Attending GUADEC

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/guadec-2006.html

Due to the generosity of the GNOME Foundation I have been able to get to the GUADEC 2006 this year. I’d like to thank Jeff Waugh and Quim Gil for the “last-minute” funding of my trip to Vilanova, and all the sponsors who actually are providing the funds. If anyone wants to talk to me about Avahi and/or PulseAudio (aka Polypaudio) (or any of my other projects), just try to find and speak to me. (Bungalow 870)

In related news, the new PulseAudio homepage will be “inaugurated” soon, becoming the official new home of PulseAudio/Polypaudio as soon as we release 0.9.2, which hopefully will be pretty soon.

Attending GUADEC

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/guadec-2006.html

Due to the generosity of the GNOME Foundation I have been able to get to the GUADEC 2006 this year. I’d like to thank Jeff Waugh and Quim Gil for the “last-minute” funding of my trip to Vilanova, and all the sponsors who actually are providing the funds. If anyone wants to talk to me about Avahi and/or PulseAudio (aka Polypaudio) (or any of my other projects), just try to find and speak to me. (Bungalow 870)

In related news, the new PulseAudio homepage will be “inaugurated” soon, becoming the official new home of PulseAudio/Polypaudio as soon as we release 0.9.2, which hopefully will be pretty soon.

TPFKAPA: The Project Formerly Known as Polypaudio

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/pulse.html

It came to our attention that some people really disliked the name of Polypaudio, because
it reminded them of that medical condition,
though the software was actually named after the sea dweller. I actually
liked that double entendre, but many did not and expressed concerns that the name
would hinder Polypaudio’s adoption. After a long discussion on
#polypaudio we came to the conclusion that a name change is a good
idea in this case. Name changes are usually a bad idea, but this time it’s
worth it, we think.

The new name we agreed on is PulseAudio, or shorter just Pulse. It has
the nice advantage that it abbreviates to pa, just as Polypaudio did. This
allows us to keep source code compatiblity (and binary compatibility to a
certain degree) with the current releases of Polypaudio, because the symbol
prefix can stay pa_. In addition the auxiliary tools paman, pavucontrol, pavumeter need not to
be renamed.

We will try to make the transition as smooth as possible and would like to
apologize to all the packagers, who need to rename their packages now.

The next release of Polypaudio (0.9.2) will be a bugfix release and be the first to bear the new name: PulseAudio 0.9.2.

Polypaudio is dead. Long live PulseAudio!

TPFKAPA: The Project Formerly Known as Polypaudio

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/pulse.html

It came to our attention that some people really disliked the name of Polypaudio, because
it reminded them of that medical condition,
though the software was actually named after the sea dweller. I actually
liked that double entendre, but many did not and expressed concerns that the name
would hinder Polypaudio’s adoption. After a long discussion on
#polypaudio we came to the conclusion that a name change is a good
idea in this case. Name changes are usually a bad idea, but this time it’s
worth it, we think.

The new name we agreed on is PulseAudio, or shorter just Pulse. It has
the nice advantage that it abbreviates to pa, just as Polypaudio did. This
allows us to keep source code compatiblity (and binary compatibility to a
certain degree) with the current releases of Polypaudio, because the symbol
prefix can stay pa_. In addition the auxiliary tools paman, pavucontrol, pavumeter need not to
be renamed.

We will try to make the transition as smooth as possible and would like to
apologize to all the packagers, who need to rename their packages now.

The next release of Polypaudio (0.9.2) will be a bugfix release and be the first to bear the new name: PulseAudio 0.9.2.

Polypaudio is dead. Long live PulseAudio!

Polypaudio article on LWN

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/polypaudio-lwn.html

The current issue of the Linux
Weekly News
features a short article about Polypaudio. (The article is not (yet)
accessible for free, come back in a week if you aren’t an LWN subscriber.)

Quoting:

With its support for a wide variety of popular audio utilities, actively developed code, and broad capabilities, the Polypaudio project fills an important role in Linux-based audio development.

Polypaudio article on LWN

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/polypaudio-lwn.html

The current issue of the Linux
Weekly News
features a short article about Polypaudio. (The article is not (yet)
accessible for free, come back in a week if you aren’t an LWN subscriber.)

Quoting:

With its support for a wide variety of popular audio utilities, actively developed code, and broad capabilities, the Polypaudio project fills an important role in Linux-based audio development.

Looking for a Logo

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/polypaudio-logo.html

Polypaudio
needs a logo! If you have some time to spare and graphic talent please send us
your suggestions! Perhaps something in a nice Tango design? See Wikipedia to for an explanation
what a polyp is.

Please send your suggestions to lennart (at) poettering (dot) net or join #polypaudio on freenode.

Polypaudio 0.9.0 released

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/polypaudio-0.9.0.html

We are proud to announce Polypaudio
0.9.0
. This is a major step ahead since we decided to freeze the
current API. From now on we will maintain API compability (or at least
try to). To emphasize this starting with this release the shared
library sonames are properly versioned. While Polypaudio 0.9.0 is not
API/ABI compatible with 0.8 it is protocol compatible.

Other notable changes beyond bug fixing, bug fixing and bug fixing
are: a new Open Sound System /dev/dsp wrapper named
padsp and a module module-volume-restore have been
added.

padsp works more or less like that ESOUND tool known as
esddsp. However, it is much cleaner in design and thus works
with many more applications than the original tool. Proper locking is
implemented which allows it to work in multithreaded applications. In
addition to mere /dev/dsp emulation it wraps
/dev/sndstat and /dev/mixer. Proper synchronization
primitives are also available, which enables lip-sync movie playback
using padsp on mplayer. Other applications that are
known to work properly with padsp are aumix,
libao, XMMS, sox. There are some things
padsp doesn’t support (yet): that’s most notably recording,
and mmap() wrapping. Recording will be added in a later
version. mmap() support is available in esddsp but
not in padsp. I am reluctant to add support for this, because
it cannot work properly when it comes to playback latency
handling. However, latency handling this the primary reasoning for
using mmap(). In addition the hack that is included in
esddsp works only for Quake2 and Quake3, both being Free
Software now. It probably makes more sense to fix those two games than
implementing a really dirty hack in padsp. Remember that you
can always use the original esddsp tools since Polypaudio
offers full protocol compatibility with ESOUND.

module-volume-restore is a small module that stores the
volume of all playback streams and restores them when the applications
which created them creates a new stream. If this module is loaded,
Polypaudio will make sure that you Gaim sounds are always played at
low volume, while your XMMS music is always played at full volume.

Besides the new release of Polypaudio itself we released a bunch of
other packages to work with the new release:

gst-polyp
0.9.0
, a Polypaudio plugin for GStreamer 0.10. The
plugin is quite sophisticated. In fact it is probably the only
sink/source plugin for GStreamer that reaches the functionality of the
ALSA plugin that is shipped with upstream. It implements the
GstPropertyProbe and GstImplementsInterface
interfaces, which allow gnome-volume-meter and other
GStreamer tools to control the volume of a Polypaudio server. The sink
element listens for GST_EVENT_TAG events, and can thus use
ID3 tags and other meta data to name the playback stream in the
Polypaudio server. This is useful to identify the stream in the Polypaudio
Volume Control
. In short: Polypaudio 0.9.0 now offers first class
integration into GStreamer.

libao-polyp
0.9.0
, a simple plugin for libao, which is used for audio playback by tools like ogg123 and Gaim, besides others.

xmms-polyp
0.9.0
, an output plugin for XMMS. As special feature it uses the
currently played song name for naming the audio stream in
Polypaudio.

Polypaudio Manager 0.9.0, updated for Polypaudio 0.9.0

Polypaudio Volume Control 0.9.0, updated for Polypaudio 0.9.0

Polypaudio Volume Meter 0.9.0, updated for Polypaudio 0.9.0

A screenshot showing most of this in action:

Polypaudio Screenshot.

This screenshot shows: the Polypaudio Manager, the Polypaudio
Volume Control, the Polypaudio Volume Meter, the XMMS plugin, the
GStreamer plugin used by Rhythmbox and gstreamer-properties,
pacat playing some noise from /dev/urandom,
padsp used on MPlayer. (This screenshot actually shows some
post-0.9.0 work, like the icons used by the application windows)

Polypaudio 0.9.0 released

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/polypaudio-0.9.0.html

We are proud to announce Polypaudio
0.9.0
. This is a major step ahead since we decided to freeze the
current API. From now on we will maintain API compability (or at least
try to). To emphasize this starting with this release the shared
library sonames are properly versioned. While Polypaudio 0.9.0 is not
API/ABI compatible with 0.8 it is protocol compatible.

Other notable changes beyond bug fixing, bug fixing and bug fixing
are: a new Open Sound System /dev/dsp wrapper named
padsp and a module module-volume-restore have been
added.

padsp works more or less like that ESOUND tool known as
esddsp. However, it is much cleaner in design and thus works
with many more applications than the original tool. Proper locking is
implemented which allows it to work in multithreaded applications. In
addition to mere /dev/dsp emulation it wraps
/dev/sndstat and /dev/mixer. Proper synchronization
primitives are also available, which enables lip-sync movie playback
using padsp on mplayer. Other applications that are
known to work properly with padsp are aumix,
libao, XMMS, sox. There are some things
padsp doesn’t support (yet): that’s most notably recording,
and mmap() wrapping. Recording will be added in a later
version. mmap() support is available in esddsp but
not in padsp. I am reluctant to add support for this, because
it cannot work properly when it comes to playback latency
handling. However, latency handling this the primary reasoning for
using mmap(). In addition the hack that is included in
esddsp works only for Quake2 and Quake3, both being Free
Software now. It probably makes more sense to fix those two games than
implementing a really dirty hack in padsp. Remember that you
can always use the original esddsp tools since Polypaudio
offers full protocol compatibility with ESOUND.

module-volume-restore is a small module that stores the
volume of all playback streams and restores them when the applications
which created them creates a new stream. If this module is loaded,
Polypaudio will make sure that you Gaim sounds are always played at
low volume, while your XMMS music is always played at full volume.

Besides the new release of Polypaudio itself we released a bunch of
other packages to work with the new release:

  • gst-polyp
    0.9.0
    , a Polypaudio plugin for GStreamer 0.10. The
    plugin is quite sophisticated. In fact it is probably the only
    sink/source plugin for GStreamer that reaches the functionality of the
    ALSA plugin that is shipped with upstream. It implements the
    GstPropertyProbe and GstImplementsInterface
    interfaces, which allow gnome-volume-meter and other
    GStreamer tools to control the volume of a Polypaudio server. The sink
    element listens for GST_EVENT_TAG events, and can thus use
    ID3 tags and other meta data to name the playback stream in the
    Polypaudio server. This is useful to identify the stream in the Polypaudio
    Volume Control
    . In short: Polypaudio 0.9.0 now offers first class
    integration into GStreamer.
  • libao-polyp
    0.9.0
    , a simple plugin for libao, which is used for audio playback by tools like ogg123 and Gaim, besides others.
  • xmms-polyp
    0.9.0
    , an output plugin for XMMS. As special feature it uses the
    currently played song name for naming the audio stream in
    Polypaudio.
  • Polypaudio Manager 0.9.0, updated for Polypaudio 0.9.0
  • Polypaudio Volume Control 0.9.0, updated for Polypaudio 0.9.0
  • Polypaudio Volume Meter 0.9.0, updated for Polypaudio 0.9.0

A screenshot showing most of this in action:

Polypaudio Screenshot.

This screenshot shows: the Polypaudio Manager, the Polypaudio
Volume Control, the Polypaudio Volume Meter, the XMMS plugin, the
GStreamer plugin used by Rhythmbox and gstreamer-properties,
pacat playing some noise from /dev/urandom,
padsp used on MPlayer. (This screenshot actually shows some
post-0.9.0 work, like the icons used by the application windows)

A big bear hugged one and then there were two

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/howl.html

Scott Herscher decided to cease development of HOWL.
That means only Avahi and Bonjour are left as
widely known mDNS/DNS-SD implementations.

Scott, your work on HOWL has not been in vain. Many Linux/Free Software
people (including me) learned to know Zeroconf with your software. Without the
troubles surrounding the licensing, I would never have started what is now
known as Avahi, and HOWL would still be the number one of the Linux mDNS/DNS-SD
implementations.

The HOWL legacy will live on, since Avahi includes a HOWL compatibility layer which will be kept around for a while.

A year and a few weeks ago Trent and I decided to merge our efforts and
form Avahi from our seperate works. I wonder how much time it will take us
until we see a similar R.I.P. note from the Bonjour camp, on our route to
AVAHI WORLD DOMINATION. 😉

In contrast to what Scott wrote in his announcement, Avahi is far from being
strictly Linux. Avahi has been ported to FreeBSD, OpenBSD, MacOSX and recently
(not yet official) Solaris. (However, he’s right with what he writes
about me.)

A big bear hugged one and then there were two

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/howl.html

Scott Herscher decided to cease development of HOWL.
That means only Avahi and Bonjour are left as
widely known mDNS/DNS-SD implementations.

Scott, your work on HOWL has not been in vain. Many Linux/Free Software
people (including me) learned to know Zeroconf with your software. Without the
troubles surrounding the licensing, I would never have started what is now
known as Avahi, and HOWL would still be the number one of the Linux mDNS/DNS-SD
implementations.

The HOWL legacy will live on, since Avahi includes a HOWL compatibility layer which will be kept around for a while.

A year and a few weeks ago Trent and I decided to merge our efforts and
form Avahi from our seperate works. I wonder how much time it will take us
until we see a similar R.I.P. note from the Bonjour camp, on our route to
AVAHI WORLD DOMINATION. 😉

In contrast to what Scott wrote in his announcement, Avahi is far from being
strictly Linux. Avahi has been ported to FreeBSD, OpenBSD, MacOSX and recently
(not yet official) Solaris. (However, he’s right with what he writes
about me.)

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close