Tag Archives: Events

Celebrate with us this weekend!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/celebrate-with-us-this-weekend/

The Raspberry Jam Big Birthday is almost here! In celebration of our seventh birthday, we’re coordinating with over 130 community‑led Raspberry Jams in 40 countries across six continents this weekend, 3-4 March 2019.

Raspberry Jams come in all shapes and sizes. They range from small pub gatherings fueled by local beer and amiable nerdy chatter to vast multi-room events with a varied programme of project displays, workshops, and talks.

To find your nearest Raspberry Jam, check out our interactive Jam map.

And if you can’t get to a Jam location this time, follow #PiParty on Twitter, where people around the world are already getting excited about their Big Birthday Weekend plans. Over the weekend you’ll see Raspberry Jams happening from the UK to the US, from Africa to – we hope – Antarctica, and everywhere in between.

Coolest Projects UK

The first of this year’s Coolest Projects events is also taking place this weekend in Manchester, UK. Coolest Projects is the world’s leading technology fair for young people, showcasing some of the very best creations by young makers across the country (and beyond), and it’s open for members of the public to attend.

Tickets are still available from the Coolest Projects website, and you can follow the action on #CoolestProjects on Twitter.

CBeebies’ Maddie Moate and the BBC’s Greg Foot will be taking over Raspberry Pi’s Instagram story on the day, so be sure to follow @RaspberryPiFoundation on Instagram.

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We’re hosting the UK’s first-ever Scratch Conference Europe

Post Syndicated from Helen Drury original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/announcing-scratch-conference-europe-2019/

We are excited to announce that we will host the first-ever Scratch Conference Europe in the UK this summer: from Friday 23 to Sunday 25 August at Churchill College, Cambridge!

A graphic highlighting the Scratch Conference Europe 2019 - taking place at Friday 23 to Sunday 25 August at Churchill College, Cambridge

Scratch Conference is a participatory event that gives hundreds of educators the chance to explore the creative ways in which people are programming and learning with Scratch. In even-numbered years, the conference is held at the MIT Media Lab, the birthplace of Scratch; in odd-numbered years, it takes place in other places around the globe.

Another graphic highlighting the Scratch Conference Europe 2019

Since 2019 is also the launch year of Scratch 3, we think it’s a fantastic opportunity for us to bring Scratch Conference Europe to the UK for the first time.

What you can look forward to

  • Hands-on, easy-to-follow workshops across a range of topics, including the new Scratch 3
  • Interactive projects to play with
  • Thought-provoking talks and keynotes
  • Plenty of informal chats, meetups, and opportunities for you to connect with other educators

Join us to become part of a growing community, discover how the Raspberry Pi Foundation can support you further, and develop your skills with Scratch as a creative tool for helping your students learn to code.

Contribute to Scratch Conference Europe

Would you like to contribute your own content at the event? We are looking for you in the community to share or host:

  • Project demos
  • Posters
  • Workshops
  • Discussion sessions
  • Presentations
  • Ignite talks

We warmly welcome young people under 18 as content contributors; they must be supported by an adult. All content contributors will be able to attend the whole event for free.

An over view of two people taking electronics pieces out of a box in order to try their hand at digital making using a Raspberry Pi and Scratch.

Find more details and apply to participate in this short online form.

Attend the conference

Tickets for Scratch Conference Europe will go on sale in April.

For updates, subscribe to Raspberry Pi LEARN, our monthly newsletter for educators, and keep an eye on @Raspberry_Pi on Twitter!

An update on Raspberry Fields

Since we’re hosting Scratch Conference Europe this year, our digital making festival Raspberry Fields will be back in 2020, even bigger and more packed with interactive family fun!

A young girl tries out a digital project at the Raspberry Pi event, Raspberry Fields 2018

Scratch is a project of the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab. It is available for free at scratch.mit.edu.

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Amazon SageMaker Neo – Train Your Machine Learning Models Once, Run Them Anywhere

Post Syndicated from Julien Simon original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-sagemaker-neo-train-your-machine-learning-models-once-run-them-anywhere/

Machine learning (ML) is split in two distinct phases: training and inference. Training deals with building the model, i.e. running a ML algorithm on a dataset in order to identify meaningful patterns. This often requires large amounts of storage and computing power, making the cloud a natural place to train ML jobs with services such as Amazon SageMaker and the AWS Deep Learning AMIs.

Inference deals with using the model, i.e. predicting results for data samples that the model has never seen. Here, the requirements are different: developers are typically concerned with optimizing latency (how long does a single prediction take?) and throughput (how many predictions can I run in parallel?). Of course, the hardware architecture of your prediction environment has a very significant impact on such metrics, especially if you’re dealing with resource-constrained devices: as a Raspberry Pi enthusiast, I often wish the little fellow packed a little more punch to speed up my inference code.

Tuning a model for a specific hardware architecture is possible, but the lack of tooling makes this an error-prone and time-consuming process. Minor changes to the ML framework or the model itself usually require the user to start all over again. Unfortunately, this forces most ML developers to deploy the same model everywhere regardless of the underlying hardware, thus missing out on significant performance gains.

Well, no more. Today, I’m very happy to announce Amazon SageMaker Neo, a new capability of Amazon SageMaker that enables machine learning models to train once and run anywhere in the cloud and at the edge with optimal performance.

Introducing Amazon SageMaker Neo

Without any manual intervention, Amazon SageMaker Neo optimizes models deployed on Amazon EC2 instances, Amazon SageMaker endpoints and devices managed by AWS Greengrass.

Here are the supported configurations:

  • Frameworks and algorithms: TensorFlow, Apache MXNet, PyTorch, ONNX, and XGBoost.
  • Hardware architectures: ARM, Intel, and NVIDIA starting today, with support for Cadence, Qualcomm, and Xilinx hardware coming soon. In addition, Amazon SageMaker Neo is released as open source code under the Apache Software License, enabling hardware vendors to customize it for their processors and devices.

The Amazon SageMaker Neo compiler converts models into an efficient common format, which is executed on the device by a compact runtime that uses less than one-hundredth of the resources that a generic framework would traditionally consume. The Amazon SageMaker Neo runtime is optimized for the underlying hardware, using specific instruction sets that help speed up ML inference.

This has three main benefits:

  • Converted models perform at up to twice the speed, with no loss of accuracy.
  • Sophisticated models can now run on virtually any resource-limited device, unlocking innovative use cases like autonomous vehicles, automated video security, and anomaly detection in manufacturing.
  • Developers can run models on the target hardware without dependencies on the framework.

Under the hood

Most machine learning frameworks represent a model as a computational graph: a vertex represents an operation on data arrays (tensors) and an edge represents data dependencies between operations. The Amazon SageMaker Neo compiler exploits patterns in the computational graph to apply high-level optimizations including operator fusion, which fuses multiple small operations together; constant-folding, which statically pre-computes portions of the graph to save execution costs; a static memory planning pass, which pre-allocates memory to hold each intermediate tensor; and data layout transformations, which transform internal data layouts into hardware-friendly forms. The compiler then produces efficient code for each operator.

Once a model has been compiled, it can be run by the Amazon SageMaker Neo runtime. This runtime takes about 1MB of disk space, compared to the 500MB-1GB required by popular deep learning libraries. An application invokes a model by first loading the runtime, which then loads the model definition, model parameters, and precompiled operations.

I can’t wait to try this on my Raspberry Pi. Let’s get to work.

Downloading a pre-trained model

Plenty of pre-trained models are available in the Apache MXNet, Gluon CV or TensorFlow model zoos: here, I’m using a 50-layer model based on the ResNet architecture, pre-trained with Apache MXNet on the ImageNet dataset.

First, I’m downloading the 227MB model as well as the JSON file defining its different layers. This file is particularly important: it tells me that the input symbol is called ‘data’ and that its shape is [1, 3, 224, 224], i.e. 1 image, 3 channels (red, green and blue), 224×224 pixels. I’ll need to make sure that images passed to the model have this exact shape. The output shape is [1, 1000], i.e. a vector containing the probability for each one of the 1,000 classes present in the ImageNet dataset.

To define a performance baseline, I use this model and a vanilla unoptimized version of Apache MXNet 1.2 to predict a few images: on average, inference takes about 6.5 seconds and requires about 306 MB of RAM.

That’s pretty slow: let’s compile the model and see how fast it gets.

Compiling the model for the Raspberry Pi

First, let’s store both model files in a compressed TAR archive and upload it to an Amazon S3 bucket.

$ tar cvfz model.tar.gz resnet50_v1-symbol.json resnet50_v1-0000.params
a resnet50_v1-symbol.json
a resnet50_v1-0000.paramsresnet50_v1-0000.params
$ aws s3 cp model.tar.gz s3://jsimon-neo/
upload: ./model.tar.gz to s3://jsimon-neo/model.tar.gz

Then, I just have to write a simple configuration file for my compilation job. If you’re curious about other frameworks and hardware targets, ‘aws sagemaker create-compilation-job help‘ will give you the exact syntax to use.

{
    "CompilationJobName": "resnet50-mxnet-raspberrypi",
    "RoleArn": $SAGEMAKER_ROLE_ARN,
    "InputConfig": {
        "S3Uri": "s3://jsimon-neo/model.tar.gz",
        "DataInputConfig": "{\"data\": [1, 3, 224, 224]}",
        "Framework": "MXNET"
    },
    "OutputConfig": {
        "S3OutputLocation": "s3://jsimon-neo/",
        "TargetDevice": "rasp3b"
    },
    "StoppingCondition": {
        "MaxRuntimeInSeconds": 300
    }
}

Launching the compilation process takes a single command.

$ aws sagemaker create-compilation-job --cli-input-json file://job.json

Compilation is complete in seconds. Let’s figure out the name of the compilation artifact, fetch it from Amazon S3 and extract it locally

$ aws sagemaker describe-compilation-job \
--compilation-job-name resnet50-mxnet-raspberrypi \
--query "ModelArtifacts"
{
"S3ModelArtifacts": "s3://jsimon-neo/model-rasp3b.tar.gz"
}
$ aws s3 cp s3://jsimon-neo/model-rasp3b.tar.gz .
$ tar xvfz model-rasp3b.tar.gz
x compiled.params
x compiled_model.json
x compiled.so

As you can see, the artifact contains:

  • The original model and symbol files.
  • A shared object file storing compiled, hardware-optimized, operators used by the model.

For convenience, let’s rename them to ‘model.params’, ‘model.json’ and ‘model.so’, and then copy them on the Raspberry pi in a ‘resnet50’ directory.

$ mkdir resnet50
$ mv compiled.params resnet50/model.params
$ mv compiled_model.json resnet50/model.json
$ mv compiled.so resnet50/model.so
$ scp -r resnet50 [email protected]:~

Setting up the inference environment on the Raspberry Pi

Before I can predict images with the model, I need to install the appropriate runtime on my Raspberry Pi. Pre-built packages are available [neopackages]: I just have to download the one for ‘armv7l’ architectures and to install it on my Pi with the provided script. Please note that I don’t need to install any additional deep learning framework (Apache MXNet in this case), saving up to 1GB of persistent storage.

$ scp -r dlr-1.0-py2.py3-armv7l [email protected]:~
<ssh to the Pi>
$ cd dlr-1.0-py2.py3-armv7l
$ sh ./install-py3.sh

We’re all set. Time to predict images!

Using the Amazon SageMaker Neo runtime

On the Pi, the runtime is available as a Python package named ‘dlr’ (deep learning runtime). Using it to predict images is what you would expect:

  • Load the model, defining its input and output symbols.
  • Load an image.
  • Predict!

Here’s the corresponding Python code.

import os
import numpy as np
from dlr import DLRModel

# Load the compiled model
input_shape = {'data': [1, 3, 224, 224]} # A single RGB 224x224 image
output_shape = [1, 1000]                 # The probability for each one of the 1,000 classes
device = 'cpu'                           # Go, Raspberry Pi, go!
model = DLRModel('resnet50', input_shape, output_shape, device)

# Load names for ImageNet classes
synset_path = os.path.join(model_path, 'synset.txt')
with open(synset_path, 'r') as f:
    synset = eval(f.read())

# Load an image stored as a numpy array
image = np.load('dog.npy').astype(np.float32)
print(image.shape)
input_data = {'data': image}

# Predict 
out = model.run(input_data)
top1 = np.argmax(out[0])
prob = np.max(out)
print("Class: %s, probability: %f" % (synset[top1], prob))

Let’s give it a try on this image. Aren’t chihuahuas and Raspberry Pis made for one another?



(1, 3, 224, 224)
Class: Chihuahua, probability: 0.901803

The prediction is correct, but what about speed and memory consumption? Well, this prediction takes about 0.85 second and requires about 260MB of RAM: with Amazon SageMaker Neo, it’s now 5 times faster and 15% more RAM-efficient than with a vanilla model.

This impressive performance gain didn’t require any complex and time-consuming work: all we had to do was to compile the model. Of course, your mileage will vary depending on models and hardware architectures, but you should see significant improvements across the board, including on Amazon EC2 instances such as the C5 or P3 families.

Now available

I hope this post was informative. Compiling models with Amazon SageMaker Neo is free of charge, you will only pay for the underlying resource using the model (Amazon EC2 instances, Amazon SageMaker instances and devices managed by AWS Greengrass).

The service is generally available today in US-East (N. Virginia), US-West (Oregon) and Europe (Ireland). Please start exploring and let us know what you think. We can’t wait to see what you will build!

Julien;

NEW – Machine Learning algorithms and model packages now available in AWS Marketplace

Post Syndicated from Shaun Ray original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-machine-learning-algorithms-and-model-packages-now-available-in-aws-marketplace/

At AWS, our mission is to put machine learning in the hands of every developer. That’s why in 2017 we launched Amazon SageMaker. Since then it has become one of the fastest growing services in AWS history, used by thousands of customers globally. Customers using Amazon SageMaker can use optimized algorithms offered in Amazon SageMaker, to run fully-managed MXNet, TensorFlow, PyTorch, and Chainer algorithms, or bring their own algorithms and models. When it comes to building their own machine learning model, many customers spend significant time developing algorithms and models that are solutions to problems that have already been solved.

 

Introducing Machine Learning in AWS Marketplace

I am pleased to announce the new Machine Learning category of products offered by AWS Marketplace, which includes over 150+ algorithms and model packages, with more coming every day. AWS Marketplace offers a tailored selection for vertical industries like retail (35 products), media (19 products), manufacturing (17 products), HCLS (15 products), and more. Customers can find solutions to critical use cases like breast cancer prediction, lymphoma classifications, hospital readmissions, loan risk prediction, vehicle recognition, retail localizer, botnet attack detection, automotive telematics, motion detection, demand forecasting, and speech recognition.

Customers can search and browse a list of algorithms and model packages in AWS Marketplace. Once customers have subscribed to a machine learning solution, they can deploy it directly from the SageMaker console, a Jupyter Notebook, the SageMaker SDK, or the AWS CLI. Amazon SageMaker protects buyers data by employing security measures such as static scans, network isolation, and runtime monitoring.

The intellectual property of sellers on the AWS Marketplace is protected by encrypting the algorithms and model package artifacts in transit and at rest, using secure (SSL) connections for communications, and ensuring role based access for deployment of artifacts. AWS provides a secure way for the sellers to monetize their work with a frictionless self-service process to publish their algorithms and model packages.

 

Machine Learning category in Action

Having tried to build my own models in the past, I sure am excited about this feature. After browsing through the available algorithms and model packages from AWS Marketplace, I’ve decided to try the Deep Vision vehicle recognition model, published by Deep Vision AI. This model will allow us to identify the make, model and type of car from a set of uploaded images. You could use this model for insurance claims, online car sales, and vehicle identification in your business.

I continue to subscribe and accept the default options of recommended instance type and region. I read and accept the subscription contract, and I am ready to get started with our model.

My subscription is listed in the Amazon SageMaker console and is ready to use. Deploying the model with Amazon SageMaker is the same as any other model package, I complete the steps in this guide to create and deploy our endpoint.

With our endpoint deployed I can start asking the model questions. In this case I will be using a single image of a car; the model is trained to detect the model, maker, and year information from any angle. First, I will start off with a Volvo XC70 and see what results I get:

Results:

{'result': [{'mmy': {'make': 'Volvo', 'score': 0.97, 'model': 'Xc70', 'year': '2016-2016'}, 'bbox': {'top': 146, 'left': 50, 'right': 1596, 'bottom': 813}, 'View': 'Front Left View'}]}

My model has detected the make, model and year correctly for the supplied image. I was recently on holiday in the UK and stayed with a relative who had a McLaren 570s supercar. The thought that crossed my mind as the gulf-wing doors opened for the first time and I was about to be sitting in the car, was how much it would cost for the insurance excess if things went wrong! Quite apt for our use case today.

Results:

{'result': [{'mmy': {'make': 'Mclaren', 'score': 0.95, 'model': '570S', 'year': '2016-2017'}, 'bbox': {'top': 195, 'left': 126, 'right': 757, 'bottom': 494}, 'View': 'Front Right View'}]}

The score (0.95) measures how confident the model is that the result is right. The range of the score is 0.0 to 1.0. My score is extremely accurate for the McLaren car, with the make, model and year all correct. Impressive results for a relatively rare type of car on the road. I test a few more cars given to me by the launch team who are excitedly looking over my shoulder and now it’s time to wrap up.

Within ten minutes, I have been able to choose a model package, deploy an endpoint and accurately detect the make, model and year of vehicles, with no data scientists, expensive GPU’s for training or writing any code. You can be sure I will be subscribing to a whole lot more of these models from AWS Marketplace throughout re:Invent week and trying to solve other use cases in less than 15 minutes!

Access for the machine learning category in AWS Marketplace can be achieved through the Amazon SageMaker console, or directly through AWS Marketplace itself. Once an algorithm or model has been successfully subscribed to, it is accessible via the console, SDK, and AWS CLI. Algorithms and models from the AWS Marketplace can be deployed just like any other model or algorithm, by selecting the AWS Marketplace option as your package source. Once you have chosen an algorithm or model, you can deploy it to Amazon SageMaker by following this guide.

 

Availability & Pricing

Customers pay a subscription fee for the use of an algorithm or model package and the AWS resource fee. AWS Marketplace provides a consolidated monthly bill for all purchased subscriptions.

At launch, AWS Marketplace for Machine Learning includes algorithms and models from Deep Vision AI Inc, Knowledgent, RocketML, Sensifai, Cloudwick Technologies, Persistent Systems, Modjoul, H2Oai Inc, Figure Eight [Crowdflower], Intel Corporation, AWS Gluon Model Zoos, and more with new sellers being added regularly. If you are interested in selling machine learning algorithms and model packages, please reach out to [email protected]

 

 

NEW – AWS Marketplace makes it easier to govern software procurement with Private Marketplace

Post Syndicated from Shaun Ray original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-aws-marketplace-makes-it-easier-to-govern-software-procurement-with-private-marketplace/

Over six years ago, we launched AWS Marketplace with the ambitious goal of providing users of the cloud with the software applications and infrastructure they needed to run their business. Today, more than 200,000 AWS active customers are using software from AWS Marketplace from categories such as security, data and analytics, log analysis and machine learning. Those customers use over 650 million hours a month of Amazon EC2 for products in AWS Marketplace and have more than 950,000 active software subscriptions. AWS Marketplace offers 35 categories and more than 4,500 software listings from more than 1,400 Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) to help you on your cloud journey, no matter what stage of adoption you are up to.

Customers have told us that they love the flexibility and myriad of options that AWS Marketplace provides. Today, I am excited to announce we are offering even more flexibility for AWS Marketplace with the launch of Private Marketplace from AWS Marketplace.

Private Marketplace is a new feature that enables you to create a custom digital catalog of pre-approved products from AWS Marketplace. As an administrator, you can select products that meet your procurement policies and make them available for your users. You can also further customize Private Marketplace with company branding, such as logo, messaging, and color scheme. All controls for Private Marketplace apply across your entire AWS Organizations entity, and you can define fine-grained controls using Identity and Access Management for roles such as: administrator, subscription manager and end user.

Once you enable Private Marketplace, users within your AWS Organizations redirect to Private Marketplace when they sign into AWS Marketplace. Now, your users can quickly find, buy, and deploy products knowing they are pre-approved.

 

Private Marketplace in Action

To get started we need to be using a master account, if you have a single account, it will automatically be classified as a master account. If you are a member of an AWS Organizations managed account, the master account will need to enable Private Marketplace access. Once done, you can add subscription managers and administrators through AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policies.

 

1- My account meets the requirement of being a master, I can proceed to create a Private Marketplace. I click “Create Private Marketplace” and am redirected to the admin page where I can whitelist products from AWS Marketplace. To grant other users access to approve products for listing, I can use AWS Organizations policies to grant the AWSMarketplaceManageSubscriptions role.

2- I select some popular software and operating systems from the list and add them to Private Marketplace. Once selected we can now see our whitelisted products.

3- One thing that I appreciate, and I am sure that the administrators of their organization’s Private Marketplace will, is some customization to bring the style and branding inline with the company. In this case, we can choose the name, logo, color, and description of our Private Marketplace.

4- After a couple of minutes we have our freshly minted Private Marketplace ready to go, there is an explicit step that we need to complete to push our Private Marketplace live. This allows us to create and edit without enabling access to users.

 

5 -For the next part, we will switch to a member account and see what our Private Marketplace looks like.

6- We can see the five pieces of software I whitelisted and our customizations to our Private Marketplace. We can also see that these products are “Approved for Procurement” and can be subscribed to by our end users. Other products are still discoverable by our users, but cannot be subscribed to until an administrator whitelists the product.

 

Conclusion

Users in a Private Marketplace can launch products knowing that all products in their Private Marketplace comply with their company’s procurement policies. When users search for products in Private Marketplace, they can see which products are labeled as “Approved for Procurement” and quickly filter between their company’s catalog and the full catalog of software products in AWS Marketplace.

 

Pricing and Availability

Subscription costs remain the same as all products in AWS Marketplace once consumed. Private Marketplace from AWS Marketplace is available in all commercial regions today.

 

 

 

New – Amazon Route 53 Resolver for Hybrid Clouds

Post Syndicated from Shaun Ray original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-amazon-route-53-resolver-for-hybrid-clouds/

I distinctly remember the excitement I felt when I created my first Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) as a customer. I had just spent months building a similar environment on-premises and had been frustrated at the complicated setup. One of the immediate benefits that the VPC provided was a magical address at 10.0.0.2 where our EC2 instances sent Domain Name Service (DNS) queries. It was reliable, scaled with our workloads, and resolved both public and private domains without any input from us.

 

Like a lot of customers, we connected our on-premises environment with our AWS one via Direct Connect (DX), leading to cases where DNS names required resolution across the connection. Back then we needed to build DNS servers and provide forwarders to achieve this. That’s why today I am very excited to announce Amazon Route 53 Resolver for Hybrid Clouds. It’s a set of features that enable bi-directional querying between on-premises and AWS over private connections.

 

Before I dive into the new functionality, I would like to provide a shout out to our old faithful .2 resolver. As part of our announcement today I would like to let you know that we have officially named the .2 DNS resolver – Route 53 Resolver, in honor of the trillions of queries the service has resolved on behalf of our customers. Route 53 Resolver continues to provide DNS query capability for your VPC, free of charge. To support DNS queries across hybrid environments, we are providing two new capabilities: Route 53 Resolver Endpoints for inbound queries and Conditional Forwarding Rules for outbound queries.

 

Route 53 Resolver Endpoints

Inbound query capability is provided by Route 53 Resolver Endpoints, allowing DNS queries that originate on-premises to resolve AWS hosted domains. Connectivity needs to be established between your on-premises DNS infrastructure and AWS through a Direct Connect (DX) or a Virtual Private Network (VPN). Endpoints are configured through IP address assignment in each subnet for which you would like to provide a resolver.

 

Conditional Forwarding Rules

Outbound DNS queries are enabled through the use of Conditional Forwarding Rules. Domains hosted within your on-premises DNS infrastructure can be configured as forwarding rules in Route 53 Resolver. Rules will trigger when a query is made to one of those domains and will attempt to forward DNS requests to your DNS servers that were configured along with the rules. Like the inbound queries, this requires a private connection over DX or VPN.

 

When combined, these two capabilities allow for recursive DNS lookup for your hybrid workloads. This saves you from the overhead of managing, operating and maintaining additional DNS infrastructre while operating both environments.

 

Route 53 Resolver in Action

1. Route 53 Resolver for Hybrid Clouds is region specific, so our first step is to choose the region we would like to configure our hybrid workloads. Once we have selected a region, we choose the query direction – outbound, inbound or both.

 

2. We have selected both inbound and outbound traffic for this workload. First up is our inbound query configuration. We enter a name and choose a VPC. We assign one or more subnets from within the VPC (in this case we choose two for availability). From these subnets we can assign specific IP addresses to use as our endpoints, or let Route 53 Resolver assign them automatically.

3. We create a rule for our on-premises domain so that workloads inside the VPC can route DNS queries to your DNS infrastructure. We enter one or more IP addresses for our on-premises DNS servers and create our rule.

4. Everything is created and our VPC is associated with our inbound and outbound rules and can start routing traffic. Conditional Forwarding Rules can be shared across multiple accounts using AWS Resource Access Manager.

Availability and Pricing

Route 53 Resolver remains free for DNS queries served within your VPC. Resolver Endpoints use Elastic Network Interfaces (ENIs) costing $0.125 per hour. DNS queries that are resolved by a Conditional Forwarding Rule or a Resolver Endpoint cost $0.40 per million queries up to the first billion and $0.20 per million after that. Route 53 Resolver for Hybrid Cloud is available today in US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), Europe (Ireland), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Tokyo) and Asia Pacific (Singapore), with other commercial regions to follow.

 

-Shaun

AWS Quest 2: Reaching Las Vegas

Post Syndicated from Greg Bilsland original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-quest-2-reaching-las-vegas/

Hey AWS Questers and puzzlehunters! We’ve reached the last day of AWS Quest: The Road to re:Invent! Ozz has made it from Seattle to Las Vegas—after taking the long way via Sydney, Tokyo, Beijing, Seoul, Singapore, Mumbai, Stockholm, Cape Town, Paris, London, Sao Paulo, New York City, Toronto, and Mexico City. Now in Vegas, Ozz plans to meet up with a new robotic friend for re:Invent 2018! This is a very special guest for re:Invent, and you might even have a chance to meet that friend at the conference if you’re attending. But first, you need to wrap up this hunt by finding a final answer. This answer is a little different from the previous ones: It’s an instruction to Ozz on how to find this new friend.

To uncover the final solution, you’ll need the answers to the puzzles so far. Here’s what we’ve done to date: Ozz started this journey in a coffee shop in Seattle. Ozz then met a bouncy animal friend in Sydney, sampled sushi in Tokyo, and got control of the nozzles on the Banpo Bridge in Seoul. The little robot then found many terra cotta warriors in Beijing, met a wordy merlion in Singapore, and tasted the spices of Mumbai.

After a quick shopping trip in Stockholm, Ozz investigated the music of Cape Town, did a whole lot more shopping in Paris, and received a letter from a clockwork friend in London. Then, it was off across the Atlantic to São Paulo where Ozz engaged in some healthy capoeira. Our robot hero went to New York City and toured the skyscrapers, had a puck-shaped hockey treat in Toronto, and rode the roller coasters at Chapultepec Park in Mexico City. Along the way, with your help, we decoded the puzzles and got 15 different postcards of Ozz with special souvenirs from each city!

After reaching Las Vegas, Ozz has passed on this message to this new robotic friend:

“Boop boop boop beeeep beeeep. Beeeep beeeep boop boop boop. Beeeep boop boop boop boop. Beeeep boop boop boop boop. Boop boop boop beeeep beeeep. Beeeep beeeep beeeep beeeep boop. Beeeep beeeep beeeep boop boop. Boop boop boop beeeep beeeep. Boop boop boop boop boop. Boop boop boop beeeep beeeep. Boop beeeep beeeep beeeep beeeep boop boop beeeep beeeep beeeep. Beeeep beeeep boop boop boop. Boop boop boop boop boop. Beeeep beeeep boop boop boop. Boop beeeep beeeep beeeep beeeep!”

Well, that didn’t make much sense. But it’s likely just another puzzling example of our little robot’s sense of humor. Join the AWS Slack community in solving the puzzle and then type the solution into the submission page. If correct, you’ll see the final postcard from Ozz.

If you’ve been playing along and managed to solve the final puzzle, be sure to tweet at me and Jeff if you’ll be at re:Invent. We have Ozz pins to give out as well as a few other treats. You can also get an Ozz pin by visiting the Swag Booth at the Venetian and letting them know you’re an AWS blog reader.

Thanks for playing AWSQuest! For more puzzling fun, visit the Camp re:Invent Trivia Challenge with Jeff Barr at 7 PM on November 28th in the Venetian Theatre.

New Podcast: Preview the security track at re:Invent, learn what’s new and maximize your time

Post Syndicated from Katie Doptis original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/previewing-the-security-track-at-reinvent-learn-whats-new-and-maximize-your-time/

There are about 60 security-focused sessions and talks at re:Invent this year. That’s in addition to more than 2,000 other sessions, activities, chalk talks, and demos planned throughout the week. We want to help you get the most out the event and maximize your time. That’s why we’re previewing the security track and highlighting what’s new in the latest AWS Security & Compliance podcast.

Staffers developing security track content offer their advice for navigating the learning conference that is expected to draw 50,000 people from around the world. Listen to the podcast and learn about the newest hands-on session, which was designed to give you deep technical insight within a small-group setting. Plus, find out about the event change that is meant to make it easier to attend more of the talks that interest you.

Announcing Coolest Projects 2019

Post Syndicated from Philip Colligan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/announcing-coolest-projects-2019/

Coolest Projects is the world’s leading technology fair for young people. It’s the science fair for the digital age, where thousands of young people showcase amazing projects that they’ve built using digital technologies. If you want to meet the innovators of the future, this is the place to be, so today we’re really excited to announce three Coolest Projects events in 2019.

Will you be attending Coolest Projects 2019?

Dates are now live for Coolest Projects 2019. Will you be joining us in the UK, Republic of Ireland, or North America?

I’ll never forget my first Coolest Projects

My first experience was in Dublin in 2016. I had been told Coolest Projects was impressive, but I was blown away by the creativity, innovation, and sheer effort that everyone had put in. Every bit as impressive as the technology was the sense of community, particularly among the young people. Girls and boys, with different backgrounds and levels of skill, travelled from all over the world to show off what they’d made and to be inspired by each other.

Igniting imaginations

Coolest Projects began in 2012, the work of CoderDojo volunteers Noel King and Ben Chapman. The first event was held in Dublin, and this city remains the location of the annual Coolest Projects International event. Since then, it has sparked off events all over the world, organised by the community and engaging thousands more young people.

This year, the baton passed to the Raspberry Pi Foundation. We’ve just completed our first season managing the Coolest Projects events and brand, including the first-ever UK event, which took place in April, and a US event that we held at Discovery Cube in Orange County on 23 September. We’ve had a lot of fun!

We’ve seen revolutionary ideas, including a robot guide dog for blind people and a bot detector that could disrupt the games industry. We’ve seen kids’ grit and determination in overcoming heinous obstacles such as their projects breaking in transit and having to rebuild everything from scratch on the morning of the event.

We’ve also seen hundreds of young people who are levelling up, being inspired to learn more, and bringing more ambitious and challenging projects to every new event.

Coolest Projects 2019

We want to expand Coolest Projects and provide a space for even more young people to showcase their digital makes. Today we’re announcing the dates for three Coolest Projects events that are taking place in 2019:

  • Coolest Projects UK, Saturday 2 March, The Sharp Project, Manchester
  • Coolest Projects USA, Saturday 23 March, Discovery Cube Orange County, California
  • Coolest Projects International, Sunday 5 May, RDS, Dublin, Ireland

These are the events that we’ll be running directly, and there will also be community-led events happening in Milan, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Bulgaria.

Project registration for all three events we’re leading opens in January 2019, so you’ve got plenty of time to plan for your next big idea.

If you need some inspiration, there are plenty of places to start. You could check out our How to make a project worksheets worksheets, or get try out one of our online projects before you plan your own.



Head to coolestprojects.org to find out about the 2019 events and how you can get involved!

The post Announcing Coolest Projects 2019 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Hang out with Raspberry Pi this month in California, New York, and Boston

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-california-new-york-boston/

This month sees two wonderful events where you can meet the Raspberry Pi team, both taking place on the weekend of September 22 and 23 in the USA.

And for more impromptu fun, you can also hang out with our Social Media Editor and fellow Pi enthusiasts on the East Coast on September 24–28.

Coolest Projects North America

In the Discovery Cube Orange County in Santa Ana, California, team members of the Raspberry Pi Foundation North America, CoderDojo, and Code Club will be celebrating the next generation of young makers at Coolest Projects North America.

Coolest Projects is a world-leading showcase that empowers and inspires the next generation of digital creators, innovators, changemakers, and entrepreneurs. This year, for the first time, we are bringing Coolest Projects to North America for a spectacular event!

While project submissions for the event are now closed, you can still get the last FREE tickets to attend this showcase on Sunday, September 23.

To get your free tickets, click here. And for more information on the event, visit the Coolest Projects North America homepage.

World Maker Faire New York

For those on the east side of the continent at World Maker Faire New York, we’ll have representation in the form of Alex, our Social Media Editor.

The East Coast’s largest celebration of invention, creativity, and curiosity showcases the very best of the global Maker Movement. Get immersed in hundreds of projects and multiple stages focused on making for social good, health, technology, electronics, 3D printing & fabrication, food, robotics, art and more!

Alex will be adorned in Raspberry Pi stickers while exploring the cornucopia of incredible projects on show. She’ll be joined by Raspberry Pi’s videographer Brian, and they’ll gather footage of Raspberry Pis being used across the event for videos like this one from last year’s World Maker Faire:

Raspberry Pi Coffee Robot || Mugsy || Maker Faire NY ’17

Labelled ‘the world’s first hackable, customisable, dead simple, robotic coffee maker’, and powered by a Raspberry Pi, Mugsy allows you to take control of every aspect of the coffee-making process: from grind size and water temperature, to brew and bloom time.

So if you’re planning to attend World Maker Faire, either as a registered exhibitor or an attendee showing off your most recent project, we want to know! Share your project in the comments so we can find you at the event.

A week of New York and Boston meetups

Lastly, since she’ll be in New York, Alex will be out and about after MFNY, meeting up with members of the Raspberry Pi community. If you’d be game for a Raspberry Pi-cnic in Central Park, Coffee and Pi in a cafe, or any other semi-impromptu meetup in the city, let us know the best days for you between Monday, September 24 to Thursday, September 27! Alex will organise some fun gatherings in the Big Apple.

You can also join her in Boston, Massachusetts, on Friday, September 28, where Alex will again be looking to meet up with makers and Pi enthusiasts — let us know if you’re game!

This is weird

Does anyone else think it’s weird that I’ve been referring to myself in the third person throughout this post?

The post Hang out with Raspberry Pi this month in California, New York, and Boston appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Amazon sponsors R00tz at DEF CON 2018

Post Syndicated from Patrick McCanna original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/amazon-sponsors-rootz-at-def-con-2018/

It’s early August, and we’re quickly approaching Hacker summer camp (AKA DEF CON). The Black Hat Briefings start August 8, DEF CON starts August 9, and many people will be closely following the latest security presentations at both conferences. But there’s another, exclusive conference happening at DEF CON that Amazon is excited to be a part of: we’re sponsoring R00tz Asylum. R00tz is a conference dedicated to teaching kids ages 8-18 how to become white-hat hackers.

Kids who attend will learn how hackers break into computers and networks and how cybersecurity experts defend against hackers. They’ll get hands-on experience soldering and disassembling computers. They’ll learn about lock-picking and how to use 3D printers, and they’ll even get to compete in a security-oriented “Capture the Flag” event where competitors are rewarded for discovering secrets embedded in servers and encrypted files. And throughout the conference, they’ll hear talks from top-notch presenters on topics that include hacking web apps, hacking elections, and hacking conference badges covered in blinky LEDs.

Many of Amazon’s best security experts started young, with limited access to mentors. We learned how to keep hackers from breaking into computers and networks before cybersecurity became the industry it is today. Amazon’s support for R00tz is our chance to give back to the next generation of cyber-security professionals. Kids who are interested in learning about security will get a safe environment and access to mentors. If you’re in Las Vegas for DEF CON, head over to the R00tz FAQs to learn more about the event, and be sure to check out the conference schedule.

Raspberry Fields 2018: ice cream, robots, and coding

Post Syndicated from Tom Evans original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/relive-raspberry-fields-2018/

Umbrella trees, giant mushrooms, and tiny museums. A light-up Lovelace, LED cubes, LED eyelashes, and LED coding (we have a bit of a thing for LEDs). Magic cocktails, melted ice creams, and the coolest hot dog around. Face paint masterpieces, swag bags, and bingo. More stickers than a laptop can cope with, a flock of amazing volunteers, and it all ending with an exploding microwave! This can only mean one thing: Raspberry Fields 2018.

The #RaspberryFields digital making festival 2018

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspberry Pi from one of our Approved Resellers: http://rpf.io/ytproducts Find out more about the Raspberry Pi Foundation: Raspberry Pi http://rpf.io/ytrpi Code Club UK http://rpf.io/ytccuk Code Club International http://rpf.io/ytcci CoderDojo http://rpf.io/ytcd Check out our free online training courses: http://rpf.io/ytfl Find your local Raspberry Jam event: http://rpf.io/ytjam Work through our free online projects: http://rpf.io/ytprojects Do you have a question about your Raspberry Pi?

Raspberry Fields forever

On 30 June and 1 July, our community of makers, vendors, speakers, volunteers, and drop-in activity leaders impressed over 1300 visitors who braved the heat to visit our festival of digital making at Cambridge Junction.

Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018
Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018
Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018

Our mini festival was both a thank you to our wonderful community and a demonstration of the sheer scale of support and ideas we offer to people looking to get involved in digital making for the first time.

Projects and talks galore

Our community of makers came out in force at Raspberry Fields, with shops, hands-on activities, installations, and show-and-tells demonstrating some of the coolest stuff you can do with a Raspberry Pi and with digital making in general.

Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018
Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018
Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018

Many visitors we spoke to couldn’t believe some of the incredible creations and projects our community members had brought along for them to learn about and play with.

Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018
Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018
Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018

Over the weekend, e had 29 talks on two stages, with our community speakers coming from all over the UK, as well as France, Germany, Korea, Japan, and Australia! Their talks covered a fascinating range of topics such as volunteering with our coding clubs, digital inclusion, drones, wildlife conservation, and so much more! If you missed any of the speakers, don’t worry: we will be uploading talks to our Youtube channel for everyone to see.

Spectacular live shows

We rounded off the two days with three smashing performances: on Saturday, the fantastic Neil Monteiro showed off some of the awesome things you can do with an Astro Pi at home. He was followed by the outstanding Ada.Ada.Ada., in which Ada Lovelace, kitted out in an epic tech-covered dress, taught people all about her programming legacy.

Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018
Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018

Sunday’s finale brought the mischief of Brainiac Live! to Raspberry Fields: the Brainiacs showed us just how much they laugh in the face of science, before providing us with the explosive finish every good festival needs!

Outstanding volunteers

A whopping 60 community members came and helped us out, many of whom had never volunteered at a Raspberry Pi event before! Our festival of digital making would not have happened without these lovely people willing to give up some of their precious weekend to ensure that everything went off without a hitch.

Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018
Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018
Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018

The volunteers were doing everything from greeting and registering guests as they arrived, handing out swag bags, and stamping bingo cards, to giving directions, helping out with activities, and managing our two stages. They were absolutely fantastic, and we hope to see them all again at future events!

Join our community today

Raspberry Fields was just a taster of what is going on around the world every day within the marvellous Raspberry Pi community at Raspberry Jams, Code Clubs, CoderDojos, Coolest Projects events, or at home, where people use our products and free resources to create their own projects. If our festival has made you curious, then dive in and join the amazing people that have made it possible!

Till next time!

The whole Raspberry Pi team is hugely grateful to all our community members who helped out in some way with Raspberry Fields, as well as to all the staff at Cambridge Junction, who were so open and friendly, and happy to let us taking over the whole venue for a weekend. We would like to say a massive thank you for making the event so much fun for everyone involved, and for being so welcoming to everyone who took part!

Raspberry Pi event Raspberry Fields 2018

We look forward to seeing all of you at upcoming events!

The post Raspberry Fields 2018: ice cream, robots, and coding appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Moonhack 2018: reaching for the stars!

Post Syndicated from Katherine Leadbetter original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/moonhack-2018/

Last year, Code Club Australia set a new world record during their Moonhack event for the most young people coding within 24 hours. This year, they’re hoping to get 50000 kids involved — here’s how you can take part in this interstellar record attempt!

Moonhack 2018 Code Club Raspberry Pi

Celebrating the Apollo 11 moon landing

Nearly 50 years ago, humankind took one giant leap and landed on the moon for the first time. The endeavour involved an incredible amount of technological innovation that, amongst other things, helped set the stage for modern coding.

Apollo 11 moon landing

To celebrate this amazing feat, Code Club Australia are hosting Moonhack, an annual world record attempt to get as many young people as possible coding space-themed projects over 24 hours. This year, Moonhack is even bigger and better, and we want you to take part!

Moonhack past and present

The first Moonhack took place in 2016 in Sydney, Australia, and has since spread across the globe. More than 28000 young people from 56 countries took part last year, from Syria to South Korea and Croatia to Guatemala.

This year, the aim is to break that world record with 50000 young people — the equivalent of the population of a small town — coding over 24 hours!

Moonhack 2018
Moonhack 2018
Moonhack 2018

Get involved

Taking part in Moonhack is super simple: code a space-themed project and submit it on 20 July, the anniversary of the moon landing. Young people from 8 to 18 can take part, and Moonhack is open to everyone, wherever you are in the world.

The event is perfect for Code Clubs, CoderDojos, and Raspberry Jams looking for a new challenge, but you can also take part at home with your family. Or, if you have access to a great venue, you could also host a Moonhackathon event and invite young people from your community to get involved — the Moonhack team is offering online resources to help you do this.

On the Moonhack website, you’ll find four simple, astro-themed projects to choose from, one each for Scratch, Python, micro:bit, and Gamefroot. If your young coders are feeling adventurous, they can also create their own space-themed projects: last year we saw some amazing creations, from a ‘dogs vs aliens’ game to lunar football!

Moonhack 2018

For many young people, Moonhack falls in the last week of term, so it’s a perfect activity to celebrate the end of the academic year. If you’re in a part of the world that’s already on break from school, you can hold a Moonhack coding party, which is a great way to keep coding over the holidays!

To register to take part in Moonhack, head over to moonhack.com and fill in your details. If you’re interested in hosting a Moonhackathon, you can also download an information pack here.

The post Moonhack 2018: reaching for the stars! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Look who’s coming to Raspberry Fields 2018!

Post Syndicated from Helen Drury original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-fields-2018-highlights/

For those that don’t yet know, Raspberry Fields is the all-new community festival of digital making we’re hosting in Cambridge, UK on 30 June and 1 July 2018!

Raspberry Pi two-day digital making event Raspberry Fields

It will be a chance for people of all ages and skill levels to have a go at getting creative with tech! Raspberry Fields is a celebration of all that our digital makers have already learnt and achieved, whether through taking part in Code Clubs, CoderDojos, or Raspberry Jams, or through trying our resources at home.

We have a packed festival programme of exciting activities, talks, and shows for you to experience! So clear the weekend of 30 June and 1 July, because you won’t want to miss a thing.

Saturday

On Saturday, we’ll be welcoming two very special acts to the Raspberry Fields stage.

Neil Monterio

Neil Monterio - Raspberry Fields

Originally trained as a physicist, Neil is famous for his live shows exploring the power of scientific thinking and how it helps us tell the difference between the real and the impossible.

Ada.Ada.Ada

AdaAdaAda - Raspberry Fields

The spellbinding interactive show about computing pioneer Ada Lovelace — catch a sneak peek here!

Sunday

On Sunday, “Science Museum meets Top Gear” as Brainiac Live! takes to the stage to close Raspberry Fields in style.

Brainiac Live!

Brainiac Live! - Raspberry Fields

Strap on your safety goggles — due to popular demand science’s greatest and most volatile live show arrives with a vengeance. The West End and international touring favourite is coming to Raspberry Fields!

More mischievous than ever before, Brainiac Live! will take you on a breathless ride through the wild world of the weird and wonderful. Watch from the safety of your seat as the Brainiacs fearlessly delve into the mysteries of science and do all those things on stage that you’re too scared to do at home!

Weekend highlights

And that’s not all — we’ll also be welcoming some very special guests who will display their projects throughout the weekend. These include:

The Cauldron

The Cauldron - Raspberry Fields

Brew potions with molecular mixology and responsive magic wands using science and technology, and bring the magic from fantasy books to life in this immersive, interactive experience! Learn more about The Cauldron here.

The mechanical Umbrella Tree

The Umbrella Tree - Raspberry Fields

The Umbrella Tree is a botanical, mechanical contraption designed to bemuse, baffle, delight, and amuse all ages. Audiences discover it in the landscape singing to itself and dancing its strange mechanical ballet. The four-metre high structure weaves a creaky choreography of mechanically operated umbrellas, lights, and smoke.

Museum in a Box

Artefacts in the classroom with Museum in a Box || Raspberry Pi Stories

Museum in a Box bridges the gap between museums and schools by creating a more hands-on approach to conservation education through 3D printing and digital making.

Museum in a Box puts museum collections and expert knowledge into your hands, wherever you are in the world. It’s an intriguing and interactive mix of replica objects and contextual content from museum curators and educators, directly at the tips of your fingers!

And there’s still more to discover

Alongside these exciting and explosive performances and displays, we’ll be hosting loads of amazing projects and hands-on activities built by our awesome community of young people and enthusiasts, as well as licensed resellers for you to get all the latest kit and gadgets!

If you’re wondering about bringing along young children or less technologically minded family members or friends, there’ll be plenty for them to enjoy — with lots of festival-themed activities such as face painting, fun performances, free giveaways, and delicious food, Raspberry Fields will have something for everyone!

Tickets!

Tickets are selling fast, so don’t miss out — buy your tickets here today!

Fancy helping out? Find out about our volunteering opportunities.

The post Look who’s coming to Raspberry Fields 2018! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Flight Sim Company Threatens Reddit Mods Over “Libelous” DRM Posts

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/flight-sim-company-threatens-reddit-mods-over-libellous-drm-posts-180604/

Earlier this year, in an effort to deal with piracy of their products, flight simulator company FlightSimLabs took drastic action by installing malware on customers’ machines.

The story began when a Reddit user reported something unusual in his download of FlightSimLabs’ A320X module. A file – test.exe – was being flagged up as a ‘Chrome Password Dump’ tool, something which rang alarm bells among flight sim fans.

As additional information was made available, the story became even more sensational. After first dodging the issue with carefully worded statements, FlightSimLabs admitted that it had installed a password dumper onto ALL users’ machines – whether they were pirates or not – in an effort to catch a particular software cracker and launch legal action.

It was an incredible story that no doubt did damage to FlightSimLabs’ reputation. But the now the company is at the center of a new storm, again centered around anti-piracy measures and again focused on Reddit.

Just before the weekend, Reddit user /u/walkday reported finding something unusual in his A320X module, the same module that caused the earlier controversy.

“The latest installer of FSLabs’ A320X puts two cmdhost.exe files under ‘system32\’ and ‘SysWOW64\’ of my Windows directory. Despite the name, they don’t open a command-line window,” he reported.

“They’re a part of the authentication because, if you remove them, the A320X won’t get loaded. Does someone here know more about cmdhost.exe? Why does FSLabs give them such a deceptive name and put them in the system folders? I hate them for polluting my system folder unless, of course, it is a dll used by different applications.”

Needless to say, the news that FSLabs were putting files into system folders named to make them look like system files was not well received.

“Hiding something named to resemble Window’s “Console Window Host” process in system folders is a huge red flag,” one user wrote.

“It’s a malware tactic used to deceive users into thinking the executable is a part of the OS, thus being trusted and not deleted. Really dodgy tactic, don’t trust it and don’t trust them,” opined another.

With a disenchanted Reddit userbase simmering away in the background, FSLabs took to Facebook with a statement to quieten down the masses.

“Over the past few hours we have become aware of rumors circulating on social media about the cmdhost file installed by the A320-X and wanted to clear up any confusion or misunderstanding,” the company wrote.

“cmdhost is part of our eSellerate infrastructure – which communicates between the eSellerate server and our product activation interface. It was designed to reduce the number of product activation issues people were having after the FSX release – which have since been resolved.”

The company noted that the file had been checked by all major anti-virus companies and everything had come back clean, which does indeed appear to be the case. Nevertheless, the critical Reddit thread remained, bemoaning the actions of a company which probably should have known better than to irritate fans after February’s debacle. In response, however, FSLabs did just that once again.

In private messages to the moderators of the /r/flightsim sub-Reddit, FSLabs’ Marketing and PR Manager Simon Kelsey suggested that the mods should do something about the thread in question or face possible legal action.

“Just a gentle reminder of Reddit’s obligations as a publisher in order to ensure that any libelous content is taken down as soon as you become aware of it,” Kelsey wrote.

Noting that FSLabs welcomes “robust fair comment and opinion”, Kelsey gave the following advice.

“The ‘cmdhost.exe’ file in question is an entirely above board part of our anti-piracy protection and has been submitted to numerous anti-virus providers in order to verify that it poses no threat. Therefore, ANY suggestion that current or future products pose any threat to users is absolutely false and libelous,” he wrote, adding:

“As we have already outlined in the past, ANY suggestion that any user’s data was compromised during the events of February is entirely false and therefore libelous.”

Noting that FSLabs would “hate for lawyers to have to get involved in this”, Kelsey advised the /r/flightsim mods to ensure that no such claims were allowed to remain on the sub-Reddit.

But after not receiving the response he would’ve liked, Kelsey wrote once again to the mods. He noted that “a number of unsubstantiated and highly defamatory comments” remained online and warned that if something wasn’t done to clean them up, he would have “no option” than to pass the matter to FSLabs’ legal team.

Like the first message, this second effort also failed to have the desired effect. In fact, the moderators’ response was to post an open letter to Kelsey and FSLabs instead.

“We sincerely disagree that you ‘welcome robust fair comment and opinion’, demonstrated by the censorship on your forums and the attempted censorship on our subreddit,” the mods wrote.

“While what you do on your forum is certainly your prerogative, your rules do not extend to Reddit nor the r/flightsim subreddit. Removing content you disagree with is simply not within our purview.”

The letter, which is worth reading in full, refutes Kelsey’s claims and also suggests that critics of FSLabs may have been subjected to Reddit vote manipulation and coordinated efforts to discredit them.

What will happen next is unclear but the matter has now been placed in the hands of Reddit’s administrators who have agreed to deal with Kelsey and FSLabs’ personally.

It’s a little early to say for sure but it seems unlikely that this will end in a net positive for FSLabs, no matter what decision Reddit’s admins take.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

ISP Questions Impartiality of Judges in Copyright Troll Cases

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/isp-questions-impartiality-of-judges-in-copyright-troll-cases-180602/

Following in the footsteps of similar operations around the world, two years ago the copyright trolling movement landed on Swedish shores.

The pattern was a familiar one, with trolls harvesting IP addresses from BitTorrent swarms and tracing them back to Internet service providers. Then, after presenting evidence to a judge, the trolls obtained orders that compelled ISPs to hand over their customers’ details. From there, the trolls demanded cash payments to make supposed lawsuits disappear.

It’s a controversial business model that rarely receives outside praise. Many ISPs have tried to slow down the flood but most eventually grow tired of battling to protect their customers. The same cannot be said of Swedish ISP Bahnhof.

The ISP, which is also a strong defender of privacy, has become known for fighting back against copyright trolls. Indeed, to thwart them at the very first step, the company deletes IP address logs after just 24 hours, which prevents its customers from being targeted.

Bahnhof says that the copyright business appeared “dirty and corrupt” right from the get go, so it now operates Utpressningskollen.se, a web portal where the ISP publishes data on Swedish legal cases in which copyright owners demand customer data from ISPs through the Patent and Market Courts.

Over the past two years, Bahnhof says it has documented 76 cases of which six are still ongoing, 11 have been waived and a majority 59 have been decided in favor of mainly movie companies. Bahnhof says that when it discovered that 59 out of the 76 cases benefited one party, it felt a need to investigate.

In a detailed report compiled by Bahnhof Communicator Carolina Lindahl and sent to TF, the ISP reveals that it examined the individual decision-makers in the cases before the Courts and found five judges with “questionable impartiality.”

“One of the judges, we can call them Judge 1, has closed 12 of the cases, of which two have been waived and the other 10 have benefitted the copyright owner, mostly movie companies,” Lindahl notes.

“Judge 1 apparently has written several articles in the magazine NIR – Nordiskt Immateriellt Rättsskydd (Nordic Intellectual Property Protection) – which is mainly supported by Svenska Föreningen för Upphovsrätt, the Swedish Association for Copyright (SFU).

“SFU is a member-financed group centered around copyright that publishes articles, hands out scholarships, arranges symposiums, etc. On their website they have a public calendar where Judge 1 appears regularly.”

Bahnhof says that the financiers of the SFU are Sveriges Television AB (Sweden’s national public TV broadcaster), Filmproducenternas Rättsförening (a legally-oriented association for filmproducers), BMG Chrysalis Scandinavia (a media giant) and Fackförbundet för Film och Mediabranschen (a union for the movie and media industry).

“This means that Judge 1 is involved in a copyright association sponsored by the film and media industry, while also judging in copyright cases with the film industry as one of the parties,” the ISP says.

Bahnhof’s also has criticism for Judge 2, who participated as an event speaker for the Swedish Association for Copyright, and Judge 3 who has written for the SFU-supported magazine NIR. According to Lindahl, Judge 4 worked for a bureau that is partly owned by a board member of SFU, who also defended media companies in a “high-profile” Swedish piracy case.

That leaves Judge 5, who handled 10 of the copyright troll cases documented by Bahnhof, waiving one and deciding the remaining nine in favor of a movie company plaintiff.

“Judge 5 has been questioned before and even been accused of bias while judging a high-profile piracy case almost ten years ago. The accusations of bias were motivated by the judge’s membership of SFU and the Swedish Association for Intellectual Property Rights (SFIR), an association with several important individuals of the Swedish copyright community as members, who all defend, represent, or sympathize with the media industry,” Lindahl says.

Bahnhof hasn’t named any of the judges nor has it provided additional details on the “high-profile” case. However, anyone who remembers the infamous trial of ‘The Pirate Bay Four’ a decade ago might recall complaints from the defense (1,2,3) that several judges involved in the case were members of pro-copyright groups.

While there were plenty of calls to consider them biased, in May 2010 the Supreme Court ruled otherwise, a fact Bahnhof recognizes.

“Judge 5 was never sentenced for bias by the court, but regardless of the court’s decision this is still a judge who shares values and has personal connections with [the media industry], and as if that weren’t enough, the judge has induced an additional financial aspect by participating in events paid for by said party,” Lindahl writes.

“The judge has parties and interest holders in their personal network, a private engagement in the subject and a financial connection to one party – textbook characteristics of bias which would make anyone suspicious.”

The decision-makers of the Patent and Market Court and their relations.

The ISP notes that all five judges have connections to the media industry in the cases they judge, which isn’t a great starting point for returning “objective and impartial” results. In its summary, however, the ISP is scathing of the overall system, one in which court cases “almost looked rigged” and appear to be decided in favor of the movie company even before reaching court.

In general, however, Bahnhof says that the processes show a lack of individual attention, such as the court blindly accepting questionable IP address evidence supplied by infamous anti-piracy outfit MaverickEye.

“The court never bothers to control the media company’s only evidence (lists generated by MaverickMonitor, which has proven to be an unreliable software), the court documents contain several typos of varying severity, and the same standard texts are reused in several different cases,” the ISP says.

“The court documents show a lack of care and control, something that can easily be taken advantage of by individuals with shady motives. The findings and discoveries of this investigation are strengthened by the pure numbers mentioned in the beginning which clearly show how one party almost always wins.

“If this is caused by bias, cheating, partiality, bribes, political agenda, conspiracy or pure coincidence we can’t say for sure, but the fact that this process has mainly generated money for the film industry, while citizens have been robbed of their personal integrity and legal certainty, indicates what forces lie behind this machinery,” Bahnhof’s Lindahl concludes.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Friday Squid Blogging: Do Cephalopods Contain Alien DNA?

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/06/friday_squid_bl_627.html

Maybe not DNA, but biological somethings.

Cause of Cambrian explosion — Terrestrial or Cosmic?“:

Abstract: We review the salient evidence consistent with or predicted by the Hoyle-Wickramasinghe (H-W) thesis of Cometary (Cosmic) Biology. Much of this physical and biological evidence is multifactorial. One particular focus are the recent studies which date the emergence of the complex retroviruses of vertebrate lines at or just before the Cambrian Explosion of ~500 Ma. Such viruses are known to be plausibly associated with major evolutionary genomic processes. We believe this coincidence is not fortuitous but is consistent with a key prediction of H-W theory whereby major extinction-diversification evolutionary boundaries coincide with virus-bearing cometary-bolide bombardment events. A second focus is the remarkable evolution of intelligent complexity (Cephalopods) culminating in the emergence of the Octopus. A third focus concerns the micro-organism fossil evidence contained within meteorites as well as the detection in the upper atmosphere of apparent incoming life-bearing particles from space. In our view the totality of the multifactorial data and critical analyses assembled by Fred Hoyle, Chandra Wickramasinghe and their many colleagues since the 1960s leads to a very plausible conclusion — life may have been seeded here on Earth by life-bearing comets as soon as conditions on Earth allowed it to flourish (about or just before 4.1 Billion years ago); and living organisms such as space-resistant and space-hardy bacteria, viruses, more complex eukaryotic cells, fertilised ova and seeds have been continuously delivered ever since to Earth so being one important driver of further terrestrial evolution which has resulted in considerable genetic diversity and which has led to the emergence of mankind.

Two commentaries.

This is almost certainly not true.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Measuring the throughput for Amazon MQ using the JMS Benchmark

Post Syndicated from Rachel Richardson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/measuring-the-throughput-for-amazon-mq-using-the-jms-benchmark/

This post is courtesy of Alan Protasio, Software Development Engineer, Amazon Web Services

Just like compute and storage, messaging is a fundamental building block of enterprise applications. Message brokers (aka “message-oriented middleware”) enable different software systems, often written in different languages, on different platforms, running in different locations, to communicate and exchange information. Mission-critical applications, such as CRM and ERP, rely on message brokers to work.

A common performance consideration for customers deploying a message broker in a production environment is the throughput of the system, measured as messages per second. This is important to know so that application environments (hosts, threads, memory, etc.) can be configured correctly.

In this post, we demonstrate how to measure the throughput for Amazon MQ, a new managed message broker service for ActiveMQ, using JMS Benchmark. It should take between 15–20 minutes to set up the environment and an hour to run the benchmark. We also provide some tips on how to configure Amazon MQ for optimal throughput.

Benchmarking throughput for Amazon MQ

ActiveMQ can be used for a number of use cases. These use cases can range from simple fire and forget tasks (that is, asynchronous processing), low-latency request-reply patterns, to buffering requests before they are persisted to a database.

The throughput of Amazon MQ is largely dependent on the use case. For example, if you have non-critical workloads such as gathering click events for a non-business-critical portal, you can use ActiveMQ in a non-persistent mode and get extremely high throughput with Amazon MQ.

On the flip side, if you have a critical workload where durability is extremely important (meaning that you can’t lose a message), then you are bound by the I/O capacity of your underlying persistence store. We recommend using mq.m4.large for the best results. The mq.t2.micro instance type is intended for product evaluation. Performance is limited, due to the lower memory and burstable CPU performance.

Tip: To improve your throughput with Amazon MQ, make sure that you have consumers processing messaging as fast as (or faster than) your producers are pushing messages.

Because it’s impossible to talk about how the broker (ActiveMQ) behaves for each and every use case, we walk through how to set up your own benchmark for Amazon MQ using our favorite open-source benchmarking tool: JMS Benchmark. We are fans of the JMS Benchmark suite because it’s easy to set up and deploy, and comes with a built-in visualizer of the results.

Non-Persistent Scenarios – Queue latency as you scale producer throughput

JMS Benchmark nonpersistent scenarios

Getting started

At the time of publication, you can create an mq.m4.large single-instance broker for testing for $0.30 per hour (US pricing).

This walkthrough covers the following tasks:

  1.  Create and configure the broker.
  2. Create an EC2 instance to run your benchmark
  3. Configure the security groups
  4.  Run the benchmark.

Step 1 – Create and configure the broker
Create and configure the broker using Tutorial: Creating and Configuring an Amazon MQ Broker.

Step 2 – Create an EC2 instance to run your benchmark
Launch the EC2 instance using Step 1: Launch an Instance. We recommend choosing the m5.large instance type.

Step 3 – Configure the security groups
Make sure that all the security groups are correctly configured to let the traffic flow between the EC2 instance and your broker.

  1. Sign in to the Amazon MQ console.
  2. From the broker list, choose the name of your broker (for example, MyBroker)
  3. In the Details section, under Security and network, choose the name of your security group or choose the expand icon ( ).
  4. From the security group list, choose your security group.
  5. At the bottom of the page, choose Inbound, Edit.
  6. In the Edit inbound rules dialog box, add a role to allow traffic between your instance and the broker:
    • Choose Add Rule.
    • For Type, choose Custom TCP.
    • For Port Range, type the ActiveMQ SSL port (61617).
    • For Source, leave Custom selected and then type the security group of your EC2 instance.
    • Choose Save.

Your broker can now accept the connection from your EC2 instance.

Step 4 – Run the benchmark
Connect to your EC2 instance using SSH and run the following commands:

$ cd ~
$ curl -L https://github.com/alanprot/jms-benchmark/archive/master.zip -o master.zip
$ unzip master.zip
$ cd jms-benchmark-master
$ chmod a+x bin/*
$ env \
  SERVER_SETUP=false \
  SERVER_ADDRESS={activemq-endpoint} \
  ACTIVEMQ_TRANSPORT=ssl\
  ACTIVEMQ_PORT=61617 \
  ACTIVEMQ_USERNAME={activemq-user} \
  ACTIVEMQ_PASSWORD={activemq-password} \
  ./bin/benchmark-activemq

After the benchmark finishes, you can find the results in the ~/reports directory. As you may notice, the performance of ActiveMQ varies based on the number of consumers, producers, destinations, and message size.

Amazon MQ architecture

The last bit that’s important to know so that you can better understand the results of the benchmark is how Amazon MQ is architected.

Amazon MQ is architected to be highly available (HA) and durable. For HA, we recommend using the multi-AZ option. After a message is sent to Amazon MQ in persistent mode, the message is written to the highly durable message store that replicates the data across multiple nodes in multiple Availability Zones. Because of this replication, for some use cases you may see a reduction in throughput as you migrate to Amazon MQ. Customers have told us they appreciate the benefits of message replication as it helps protect durability even in the face of the loss of an Availability Zone.

Conclusion

We hope this gives you an idea of how Amazon MQ performs. We encourage you to run tests to simulate your own use cases.

To learn more, see the Amazon MQ website. You can try Amazon MQ for free with the AWS Free Tier, which includes up to 750 hours of a single-instance mq.t2.micro broker and up to 1 GB of storage per month for one year.