Tag Archives: canada

Now Available – I3 Instances for Demanding, I/O Intensive Applications

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-available-i3-instances-for-demanding-io-intensive-applications/

On the first day of AWS re:Invent I published an EC2 Instance Update and promised to share additional information with you as soon as I had it.

Today I am happy to be able to let you know that we are making six sizes of our new I3 instances available in fifteen AWS regions! Designed for I/O intensive workloads and equipped with super-efficient NVMe SSD storage, these instances can deliver up to 3.3 million IOPS at a 4 KB block and up to 16 GB/second of sequential disk throughput. This makes them a great fit for any workload that requires high throughput and low latency including relational databases, NoSQL databases, search engines, data warehouses, real-time analytics, and disk-based caches. When compared to the I2 instances, I3 instances deliver storage that is less expensive and more dense, with the ability to deliver substantially more IOPS and more network bandwidth per CPU core.

The Specs
Here are the instance sizes and the associated specs:

Instance Name vCPU Count Memory
Instance Storage (NVMe SSD) Price/Hour
i3.large 2 15.25 GiB 0.475 TB $0.15
i3.xlarge 4 30.5 GiB 0.950 TB $0.31
i3.2xlarge 8 61 GiB 1.9 TB $0.62
i3.4xlarge 16 122 GiB 3.8 TB (2 disks) $1.25
i3.8xlarge 32 244 GiB 7.6 TB (4 disks) $2.50
i3.16xlarge 64 488 GiB 15.2 TB (8 disks) $4.99

The prices shown are for On-Demand instances in the US East (Northern Virginia) Region; see the EC2 pricing page for more information.

I3 instances are available in On-Demand, Reserved, and Spot form in the US East (Northern Virginia), US West (Oregon), US West (Northern California), US East (Ohio), Canada (Central), South America (São Paulo), EU (Ireland), EU (London), EU (Frankfurt), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Mumbai), Asia Pacific (Sydney), and AWS GovCloud (US) Regions. You can also use them as Dedicated Hosts and as Dedicated Instances.

These instances support Hardware Virtualization (HVM) AMIs only, and must be run within a Virtual Private Cloud. In order to benefit from the performance made possible by the NVMe storage, you must run one of the following operating systems:

  • Amazon Linux AMI
  • RHEL – 6.5 or better
  • CentOS – 7.0 or better
  • Ubuntu – 16.04 or 16.10
  • SUSE 12
  • SUSE 11 with SP3
  • Windows Server 2008 R2, 2012 R2, and 2016

The I3 instances offer up to 8 NVMe SSDs. In order to achieve the best possible throughput and to get as many IOPS as possible, you can stripe multiple volumes together, or spread the I/O workload across them in another way.

Each vCPU (Virtual CPU) is a hardware hyperthread on an Intel E5-2686 v4 (Broadwell) processor running at 2.3 GHz. The processor supports the AVX2 instructions, along with Turbo Boost and NUMA.

Go For Launch
The I3 instances are available today in fifteen AWS regions and you can start to use them right now.

Jeff;

 

Canada Remains a “Safe Haven” for Online Piracy, Rightsholders Claim

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/canada-remains-a-safe-haven-for-online-piracy-rightsholders-claim-170214/

canada-pirateThe International Intellectual Property Alliance (IIPA) has released its latest 301 ‘watch list’ submission to the U.S. Government.

The IIPA, which includes a wide range of copyright groups including the MPAA, RIAA, and ESA, has listed its complaints against a whole host of countries. As in previous years, Canada is discussed in detail with the recommendation to put it on the 2017 Special 301 ‘watch list.’

One of the main criticisms is that, despite having been called out repeatedly in the past, the country still offers a home to many pirate sites.

“For a number of years, extending well into the current decade, Canada had a well-deserved reputation as a safe haven for some of the most massive and flagrant Internet sites dedicated to the online theft of copyright material,” IIPA writes.

The group notes that some progress has been made. For example, last year the Canadian authorities actively helped to shut down the popular torrent site KickassTorrents, which was partly hosted there. However, the rightsholders say that there’s more work to be done.

“Nonetheless, major online piracy operations still find a home in Canada. These include leading BitTorrent sites such as Sumotorrent.sx and Seedpeer.eu, and hybrid cloud storage services utilizing BitTorrents, such as cloudload.com.”

Another disturbing development, according to IIPA, is the emergence of stand-alone BitTorrent applications that allow users to stream content directly through an attractive and user-friendly interface, hinting at Popcorn Time.

In addition to the traditional pirate sites that remain in Canada, IIPA reports that several websites offering modified game console gear have also moved there in an attempt to escape liability under U.S. law.

“In a growing and problematic trend, sites selling circumvention devices that have been subject to DMCA takedown notices from right holders in the U.S. are moving to Canadian ISPs for hosting, to evade enforcement action under U.S. law. Canadian hosting services such as Hawk Host and Crocweb are particularly popular with such sites.”

The group specifically highlights R4cardmontreal.com, gamersection.ca and r4dscanada.com among the offenders, and notes that “This trend breathes new life into Canada’s problematic ‘safe haven’ reputation.”

The recommendation continues by stressing that Canada’s legal regime fails to deal with online piracy in a proper manner. This is also true for the “notice and notice” legislation that was adopted two years ago, which requires ISPs to forward copyright infringement notices to pirating subscribers.

IIPA notes that there is no evidence that this initiative has resulted in a significant change in consumer behavior, in part because there are no punishments involved for frequent offenders.

“…simply notifying ISP subscribers that their infringing activity has been detected is ineffective in deterring illegal activity, because receiving the notices lacks any meaningful consequences under the Canadian system,” IIPA writes.

This is even worse for hosting providers and other Internet services, who currently have no legal incentive to take infringing material down, IIPA argues.

“The ‘notice-and-takedown’ remedy that most other modern copyright laws provide is far from a panacea for online piracy, but it does, at a minimum, provide some incentives for cooperation, incentives that Canada’s laws simply lack.”

In addition, IIPA notes that a broad range of third-party services such as advertisers, payment processors, and domain name registrars are all too often abused to facilitate piracy. They believe that this is in part because Canadian law doesn’t offer enough “motivation” for these companies to cooperate.

The rightsholders hope that the U.S. Government can help to steer Canada in another direction and encourage more and better anti-piracy regulation. If not, they fear that Canada will remain a safe haven for pirates during the years to come.

IIPA’s full submission, which highlights a variety of countries which deserve a spot on the 301 Watch Lists per IIPA’s standards, is available here (pdf).

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

AWS Direct Connect Update – Link Aggregation Groups, Bundles, and re:Invent Recap

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-direct-connect-update-link-aggregation-groups-bundles-and-reinvent-recap/

AWS Direct Connect helps our large-scale customers to create private, dedicated network connections to their office, data center, or colocation facility. Our customers create 1 Gbps and 10 Gbps connections in order to reduce their network costs, increase data transfer throughput, and to get a more consistent network experience than is possible with an Internet-based connection.

Today I would like to tell you about a new Link Aggregation feature for Direct Connect. I’d also like to tell you about our new Direct Connect Bundles and to tell you more about how we used Direct Connect to provide a first-class customer experience at AWS re:Invent 2016.

Link Aggregation Groups
Some of our customers would like to set up multiple connections (generally known as ports) between their location and one of the 46 Direct Connect locations. Some of them would like to create a highly available link that is resilient in the face of network issues outside of AWS; others simply need more data transfer throughput.

In order to support this important customer use case, you can now purchase up to 4 ports and treat them as a single managed connection, which we call a Link Aggregation Group or LAG. After you have set this up, traffic is load-balanced across the ports at the level of individual packet flows. All of the ports are active simultaneously, and are represented by a single BGP session. Traffic across the group is managed via Dynamic LACP (Link Aggregation Control Protocol – or ISO/IEC/IEEE 8802-1AX:2016). When you create your group, you also specify the minimum number of ports that must be active in order for the connection to be activated.

You can order a new group with multiple ports and you can aggregate existing ports into a new group. Either way, all of the ports must have the same speed (1 Gbps or 10 Gbps).

All of the ports in as group will connect to the same device on the AWS side. You can add additional ports to an existing group as long as there’s room on the device (this information is now available in the Direct Connect Console). If you need to expand an existing group and the device has no open ports, you can simply order a new group and migrate your connections.

Here’s how you can make use of link aggregation from the Console. First, creating a new LAG from scratch:

And second, creating a LAG from existing connections:


Link Aggregation Groups are now available in the US East (Northern Virginia), US West (Northern California), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), Canada (Central), South America (São Paulo), Asia Pacific (Mumbai), and Asia Pacific (Seoul) Regions and you can create them today. We expect to make them available in the remaining regions by the end of this month.

Direct Connect Bundles
We announced some powerful new Direct Connect Bundles at re:Invent 2016. Each bundle is an advanced, hybrid reference architecture designed to reduce complexity and to increase performance. Here are the new bundles:

Level 3 Communications Powers Amazon WorkSpaces – Connects enterprise applications, data, user workspaces, and end-point devices to offer reliable performance and a better end-user experience:

SaaS Architecture enhanced by AT&T NetBond – Enhances quality and user experience for applications migrated to the AWS Cloud:

Aviatrix User Access Integrated with Megaport DX – Supports encrypted connectivity between AWS Cloud Regions, between enterprise data centers and AWS, and on VPN access to AWS:

Riverbed Hybrid SDN/NFV Architecture over Verizon Secure Cloud Interconnect – Allows enterprise customers to provide secure, optimized access to AWS services in a hybrid network environment:

Direct Connect at re:Invent 2016
In order to provide a top-notch experience for attendees and partners at re:Invent, we worked with Level 3 to set up a highly available and fully redundant set of connections. This network was used to support breakout sessions, certification exams, the hands-on labs, the keynotes (including the live stream to over 25,000 viewers in 122 countries), the hackathon, bootcamps, and workshops. The re:Invent network used four 10 Gbps connections, two each to US West (Oregon) and US East (Northern Virginia):

It supported all of the re:Invent venues:

Here are some video resources that will help you to learn more about how we did this, and how you can do it yourself:

Jeff;

AWS IPv6 Update – Global Support Spanning 15 Regions & Multiple AWS Services

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-ipv6-update-global-support-spanning-15-regions-multiple-aws-services/

We’ve been working to add IPv6 support to many different parts of AWS over the last couple of years, starting with Elastic Load Balancing, AWS IoT, Amazon Route 53, Amazon CloudFront, AWS WAF, and S3 Transfer Acceleration, all building up to last month’s announcement of IPv6 support for EC2 instances in Virtual Private Clouds (initially available for use in the US East (Ohio) Region).

Today I am happy to share the news that IPv6 support for EC2 instances in VPCs is now available in a total of fifteen regions, along with Application Load Balancer support for IPv6 in nine of those regions.

You can now build and deploy applications that can use IPv6 addresses to communicate with servers, object storage, load balancers, and content distribution services. In accord with the latest guidelines for IPv6 support from Apple and other vendors, your mobile applications can now make use of IPv6 addresses when they communicate with AWS.

IPv6 Now in 15 Regions
IPv6 support for EC2 instances in new and existing VPCs is now available in the US East (Northern Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Northern California), US West (Oregon), South America (São Paulo), Canada (Central), EU (Ireland), EU (Frankfurt), EU (London), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Mumbai), and AWS GovCloud (US) Regions and you can start using it today!

You can enable IPv6 from the AWS Management Console when you create a new VPC:

Application Load Balancer
Application Load Balancers in the US East (Northern Virginia), US West (Northern California), US West (Oregon), South America (São Paulo), EU (Ireland), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney), and AWS GovCloud (US) Regions now support IPv6 in dual-stack mode, making them accessible via IPv4 or IPv6 (we expect to add support for the remaining regions within a few weeks).

Simply enable the dualstack option when you configure the ALB and then make sure that your security groups allow or deny IPv6 traffic in accord with your requirements. Here’s how you select the dualstack option:

You can also enable this option by running the set-ip-address-type command or by making a call to the SetIpAddressType function. To learn more about this new feature, read the Load Balancer Address Type documentation.

IPv6 Recap
Here are the IPv6 launches that we made in the run-up to the launch of IPv6 support for EC2 instances in VPCs:

CloudFront, WAF, and S3 Transfer Acceleration – This launch let you enable IPv6 support for individual CloudFront distributions. Newly created distributions supported IPv6 by default and existing distributions could be upgraded with a couple of clicks (if you using Route 53 alias records, you also need to add an AAAA record to the domain). With IPv6 support enabled, the new addresses will show up in the CloudFront Access Logs. The launch also let you use AWS WAF to inspect requests that arrive via IPv4 or IPv6 addresses and to use a new, dual-stack endpoint for S3 Transfer Acceleration.

Route 53 – This launch added support for DNS queries over IPv6 (support for the requisite AAAA records was already in place). A subsequent launch added support for Health Checks of IPv6 Endpoints, allowing you to monitor the health of the endpoints and to arrange for DNS failover.

IoT – This product launch included IPv6 support for message exchange between devices and AWS IoT.

S3 – This launch added support for access to S3 buckets via dual-stack endpoints.

Elastic Load Balancing – This launch added publicly routable IPv6 addresses for Elastic Load Balancers.

Jeff;

 

2017: inspiring young makers and supporting educators

Post Syndicated from Philip Colligan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/2017-inspiring-young-makers-educators/

By any measure, the Raspberry Pi Foundation had a fantastic 2016. We ended the year with over 11 million Raspberry Pi computers sold, millions of people using our learning resources, almost 1,000 Certified Educators in the UK and US, 75,000 children regularly attending over 5,000 Code Clubs in the UK, hundreds of Raspberry Jams taking place all over the world, code written by schoolkids running in space (yes, space), and much, much more.

Tim Peake on Twitter

Fantastic to see 5,000 active Code Clubs in the UK, helping over 75,000 young people learn to code. https://t.co/OyShrUzAhI @Raspberry_Pi https://t.co/luFj1qgzvQ

As I’ve said before, what we achieve is only possible thanks to the amazing community of makers, educators, volunteers, and young people all over the world who share our mission and support our work. You’re all awesome: thank you.

So here we are, just over a week into the New Year, and I thought it might be a good time to share with you some of what we’ve got planned for 2017.

Young digital makers

At the core of our mission is getting more young people excited about computing, and learning how to make things with computers. That was the original inspiration for the Raspberry Pi computer and it remains our number-one objective.

One of the ways we do that is through Code Club, a network of after-school clubs for 9- 11-year-olds run by teachers and volunteers. It’s already one of the largest networks of after-school clubs in the world, and this year we’ll be working with our existing partners in Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, France, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and Ukraine, as well as finding more partners in more countries, to bring Code Club to many more children.

Code Club

This year also sees the launch of Pioneers, our new programme for teen digital makers. It’s built around a series of challenges that will inspire young people to make things with technology and share their makes with the world. Check out the first challenge here, and keep watching the hashtag #MakeYourIdeas across your favourite social media platforms.

This is Pioneers #MakeYourIdeas

UPDATE – The first challenge is now LIVE. Head here for more information https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCUzza7LJog Woohoo! Get together, get inspired, and get thinking. We’re looking for Pioneers to use technology to make something awesome. Get together in a team or on your own, post online to show us how you’re getting on, and then show the world your build when you’re done.

We’re also expanding our space programme Astro Pi, with 250 teams across Europe currently developing code that will be run on the ISS by ESA French Astronaut Thomas Pesquet. And, building on our Weather Station project, we’re excited to be developing new ideas for citizen science programmes that get more young people involved in computing.

European Astro Pi Challenge – Code your experiment

British ESA astronaut Tim Peake is safely back on Earth now, but French ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet is onboard the ISS, keen to see what students from all over Europe can do with the Astro Pi units too.

Supporting educators

Another big part of our work is supporting educators who are bringing computing and digital making into the classroom, and this year we’re going to be doing even more to help them.

Certified Educators

We’ll continue to grow our community of official Raspberry Pi Certified Educators, with Picademy training programmes in the UK and US. Watch out for those dates coming soon. We’re also opening up our educator training to a much wider audience through a series of online courses in partnership with FutureLearn. The first two courses are open for registration now, and we’ve got plans to develop and run more courses throughout the year, so if you’re an educator, let us know what you would find most useful.

We’re also really excited to be launching a brand-new free resource for educators later this month in partnership with CAS, the grass-roots network of computing educators. For now, it’s top-secret, but if you’re in the Bett Arena on 25 January, you’ll be the first to hear all about it.

Free educational resources

One of the most important things we do at Pi Towers is create the free educational resources that are used in Code Clubs, STEM clubs, CoderDojos, classrooms, libraries, makerspaces, and bedrooms by people of all ages learning about computing and digital making. We love making these resources and we know that you love using them. This year, we want to make them even more useful.

resources

As a first step, later this month we will share our digital making curriculum, which explains how we think about learning and progression, and which provides the structure for our educational resources and programmes. We’re publishing it so that we can get feedback to make it better, but we also hope that it will be used by other organisations creating educational resources.

We’re also working hard behind the scenes to improve the content and presentation of our learning resources. We want to include more diverse content like videos, make it easier for users to track their own progress, and generally make the experience more interactive and social. We’re looking forward to sharing that work and getting your feedback over the next few months.

Community

Last, but by no means least, we will continue to support and grow the community around our mission. We’ll be doing even more outreach, with ever more diverse groups, and doing much more to support the Raspberry Jam organisers and others who do so much to involve people in the digital making movement.

Birthday Bash

The other big community news is that we will be formally establishing ourselves as a charity in the US, which will provide the foundation (see what I did there?) for a serious expansion of our charitable activities and community in North America.


As you can see, we’ve got big plans for the year. Let me know what you think in the comments below and, if you’re excited about the mission, there’s lots of ways to get involved.

The post 2017: inspiring young makers and supporting educators appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Australian Govt Advisory Body Digs in Over Fair Use & Geo-Unblocking

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/australian-govt-agency-digs-in-over-fair-use-geo-unblocking-161222/

copyright-bloodEarlier this year, Australia’s Productivity Commission released a draft report covering various aspects of the country’s intellectual property system.

Among the Commission’s recommendations was advice to the government that it should allow citizens to access geo-blocked content in order for them to obtain the best deals on international content.

“Geoblocking results in Australians paying higher prices (often for a lesser or later service) than consumers overseas,” the draft read.

The report also urged the introduction of fair use provisions into local copyright law instead of the current “fair dealing” arrangement.

“Australia’s copyright system has expanded over time, often with no transparent, evidence-based policy analysis demonstrating the need for, or quantum of, new rights. A new system of user rights, including the introduction of a broad, principles-based fair use exception, is needed to help address this imbalance,” the report said.

During the summer, copyright holders fought back, claiming that fair use would have a negative effect on creation. Music group IFPI, for example, warned that fair use would threaten innovation and disadvantage creators while creating legal uncertainty.

“Licensing, not exceptions to copyright, drives innovation. Innovation is best achieved through licensing agreements between content owners and users, including technological innovators,” IFPI said. In December, similar arguments were presented in a new campaign championed by local celebrities.

But in a final inquiry report sent to the government in September and published this week, the Commission’s position remains unmoved.

“Rights holders have argued against the adoption of fair use in Australia. They claim that by design, fair use is imprecise and would create significant legal uncertainty for both rightsholders and users. Initial uncertainty is not a compelling reason to eschew a fair use exception, especially if it serves to preserve poor policy outcomes,” the Commission writes.

“Australia’s current exceptions are themselves subject to legal uncertainty, and evidence suggests that fair use cases, as shown in the US, are more predictable than rights holders argue. Moreover, courts routinely apply principles-based law to new cases, such as in consumer and employment law, updating case law when the circumstances warrant doing so.”

The Commission says that over time, both rightsholders and users will become “increasingly comfortable” when making judgments over what is and is not fair use. In the event that Courts are called on to decide, four factors should be considered.

• the purpose and character of the use
• the nature of the copyright material
• the amount and substantiality of the part used
• the effect of the use upon the potential market for, or value of, the copyright material.

“Rights holders also argued fair use would significantly reduce their incentives to create and invest in new works, holding up Canada as an example. Some have proclaimed that fair use will equate with ‘free use’, particularly by the education sector. But these concerns are ill-founded and premised on flawed (and self-interested) assumptions,” the Commission writes.

“Indeed, rather than ignore the interests of rights holders, under fair use the effect on the rights holder is one of the factors to be considered. Where a use of copyright material harms a rights holder, the use is less likely to be considered fair. In the US, where fair use is long established, creative industries thrive.”

Fair Use recommedation from the Commissionrecco-51

And when it comes to allowing Australians unfettered access to legitimate content, the Commission remains equally unmoved. It notes that prompt access to reasonably priced content is vital in the fight against piracy and the government should change the law to make it clear to consumers that they have the right to obtain content from overseas, should that mean getting a better deal.

“Research consistently demonstrates that timely and cost effective access to
copyright-protected works is the best way for industry to reduce online copyright
infringement. Therefore, in addition to implementing a new exception for fair use, the Commission is recommending making it easier for users to access legitimate copyright-protected content,” the inquiry report reads.

“Studies show Australian consumers systematically pay higher prices for professional software, music, games and e-books than consumers in comparable overseas markets. While some digital savvy consumers are able to avoid these costs (such as through the use of proxy servers and Virtual Private Networks), most pay inflated prices for lower standard services and some will ultimately infringe.

“The Australian Government should make clear that it is not an infringement of Australia’s copyright system for consumers to circumvent geoblocking technology and should avoid international obligations that would preclude such practices,” it adds.

Anti-Geoblocking recommendation from the Commissionrecco-52

The Intellectual Property Arrangements final inquiry report is available here.

Note: An earlier version of this article referred to the Productivity Commission as an “agency”. That has been corrected to “advisory body”.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Now Open AWS Canada (Central) Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-canada-central-region/

We are growing the AWS footprint once again. Our new Canada (Central) Region is now available and you can start using it today. AWS customers in Canada and the northern parts of the United States have fast, low-latency access to the suite of AWS infrastructure services.

The Details
The new Canada (Central) Region supports Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) and related services including Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, Elastic Load Balancing, NAT Gateway, Spot Instances, and Dedicated Hosts.

It also supports Amazon Aurora, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, Amazon CloudFront, AWS CloudHSM, AWS CloudTrail, Amazon CloudWatch, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Direct Connect, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon ECS, EC2 Container Registry, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon EMR, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Glacier, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS Snowball, AWS Key Management Service (KMS), Amazon Kinesis, AWS Marketplace, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Route 53, AWS Shield Standard, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Trusted Advisor, VM Import/Export, and AWS WAF.

The Region supports all sizes of C4, D2, M4, T2, and X1 instances.

As part of our on-going focus on making cloud computing available to you in an environmentally friendly fashion, AWS data centers in Canada draw power from a grid that generates 99% of its electricity using hydropower (read about AWS Sustainability to learn more).

Well Connected
After receiving a lot of positive feedback on the network latency metrics that I shared when we launched the AWS Region in Ohio, I am happy to have a new set to share as part of today’s launch (these times represent a lower bound on latency and may change over time).

The first set of metrics are to other Canadian cities:

  • 9 ms to Toronto.
  • 14 ms to Ottawa.
  • 47 ms to Calgary.
  • 49 ms to Edmonton.
  • 60 ms to Vancouver.

The second set are to locations in the US:

  • 9 ms to New York.
  • 19 ms to Chicago.
  • 16 ms to US East (Northern Virginia).
  • 27 ms to US East (Ohio).
  • 75 ms to US West (Oregon).

Canada is also home to CloudFront edge locations in Toronto, Ontario, and Montreal, Quebec.

And Canada Makes 15
Today’s launch brings our global footprint to 15 Regions and 40 Availability Zones, with seven more Availability Zones and three more Regions coming online through the next year. As a reminder, each Region is a physical location where we have two or more Availability Zones or AZs. Each Availability Zone, in turn, consists of one or more data centers, each with redundant power, networking, and connectivity, all housed in separate facilities. Having two or more AZ’s in each Region gives you the ability to run applications that are more highly available, fault tolerant, and durable than would be the case if you were limited to a single AZ.

For more information about current and future AWS Regions, take a look at the AWS Global Infrastructure page.

Jeff;


Région AWS Canada (Centre) Maintenant Ouverte

Nous étendons la portée d’AWS une fois de plus. Notre nouvelle Région du Canada (Centre) est maintenant disponible et vous pouvez commencer à l’utiliser dès aujourd’hui. Les clients d’AWS au Canada et dans les régions du nord des États-Unis ont un accès rapide et à latence réduite à l’ensemble des services d’infrastructure AWS.

Les détails
La nouvelle Région du Canada (Centre) supporte Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) et les services associés incluant Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, Elastic Load Balancing, NAT Gateway, Spot Instances et Dedicated Hosts.

Également supportés sont Amazon Aurora, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, Amazon CloudFront, AWS CloudHSM, AWS CloudTrail, Amazon CloudWatch, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Direct Connect, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon ECS, EC2 Container Registry, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon EMR, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Glacier, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS Snowball, AWS Key Management Service (KMS), Amazon Kinesis, AWS Marketplace, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Route 53, AWS Shield Standard, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Trusted Advisor, VM Import/Export, et AWS WAF.

La région supporte toutes les tailles des instances C4, D2, M4, T2 et X1.

Dans le cadre de notre mission continue de vous offrir des services infonuagiques de manière écologique, les centres de données d’AWS au Canada sont alimentés par un réseau électrique dont 99 pour cent de l’énergie fournie est de nature hydroélectrique (consultez AWS Sustainability pour en savoir plus).

Bien connecté
Après avoir reçu beaucoup de commentaires positifs sur les mesures de latence du réseau dont je vous ai fait part lorsque nous avons lancé la région AWS en Ohio, je suis heureux de vous faire part d’un nouvel ensemble de mesures dans le cadre du lancement d’aujourd’hui (ces mesures représentent une limite inférieure à la latence et pourraient changer au fil du temps).

Le premier ensemble de mesures concerne d’autres villes canadiennes:

  • 9 ms à Toronto.
  • 14 ms à Ottawa.
  • 47 ms à Calgary.
  • 49 ms à Edmonton.
  • 60 ms à Vancouver.

Le deuxième ensemble concerne des emplacements aux États-Unis :

  • 9 ms à New York.
  • 19 ms à Chicago.
  • 16 ms à USA Est (Virginie du Nord).
  • 27 ms à USA Est (Ohio).
  • 75 ms à USA Ouest (Oregon).

Le Canada compte également des emplacements périphériques CloudFront à Toronto, en Ontario, et à Montréal, au Québec.

Et le Canada fait 15
Le lancement d’aujourd’hui porte notre présence mondiale à 15 régions et 40 zones de disponibilité avec sept autres zones de disponibilité et trois autres régions qui seront mises en opération au cours de la prochaine année. Pour vous rafraîchir la mémoire, chaque région est un emplacement physique où nous avons deux ou plusieurs zones de disponibilité. Chaque zone de disponibilité, à son tour, comprend un ou plusieurs centres de données, chacun doté d’une alimentation, d’une mise en réseau et d’une connectivité redondantes dans des installations distinctes. Avoir deux zones de disponibilité ou plus dans chaque région vous donne la possibilité d’opérer des applications qui sont plus disponibles, plus tolérantes aux pannes et plus durables qu’elles ne le seraient si vous étiez limité à une seule zone de disponibilité.

Pour plus d’informations sur les régions AWS actuelles et futures, consultez la page Infrastructure mondiale AWS.

Jeff;

The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List 2016

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-raspberry-pi-christmas-shopping-list-2016/

Feeling stuck for what to buy the beloved maker in your life? Maybe your niece wants to get into Minecraft hacking, or your Dad fancies his hand at home automation on a budget?

Maybe you’ve seen Raspberry Pi in the news and figure it would be a fun activity for the family, or you’re stuck for what to buy the Pi pro who’s slowly filling your spare room with wires, servers, and a mysterious, unidentified object that keeps beeping?

Whatever the reason, you’re in the right place. The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List is here to help you out.

For the beginner

Here are some of our favourite bits to get them started.

  • A Raspberry Pi Starter Kit will give your budding maker everything they need to get started. There’s a whole host of options, from our own kit to project-specific collections from our friends at The Pi Hut and Pimoroni in the UK, Adafruit in the USA, Canakit in Canada, and RS Components across the globe.

Marc Scott Beginner's Guide to Coding Book

  • They may already have a screen, keyboard, and mouse, but having a separate display allows them free rein to play to their heart’s content. The pi-top takes the form of a laptop, while the pi-topCEED still requires a mouse and keyboard.

pi-top

CamJam EduKit

For the hobbyist

They’ve been tinkering with LEDs and servo motors for a while. Now it’s time to pull out the big guns.

  • Help to broaden their interest by introducing them to some of the brilliant products over at Bare Conductive. Pair up the Pi Cap with some Electric Paint, and they’ll create an interactive masterpiece by the time the Queen’s Speech is on.

Bare Conductive

  • Add to their maker toolkit with some of the great products in the RasPiO range. The GPIO Zero Ruler will be an instant hit, and a great stocking filler for anyone wanting to do more with the GPIO pins.

GPIO Zero Ruler

Camera Kit Adafruit

For the tech whizz

You don’t understand half the things they talk about at the dinner table, but they seem to be enthusiastic and that’s all that counts.

  • Help them organise their components with a handy Storage Organiser. We swear by them here at Pi Towers.

Storage

Helping Hand

  • And then there’s the PiBorg. Treat them to the superfast DiddyBorg and you’ll be hailed as gift-buyer supreme (sorry if you’ll have to better this next year).

Diddybord

  • And then there’s the Raspberry Pi Zero. Check out availability here and buy them the sought-after $5 beast of an SBC.

For the… I really have no idea what to buy them this year

There’s always one, right?

  • A physical subscription to The MagPi Magazine is sure to go down well. And with the added bonus of a free Raspberry Pi Zero, you’ll win this Christmastime. Well done, you!

MagPi_Logo

 

Stocking fillers for everyone

Regardless of their experience and tech know-how, here are some great stocking fillers that everyone will enjoy.

 

STEM-ish gifts that everyone will love

These books are top of everyone’s lists this year, and for good reason. Why not broaden the interest of the Pi fan in your life with one of these brilliant reads?

The post The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List 2016 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Court Awards Damages Following Bogus DMCA Takedowns

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/court-awards-damages-following-bogus-dmca-takedowns-161130/

sadyoutubeEvery hour of every day, millions of DMCA-style takedown notices flood into service providers all over the globe. Google alone has received a billion in the past 12 months.

While the majority of these notices comply with the law, a percentage are duplicates, erroneous, or flat-out malicious. Until recently, however, no one had ever been held to account for sending bad notices, but a case in Canada has changed that.

Whyte Potter-Mäl c Topdawg Entertainment Inc. is a curious case that has its roots back in 2011 when rapper Jonathan Emile asked fellow rapper and songwriter Kendrick Lamar to contribute to the track ‘Heaven Help Dem’. Lamar agreed and provided a verse in 2012.

“We sent [Lamar] an email outlining what we wanted to do and they got us on the phone and said they were feeling it and that they would go ahead and do the song,” Emile told Billboard.

“We paid Kendrick Lamar for a feature, and once we paid them, they basically stopped communicating with us altogether. It was understood that we’d take care of the paperwork with the lawyers, so we paid them and they basically disappeared… we couldn’t get in contact, so I just continued producing my album and with the verbal agreement we had, and we put out the song in 2015.”

Heaven Help Dem was supposed to be the lead track on Emile’s debut album, but instead it was quickly pulled from YouTube, iTunes, Soundcloud and other sites following bogus copyright claims from Lamar’s label Top Dawg Entertainment Inc., Interscope Records and Universal Music Group.

Emile says that after going back and forth with the labels, they realized that they had no right to take the track down. By then, however, the damage had been done and all momentum to promote the song had been lost. Also faced with the prospect of fans believing that he had stolen the verse from Lamar, Emile decided to take the labels to court in Canada.

In a case before the small claims division of the Court of Quebec, Emile asked for a token amount in damages – just CAD$15,000 – after the labels removed his work from the Internet for two months after bogus copyright claims. None appeared in court to defend themselves and Emile won by default.

“It’s only after the intervention of this lawyer that the song was reinstated on the social media,” the Court’s judgment reads.

“While the song was down, and even after it was reinstated, it is clear from the evidence provided that the incomes of the Plaintiff and his reputation was negatively affected from the false report of the Defendants.”

In most cases there would be earlier rulings to look back on, but the Montreal Court said that it was unable to find anything similar on file. Instead, it used Copyright Act to determine an appropriate damages award.

“In these circumstances, and after reviewing sections 28.1, 28.2, 34 of the Copyright Act, sections 6 and 49 of the Charter of human rights and freedoms and the Cinar judgment [1] from the Supreme Court, the Court will allow the discretionary amount of $5,000 as moral and material damages to be solidarily paid by the Defendants and an additional amount of $1,000 per Defendant as punitive damages,” the Court ruled.

Speaking with Legal Feeds, IP expert Noel Courage said he’d never seen a case where someone had been sued over a takedown notice.

“The Court seemed to say that the takedown affected the moral rights of the musician’s work or performance,” he said.

“Moral rights are the musician’s rights to the integrity of a work. These rights can be infringed if the work is modified without consent, and prejudices the musician’s reputation or honour. This is the first I have heard of the use of moral rights in response to a web music takedown.”

While the Court’s decision will be welcomed by those who believe the DMCA is too often used as a weapon, Courage said that the case doesn’t set a strong precedent due to it being heard before a low-level court.

However, “it may give companies pause before giving takedown notices.”

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Hosting Companies Dragged into Piracy Lawsuit Alongside Cloudflare

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/hosting-companies-dragged-into-piracy-lawsuit-alongside-cloudflare-161126/

cloudflareFaced with non-cooperative ‘pirate’ sites, copyright holders have begun targeting web services with demands for them to stop serving errant platforms.

A lot of attention has focused on search engines, domain name registrars, and advertisers, who are frequently asked to do more to counter online piracy.

This summer, adult entertainment publisher ALS Scan took it up a notch, taking legal steps to hold several third-party services accountable for the actions of several pirate sites “with no apparent function other than to display infringing [ALS] adult content.”

In a complaint filed at a California federal court, ALS Scan targeted CloudFlare and the advertising network JuicyAds over image copyright infringement carried out by the users of pirate sites (full list below) they service.

“The pirate sites would not be able to thrive were it not for third party service providers who provide valuable services to these sites,” ALS wrote.

Last month, JuicyAds was cleared of any wrongdoing and the case against it was dismissed. However, Cloudflare is still a defendant and in an amended complaint filed earlier this month, other companies have now been dragged into the dispute.

First up is well-known hosting provider OVH, which made the headlines earlier this month when it was targeted by police seeking to shut down private tracker What.cd. ALS Scan says that OVH (based in France and Canada) is responsible for providing hosting and related services to pirate sites.

Also under fire is United States hosting provider Steadfast Networks. According to ALS, like OVH this Chicago-based company also hosts illegal sites, including “pirate” image hosting platform Imagebam.com. This is a very popular site indeed, currently ranked #680 in the world by SimilarWeb with more than 40m visits per month.

According to ALS, Dolphin Media Ltd is the Hong Kong-based company behind an image hosting site operating from Imgchilli.net. Again, ALS characterizes this as a pirate platform but instead of Dolphin merely being the host, it’s claimed the company also owns and operates the service.

Finally, ALS names Hivelocity Ventures as a new defendant. According to the adult outfit, Hivelocity hosts ‘pirate’ sites including namethatpornstar.com.

“The pirate sites would not be able to thrive were it not for third party service providers who provide valuable services to these sites. These third party providers include hosts and content delivery networks,” the amended complaint reads.

According to ALS, when Cloudflare learned of this lawsuit its lawyers contacted ALS offering to hand over the information it holds on the pirate sites in question, but only in exchange for a release of liability. While that doesn’t appear to have been granted, Cloudflare did begin to play ball.

“Eventually Cloudflare identified the OVH Companies as the primary host of some of the sites in question,” the company adds, noting that despite “numerous notifications of infringement”, OVH has continued to provide hosting services to pirate sites.

“On information and belief, the OVH Companies have failed to implement and enforce a repeat infringer policy,” ALS adds.

US-based host Steadfast Networks is subjected to the same criticism. The company allegedly received numerous infringement notifications on which it failed to act, and has failed to “implement or enforce a repeat infringer policy by removing Imagebam.com from its servers.”

In respect of ImgChilli and owner Dolphin, ALS has nothing good to say either.

“This is no site like dropbox.com, however, which caters to consumers who want to share family pictures or personal oversize files. Instead, Dolphin offers to pay imgchili.net members $4.50 per thousand views of images uploaded to imgchili.net,” the complaint reads.

“Dolphin is not offering to pay members money for page views of uploaded materials to encourage consumers to share pictures of their vacations. On information and belief, Dolphin provides monetary incentives to induce members to steal and upload massive galleries of infringing adult content.”

In summary, ALS says that while some of the defendants may claim safe harbor under the DMCA, they do not qualify for its protections.

“ALS denies that any would apply, but if they do, such safe harbors have been lost through ignoring red flags of infringement, ignoring actual notifications of infringement, failure to adopt and reasonably implement a repeat infringer policy and failure to accommodate, and interference with, standard technical measures,” the amended complaint reads.

If successful, ALS is demanding actual damages of no less than $10m, statutory damages, disgorgement of defendants’ profits, trebling of damages, costs and attorneys’ fees, plus preliminary and permanent injunctive relief.

The full list of the pirate sites in the complaint:

a. imgchili.net (Dolphin, Cloudflare, OVH)
b. namethatpornstar.com (Hivelocity)
c. slimpics.com (Cloudflare)
d. cumonmy.com (Cloudflare)
e. bestofsexpics.com (Cloudflare)
f. stooorage.com (Cloudflare, OVH)
g. greenpiccs.com (Cloudflare)
h. imagebam.com (Steadfast)
i. imgsen.se (Cloudflare)
j. imgspice.com (Cloudflare)
k. imgspot.org (Cloudflare)
l. img.yt (Cloudflare)
m. vipergirls.to (Cloudflare)
n. pornwire.net (Cloudflare)
o. fboom.me (Cloudflare)
p. imgflash.net (Cloudflare)
q. imgtrex.com (Cloudflare)

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

University Bans BitTorrent to Stop Flood of Infringement Notices

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/university-bans-bittorrent-to-stop-flood-of-infringement-notices-161111/

servers-noFollowing changes to Canada’s copyright law in early 2015, ISPs are now required to forward copyright infringement notices to their customers. Copyright owners and anti-piracy outfits have taken full advantage, with tens of thousands of users becoming targets for warnings and even demands for cash.

With opportunities for generating revenue piling up, the volume of notices has continued to increase, causing headaches for users and ISPs alike. The phenomenon has also been felt at the University of Calgary, which acts as a service provider to thousands of students.

Inevitably, some of those students have been using their connections to obtain music and movies for free, which has led to the university receiving large numbers of notices. So, in an effort to reduce the instances of alleged infringement, the university has recently banned BitTorrent usage on several WiFi networks.

Speaking to student newspaper The Gauntlet, vice-president finance and services Linda Dalgetty said that the effect was felt immediately. During the first eight days of the ban, the university received 90% fewer notices than usual.

“I think what we’re finding is it has definitely made a difference. But we have to monitor that, because statistically, we have to go through a longer time frame than eight days,” Dalgetty said.

According to Dalgetty, reducing the number of infringement notices wasn’t the only consideration. The volume of traffic and other threats were also on the agenda.

“The more streaming we have on the campus, the more it impacts network performance and that takes away the user experience for other pursuits,” she said. “The third [reason] is security. The more streaming we have, the [higher chance] of inadvertently downloading something that would create issues.”

Despite the ban, if people at the university simply must use BitTorrent as part of their academic activities they can apply for an exemption. Any use must be permitted under copyright law for the application to be successful.

Moving forward, the university may not stop at only blocking BitTorrent. Speaking with TorrentFreak, The Gauntlet news editor Scott Strasser shared information which indicates that if there are problems with other file-sharing tools, they too could be subjected to a block.

The university’s BitTorrent ban is the latest fallout from Canada’s notice-and-notice regime. Earlier this month, Christine McMillan from Ontario made the headlines as the more recent victim of copyright trolls. They accused the 86-year-old of illegally downloading a zombie game and warned that a $5,000 fine could follow.

McMillan has refused to pay the fine.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

AWS Week in Review – October 31, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-october-31-2016/

Over 25 internal and external contributors helped out with pull requests and fresh content this week! Thank you all for your help and your support.

Monday

October 31

Tuesday

November 1

Wednesday

November 2

Thursday

November 3

Friday

November 4

Saturday

November 5

Sunday

November 6

New & Notable Open Source

New Customer Success Stories

  • Apposphere – Using AWS and bitfusion.io from the AWS Marketplace, Apposphere can scale 50 to 60 percent month-over-month while keeping customer satisfaction high. Based in Austin, Texas, the Apposphere mobile app delivers real-time leads from social media channels.
  • CADFEM – CADFEM uses AWS to make complex simulation software more accessible to smaller engineering firms, helping them compete with much larger ones. The firm specializes in simulation software and services for the engineering industry.
  • Mambu – Using AWS, Mambu helped one of its customers launch the United Kingdom’s first cloud-based bank, and the company is now on track for tenfold growth, giving it a competitive edge in the fast-growing fintech sector. Mambu is an all-in-one SaaS banking platform for managing credit and deposit products quickly, simply, and affordably.
  • Okta – Okta uses AWS to get new services into production in days instead of weeks. Okta creates products that use identity information to grant people access to applications on multiple devices at any time, while still enforcing strong security protections.
  • PayPlug – PayPlug is a startup created in 2013 that developed an online payment solution. It differentiates itself by the simplicity of its services and its ease of integration on e-commerce websites. PayPlug is a startup created in 2013 that developed an online payment solution. It differentiates itself by the simplicity of its services and its ease of integration on e-commerce websites
  • Rent-a-Center – Rent-a-Center is a leading renter of furniture, appliances, and electronics to customers in the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, and Mexico. Rent-A-Center uses AWS to manage its new e-commerce website, scale to support a 1,000 percent spike in site traffic, and enable a DevOps approach.
  • UK Ministry of Justice – By going all in on the AWS Cloud, the UK Ministry of Justice (MoJ) can use technology to enhance the effectiveness and fairness of the services it provides to British citizens. The MoJ is a ministerial department of the UK government. MoJ had its own on-premises data center, but lacked the ability to change and adapt rapidly to the needs of its citizens. As it created more digital services, MoJ turned to AWS to automate, consolidate, and deliver constituent services.

New SlideShare Presentations

New YouTube Videos

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

Copyright Trolls Abandon Sweden in a Blaze of Bad Publicity

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/copyright-trolls-abandon-sweden-in-blaze-of-bad-publicity-161101/

trollsignIn the US, Europe, and Canada, copyright holders have been teaming up with piracy monitoring firms to develop a new flow of revenue. Together they track down alleged pirates and hit them with a demand for cash settlement – or else.

This so-called ‘copyright-trolling’ hit Sweden earlier this year. An organization calling itself Spridningskollen (Distribution Check) headed up by law firm Gothia Law, said its new initiative would save the entertainment industries and educate the masses.

“One can compare it to a speed camera. In the same way that a speed camera only records those who drive too fast, only those Internet users who share copyrighted material without permission are logged,” said spokesman Gordon Odenbark.

Those ‘speeding fines’ were set at around $250 but backed up by threats that they would increase if file-sharers were uncooperative. Predictably there was a huge backlash, both among the public and in the media, but few expected the announcement that came yesterday.

“Gothia Law, who on behalf of rights holders in the film and television industry created Distribution Check, is now ending its involvement in the file sharing issue,” the firm said.

“In a short time, Distribution Check has given rise to criticism but also a decline in illegal file sharing. This without a single collection letter being sent out.”

Noting that in a short time the anti-piracy campaign had generated intense debate, the law firm also went on to claim that it had been a success.

“Knowledge of an individual’s legal responsibility is higher today than it was before the initiative was launched. It also established that the method to address a claim against a person who held a particular IP address through which copyrighted materials were distributed illegally, is in full compliance with both Swedish and European legislation,” the company added.

The claim that the campaign had somehow achieved its aims is somewhat weak, especially when one considers the legal and administrative costs that have been accrued in what was a sizeable operation.

That is further compounded by the fact that no letters being sent out means that a) all the threats and promises were hollow and b) zero revenue was generated. Perhaps worse still, those threats were made by a law firm that now has to deal with damage to its reputation among both its clients and the general public.

“The polarized debate focused on how to act to avoid the Swedish law. Many hold the belief that it is socially acceptable to withhold the truth in order to escape the penalty for a criminal act, which also seriously damages the cultural sector,” Gothia said.

“As legislation and public opinion differs in a significant way, Gothia Law has now ended its involvement in the file-sharing issue.”

It is quite something for a law firm to state that it’s backed out of a project because people have no respect for the law. Then again, it’s not unusual for law firms to get involved in this type of work only to find that it’s more trouble than it’s worth. Still, the company signs off with its successes, which were apparently achieved in just two months and without sending out a single letter.

“The initiative has meant a certain success for rights holders who will continue to protect their own interests in the file-sharing issue. Not only has the issue risen on the agenda, during the time that has passed since the initiative was launched, illegal downloading in Sweden also declined,” Gothia said.

While it’s reportedly true that file-sharing in Sweden is on the decline, it seems unlikely that this campaign had much of an effect on that since its launch in September. Nevertheless, Gothia insists that it did.

“The decline in sharing of the 150 titles represented by Distribution Check has been greater than the overall decline. For some titles, the download has fallen by 17 percent,” the company concludes.

It’s difficult to see the announcement as anything less than a damage limitation exercise but for local ISP Bahnhof, the news is still welcome. Bahnhof CEO Jon Karlung has been Distribution Check’s most vocal critic and through his company has been a thorn in the side of the project. Now it’s all over, people can relax again.

“This means that ordinary families do not have to come home to mysterious invoices that you have to think about whether to pay or not,” Karlung says.

“Hopefully this means that the copyright industry will seriously leave the 90s behind and put their resources into better experiences instead, such as Netflix and Spotify have done.”

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

86-Year Old Grandma Accused of Pirating a Zombie Game

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/86-year-old-grandma-accused-of-pirating-a-zombie-game-161031/

metro2033Not to sound ageist, but generally speaking 86-year-old women are not that interested in zombie games like Metro 2033.

This also applies to Christine McMillan from Ontario, Canada. In fact, she’d never even heard of the game until an anti-piracy group accused her of pirating a copy via BitTorrent.

McMillan is one of the hundreds of thousands of people who’ve been accused of copyright infringement under Canada’s “notice and notice” regime.

Due to a change to Canada’s copyright law early last year, ISPs are now required to forward copyright infringement notices to their customers. As a result, tens of thousands of Internet subscribers have received warnings in their mailboxes, with some asking for cash settlements.

The 86-year-old woman falls in the latter category. In the letter received from anti-piracy group Canipre, she’s threatened with thousands of dollars in damages, if she doesn’t comply.

“They didn’t tell me how much I owed, they only told me that if I didn’t comply, I would be liable for a fine of up to $5,000 and I could pay immediately by entering my credit card number,” McMillan told Go Public.

At first, McMillan thought she was dealing with spammers but Cogeco, her Internet provider, confirmed that the email with the settlement offer was legitimate.

The power of the settlement scheme lies in the uncertainty people face. Most recipients are unaware of the notice-and-notice system and fear that a lawsuit is looming. However, thus far not a single lawsuit has followed in these cases.

They are basically regular takedown notices, bundled with a settlement request, which are common in the U.S. as well. The rightsholders have no idea who the accused are and have no way to contact them directly.

McMillan is obviously not happy with the notice-and-notice legislation which she brands as “foolish.”

“That somebody can threaten you over the internet … that to me is intimidation and I can’t believe the government would support such action,” she says.

Canipre’s owner Barry Logan, however, doesn’t see anything wrong with the practice and says that his company is helping its clients to educate the public on piracy and theft. The threatening language in the letters doesn’t cross any lines, he notes.

For the anti-piracy group the new legislation has been a great success. By sending out tens, or hundreds of thousands of warning letters, they’ve collected about $500,000 in settlements since it was put in place last year.

This also means that Canadian Internet subscribers are half a million lighter as a result.

Interestingly, McMillan is not one of them. While she made herself known by going to the press, she has no intention of paying up for pirating a zombie game she’d never even heard of.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Police Confirm Arrests of BlackCats-Games Operators

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/police-confirm-arrests-blackcats-games-operators-161020/

After being down for several hours, yesterday the domain of private tracker BlackCats-Games was seized by the UK’s Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit.

The domain used to point to an IP address in Canada, but was later switched to a server known to be under the control of PIPCU, the UK’s leading anti-piracy force.

Following several hours of rumors, last evening sources close to the site began to confirm that the situation was serious. Reddit user Farow went public with specific details, noting that the owner of BlackCats-Games had been arrested and the site would be closing down.

Former site staff member SteWieH added that there had in fact been two arrests and it was the site’s sysops that had been taken into custody.

While both are credible sources, there was no formal confirmation from PIPCU. That came a few moments ago and it’s pretty bad news for fans of the site and its operators.

“Officers from the City of London Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) have arrested two men in connection with an ongoing investigation into the illegal distribution of copyright protected video games,” the unit said in a statement.

Police say that the raids took place on Tuesday, with officers arresting two men aged 47 and 44 years at their homes in Birmingham, West Midlands and Blyth, Northumberland. Both were arrested on suspicion of copyright infringement and money laundering offenses.

Detectives say they also seized digital media and computer hardware.

PIPCU report that the investigation into the site was launched in cooperation with UK Interactive Entertainment (UKIE) and the Entertainment Software Association (ESA). Former staff member SteWieH says that a PayPal account operated by the site in 2013 appears to have played an important role in the arrests.

Detective Sergeant Gary Brownfrom the City of London Police Intellectual Property Unit said that their goal was to disrupt the work of “content thieves.”

“With the ever-growing consumer appetite for gaming driving the threat of piracy to the industry, our action today is essential in disrupting criminal activity and the money which drives it,” Brownfrom said.

“Those who steal copyrighted content exploit the highly skilled work and jobs supported by the gaming industry. We are working hard to tackle digital intellectual property crime and we will continue to target our enforcement activity towards those identified as content thieves whatever scale they are operating at.”

UK Interactive Entertainment welcomed the arrests.

“UKIE applauds the action taken by PIPCU against the operators of the site. Sites like this are harmful to the hard work of game creators around the world. PIPCU’s actions confirm that these sites will not be tolerated, and are subject to criminal enforcement,” a spokesman said.

Stanley Pierre-Louis, general counsel for the Entertainment Software Association, thanked PIPCU for its work.

“ESA commends PIPCU for its commitment to taking action against sites that facilitate the illegal copying and distribution of incredibly advanced works of digital art. We are grateful for PIPCU’s leadership in this area and their support of creative industries.”

Both men have been released on police bail.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Blackcat Games Domain Seized by UK Anti-Piracy Police

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/blackcat-games-domain-seized-by-uk-anti-piracy-police-161019/

blackcats-1For the past several years, the UK’s Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) has been contacting torrent, streaming, and file-hosting sites in an effort to close them down.

In the main, PIPCU has relied on its position as a government agency to add weight to its threats that one or way or another, sites will either be shut down or have their operations hampered.

Many sites located overseas didn’t take the threats particularly seriously but on several occasions, PIPCU has shown that it doesn’t need to leave the UK to make an impact. That appears to be the case today with private tracker Blackcats-Games.

With around 30K members, the long-established private tracker has been a major player in the gaming torrents scene for many years but earlier today TorrentFreak received a tip that the site may have attracted the attention of the authorities.

With the site down no further news became available, but in the past few hours, fresh signs suggest that the site is indeed in some kind of legal trouble.

Results currently vary depending on ISP and region, but most visitors to the site’s Blackcats-Games.net domain are now greeted with the familiar banner that PIPCU places on sites when they’re under investigation.

PIPCU-shutdown

TorrentFreak has confirmed that the police images appearing on the site’s main page are not stored on the front-facing server BlackCats-Games operated in Canada (OVH, 192.99.46.83), but are actually being served from an IP address known to be under the control of the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit.

The same server also provides the images for previously-seized domains including filecrop.com, mp3juices.com, immunicity.org, nutjob.eu, deejayportal.co.uk and oldskoolscouse.co.uk.

black-3

Of course, being greeted by these PIPCU images leads many users to the conclusion that the site may have been raided and/or its operators arrested. While that is yet to be confirmed by the authorities or sources close to the site, there is also a less dramatic option.

PIPCU is known to approach registrars with requests for them to suspend domains. The police argue that since they have determined that a particular site is acting illegally, registrars should comply with their requests.

While some like Canada-based EasyDNS have not caved in to the demands, others have. This has resulted in domains quickly being taken out of the control of site operators without any due process. It’s certainly possible that this could’ve happened to Blackcats-Games.net.

Furthermore, a separate micro-site (nefarious-gamer.com) on BlackCats’ server in Canada is still serving a short message, an indication that the server hasn’t been completely seized. However, there are probably other servers elsewhere, so only time will tell how they have been affected.

Until official word is received from one side or the other, the site’s users will continue to presume the worst. In 2015, PIPCU deprioritized domain suspensions so more could be at play here.

Update: A source close to the site has informed TF that there has been an arrest but was unable to confirm who was detained.

Update2: A Reddit moderator says that the owner of Blackcats-Games has been raided and arrested, with equipment seized.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Now Open – AWS US East (Ohio) Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-us-east-ohio-region/

As part of our ongoing plan to expand the AWS footprint, I am happy to announce that our new US East (Ohio) Region is now available. In conjunction with the existing US East (Northern Virginia) Region, AWS customers in the Eastern part of the United States have fast, low-latency access to the suite of AWS infrastructure services.

The Details
The new Ohio Region supports Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) and related services including Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, Elastic Load Balancing, NAT Gateway, Spot Instances, and Dedicated Hosts.

It also supports (deep breath) Amazon API Gateway, Amazon Aurora, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, Amazon CloudFront, AWS CloudHSM, Amazon CloudWatch (including CloudWatch Events and CloudWatch Logs), AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS CodePipeline, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Direct Connect, Amazon DynamoDB, EC2 Container Registy, Amazon ECS, Amazon Elastic File System, Amazon ElastiCache, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon EMR, Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon Glacier, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS Import/Export Snowball, AWS Key Management Service (KMS), Amazon Kinesis, AWS Lambda, AWS Marketplace, Mobile Hub, AWS OpsWorks, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Redshift, Amazon Route 53, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), AWS Service Catalog, Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), AWS Storage Gateway, Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), AWS Trusted Advisor, VM Import/Export, and AWS WAF.

The Region supports all sizes of C4, D2, I2, M4, R3, T2, and X1 instances. As is the case with all of our newer Regions, instances must be launched within a Virtual Private Cloud (read Virtual Private Clouds for Everyone to learn more).

Well Connected
Here are some round-trip network metrics that you may find interesting (all names are airport codes, as is apparently customary in the networking world; all times are +/- 2 ms):

  • 12 ms to IAD (home of the US East (Northern Virginia) Region).
  • 20 ms to JFK (home to an Internet exchange point).
  • 29 ms to ORD (home to a pair of Direct Connect locations hosted by QTS and Equinix and another exchange point).
  • 91 ms to SFO (home of the US West (Northern California) Region).

With just 12 ms of round-trip latency between US East (Ohio) and US East (Northern Virginia), you can make good use of unique AWS features such as S3 Cross-Region Replication, Cross-Region Read Replicas for Amazon Aurora, Cross-Region Read Replicas for MySQL, and Cross-Region Read Replicas for PostgreSQL. Data transfer between the two Regions is priced at the Inter-AZ price ($0.01 per GB), making your cross-region use cases even more economical.

Also on the networking front, we have agreed to work together with Ohio State University to provide AWS Direct Connect access to OARnet. This 100-gigabit network connects colleges, schools, medical research hospitals, and state government across Ohio. This connection provides local teachers, students, and researchers with a dedicated, high-speed network connection to AWS.

14 Regions, 38 Availability Zones, and Counting
Today’s launch of this 3-AZ Region expands our global footprint to a grand total of 14 Regions and 38 Availability Zones. We are also getting ready to open up a second AWS Region in China, along with other new AWS Regions in Canada, France, and the UK.

Since there’s been some industry-wide confusion about the difference between Regions and Availability Zones of late, I think it is important to understand the differences between these two terms. Each Region is a physical location where we have one or more Availability Zones or AZs. Each Availability Zone, in turn, consists of one or more data centers, each with redundant power, networking, and connectivity, all housed in separate facilities. Having two or more AZ’s in each Region gives you the ability to run applications that are more highly available, fault tolerant, and durable than would be the case if you were limited to a single AZ.

Around the office, we sometimes play with analogies that can serve to explain the difference between the two terms. My favorites are “Hotels vs. hotel rooms” and “Apple trees vs. apples.” So, pick your analogy, but be sure that you know what it means!


Jeff;

 

Putlocker.is Mysteriously Goes Down

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/putlocker-is-mysteriously-goes-down-161014/

putlockerisWith dozens of millions of monthly views, Putlocker.is is the go-to video streaming site for many people.

The site ranks among the 250 most-visited websites on the Internet and is particularly popular in the United States, Canada, Australia and South Africa.

However, starting three days ago the site suddenly became inaccessible. While a brief downtime stint is nothing unusual for these type of sites, the prolonged downtime is cause for concern among users.

Many are voicing their frustration after being confronted by yet another CloudFlare downtime banner, showing them that the site’s servers are still unresponsive.

“Putlocker is down so I no longer have a reason to live,” one user dramatically announced.

“Putlocker has been down the whole day. I’m going through serious withdrawals,” another added.

Putlocker.is down

putlockercf

Looking for answers, TorrentFreak tried to contact the Putlocker.is team on their known support address. However, this email returned an error message as well.

As far as we can see the current problems are related to the site’s servers. The domain name itself is operating as it should and hasn’t been seized or suspended by the registrar.

Interestingly, the downtime occurs right after Hollywood’s MPAA reported the site to the United States Trade Representative, describing it as one of the largest piracy threats.

“Putlocker.is is the most visited infringing English language video streaming link site in the world,” the MPAA wrote.

According to the MPAA the site is believed to operate from Vietnam, with its servers being hosted at the Swiss company Private Layer. Whether there’s a direct relation between the report and the downtime is unclear though.

Meanwhile, several “other” Putlockers are seizing the opportunity to gain some traction, at least for the time being. Whether the real Putlocker.is will return as well has yet to be seen.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Amazon ECS Service Auto Scaling Enables Rent-A-Center SAP Hybris Solution

Post Syndicated from Chris Barclay original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/amazon-ecs-service-auto-scaling-enables-rent-a-center-sap-hybris-solution/

This is a guest post from Troy Washburn, Sr. DevOps Manager @ Rent-A-Center, Inc., and Ashay Chitnis, Flux7 architect.

—–

Rent-A-Center in their own words: Rent-A-Center owns and operates more than 3,000 rent-to-own retail stores for name-brand furniture, electronics, appliances and computers across the US, Canada, and Puerto Rico.

Rent-A-Center (RAC) wanted to roll out an ecommerce platform that would support the entire online shopping workflow using SAP’s Hybris platform. The goal was to implement a cloud-based solution with a cluster of Hybris servers which would cater to online web-based demand.

The challenge: to run the Hybris clusters in a microservices architecture. A microservices approach has several advantages including the ability for each service to scale up and down to meet fluctuating changes in demand independently. RAC also wanted to use Docker containers to package the application in a format that is easily portable and immutable. There were four types of containers necessary for the architecture. Each corresponded to a particular service:

1. Apache: Received requests from the external Elastic Load Balancing load balancer. Apache was used to set certain rewrite and proxy http rules.
2. Hybris: An external Tomcat was the frontend for the Hybris platform.
3. Solr Master: A product indexing service for quick lookup.
4. Solr Slave: Replication of master cache to directly serve product searches from Hybris.

To deploy the containers in a microservices architecture, RAC and AWS consultants at Flux7 started by launching Amazon ECS resources with AWS CloudFormation templates. Running containers on ECS requires the use of three primary resources: clusters, services, and task definitions. Each container refers to its task definition for the container properties, such as CPU and memory. And, each of the above services stored its container images in Amazon ECR repositories.

This post describes the architecture that we created and implemented.

Auto Scaling

At first glance, scaling on ECS can seem confusing. But the Flux7 philosophy is that complex systems only work when they are a combination of well-designed simple systems that break the problem down into smaller pieces. The key insight that helped us design our solution was understanding that there are two very different scaling operations happening. The first is the scaling up of individual tasks in each service and the second is the scaling up of the cluster of Amazon EC2 instances.

During implementation, Service Auto Scaling was released by the AWS team and so we researched how to implement task scaling into the existing solution. As we were implementing the solution through AWS CloudFormation, task scaling needed to be done the same way. However, the new scaling feature was not available for implementation through CloudFormation and so the natural course was to implement it using AWS Lambda–backed custom resources.

A corresponding Lambda function is implemented in Node.js 4.3, while automatic scaling happens by monitoring the CPUUtilization Amazon CloudWatch metric. The ECS policies below are registered with CloudWatch alarms that are triggered when specific thresholds are crossed. Similarly, by using the MemoryUtilization CloudWatch metric, ECS scaling can be made to scale in and out as well.

The Lambda function and CloudFormation custom resource JSON are available in the Flux7 GitHub repository: https://github.com/Flux7Labs/blog-code-samples/tree/master/2016-10-ecs-enables-rac-sap-hybris

Scaling ECS services and EC2 instances automatically

The key to understanding cluster scaling is to start by understanding the problem. We are no longer running a homogeneous workload in a simple environment. We have a cluster hosting a heterogeneous workload with different requirements and different demands on the system.

This clicked for us after we phrased the problem as, “Make sure the cluster has enough capacity to launch ‘x’ more instances of a task.” This led us to realize that we were no longer looking at an overall average resource utilization problem, but rather a discrete bin packing problem.

The problem is inherently more complex. (Anyone remember from algorithms class how the discrete Knapsack problem is NP-hard, but the continuous knapsack problem can easily be solved in polynomial time? Same thing.) So we have to check on each individual instance if a particular task can be scheduled on it, and if for any task we don’t cross the required capacity threshold, then we need to allocate more instance capacity.

To ensure that ECS scaling always has enough resources to scale out and has just enough resources after scaling in, it was necessary that the Auto Scaling group scales according to three criteria:

1. ECS task count in relation to the host EC2 instance count in a cluster
2. Memory reservation
3. CPU reservation

We implemented the first criteria for the Auto Scaling group. Instead of using the default scaling abilities, we set group scaling in and out using Lambda functions that were triggered periodically by a combination of the AWS::Lambda::Permission and an AWS::Events::Rule resources, as we wanted specific criteria for scaling.

The Lambda function is available in the Flux7 GitHub repository: https://github.com/Flux7Labs/blog-code-samples/tree/master/2016-10-ecs-enables-rac-sap-hybris

Future versions of this piece of code will incorporate the other two criteria along with the ability to use CloudWatch alarms to trigger scaling.

Conclusion

Using advanced ECS features like Service Auto Scaling in conjunction with Lambda to meet RAC’s business requirements, RAC and Flux7 were able to Dockerize SAP Hybris in production for the first time ever.

Further, ECS and CloudFormation give users the ability to implement robust solutions while still providing the ability to roll back in case of failures. With ECS as a backbone technology, RAC has been able to deploy a Hybris setup with automatic scaling, self-healing, one-click deployment, CI/CD, and PCI compliance consistent with the company’s latest technology guidelines and meeting the requirements of their newly-formed culture of DevOps and extreme agility.

If you have any questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Coming in 2017 – New AWS Region in France

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/coming-in-2017-new-aws-region-in-france/

As cloud computing becomes the new normal for organizations all over the world and as our customer base becomes larger and more diverse, we will continue to build and launch additional AWS Regions.

Bonjour la France
I am happy to announce that we will be opening an AWS Region in Paris, France in 2017. The new Region will give AWS partners and customers the ability to run their workloads and store their data in France.

This will be the fourth AWS Region in Europe. We currently have two other Regions in Europe — EU (Ireland) and EU (Frankfurt) and an additional Region in the UK expected to launch in the coming months. Together, these Regions will provide our customers with a total of 10 Availability Zones (AZs) and allow them to architect highly fault tolerant applications while storing their data in the EU.

Today’s announcement means that our global infrastructure now comprises 35 Availability Zones across 13 geographic regions worldwide, with another five AWS Regions (and 12 Availability Zones) in France, Canada, China, Ohio, and the United Kingdom coming online throughout the next year (see the AWS Global Infrastructure page for more info).

As always, we are looking forward to serving new and existing French customers and working with partners across Europe. Of course, the new Region will also be open to existing AWS customers who would like to process and store data in France.

To learn more about the AWS France Region feel free to contact our team in Paris at aws-in-france@amazon.com.


A venir en 2017 – Une nouvelle région AWS en France

Je suis heureux d’annoncer que nous allons ouvrir une nouvelle région AWS à Paris, en France, en 2017. Cette nouvelle région offrira aux partenaires et clients AWS la possibilité de gérer leurs charges de travail et de stocker leurs données en France.

Cette Région sera la quatrième en Europe. Nous avons actuellement deux autres régions en Europe – EU (Irlande) et EU (Francfort) et une région supplémentaire ouvrira dans les prochains mois au Royaume-Uni. Cela portera à dix le total des Zones de Disponibilités (AZ) en Europe permettant aux clients de concevoir des applications tolérantes aux pannes et de stocker leurs données au sein de l’Union Européenne.

Cette annonce signifie que notre infrastructure globale comprend désormais 35 Zones de Disponibilités, réparties sur 13 régions dans le monde et que s’ajoute à cela l’ouverture l’année prochaine de cinq régions AWS (et 12 Zones de Disponibilités) en France, au Canada, en Chine, dans l’Ohio, et au Royaume-Uni (pour plus d’informations, visitez la page d’AWS Global Infrastructure).

Comme toujours, nous sommes impatients de répondre aux besoins de nos clients français, actuels et futurs, et de travailler avec nos partenaires en Europe. Bien entendu, cette nouvelle région sera également disponible pour tous les clients AWS souhaitant traiter et stocker leurs données en France.

Pour en savoir plus sur la région AWS en France, vous pouvez contacter nos équipes à Paris: aws-in-france@amazon.com.



Jeff;