular snapshots of your data by using EBS Snapshot Scheduler and how to use Amazon Inspector to check if your EC2 instances running Microsoft Windows contain any common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs).

If you have comments about today’s or yesterday’s post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing any part of this solution, start a new thread on the Amazon EC2 forum or the Amazon Inspector forum, or contact AWS Support.

– Koen

AWS IoT Update – Better Value with New Pricing Model

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-iot-update-better-value-with-new-pricing-model/

Our customers are using AWS IoT to make their connected devices more intelligent. These devices collect & measure data in the field (below the ground, in the air, in the water, on factory floors and in hospital rooms) and use AWS IoT as their gateway to the AWS Cloud. Once connected to the cloud, customers can write device data to Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) and Amazon DynamoDB, process data using Amazon Kinesis and AWS Lambda functions, initiate Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) push notifications, and much more.

New Pricing Model (20-40% Reduction)
Today we are making a change to the AWS IoT pricing model that will make it an even better value for you. Most customers will see a price reduction of 20-40%, with some receiving a significantly larger discount depending on their workload.

The original model was based on a charge for the number of messages that were sent to or from the service. This all-inclusive model was a good starting point, but also meant that some customers were effectively paying for parts of AWS IoT that they did not actually use. For example, some customers have devices that ping AWS IoT very frequently, with sparse rule sets that fire infrequently. Our new model is more fine-grained, with independent charges for each component (all prices are for devices that connect to the US East (Northern Virginia) Region):

Connectivity – Metered in 1 minute increments and based on the total time your devices are connected to AWS IoT. Priced at $0.08 per million minutes of connection (equivalent to $0.042 per device per year for 24/7 connectivity). Your devices can send keep-alive pings at 30 second to 20 minute intervals at no additional cost.

Messaging – Metered by the number of messages transmitted between your devices and AWS IoT. Pricing starts at $1 per million messages, with volume pricing falling as low as $0.70 per million. You may send and receive messages up to 128 kilobytes in size. Messages are metered in 5 kilobyte increments (up from 512 bytes previously). For example, an 8 kilobyte message is metered as two messages.

Rules Engine – Metered for each time a rule is triggered, and for the number of actions executed within a rule, with a minimum of one action per rule. Priced at $0.15 per million rules-triggered and $0.15 per million actions-executed. Rules that process a message in excess of 5 kilobytes are metered at the next multiple of the 5 kilobyte size. For example, a rule that processes an 8 kilobyte message is metered as two rules.

Device Shadow & Registry Updates – Metered on the number of operations to access or modify Device Shadow or Registry data, priced at $1.25 per million operations. Device Shadow and Registry operations are metered in 1 kilobyte increments of the Device Shadow or Registry record size. For example, an update to a 1.5 kilobyte Shadow record is metered as two operations.

The AWS Free Tier now offers a generous allocation of connection minutes, messages, triggered rules, rules actions, Shadow, and Registry usage, enough to operate a fleet of up to 50 devices. The new prices will take effect on January 1, 2018 with no effort on your part. At that time, the updated prices will be published on the AWS IoT Pricing page.

AWS IoT at re:Invent
We have an entire IoT track at this year’s AWS re:Invent. Here is a sampling:

We also have customer-led sessions from Philips, Panasonic, Enel, and Salesforce.

Jeff;

Using AWS CodeCommit Pull Requests to request code reviews and discuss code

Post Syndicated from Chris Barclay original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/using-aws-codecommit-pull-requests-to-request-code-reviews-and-discuss-code/

Thank you to Michael Edge, Senior Cloud Architect, for a great blog on CodeCommit pull requests.

~~~~~~~

AWS CodeCommit is a fully managed service for securely hosting private Git repositories. CodeCommit now supports pull requests, which allows repository users to review, comment upon, and interactively iterate on code changes. Used as a collaboration tool between team members, pull requests help you to review potential changes to a CodeCommit repository before merging those changes into the repository. Each pull request goes through a simple lifecycle, as follows:

  • The new features to be merged are added as one or more commits to a feature branch. The commits are not merged into the destination branch.
  • The pull request is created, usually from the difference between two branches.
  • Team members review and comment on the pull request. The pull request might be updated with additional commits that contain changes made in response to comments, or include changes made to the destination branch.
  • Once team members are happy with the pull request, it is merged into the destination branch. The commits are applied to the destination branch in the same order they were added to the pull request.

Commenting is an integral part of the pull request process, and is used to collaborate between the developers and the reviewer. Reviewers add comments and questions to a pull request during the review process, and developers respond to these with explanations. Pull request comments can be added to the overall pull request, a file within the pull request, or a line within a file.

To make the comments more useful, sign in to the AWS Management Console as an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) user. The username will then be associated with the comment, indicating the owner of the comment. Pull request comments are a great quality improvement tool as they allow the entire development team visibility into what reviewers are looking for in the code. They also serve as a record of the discussion between team members at a point in time, and shouldn’t be deleted.

AWS CodeCommit is also introducing the ability to add comments to a commit, another useful collaboration feature that allows team members to discuss code changed as part of a commit. This helps you discuss changes made in a repository, including why the changes were made, whether further changes are necessary, or whether changes should be merged. As is the case with pull request comments, you can comment on an overall commit, on a file within a commit, or on a specific line or change within a file, and other repository users can respond to your comments. Comments are not restricted to commits, they can also be used to comment on the differences between two branches, or between two tags. Commit comments are separate from pull request comments, i.e. you will not see commit comments when reviewing a pull request – you will only see pull request comments.

A pull request example

Let’s get started by running through an example. We’ll take a typical pull request scenario and look at how we’d use CodeCommit and the AWS Management Console for each of the steps.

To try out this scenario, you’ll need:

  • An AWS CodeCommit repository with some sample code in the master branch. We’ve provided sample code below.
  • Two AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) users, both with the AWSCodeCommitPowerUser managed policy applied to them.
  • Git installed on your local computer, and access configured for AWS CodeCommit.
  • A clone of the AWS CodeCommit repository on your local computer.

In the course of this example, you’ll sign in to the AWS CodeCommit console as one IAM user to create the pull request, and as the other IAM user to review the pull request. To learn more about how to set up your IAM users and how to connect to AWS CodeCommit with Git, see the following topics:

  • Information on creating an IAM user with AWS Management Console access.
  • Instructions on how to access CodeCommit using Git.
  • If you’d like to use the same ‘hello world’ application as used in this article, here is the source code:
package com.amazon.helloworld;

public class Main {
	public static void main(String[] args) {

		System.out.println("Hello, world");
	}
}

The scenario below uses the us-east-2 region.

Creating the branches

Before we jump in and create a pull request, we’ll need at least two branches. In this example, we’ll follow a branching strategy similar to the one described in GitFlow. We’ll create a new branch for our feature from the main development branch (the default branch). We’ll develop the feature in the feature branch. Once we’ve written and tested the code for the new feature in that branch, we’ll create a pull request that contains the differences between the feature branch and the main development branch. Our team lead (the second IAM user) will review the changes in the pull request. Once the changes have been reviewed, the feature branch will be merged into the development branch.

Figure 1: Pull request link

Sign in to the AWS CodeCommit console with the IAM user you want to use as the developer. You can use an existing repository or you can go ahead and create a new one. We won’t be merging any changes to the master branch of your repository, so it’s safe to use an existing repository for this example. You’ll find the Pull requests link has been added just above the Commits link (see Figure 1), and below Commits you’ll find the Branches link. Click Branches and create a new branch called ‘develop’, branched from the ‘master’ branch. Then create a new branch called ‘feature1’, branched from the ‘develop’ branch. You’ll end up with three branches, as you can see in Figure 2. (Your repository might contain other branches in addition to the three shown in the figure).

Figure 2: Create a feature branch

If you haven’t cloned your repo yet, go to the Code link in the CodeCommit console and click the Connect button. Follow the instructions to clone your repo (detailed instructions are here). Open a terminal or command line and paste the git clone command supplied in the Connect instructions for your repository. The example below shows cloning a repository named codecommit-demo:

git clone https://git-codecommit.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codecommit-demo

If you’ve previously cloned the repo you’ll need to update your local repo with the branches you created. Open a terminal or command line and make sure you’re in the root directory of your repo, then run the following command:

git remote update origin

You’ll see your new branches pulled down to your local repository.

$ git remote update origin
Fetching origin
From https://git-codecommit.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codecommit-demo
 * [new branch]      develop    -> origin/develop
 * [new branch]      feature1   -> origin/feature1

You can also see your new branches by typing:

git branch --all

$ git branch --all
* master
  remotes/origin/develop
  remotes/origin/feature1
  remotes/origin/master

Now we’ll make a change to the ‘feature1’ branch. Open a terminal or command line and check out the feature1 branch by running the following command:

git checkout feature1

$ git checkout feature1
Branch feature1 set up to track remote branch feature1 from origin.
Switched to a new branch 'feature1'

Make code changes

Edit a file in the repo using your favorite editor and save the changes. Commit your changes to the local repository, and push your changes to CodeCommit. For example:

git commit -am 'added new feature'
git push origin feature1

$ git commit -am 'added new feature'
[feature1 8f6cb28] added new feature
1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)

$ git push origin feature1
Counting objects: 9, done.
Delta compression using up to 4 threads.
Compressing objects: 100% (4/4), done.
Writing objects: 100% (9/9), 617 bytes | 617.00 KiB/s, done.
Total 9 (delta 2), reused 0 (delta 0)
To https://git-codecommit.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codecommit-demo
   2774a53..8f6cb28  feature1 -> feature1

Creating the pull request

Now we have a ‘feature1’ branch that differs from the ‘develop’ branch. At this point we want to merge our changes into the ‘develop’ branch. We’ll create a pull request to notify our team members to review our changes and check whether they are ready for a merge.

In the AWS CodeCommit console, click Pull requests. Click Create pull request. On the next page select ‘develop’ as the destination branch and ‘feature1’ as the source branch. Click Compare. CodeCommit will check for merge conflicts and highlight whether the branches can be automatically merged using the fast-forward option, or whether a manual merge is necessary. A pull request can be created in both situations.

Figure 3: Create a pull request

After comparing the two branches, the CodeCommit console displays the information you’ll need in order to create the pull request. In the ‘Details’ section, the ‘Title’ for the pull request is mandatory, and you may optionally provide comments to your reviewers to explain the code change you have made and what you’d like them to review. In the ‘Notifications’ section, there is an option to set up notifications to notify subscribers of changes to your pull request. Notifications will be sent on creation of the pull request as well as for any pull request updates or comments. And finally, you can review the changes that make up this pull request. This includes both the individual commits (a pull request can contain one or more commits, available in the Commits tab) as well as the changes made to each file, i.e. the diff between the two branches referenced by the pull request, available in the Changes tab. After you have reviewed this information and added a title for your pull request, click the Create button. You will see a confirmation screen, as shown in Figure 4, indicating that your pull request has been successfully created, and can be merged without conflicts into the ‘develop’ branch.

Figure 4: Pull request confirmation page

Reviewing the pull request

Now let’s view the pull request from the perspective of the team lead. If you set up notifications for this CodeCommit repository, creating the pull request would have sent an email notification to the team lead, and he/she can use the links in the email to navigate directly to the pull request. In this example, sign in to the AWS CodeCommit console as the IAM user you’re using as the team lead, and click Pull requests. You will see the same information you did during creation of the pull request, plus a record of activity related to the pull request, as you can see in Figure 5.

Figure 5: Team lead reviewing the pull request

Commenting on the pull request

You now perform a thorough review of the changes and make a number of comments using the new pull request comment feature. To gain an overall perspective on the pull request, you might first go to the Commits tab and review how many commits are included in this pull request. Next, you might visit the Changes tab to review the changes, which displays the differences between the feature branch code and the develop branch code. At this point, you can add comments to the pull request as you work through each of the changes. Let’s go ahead and review the pull request. During the review, you can add review comments at three levels:

  • The overall pull request
  • A file within the pull request
  • An individual line within a file

The overall pull request
In the Changes tab near the bottom of the page you’ll see a ‘Comments on changes’ box. We’ll add comments here related to the overall pull request. Add your comments as shown in Figure 6 and click the Save button.

Figure 6: Pull request comment

A specific file in the pull request
Hovering your mouse over a filename in the Changes tab will cause a blue ‘comments’ icon to appear to the left of the filename. Clicking the icon will allow you to enter comments specific to this file, as in the example in Figure 7. Go ahead and add comments for one of the files changed by the developer. Click the Save button to save your comment.

Figure 7: File comment

A specific line in a file in the pull request
A blue ‘comments’ icon will appear as you hover over individual lines within each file in the pull request, allowing you to create comments against lines that have been added, removed or are unchanged. In Figure 8, you add comments against a line that has been added to the source code, encouraging the developer to review the naming standards. Go ahead and add line comments for one of the files changed by the developer. Click the Save button to save your comment.

Figure 8: Line comment

A pull request that has been commented at all three levels will look similar to Figure 9. The pull request comment is shown expanded in the ‘Comments on changes’ section, while the comments at file and line level are shown collapsed. A ‘comment’ icon indicates that comments exist at file and line level. Clicking the icon will expand and show the comment. Since you are expecting the developer to make further changes based on your comments, you won’t merge the pull request at this stage, but will leave it open awaiting feedback. Each comment you made results in a notification being sent to the developer, who can respond to the comments. This is great for remote working, where developers and team lead may be in different time zones.

Figure 9: Fully commented pull request

Adding a little complexity

A typical development team is going to be creating pull requests on a regular basis. It’s highly likely that the team lead will merge other pull requests into the ‘develop’ branch while pull requests on feature branches are in the review stage. This may result in a change to the ‘Mergable’ status of a pull request. Let’s add this scenario into the mix and check out how a developer will handle this.

To test this scenario, we could create a new pull request and ask the team lead to merge this to the ‘develop’ branch. But for the sake of simplicity we’ll take a shortcut. Clone your CodeCommit repo to a new folder, switch to the ‘develop’ branch, and make a change to one of the same files that were changed in your pull request. Make sure you change a line of code that was also changed in the pull request. Commit and push this back to CodeCommit. Since you’ve just changed a line of code in the ‘develop’ branch that has also been changed in the ‘feature1’ branch, the ‘feature1’ branch cannot be cleanly merged into the ‘develop’ branch. Your developer will need to resolve this merge conflict.

A developer reviewing the pull request would see the pull request now looks similar to Figure 10, with a ‘Resolve conflicts’ status rather than the ‘Mergable’ status it had previously (see Figure 5).

Figure 10: Pull request with merge conflicts

Reviewing the review comments

Once the team lead has completed his review, the developer will review the comments and make the suggested changes. As a developer, you’ll see the list of review comments made by the team lead in the pull request Activity tab, as shown in Figure 11. The Activity tab shows the history of the pull request, including commits and comments. You can reply to the review comments directly from the Activity tab, by clicking the Reply button, or you can do this from the Changes tab. The Changes tab shows the comments for the latest commit, as comments on previous commits may be associated with lines that have changed or been removed in the current commit. Comments for previous commits are available to view and reply to in the Activity tab.

In the Activity tab, use the shortcut link (which looks like this </>) to move quickly to the source code associated with the comment. In this example, you will make further changes to the source code to address the pull request review comments, so let’s go ahead and do this now. But first, you will need to resolve the ‘Resolve conflicts’ status.

Figure 11: Pull request activity

Resolving the ‘Resolve conflicts’ status

The ‘Resolve conflicts’ status indicates there is a merge conflict between the ‘develop’ branch and the ‘feature1’ branch. This will require manual intervention to restore the pull request back to the ‘Mergable’ state. We will resolve this conflict next.

Open a terminal or command line and check out the develop branch by running the following command:

git checkout develop

$ git checkout develop
Switched to branch 'develop'
Your branch is up-to-date with 'origin/develop'.

To incorporate the changes the team lead made to the ‘develop’ branch, merge the remote ‘develop’ branch with your local copy:

git pull

$ git pull
remote: Counting objects: 9, done.
Unpacking objects: 100% (9/9), done.
From https://git-codecommit.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codecommit-demo
   af13c82..7b36f52  develop    -> origin/develop
Updating af13c82..7b36f52
Fast-forward
 src/main/java/com/amazon/helloworld/Main.java | 2 +-
 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)

Then checkout the ‘feature1’ branch:

git checkout feature1

$ git checkout feature1
Switched to branch 'feature1'
Your branch is up-to-date with 'origin/feature1'.

Now merge the changes from the ‘develop’ branch into your ‘feature1’ branch:

git merge develop

$ git merge develop
Auto-merging src/main/java/com/amazon/helloworld/Main.java
CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in src/main/java/com/amazon/helloworld/Main.java
Automatic merge failed; fix conflicts and then commit the result.

Yes, this fails. The file Main.java has been changed in both branches, resulting in a merge conflict that can’t be resolved automatically. However, Main.java will now contain markers that indicate where the conflicting code is, and you can use these to resolve the issues manually. Edit Main.java using your favorite IDE, and you’ll see it looks something like this:

package com.amazon.helloworld;

import java.util.*;

/**
 * This class prints a hello world message
 */

public class Main {
   public static void main(String[] args) {

<<<<<<< HEAD
        Date todaysdate = Calendar.getInstance().getTime();

        System.out.println("Hello, earthling. Today's date is: " + todaysdate);
=======
      System.out.println("Hello, earth");
>>>>>>> develop
   }
}

The code between HEAD and ‘===’ is the code the developer added in the ‘feature1’ branch (HEAD represents ‘feature1’ because this is the current checked out branch). The code between ‘===’ and ‘>>> develop’ is the code added to the ‘develop’ branch by the team lead. We’ll resolve the conflict by manually merging both changes, resulting in an updated Main.java:

package com.amazon.helloworld;

import java.util.*;

/**
 * This class prints a hello world message
 */

public class Main {
   public static void main(String[] args) {

        Date todaysdate = Calendar.getInstance().getTime();

        System.out.println("Hello, earth. Today's date is: " + todaysdate);
   }
}

After saving the change you can add and commit it to your local repo:

git add src/
git commit -m 'fixed merge conflict by merging changes'

Fixing issues raised by the reviewer

Now you are ready to address the comments made by the team lead. If you are no longer pointing to the ‘feature1’ branch, check out the ‘feature1’ branch by running the following command:

git checkout feature1

$ git checkout feature1
Branch feature1 set up to track remote branch feature1 from origin.
Switched to a new branch 'feature1'

Edit the source code in your favorite IDE and make the changes to address the comments. In this example, the developer has updated the source code as follows:

package com.amazon.helloworld;

import java.util.*;

/**
 *  This class prints a hello world message
 *
 * @author Michael Edge
 * @see HelloEarth
 * @version 1.0
 */

public class Main {
   public static void main(String[] args) {

        Date todaysDate = Calendar.getInstance().getTime();

        System.out.println("Hello, earth. Today's date is: " + todaysDate);
   }
}

After saving the changes, commit and push to the CodeCommit ‘feature1’ branch as you did previously:

git commit -am 'updated based on review comments'
git push origin feature1

Responding to the reviewer

Now that you’ve fixed the code issues you will want to respond to the review comments. In the AWS CodeCommit console, check that your latest commit appears in the pull request Commits tab. You now have a pull request consisting of more than one commit. The pull request in Figure 12 has four commits, which originated from the following activities:

  • 8th Nov: the original commit used to initiate this pull request
  • 10th Nov, 3 hours ago: the commit by the team lead to the ‘develop’ branch, merged into our ‘feature1’ branch
  • 10th Nov, 24 minutes ago: the commit by the developer that resolved the merge conflict
  • 10th Nov, 4 minutes ago: the final commit by the developer addressing the review comments

Figure 12: Pull request with multiple commits

Let’s reply to the review comments provided by the team lead. In the Activity tab, reply to the pull request comment and save it, as shown in Figure 13.

Figure 13: Replying to a pull request comment

At this stage, your code has been committed and you’ve updated your pull request comments, so you are ready for a final review by the team lead.

Final review

The team lead reviews the code changes and comments made by the developer. As team lead, you own the ‘develop’ branch and it’s your decision on whether to merge the changes in the pull request into the ‘develop’ branch. You can close the pull request with or without merging using the Merge and Close buttons at the bottom of the pull request page (see Figure 13). Clicking Close will allow you to add comments on why you are closing the pull request without merging. Merging will perform a fast-forward merge, incorporating the commits referenced by the pull request. Let’s go ahead and click the Merge button to merge the pull request into the ‘develop’ branch.

Figure 14: Merging the pull request

After merging a pull request, development of that feature is complete and the feature branch is no longer needed. It’s common practice to delete the feature branch after merging. CodeCommit provides a check box during merge to automatically delete the associated feature branch, as seen in Figure 14. Clicking the Merge button will merge the pull request into the ‘develop’ branch, as shown in Figure 15. This will update the status of the pull request to ‘Merged’, and will close the pull request.

Conclusion

This blog has demonstrated how pull requests can be used to request a code review, and enable reviewers to get a comprehensive summary of what is changing, provide feedback to the author, and merge the code into production. For more information on pull requests, see the documentation.

Event-Driven Computing with Amazon SNS and AWS Compute, Storage, Database, and Networking Services

Post Syndicated from Christie Gifrin original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/event-driven-computing-with-amazon-sns-compute-storage-database-and-networking-services/

Contributed by Otavio Ferreira, Manager, Software Development, AWS Messaging

Like other developers around the world, you may be tackling increasingly complex business problems. A key success factor, in that case, is the ability to break down a large project scope into smaller, more manageable components. A service-oriented architecture guides you toward designing systems as a collection of loosely coupled, independently scaled, and highly reusable services. Microservices take this even further. To improve performance and scalability, they promote fine-grained interfaces and lightweight protocols.

However, the communication among isolated microservices can be challenging. Services are often deployed onto independent servers and don’t share any compute or storage resources. Also, you should avoid hard dependencies among microservices, to preserve maintainability and reusability.

If you apply the pub/sub design pattern, you can effortlessly decouple and independently scale out your microservices and serverless architectures. A pub/sub messaging service, such as Amazon SNS, promotes event-driven computing that statically decouples event publishers from subscribers, while dynamically allowing for the exchange of messages between them. An event-driven architecture also introduces the responsiveness needed to deal with complex problems, which are often unpredictable and asynchronous.

What is event-driven computing?

Given the context of microservices, event-driven computing is a model in which subscriber services automatically perform work in response to events triggered by publisher services. This paradigm can be applied to automate workflows while decoupling the services that collectively and independently work to fulfil these workflows. Amazon SNS is an event-driven computing hub, in the AWS Cloud, that has native integration with several AWS publisher and subscriber services.

Which AWS services publish events to SNS natively?

Several AWS services have been integrated as SNS publishers and, therefore, can natively trigger event-driven computing for a variety of use cases. In this post, I specifically cover AWS compute, storage, database, and networking services, as depicted below.

Compute services

  • Auto Scaling: Helps you ensure that you have the correct number of Amazon EC2 instances available to handle the load for your application. You can configure Auto Scaling lifecycle hooks to trigger events, as Auto Scaling resizes your EC2 cluster.As an example, you may want to warm up the local cache store on newly launched EC2 instances, and also download log files from other EC2 instances that are about to be terminated. To make this happen, set an SNS topic as your Auto Scaling group’s notification target, then subscribe two Lambda functions to this SNS topic. The first function is responsible for handling scale-out events (to warm up cache upon provisioning), whereas the second is in charge of handling scale-in events (to download logs upon termination).

  • AWS Elastic Beanstalk: An easy-to-use service for deploying and scaling web applications and web services developed in a number of programming languages. You can configure event notifications for your Elastic Beanstalk environment so that notable events can be automatically published to an SNS topic, then pushed to topic subscribers.As an example, you may use this event-driven architecture to coordinate your continuous integration pipeline (such as Jenkins CI). That way, whenever an environment is created, Elastic Beanstalk publishes this event to an SNS topic, which triggers a subscribing Lambda function, which then kicks off a CI job against your newly created Elastic Beanstalk environment.

  • Elastic Load Balancing: Automatically distributes incoming application traffic across Amazon EC2 instances, containers, or other resources identified by IP addresses.You can configure CloudWatch alarms on Elastic Load Balancing metrics, to automate the handling of events derived from Classic Load Balancers. As an example, you may leverage this event-driven design to automate latency profiling in an Amazon ECS cluster behind a Classic Load Balancer. In this example, whenever your ECS cluster breaches your load balancer latency threshold, an event is posted by CloudWatch to an SNS topic, which then triggers a subscribing Lambda function. This function runs a task on your ECS cluster to trigger a latency profiling tool, hosted on the cluster itself. This can enhance your latency troubleshooting exercise by making it timely.

Storage services

  • Amazon S3: Object storage built to store and retrieve any amount of data.You can enable S3 event notifications, and automatically get them posted to SNS topics, to automate a variety of workflows. For instance, imagine that you have an S3 bucket to store incoming resumes from candidates, and a fleet of EC2 instances to encode these resumes from their original format (such as Word or text) into a portable format (such as PDF).In this example, whenever new files are uploaded to your input bucket, S3 publishes these events to an SNS topic, which in turn pushes these messages into subscribing SQS queues. Then, encoding workers running on EC2 instances poll these messages from the SQS queues; retrieve the original files from the input S3 bucket; encode them into PDF; and finally store them in an output S3 bucket.

  • Amazon EFS: Provides simple and scalable file storage, for use with Amazon EC2 instances, in the AWS Cloud.You can configure CloudWatch alarms on EFS metrics, to automate the management of your EFS systems. For example, consider a highly parallelized genomics analysis application that runs against an EFS system. By default, this file system is instantiated on the “General Purpose” performance mode. Although this performance mode allows for lower latency, it might eventually impose a scaling bottleneck. Therefore, you may leverage an event-driven design to handle it automatically.Basically, as soon as the EFS metric “Percent I/O Limit” breaches 95%, CloudWatch could post this event to an SNS topic, which in turn would push this message into a subscribing Lambda function. This function automatically creates a new file system, this time on the “Max I/O” performance mode, then switches the genomics analysis application to this new file system. As a result, your application starts experiencing higher I/O throughput rates.

  • Amazon Glacier: A secure, durable, and low-cost cloud storage service for data archiving and long-term backup.You can set a notification configuration on an Amazon Glacier vault so that when a job completes, a message is published to an SNS topic. Retrieving an archive from Amazon Glacier is a two-step asynchronous operation, in which you first initiate a job, and then download the output after the job completes. Therefore, SNS helps you eliminate polling your Amazon Glacier vault to check whether your job has been completed, or not. As usual, you may subscribe SQS queues, Lambda functions, and HTTP endpoints to your SNS topic, to be notified when your Amazon Glacier job is done.

  • AWS Snowball: A petabyte-scale data transport solution that uses secure appliances to transfer large amounts of data.You can leverage Snowball notifications to automate workflows related to importing data into and exporting data from AWS. More specifically, whenever your Snowball job status changes, Snowball can publish this event to an SNS topic, which in turn can broadcast the event to all its subscribers.As an example, imagine a Geographic Information System (GIS) that distributes high-resolution satellite images to users via Web browser. In this example, the GIS vendor could capture up to 80 TB of satellite images; create a Snowball job to import these files from an on-premises system to an S3 bucket; and provide an SNS topic ARN to be notified upon job status changes in Snowball. After Snowball changes the job status from “Importing” to “Completed”, Snowball publishes this event to the specified SNS topic, which delivers this message to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally creates a CloudFront web distribution for the target S3 bucket, to serve the images to end users.

Database services

  • Amazon RDS: Makes it easy to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud.RDS leverages SNS to broadcast notifications when RDS events occur. As usual, these notifications can be delivered via any protocol supported by SNS, including SQS queues, Lambda functions, and HTTP endpoints.As an example, imagine that you own a social network website that has experienced organic growth, and needs to scale its compute and database resources on demand. In this case, you could provide an SNS topic to listen to RDS DB instance events. When the “Low Storage” event is published to the topic, SNS pushes this event to a subscribing Lambda function, which in turn leverages the RDS API to increase the storage capacity allocated to your DB instance. The provisioning itself takes place within the specified DB maintenance window.

  • Amazon ElastiCache: A web service that makes it easy to deploy, operate, and scale an in-memory data store or cache in the cloud.ElastiCache can publish messages using Amazon SNS when significant events happen on your cache cluster. This feature can be used to refresh the list of servers on client machines connected to individual cache node endpoints of a cache cluster. For instance, an ecommerce website fetches product details from a cache cluster, with the goal of offloading a relational database and speeding up page load times. Ideally, you want to make sure that each web server always has an updated list of cache servers to which to connect.To automate this node discovery process, you can get your ElastiCache cluster to publish events to an SNS topic. Thus, when ElastiCache event “AddCacheNodeComplete” is published, your topic then pushes this event to all subscribing HTTP endpoints that serve your ecommerce website, so that these HTTP servers can update their list of cache nodes.

  • Amazon Redshift: A fully managed data warehouse that makes it simple to analyze data using standard SQL and BI (Business Intelligence) tools.Amazon Redshift uses SNS to broadcast relevant events so that data warehouse workflows can be automated. As an example, imagine a news website that sends clickstream data to a Kinesis Firehose stream, which then loads the data into Amazon Redshift, so that popular news and reading preferences might be surfaced on a BI tool. At some point though, this Amazon Redshift cluster might need to be resized, and the cluster enters a ready-only mode. Hence, this Amazon Redshift event is published to an SNS topic, which delivers this event to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally deletes the corresponding Kinesis Firehose delivery stream, so that clickstream data uploads can be put on hold.At a later point, after Amazon Redshift publishes the event that the maintenance window has been closed, SNS notifies a subscribing Lambda function accordingly, so that this function can re-create the Kinesis Firehose delivery stream, and resume clickstream data uploads to Amazon Redshift.

  • AWS DMS: Helps you migrate databases to AWS quickly and securely. The source database remains fully operational during the migration, minimizing downtime to applications that rely on the database.DMS also uses SNS to provide notifications when DMS events occur, which can automate database migration workflows. As an example, you might create data replication tasks to migrate an on-premises MS SQL database, composed of multiple tables, to MySQL. Thus, if replication tasks fail due to incompatible data encoding in the source tables, these events can be published to an SNS topic, which can push these messages into a subscribing SQS queue. Then, encoders running on EC2 can poll these messages from the SQS queue, encode the source tables into a compatible character set, and restart the corresponding replication tasks in DMS. This is an event-driven approach to a self-healing database migration process.

Networking services

  • Amazon Route 53: A highly available and scalable cloud-based DNS (Domain Name System). Route 53 health checks monitor the health and performance of your web applications, web servers, and other resources.You can set CloudWatch alarms and get automated Amazon SNS notifications when the status of your Route 53 health check changes. As an example, imagine an online payment gateway that reports the health of its platform to merchants worldwide, via a status page. This page is hosted on EC2 and fetches platform health data from DynamoDB. In this case, you could configure a CloudWatch alarm for your Route 53 health check, so that when the alarm threshold is breached, and the payment gateway is no longer considered healthy, then CloudWatch publishes this event to an SNS topic, which pushes this message to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally updates the DynamoDB table that populates the status page. This event-driven approach avoids any kind of manual update to the status page visited by merchants.

  • AWS Direct Connect (AWS DX): Makes it easy to establish a dedicated network connection from your premises to AWS, which can reduce your network costs, increase bandwidth throughput, and provide a more consistent network experience than Internet-based connections.You can monitor physical DX connections using CloudWatch alarms, and send SNS messages when alarms change their status. As an example, when a DX connection state shifts to 0 (zero), indicating that the connection is down, this event can be published to an SNS topic, which can fan out this message to impacted servers through HTTP endpoints, so that they might reroute their traffic through a different connection instead. This is an event-driven approach to connectivity resilience.

More event-driven computing on AWS

In addition to SNS, event-driven computing is also addressed by Amazon CloudWatch Events, which delivers a near real-time stream of system events that describe changes in AWS resources. With CloudWatch Events, you can route each event type to one or more targets, including:

Many AWS services publish events to CloudWatch. As an example, you can get CloudWatch Events to capture events on your ETL (Extract, Transform, Load) jobs running on AWS Glue and push failed ones to an SQS queue, so that you can retry them later.

Conclusion

Amazon SNS is a pub/sub messaging service that can be used as an event-driven computing hub to AWS customers worldwide. By capturing events natively triggered by AWS services, such as EC2, S3 and RDS, you can automate and optimize all kinds of workflows, namely scaling, testing, encoding, profiling, broadcasting, discovery, failover, and much more. Business use cases presented in this post ranged from recruiting websites, to scientific research, geographic systems, social networks, retail websites, and news portals.

Start now by visiting Amazon SNS in the AWS Management Console, or by trying the AWS 10-Minute Tutorial, Send Fan-out Event Notifications with Amazon SNS and Amazon SQS.

 

Cross-Account Integration with Amazon SNS

Post Syndicated from Christie Gifrin original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/cross-account-integration-with-amazon-sns/

Contributed by Zak Islam, Senior Manager, Software Development, AWS Messaging

 

Amazon Simple Notification Service (Amazon SNS) is a fully managed AWS service that makes it easy to decouple your application components and fan-out messages. SNS provides topics (similar to topics in message brokers such as RabbitMQ or ActiveMQ) that you can use to create 1:1, 1:N, or N:N producer/consumer design patterns. For more information about how to send messages from SNS to Amazon SQS, AWS Lambda, or HTTP(S) endpoints in the same account, see Sending Amazon SNS Messages to Amazon SQS Queues.

SNS can be used to send messages within a single account or to resources in different accounts to create administrative isolation. This enables administrators to grant only the minimum level of permissions required to process a workload (for example, limiting the scope of your application account to only send messages and to deny deletes). This approach is commonly known as the “principle of least privilege.” If you are interested, read more about AWS’s multi-account security strategy.

This is great from a security perspective, but why would you want to share messages between accounts? It may sound scary, but it’s a common practice to isolate application components (such as producer and consumer) to operate using different AWS accounts to lock down privileges in case credentials are exposed. In this post, I go slightly deeper and explore how to set up your SNS topic so that it can route messages to SQS queues that are owned by a separate AWS account.

Potential use cases

First, look at a common order processing design pattern:

This is a simple architecture. A web server submits an order directly to an SNS topic, which then fans out messages to two SQS queues. One SQS queue is used to track all incoming orders for audits (such as anti-entropy, comparing the data of all replicas and updating each replica to the newest version). The other is used to pass the request to the order processing systems.

Imagine now that a few years have passed, and your downstream processes no longer scale, so you are kicking around the idea of a re-architecture project. To thoroughly test your system, you need a way to replay your production messages in your development system. Sure, you can build a system to replicate and replay orders from your production environment in your development environment. Wouldn’t it be easier to subscribe your development queues to the production SNS topic so you can test your new system in real time? That’s exactly what you can do here.

Here’s another use case. As your business grows, you recognize the need for more metrics from your order processing pipeline. The analytics team at your company has built a metrics aggregation service and ingests data via a central SQS queue. Their architecture is as follows:

Again, it’s a fairly simple architecture. All data is ingested via SQS queues (master_ingest_queue, in this case). You subscribe the master_ingest_queue, running under the analytics team’s AWS account, to the topic that is in the order management team’s account.

Making it work

Now that you’ve seen a few scenarios, let’s dig into the details. There are a couple of ways to link an SQS queue to an SNS topic (subscribe a queue to a topic):

  1. The queue owner can create a subscription to the topic.
  2. The topic owner can subscribe a queue in another account to the topic.

Queue owner subscription

What happens when the queue owner subscribes to a topic? In this case, assume that the topic owner has given permission to the subscriber’s account to call the Subscribe API action using the topic ARN (Amazon Resource Name). For the examples below, also assume the following:

  •  Topic_Owner is the identifier for the account that owns the topic MainTopic
  • Queue_Owner is the identifier for the account that owns the queue subscribed to the main topic

To enable the subscriber to subscribe to a topic, the topic owner must add the sns:Subscribe and topic ARN to the topic policy via the AWS Management Console, as follows:

{
  "Version":"2012-10-17",
  "Id":"MyTopicSubscribePolicy",
  "Statement":[{
      "Sid":"Allow-other-account-to-subscribe-to-topic",
      "Effect":"Allow",
      "Principal":{
        "AWS":"Topic_Owner"
      },
      "Action":"sns:Subscribe",
      "Resource":"arn:aws:sns:us-east-1:Queue_Owner:MainTopic"
    }
  ]
}

After this has been set up, the subscriber (using account Queue_Owner) can call Subscribe to link the queue to the topic. After the queue has been successfully subscribed, SNS starts to publish notifications. In this case, neither the topic owner nor the subscriber have had to process any kind of confirmation message.

Topic owner subscription

The second way to subscribe an SQS queue to an SNS topic is to have the Topic_Owner account initiate the subscription for the queue from account Queue_Owner. In this case, SNS first sends a confirmation message to the queue. To confirm the subscription, a user who can read messages from the queue must visit the URL specified in the SubscribeURL value in the message. Until the subscription is confirmed, no notifications published to the topic are sent to the queue. To confirm a subscription, you can use the SQS console or the ReceiveMessage API action.

What’s next?

In this post, I covered a few simple use cases but the principles can be extended to complex systems as well. As you architect new systems and refactor existing ones, think about where you can leverage queues (SQS) and topics (SNS) to build a loosely coupled system that can be quickly and easily extended to meet your business need.

For step by step instructions, see Sending Amazon SNS messages to an Amazon SQS queue in a different account. You can also visit the following resources to get started working with message queues and topics: