All posts by Channy Yun

Anthropic’s Claude 3 Opus model is now available on Amazon Bedrock

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/anthropics-claude-3-opus-model-on-amazon-bedrock/

We are living in the generative artificial intelligence (AI) era; a time of rapid innovation. When Anthropic announced its Claude 3 foundation models (FMs) on March 4, we made Claude 3 Sonnet, a model balanced between skills and speed, available on Amazon Bedrock the same day. On March 13, we launched the Claude 3 Haiku model on Amazon Bedrock, the fastest and most compact member of the Claude 3 family for near-instant responsiveness.

Today, we are announcing the availability of Anthropic’s Claude 3 Opus on Amazon Bedrock, the most intelligent Claude 3 model, with best-in-market performance on highly complex tasks. It can navigate open-ended prompts and sight-unseen scenarios with remarkable fluency and human-like understanding, leading the frontier of general intelligence.

With the availability of Claude 3 Opus on Amazon Bedrock, enterprises can build generative AI applications to automate tasks, generate revenue through user-facing applications, conduct complex financial forecasts, and accelerate research and development across various sectors. Like the rest of the Claude 3 family, Opus can process images and return text outputs.

Claude 3 Opus shows an estimated twofold gain in accuracy over Claude 2.1 on difficult open-ended questions, reducing the likelihood of faulty responses. As enterprise customers rely on Claude across industries like healthcare, finance, and legal research, improved accuracy is essential for safety and performance.

How does Claude 3 Opus perform?
Claude 3 Opus outperforms its peers on most of the common evaluation benchmarks for AI systems, including undergraduate-level expert knowledge (MMLU), graduate-level expert reasoning (GPQA), basic mathematics (GSM8K), and more. It exhibits high levels of comprehension and fluency on complex tasks, leading the frontier of general intelligence.


Source: https://www.anthropic.com/news/claude-3-family

Here are a few supported use cases for the Claude 3 Opus model:

  • Task automation: planning and execution of complex actions across APIs, databases, and interactive coding
  • Research: brainstorming and hypothesis generation, research review, and drug discovery
  • Strategy: advanced analysis of charts and graphs, financials and market trends, and forecasting

To learn more about Claude 3 Opus’s features and capabilities, visit Anthropic’s Claude on Bedrock page and Anthropic Claude models in the Amazon Bedrock documentation.

Claude 3 Opus in action
If you are new to using Anthropic models, go to the Amazon Bedrock console and choose Model access on the bottom left pane. Request access separately for Claude 3 Opus.

2024-claude3-opus-2-model-access screenshot

To test Claude 3 Opus in the console, choose Text or Chat under Playgrounds in the left menu pane. Then choose Select model and select Anthropic as the category and Claude 3 Opus as the model.

To test more Claude prompt examples, choose Load examples. You can view and run examples specific to Claude 3 Opus, such as analyzing a quarterly report, building a website, and creating a side-scrolling game.

By choosing View API request, you can also access the model using code examples in the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) and AWS SDKs. Here is a sample of the AWS CLI command:

aws bedrock-runtime invoke-model \
     --model-id anthropic.claude-3-opus-20240229-v1:0 \
     --body "{\"messages\":[{\"role\":\"user\",\"content\":[{\"type\":\"text\",\"text\":\" Your task is to create a one-page website for an online learning platform.\\n\"}]}],\"anthropic_version\":\"bedrock-2023-05-31\",\"max_tokens\":2000,\"temperature\":1,\"top_k\":250,\"top_p\":0.999,\"stop_sequences\":[\"\\n\\nHuman:\"]}" \
     --cli-binary-format raw-in-base64-out \
     --region us-east-1 \
     invoke-model-output.txt

As I mentioned in my previous Claude 3 model launch posts, you need to use the new Anthropic Claude Messages API format for some Claude 3 model features, such as image processing. If you use Anthropic Claude Text Completions API and want to use Claude 3 models, you should upgrade from the Text Completions API.

My colleagues, Dennis Traub and Francois Bouteruche, are building code examples for Amazon Bedrock using AWS SDKs. You can learn how to invoke Claude 3 on Amazon Bedrock to generate text or multimodal prompts for image analysis in the Amazon Bedrock documentation.

Here is sample JavaScript code to send a Messages API request to generate text:

// claude_opus.js - Invokes Anthropic Claude 3 Opus using the Messages API.
import {
  BedrockRuntimeClient,
  InvokeModelCommand
} from "@aws-sdk/client-bedrock-runtime";

const modelId = "anthropic.claude-3-opus-20240229-v1:0";
const prompt = "Hello Claude, how are you today?";

// Create a new Bedrock Runtime client instance
const client = new BedrockRuntimeClient({ region: "us-east-1" });

// Prepare the payload for the model
const payload = {
  anthropic_version: "bedrock-2023-05-31",
  max_tokens: 1000,
  messages: [{
    role: "user",
    content: [{ type: "text", text: prompt }]
  }]
};

// Invoke Claude with the payload and wait for the response
const command = new InvokeModelCommand({
  contentType: "application/json",
  body: JSON.stringify(payload),
  modelId
});
const apiResponse = await client.send(command);

// Decode and print Claude's response
const decodedResponseBody = new TextDecoder().decode(apiResponse.body);
const responseBody = JSON.parse(decodedResponseBody);
const text = responseBody.content[0].text;
console.log(`Response: ${text}`);

Now, you can install the AWS SDK for JavaScript Runtime Client for Node.js and run claude_opus.js.

npm install @aws-sdk/client-bedrock-runtime
node claude_opus.js

For more examples in different programming languages, check out the code examples section in the Amazon Bedrock User Guide, and learn how to use system prompts with Anthropic Claude at Community.aws.

Now available
Claude 3 Opus is available today in the US West (Oregon) Region; check the full Region list for future updates.

Give Claude 3 Opus a try in the Amazon Bedrock console today and send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon Bedrock or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

Introducing AWS Deadline Cloud: Set up a cloud-based render farm in minutes

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-aws-deadline-cloud-set-up-a-cloud-based-render-farm-in-minutes/

Customers in industries such as architecture, engineering, & construction (AEC) and media & entertainment (M&E) generate the final frames for film, TV, games, industrial design visualizations, and other digital media with a process called rendering, which takes 2D/3D digital content data and computes an output, such as an image or video file. Rendering also requires significant compute power, especially to generate 3D graphics and visual effects (VFX) with resolutions as high as 16K for films and TV. This constrains the number of rendering projects that customers can take on at once.

To address this growing demand for rendering high-resolution content, customers often build what are called “render farms” which combine the power of hundreds or thousands of computing nodes to process their rendering jobs. Render farms can traditionally take weeks or even months to build and deploy, and they require significant planning and upfront commitments to procure hardware.

As a result, customers increasingly are transitioning to scalable, cloud-based render farms for efficient production instead of a dedicated render farm on-premises, which can require extremely high fixed costs. But, rendering in the cloud still requires customers to manage their own infrastructure, build bespoke tooling to manage costs on a project-by-project basis, and monitor software licensing costs with their preferred partners themselves.

Today, we are announcing the general availability of AWS Deadline Cloud, a new fully managed service that enables creative teams to easily set up a render farm in minutes, scale to run more projects in parallel, and only pay for what resources they use. AWS Deadline Cloud provides a web-based portal with the ability to create and manage render farms, preview in-progress renders, view and analyze render logs, and easily track these costs.

With Deadline Cloud, you can go from zero to render faster with integrations of digital content creation (DCC) tools and customization tools are built-in. You can reduce the effort and development time required to tailor your rendering pipeline to the needs of each job. You also have the flexibility to use licenses you already own or they are provided by the service for third-party DCC software and renderers such as Maya, Nuke, and Houdini.

Concepts of AWS Deadline Cloud
AWS Deadline Cloud allows you to create and manage rendering projects and jobs on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instances directly from DCC pipelines and workstations. You can create a rendering farm, a collection of queues, and fleets. A queue is where your submitted jobs are located and scheduled to be rendered. A fleet is a group of worker nodes that can support multiple queues. A queue can be processed by multiple fleets.

Before you can work on a project, you should have access to the required resources, and the associated farm must be integrated with AWS IAM Identity Center to manage workforce authentication and authorization. IT administrators can create and grant access permissions to users and groups at different levels, such as viewers, contributors, managers, or owners.

Here are four key components of Deadline Cloud:

  • Deadline Cloud monitor – You can access statuses, logs, and other troubleshooting metrics for jobs, steps, and tasks. The Deadline Cloud monitor provides real-time access and updates to job progress. It also provides access to logs and other troubleshooting metrics, and you can browse multiple farm, fleet, and queue listings to view system utilization.
  • Deadline Cloud submitter – You can submit a rendering job directly using AWS SDK or AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI). You can also submit from DCC software using a Deadline Cloud submitter, which is a DCC-integrated plugin that supports Open Job Description (OpenJD), an open source template specification. With it, artists can submit rendering jobs from a third-party DCC interface they are more familiar with, such as Maya or Nuke, to Deadline Cloud, where project resources are managed and jobs are monitored in one location.
  • Deadline Cloud budget manager – You can create and edit budgets to help manage project costs and view how many AWS resources are used and the estimated costs for those resources.
  • Deadline Cloud usage explorer – You can use the usage explorer to track approximate compute and licensing costs based on public pricing rates in Amazon EC2 and Usage-Based Licensing (UBL).

Get started with AWS Deadline Cloud
To get started with AWS Deadline Cloud, define and create a farm with Deadline Cloud monitor, download the Deadline Cloud submitter, and install plugins for your favorite DCC applications with just a few clicks. You can define your rendering jobs in your DCC application and submit them to your created farm within the plugin’s user interfaces.

The DCC plugins detect the necessary input scene data and build a job bundle that uploads to the Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) bucket in your account, transfer to Deadline Cloud for rendering the job, and provide completed frames to the S3 bucket for your customers to access.

1. Define a farm with Deadline Cloud monitor
Let’s create your Deadline Cloud monitor infrastructure and define your farm first. In the Deadline Cloud console, choose Set up Deadline Cloud to define a farm with a guided experience, including queues and fleets, adding groups and users, choosing a service role, and adding tags to your resources.

In this step, to choose all the default settings for your Deadline Cloud resources, choose Skip to Review in Step 3 after monitor setup. Otherwise choose Next and customize your Deadline Cloud resources.

Set up your monitor’s infrastructure and enter your Monitor display name. This name makes the Monitor URL, a web portal to manage your farms, queues, fleets, and usages. You can’t change the monitor URL after you finish setting up. The AWS Region is the physical location of your rendering farm, so you should choose the closest Region from your studio to reduce the latency and improve data transfer speeds.

To access the monitor, you can create new users and groups and manage users (such as by assigning them groups, permissions, and applications) or delete users from your monitor. Users, groups, and permissions can also be managed in the IAM Identity Center. So, if you don’t set up the IAM Identity Center in your Region, you should enable it first. To learn more, visit Managing users in Deadline Cloud in the AWS documentation.

In Step 2, you can define farm details such as the name and description of your farm. In Additional farm settings, you can set an AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) key to encrypt your data and tags to assign AWS resources for filtering your resources or tracking your AWS costs. Your data is encrypted by default with a key that AWS owns and manages for you. To choose a different key, customize your encryption settings.

You can choose Skip to Review and Create to finish the quick setup process with the default settings.

Let’s look at more optional configurations! In the step for defining queue details, you can set up an S3 bucket for your queue. Job assets are uploaded as job attachments during the rendering process. Job attachments are stored in your defined S3 bucket. Additionally, you can set up the default budget action, service access roles, and environment variables for your queue.

In the step for defining fleet details, set the fleet name, description, Instance option (either Spot or On-Demand Instance), and Auto scaling configuration to define the number of instances and the fleet’s worker requirements. We set conservative worker requirements by default. These values can be updated at any time after setting up your render farm. To learn more, visit Manage Deadline Cloud fleets in the AWS documentation.

Worker instances define EC2 instance types with vCPUs and memory size, for example, c5.large, c5a.large, and c6i.large. You can filter up to 100 EC2 instance types by either allowing or excluding types of worker instances.

Review all of the information entered to create your farm and choose Create farm.

The progress of your Deadline Cloud onboarding is displayed, and a success message displays when your monitor and farm are ready for use. To learn more details about the process, visit Set up a Deadline Cloud monitor in the AWS documentation.

In the Dashboard in the left pane, you can visit the overview of the monitor, farms, users, and groups that you created.

Choose Monitor to visit a web portal to manage your farms, queues, fleets, usages, and budgets. After signing in to your user account, you can enter a web portal and explore the Deadline Cloud resources you created. You can also download a Deadline Cloud monitor desktop application with the same user experiences from the Downloads page.

To learn more about using the monitor, visit Using the Deadline Cloud monitor in the AWS documentation.

2. Set up a workstation and submit your render job to Deadline Cloud
Let’s set up a workstation for artists on their desktops by installing the Deadline Cloud submitter application so they can easily submit render jobs from within Maya, Nuke, and Houdini. Choose Downloads in the left menu pane and download the proper submitter installer for your operating system to test your render farm.

This program installs the latest integrated plugin for Deadline Cloud submitter for Maya, Nuke, and Houdini.

For example, open a Maya on your desktop and your asset. I have an example of a wrench file I’m going to test with. Choose Windows in the menu bar and Settings/Preferences in the sub menu. In the Plugin Manager, search for DeadlineCloudSubmitter. Select Loaded to load the Deadline Cloud submitter plugin.

If you are not already authenticated in the Deadline Cloud submitter, the Deadline Cloud Status tab will display. Choose Login and sign in with your user credentials in a browser sign-in window.

Now, select the Deadline Cloud shelf, then choose the orange deadline cloud logo on the ‘Deadline’ shelf to launch the submitter. From the submitter window, choose the farm and queue you want your render submitted to. If desired, in the Scene Settings tab, you can override the frame range, change the Output Path, or both.

If you choose Submit, the wrench turntable Maya file, along with all of the necessary textures and alembic caches, will be uploaded to Deadline Cloud and rendered on the farm. You can monitor rendering jobs in your Deadline Cloud monitor.

When your render is finished, as indicated by the Succeeded status in the job monitor, choose the job, Job Actions, and Download Output. To learn more about scheduling and monitoring jobs, visit Deadline Cloud jobs in the AWS documentation.

View your rendered image with an image viewing application such as DJView. The image will look like this:

To learn more in detail about the developer-side setup process using the command line, visit Setting up a developer workstation for Deadline Cloud in the AWS documentation.

3. Managing budgets and usage for Deadline Cloud
To help you manage costs for Deadline Cloud, you can use a budget manager to create and edit budgets. You can also use a usage explorer to view how many AWS resources are used and the estimated costs for those resources.

Choose Budgets on the Deadline Cloud monitor page to create your budget for your farm.

You can create budget amounts and limits and set automated actions to help reduce or stop additional spend against the budget.

Choose Usage in the Deadline Cloud monitor page to find real-time metrics on the activity happening on each farm. You can look at the farm’s costs by different variables, such as queue, job, or user. Choose various time frames to find usage during a specific period and look at usage trends over time.

The costs displayed in the usage explorer are approximate. Use them as a guide for managing your resources. There may be other costs from using other connected AWS resources, such as Amazon S3, Amazon CloudWatch, and other services that are not accounted for in the usage explorer.

To learn more, visit Managing budgets and usage for Deadline Cloud in the AWS documentation.

Now available
AWS Deadline Cloud is now available in US East (Ohio), US East (N. Virginia), US West (Oregon), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Europe (Frankfurt), and Europe (Ireland) Regions.

Give AWS Deadline Cloud a try in the Deadline Cloud console. For more information, visit the Deadline Cloud product page, Deadline Cloud User Guide in the AWS documentation, and send feedback to AWS re:Post for AWS Deadline Cloud or through your usual AWS support contacts.

Channy

AWS Weekly Roundup — AWS Chips Taste Test, generative AI updates, Community Days, and more — April 1, 2024

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-weekly-roundup-aws-chips-taste-test-generative-ai-updates-community-days-and-more-april-1-2024/

Today is April Fool’s Day. About 10 years ago, some tech companies would joke about an idea that was thought to be fun and unfeasible on April 1st, to the delight of readers. Jeff Barr has also posted seemingly far-fetched ideas on this blog in the past, and some of these have surprisingly come true! Here are examples:

Year Joke Reality
2010 Introducing QC2 – the Quantum Compute Cloud, a production-ready quantum computer to solve certain types of math and logic problems with breathtaking speed. In 2019, we launched Amazon Braket, a fully managed service that allows scientists, researchers, and developers to begin experimenting with computers from multiple quantum hardware providers in a single place.
2011 Announcing AWS $NAME, a scalable event service to find and automatically integrate with your systems on the cloud, on premises, and even your house and room. In 2019, we introduced Amazon EventBridge to make it easy for you to integrate your own AWS applications with third-party applications. If you use AWS IoT Events, you can monitor and respond to events at scale from your IoT devices at home.
2012 New Amazon EC2 Fresh Servers to deliver a fresh (physical) EC2 server in 15 minutes using atmospheric delivery and communucation from a fleet of satellites. In 2021, we launched AWS Outposts Server, 1U/2U physical servers with built-in AWS services. In 2023, Project Kuiper completed successful tests of an optical mesh network in low Earth orbit. Now, we only need to develop satellite warehouse and atmospheric re-entry technology to follow Amazon PrimeAir’s drone delivery.
2013 PC2 – The New Punched Card Cloud, a new mf (mainframe) instance family, Mainframe Machine Images (MMI), tape storage, and punched card interfaces for mainframe computers used from the 1970s to ’80s. In 2022, we launched AWS Mainframe Modernization to help you modernize your mainframe applications and deploy them to AWS fully managed runtime environments.

Jeff returns! This year, we have AWS “Chips” Taste Test for him to indulge in, drawing unique parallels between chip flavors and silicon innovations. He compared the taste of “Golden Nacho Cheese,” “Al Chili Lime,” and “BBQ Training Wheels” with AWS Graviton, AWS Inferentia, and AWS Trainium chips.

What’s your favorite? Watch a fun video in the LinkedIn and X post of AWS social media channels.

Last week’s launches
If we stay curious, keep learning, and insist on high standards, we will continue to see more ideas turn into reality. The same goes for the generative artificial intelligence (generative AI) world. Here are some launches that utilize generative AI technology this week.

Knowledge Bases for Amazon BedrockAnthropic’s Claude 3 Sonnet foundation model (FM) is now generally available on Knowledge Bases for Amazon Bedrock to connect internal data sources for Retrieval Augmented Generation (RAG).

Knowledge Bases for Amazon Bedrock support metadata filtering, which improves retrieval accuracy by ensuring the documents are relevant to the query. You can narrow search results by specifying which documents to include or exclude from a query, resulting in more relevant responses generated by FMs such as Claude 3 Sonnet.

Finally, you can customize prompts and number of retrieval results in Knowledge Bases for Amazon Bedrock. With custom prompts, you can tailor the prompt instructions by adding context, user input, or output indicator(s), for the model to generate responses that more closely match your use case needs. You can now control the amount of information needed to generate a final response by adjusting the number of retrieved passages. To learn more these new features, visit Knowledge bases for Amazon Bedrock in the AWS documentation.

Amazon Connect Contact Lens – At AWS re:Invent 2023, we previewed a generative AI capability to summarize long customer conversations into succinct, coherent, and context-rich contact summaries to help improve contact quality and agent performance. These generative AI–powered post-contact summaries are now available in Amazon Connect Contact Lens.

Amazon DataZone – At AWS re:Invent 2023, we also previewed a generative AI–based capability to generate comprehensive business data descriptions and context and include recommendations on analytical use cases. These generative AI–powered recommendations for descriptions are now available in Amazon DataZone.

There are also other important launches you shouldn’t miss:

A new Local Zone in Miami, Florida – AWS Local Zones are an AWS infrastructure deployment that places compute, storage, database, and other select services closer to large populations, industry, and IT centers where no AWS Region exists. You can now use a new Local Zone in Miami, Florida, to run applications that require single-digit millisecond latency, such as real-time gaming, hybrid migrations, and live video streaming. Enable the new Local Zone in Miami (use1-mia2-az1) from the Zones tab in the Amazon EC2 console settings to get started.

New Amazon EC2 C7gn metal instance – You can use AWS Graviton based new C7gn bare metal instances to run applications that benefit from deep performance analysis tools, specialized workloads that require direct access to bare metal infrastructure, legacy workloads not supported in virtual environments, and licensing-restricted business-critical applications. The EC2 C7gn metal size comes with 64 vCPUs and 128 GiB of memory.

AWS Batch multi-container jobs – You can use multi-container jobs in AWS Batch, making it easier and faster to run large-scale simulations in areas like autonomous vehicles and robotics. With the ability to run multiple containers per job, you get the advanced scaling, scheduling, and cost optimization offered by AWS Batch, and you can use modular containers representing different components like 3D environments, robot sensors, or monitoring sidecars.

Amazon Guardduty EC2 Runtime Monitoring – We are announcing the general availability of Amazon GuardDuty EC2 Runtime Monitoring to expand threat detection coverage for EC2 instances at runtime and complement the anomaly detection that GuardDuty already provides by continuously monitoring VPC Flow Logs, DNS query logs, and AWS CloudTrail management events. You now have visibility into on-host, OS-level activities and container-level context into detected threats.

GitLab support for AWS CodeBuild – You can now use GitLab and GitLab self-managed as the source provider for your CodeBuild projects. You can initiate builds from changes in source code hosted in your GitLab repositories. To get started with CodeBuild’s new source providers, visit the AWS CodeBuild User Guide.

Retroactive support for AWS cost allocation tags – You can enable AWS cost allocation tags retroactively for up to 12 months. Previously, when you activated resource tags for cost allocation purposes, the tags only took effect prospectively. Submit a backfill request, specifying the duration of time you want the cost allocation tags to be backfilled. Once the backfill is complete, the cost and usage data from prior months will be tagged with the current cost allocation tags.

For a full list of AWS announcements, be sure to keep an eye on the What’s New at AWS page.

Other AWS News
Some other updates and news about generative AI that you might have missed:

Amazon and Anthropic’s AI investiment – Read the latest milestone in our strategic collaboration and investment with Anthropic. Now, Anthropic is using AWS as its primary cloud provider and will use AWS Trainium and Inferentia chips for mission-critical workloads, including safety research and future FM development. Earlier this month, we announced access to Anthropic’s most powerful FM, Claude 3, on Amazon Bedrock. We announced availability of Sonnet on March 4 and Haiku on March 13. To learn more, watch the video introducing Claude on Amazon Bedrock.

Virtual building assistant built on Amazon Bedrock – BrainBox AI announced the launch of ARIA (Artificial Responsive Intelligent Assistant) powered by Amazon Bedrock. ARIA is designed to enhance building efficiency by assimilating seamlessly into the day-to-day processes related to building management. To learn more, read the full customer story and watch the video on how to reduce a building’s CO2 footprint with ARIA.

Solar models available on Amazon SageMaker JumpStart – Upstage Solar is a large language model (LLM) 100 percent pre-trained with Amazon SageMaker that outperforms and uses its compact size and powerful track record to specialize in purpose training, making it versatile across languages, domains, and tasks. Now, Solar Mini is available on Amazon SageMaker JumpStart. To learn more, watch how to deploy Solar models in SageMaker JumpStart.

AWS open source news and updates – My colleague Ricardo writes this weekly open source newsletter in which he highlights new open source projects, tools, and demos from the AWS Community. Last week’s highlight was news that Linux Foundation launched Valkey community, an open source alternative to the Redis in-memory, NoSQL data store.

Upcoming AWS Events
Check your calendars and sign up for upcoming AWS events:

AWS SummitAWS Summits – Join free online and in-person events that bring the cloud computing community together to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS. Register in your nearest city: Paris (April 3), Amsterdam (April 9), Sydney (April 10–11), London (April 24), Berlin (May 15–16), and Seoul (May 16–17), Hong Kong (May 22), Milan (May 23), Dubai (May 29), Stockholm (June 4), and Madrid (June 5).

AWS re:Inforce – Explore cloud security in the age of generative AI at AWS re:Inforce, June 10–12 in Pennsylvania for two-and-a-half days of immersive cloud security learning designed to help drive your business initiatives. Read the story from AWS Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) Chris Betz about a bit of what you can expect at re:Inforce.

AWS Community Days – Join community-led conferences that feature technical discussions, workshops, and hands-on labs led by expert AWS users and industry leaders from around the world: Mumbai (April 6), Poland (April 11), Bay Area (April 12), Kenya (April 20), and Turkey (May 18).

You can browse all upcoming AWS led in-person and virtual events and developer-focused events such as AWS DevDay.

That’s all for this week. Check back next Monday for another Week in Review!

— Channy

This post is part of our Week in Review series. Check back each week for a quick roundup of interesting news and announcements from AWS.

Amazon GuardDuty EC2 Runtime Monitoring is now generally available

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-guardduty-ec2-runtime-monitoring-is-now-generally-available/

Amazon GuardDuty is a machine learning (ML)-based security monitoring and intelligent threat detection service that analyzes and processes various AWS data sources, continuously monitors your AWS accounts and workloads for malicious activity, and delivers detailed security findings for visibility and remediation.

I love the feature of GuardDuty Runtime Monitoring that analyzes operating system (OS)-level, network, and file events to detect potential runtime threats for specific AWS workloads in your environment. I first introduced the general availability of this feature for Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS) resources in March 2023. Seb wrote about the expansion of the Runtime Monitoring feature to provide threat detection for Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS) and AWS Fargate as well as the preview for Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) workloads in Nov 2023.

Today, we are announcing the general availability of Amazon GuardDuty EC2 Runtime Monitoring to expand threat detection coverage for EC2 instances at runtime and complement the anomaly detection that GuardDuty already provides by continuously monitoring VPC Flow Logs, DNS query logs, and AWS CloudTrail management events. You now have visibility into on-host, OS-level activities and container-level context into detected threats.

With GuardDuty EC2 Runtime Monitoring, you can identify and respond to potential threats that might target the compute resources within your EC2 workloads. Threats to EC2 workloads often involve remote code execution that leads to the download and execution of malware. This could include instances or self-managed containers in your AWS environment that are connecting to IP addresses associated with cryptocurrency-related activity or to malware command-and-control related IP addresses.

GuardDuty Runtime Monitoring provides visibility into suspicious commands that involve malicious file downloads and execution across each step, which can help you discover threats during initial compromise and before they become business-impacting events. You can also centrally enable runtime threat detection coverage for accounts and workloads across the organization using AWS Organizations to simplify your security coverage.

Configure EC2 Runtime Monitoring in GuardDuty
With a few clicks, you can enable GuardDuty EC2 Runtime Monitoring in the GuardDuty console. For your first use, you need to enable Runtime Monitoring.

Any customers that are new to the EC2 Runtime Monitoring feature can try it for free for 30 days and gain access to all features and detection findings. The GuardDuty console shows how many days are left in the free trial.

Now, you can set up the GuardDuty security agent for the individual EC2 instances for which you want to monitor the runtime behavior. You can choose to deploy the GuardDuty security agent either automatically or manually. At GA, you can enable Automated agent configuration, which is a preferred option for most customers as it allows GuardDuty to manage the security agent on their behalf.

The agent will be deployed on EC2 instances with AWS Systems Manager and uses an Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) endpoint to receive the runtime events associated with your resource. If you want to manage the GuardDuty security agent manually, visit Managing the security agent Amazon EC2 instance manually in the AWS documentation. In multiple-account environments, delegated GuardDuty administrator accounts manage their member accounts using AWS Organizations. For more information, visit Managing multiple accounts in the AWS documentation.

When you enable EC2 Runtime Monitoring, you can find the covered EC2 instances list, account ID, and coverage status, and whether the agent is able to receive runtime events from the corresponding resource in the EC2 instance runtime coverage tab.

Even when the coverage status is Unhealthy, meaning it is not currently able to receive runtime findings, you still have defense in depth for your EC2 instance. GuardDuty continues to provide threat detection to the EC2 instance by monitoring CloudTrail, VPC flow, and DNS logs associated with it.

Check out GuardDuty EC2 Runtime security findings
When GuardDuty detects a potential threat and generates security findings, you can view the details of the healthy information.

Choose Findings in the left pane if you want to find security findings specific to Amazon EC2 resources. You can use the filter bar to filter the findings table by specific criteria, such as a Resource type of Instance. The severity and details of the findings differ based on the resource role, which indicates whether the EC2 resource was the target of suspicious activity or the actor performing the activity.

With today’s launch, we support over 30 runtime security findings for EC2 instances, such as detecting abused domains, backdoors, cryptocurrency-related activity, and unauthorized communications. For the full list, visit Runtime Monitoring finding types in the AWS documentation.

Resolve your EC2 security findings
Choose each EC2 security finding to know more details. You can find all the information associated with the finding and examine the resource in question to determine if it is behaving in an expected manner.

If the activity is authorized, you can use suppression rules or trusted IP lists to prevent false positive notifications for that resource. If the activity is unexpected, the security best practice is to assume the instance has been compromised and take the actions detailed in Remediating a potentially compromised Amazon EC2 instance in the AWS documentation.

You can integrate GuardDuty EC2 Runtime Monitoring with other AWS security services, such as AWS Security Hub or Amazon Detective. Or you can use Amazon EventBridge, allowing you to use integrations with security event management or workflow systems, such as Splunk, Jira, and ServiceNow, or trigger automated and semi-automated responses such as isolating a workload for investigation.

When you choose Investigate with Detective, you can find Detective-created visualizations for AWS resources to quickly and easily investigate security issues. To learn more, visit Integration with Amazon Detective in the AWS documentation.

Things to know
GuardDuty EC2 Runtime Monitoring support is now available for EC2 instances running Amazon Linux 2 or Amazon Linux 2023. You have the option to configure maximum CPU and memory limits for the agent. To learn more and for future updates, visit Prerequisites for Amazon EC2 instance support in the AWS documentation.

To estimate the daily average usage costs for GuardDuty, choose Usage in the left pane. During the 30-day free trial period, you can estimate what your costs will be after the trial period. At the end of the trial period, we charge you per vCPU hours tracked monthly for the monitoring agents. To learn more, visit the Amazon GuardDuty pricing page.

Enabling EC2 Runtime Monitoring also allows for a cost-saving opportunity on your GuardDuty cost. When the feature is enabled, you won’t be charged for GuardDuty foundational protection VPC Flow Logs sourced from the EC2 instances running the security agent. This is due to similar, but more contextual, network data available from the security agent. Additionally, GuardDuty would still process VPC Flow Logs and generate relevant findings so you will continue to get network-level security coverage even if the agent experiences downtime.

Now available
Amazon GuardDuty EC2 Runtime Monitoring is now available in all AWS Regions where GuardDuty is available, excluding AWS GovCloud (US) Regions and AWS China Regions. For a full list of Regions where EC2 Runtime Monitoring is available, visit Region-specific feature availability.

Give GuardDuty EC2 Runtime Monitoring a try in the GuardDuty console. For more information, visit the Amazon GuardDuty User Guide and send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon GuardDuty or through your usual AWS support contacts.

Channy

Anthropic’s Claude 3 Haiku model is now available on Amazon Bedrock

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/anthropics-claude-3-haiku-model-is-now-available-in-amazon-bedrock/

Last week, Anthropic announced their Claude 3 foundation model family. The family includes three models: Claude 3 Haiku, the fastest and most compact model for near-instant responsiveness; Claude 3 Sonnet, the ideal balanced model between skills and speed; and Claude 3 Opus, the most intelligent offering for top-level performance on highly complex tasks. AWS also announced the general availability of Claude 3 Sonnet in Amazon Bedrock.

Today, we are announcing the availability of Claude 3 Haiku on Amazon Bedrock. The Claude 3 Haiku foundation model is the fastest and most compact model of the Claude 3 family, designed for near-instant responsiveness and seamless generative artificial intelligence (AI) experiences that mimic human interactions. For example, it can read a data-dense research paper on arXiv (~10k tokens) with charts and graphs in less than three seconds.

With Claude 3 Haiku’s availability on Amazon Bedrock, you can build near-instant responsive generative AI applications for enterprises that need quick and accurate targeted performance. Like Sonnet and Opus, Haiku has image-to-text vision capabilities, can understand multiple languages besides English, and boasts increased steerability in a 200k context window.

Claude 3 Haiku use cases
Claude 3 Haiku is smarter, faster, and more affordable than other models in its intelligence category. It answers simple queries and requests with unmatched speed. With its fast speed and increased steerability, you can create AI experiences that seamlessly imitate human interactions.

Here are some use cases for using Claude 3 Haiku:

  • Customer interactions: quick and accurate support in live interactions, translations
  • Content moderation: catch risky behavior or customer requests
  • Cost-saving tasks: optimized logistics, inventory management, fast knowledge extraction from unstructured data

To learn more about Claude 3 Haiku’s features and capabilities, visit Anthropic’s Claude on Amazon Bedrock and Anthropic Claude models in the AWS documentation.

Claude 3 Haiku in action
If you are new to using Anthropic models, go to the Amazon Bedrock console and choose Model access on the bottom left pane. Request access separately for Claude 3 Haiku.

To test Claude 3 Haiku in the console, choose Text or Chat under Playgrounds in the left menu pane. Then choose Select model and select Anthropic as the category and Claude 3 Haiku as the model.

To test more Claude prompt examples, choose Load examples. You can view and run examples specific to Claude 3 Haiku, such as advanced Q&A with citations, crafting a design brief, and non-English content generation.

Using Compare mode, you can also compare the speed and intelligence between Claude 3 Haiku and the Claude 2.1 model using a sample prompt to generate personalized email responses to address customer questions.

By choosing View API request, you can also access the model using code examples in the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) and AWS SDKs. Here is a sample of the AWS CLI command:

aws bedrock-runtime invoke-model \
     --model-id anthropic.claude-3-haiku-20240307-v1:0 \
     --body "{\"messages\":[{\"role\":\"user\",\"content\":[{\"type\":\"text\",\"text\":\"Write the test case for uploading the image to Amazon S3 bucket\\nCertainly! Here's an example of a test case for uploading an image to an Amazon S3 bucket using a testing framework like JUnit or TestNG for Java:\\n\\n...."}]}],\"anthropic_version\":\"bedrock-2023-05-31\",\"max_tokens\":2000}" \
     --cli-binary-format raw-in-base64-out \
     --region us-east-1 \
     invoke-model-output.txt

To make an API request with Claude 3, use the new Anthropic Claude Messages API format, which allows for more complex interactions such as image processing. If you use Anthropic Claude Text Completions API, you should upgrade from the Text Completions API.

Here is sample Python code to send a Message API request describing the image file:

def call_claude_haiku(base64_string):

    prompt_config = {
        "anthropic_version": "bedrock-2023-05-31",
        "max_tokens": 4096,
        "messages": [
            {
                "role": "user",
                "content": [
                    {
                        "type": "image",
                        "source": {
                            "type": "base64",
                            "media_type": "image/png",
                            "data": base64_string,
                        },
                    },
                    {"type": "text", "text": "Provide a caption for this image"},
                ],
            }
        ],
    }

    body = json.dumps(prompt_config)

    modelId = "anthropic.claude-3-haiku-20240307-v1:0"
    accept = "application/json"
    contentType = "application/json"

    response = bedrock_runtime.invoke_model(
        body=body, modelId=modelId, accept=accept, contentType=contentType
    )
    response_body = json.loads(response.get("body").read())

    results = response_body.get("content")[0].get("text")
    return results

To learn more sample codes with Claude 3, see Get Started with Claude 3 on Amazon Bedrock, Diagrams to CDK/Terraform using Claude 3 on Amazon Bedrock, and Cricket Match Winner Prediction with Amazon Bedrock’s Anthropic Claude 3 Sonnet in the Community.aws.

Now available
Claude 3 Haiku is available now in the US West (Oregon) Region with more Regions coming soon; check the full Region list for future updates.

Claude 3 Haiku is the most cost-effective choice. For example, Claude 3 Haiku is cheaper, up to 68 percent of the price per 1,000 input/output tokens compared to Claude Instant, with higher levels of intelligence. To learn more, see Amazon Bedrock Pricing.

Give Claude 3 Haiku a try in the Amazon Bedrock console today and send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon Bedrock or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

Anthropic’s Claude 3 Sonnet foundation model is now available in Amazon Bedrock

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/anthropics-claude-3-sonnet-foundation-model-is-now-available-in-amazon-bedrock/

In September 2023, we announced a strategic collaboration with Anthropic that brought together their respective technology and expertise in safer generative artificial intelligence (AI), to accelerate the development of Anthropic’s Claude foundation models (FMs) and make them widely accessible to AWS customers. You can get early access to unique features of Anthropic’s Claude model in Amazon Bedrock to reimagine user experiences, reinvent your businesses, and accelerate your generative AI journeys.

In November 2023, Amazon Bedrock provided access to Anthropic’s Claude 2.1, which delivers key capabilities to build generative AI for enterprises. Claude 2.1 includes a 200,000 token context window, reduced rates of hallucination, improved accuracy over long documents, system prompts, and a beta tool use feature for function calling and workflow orchestration.

Today, Anthropic announced Claude 3, a new family of state-of-the-art AI models that allows customers to choose the exact combination of intelligence, speed, and cost that suits their business needs. The three models in the family are Claude 3 Haiku, the fastest and most compact model for near-instant responsiveness, Claude 3 Sonnet, the ideal balanced model between skills and speed, and Claude 3 Opus, a most intelligent offering for the top-level performance on highly complex tasks.

We’re also announcing the availability of Anthropic’s Claude 3 Sonnet today in Amazon Bedrock, with Claude 3 Opus and Claude 3 Haiku coming soon. For the vast majority of workloads, Claude 3 Sonnet model is two times faster than Claude 2 and Claude 2.1, with increased steerability, and new image-to-text vision capabilities.

With Claude 3 Sonnet’s availability in Amazon Bedrock, you can build cost-effective generative AI applications for enterprises that need intelligence, reliability, and speed. You can now use Anthropic’s latest model, Claude 3 Sonnet, in the Amazon Bedrock console.

Introduction of Anthropic’s Claude 3 Sonnet
Here are some key highlights about the new Claude 3 Sonnet model in Amazon Bedrock:

2x faster speed – Claude 3 has made significant gains in speed. For the vast majority of workloads, it is two times faster with the same level of intelligence as Anthropic’s most performant models, Claude 2 and Claude 2.1. This combination of speed and skill makes Claude 3 Sonnet the clear choice for tasks that require intelligent tasks demanding rapid responses, like knowledge retrieval or sales automation. This includes use cases like content generation, classification, data extraction, and research and retrieval or accurate searching over knowledge bases.

Increased steerability – Increased steerability of AI systems gives users more control over outputs and delivers predictable, higher-quality outcomes. It is significantly less likely to refuse to answer questions that border on the system’s guardrails to prevent harmful outputs. Claude 3 Sonnet is easier to steer and better at following directions in popular structured output formats like JSON—making it simpler for developers to build enterprise and frontier applications. This is particularly important in enterprise use cases such as autonomous vehicles, health and medical diagnoses, and algorithmic decision-making in sensitive domains such as financial services.

Image-to-text vision capabilities – Claude 3 offers vision capabilities that can process images and return text outputs. It is extremely capable at analyzing and understanding charts, graphs, technical diagrams, reports, and other visual assets. Claude 3 Sonnet achieves comparable performance to other best-in-class models with image processing capabilities, while maintaining a significant speed advantage.

Expanded language support – Claude 3 has improved understanding and responding in languages other than English, such as French, Japanese, and Spanish. This expanded language coverage allows Claude 3 Sonnet to better serve multinational corporations requiring AI services across different geographies and languages, as well as businesses requiring nuanced translation services. Claude 3 Sonnet is also stronger at coding and mathematics, as evidenced by Anthropic’s scores in evaluations such as grade-school math problems (GSM8K and Hendrycks) and Codex (HumanEval).

To learn more about Claude 3 Sonnet’s features and capabilities, visit Anthropic’s Claude on Amazon Bedrock and Anthropic Claude model in the AWS documentation.

Get started with Anthropic’s Claude 3 Sonnet in Amazon Bedrock
If you are new to using Anthropic models, go to the Amazon Bedrock console and choose Model access on the bottom left pane. Request access separately for Claude 3 Sonnet.

To test Claude 3 Sonnet in the console, choose Text or Chat under Playgrounds in the left menu pane. Then choose Select model and select Anthropic as the category and Claude 3 Sonnet as the model.

To test more Claude prompt examples, choose Load examples. You can view and run Claude 3 specific examples, such as advanced Q&A with citations, crafting a design brief, and non-English content generation.

By choosing View API request, you can also access the model via code examples in the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) and AWS SDKs. Here is a sample of the AWS CLI command:

aws bedrock-runtime invoke-model \
--model-id anthropic.claude-3-sonnet-v1:0 \
--body "{\"prompt\":\"Write the test case for uploading the image to Amazon S3 bucket\\nHere are some test cases for uploading an image to an Amazon S3 bucket:\\n\\n1. **Successful Upload Test Case**:\\n   - Test Data:\\n     - Valid image file (e.g., .jpg, .png, .gif)\\n     - Correct S3 bucket name\\n     - Correct AWS credentials (access key and secret access key)\\n   - Steps:\\n     1. Initialize the AWS S3 client with the correct credentials.\\n     2. Open the image file.\\n     3. Upload the image file to the specified S3 bucket.\\n     4. Verify that the upload was successful.\\n   - Expected Result: The image should be successfully uploaded to the S3 bucket.\\n\\n2. **Invalid File Type Test Case**:\\n   - Test Data:\\n     - Invalid file type (e.g., .txt, .pdf, .docx)\\n     - Correct S3 bucket name\\n     - Correct AWS credentials\\n   - Steps:\\n     1. Initialize the AWS S3 client with the correct credentials.\\n     2. Open the invalid file type.\\n     3. Attempt to upload the file to the specified S3 bucket.\\n     4. Verify that an appropriate error or exception is raised.\\n   - Expected Result: The upload should fail with an error or exception indicating an invalid file type.\\n\\nThese test cases cover various scenarios, including successful uploads, invalid file types, invalid bucket names, invalid AWS credentials, large file uploads, and concurrent uploads. By executing these test cases, you can ensure the reliability and robustness of your image upload functionality to Amazon S3.\",\"max_tokens_to_sample\":2000,\"temperature\":1,\"top_k\":250,\"top_p\":0.999,\"stop_sequences\":[\"\\n\\nHuman:\"],\"anthropic_version\":\"bedrock-2023-05-31\"}" \
--cli-binary-format raw-in-base64-out \
--region us-east-1 \
invoke-model-output.txt

Upload your image if you want to test image-to-text vision capabilities. I uploaded the featured image of this blog post and received a detailed description of this image.

You can process images via API and return text outputs in English and multiple other languages.

{
  "modelId": "anthropic.claude-3-sonnet-v1:0",
  "contentType": "application/json",
  "accept": "application/json",
  "body": {
    "anthropic_version": "bedrock-2023-05-31",
    "max_tokens": 1000,
    "system": "Please respond only in Spanish.",
    "messages": {
      "role": "user",
      "content": [
        {
          "type": "image",
          "source": {
            "type": "base64",
            "media_type": "image/jpeg",
            "data": "iVBORw..."
          }
        },
        {
          "type": "text",
          "text": "What's in this image?"
        }
      ]
    }
  }
}

To celebrate this launch, Neerav Kingsland, Head of Global Accounts at Anthropic, talks about the power of the Anthropic and AWS partnership.

“Anthropic at its core is a research company that is trying to create the safest large language models in the world, and through Amazon Bedrock we have a change to take that technology, distribute it to users globally, and do this in an extremely safe and data-secure manner.”

Now available
Claude 3 Sonnet is available today in the US East (N. Virginia) and US West (Oregon) Regions; check the full Region list for future updates. The availability of Anthropic’s Claude 3 Opus and Haiku in Amazon Bedrock also will be coming soon.

You will be charged for model inference and customization with the On-Demand and Batch mode, which allows you to use FMs on a pay-as-you-go basis without having to make any time-based term commitments. With the Provisioned Throughput mode, you can purchase model units for a specific base or custom model. To learn more, see Amazon Bedrock Pricing.

Give Anthropic’s Claude 3 Sonnet a try in the Amazon Bedrock console today and send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon Bedrock or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

AWS Weekly Roundup — Happy Lunar New Year, IaC generator, NFL’s digital athlete, AWS Cloud Clubs, and more — February 12, 2024

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-weekly-roundup-happy-lunar-new-year-iac-generator-nfls-digital-athlete-aws-cloud-clubs-and-more-february-12-2024/

Happy Lunar New Year! Wishing you a year filled with joy, success, and endless opportunities! May the Year of the Dragon bring uninterrupted connections and limitless growth 🐉 ☁

In case you missed it, here’s outstanding news you need to know as you plan your year in early 2024.

AWS was named as a Leader in the 2023 Magic Quadrant for Strategic Cloud Platform Services. AWS is the longest-running Magic Quadrant Leader, with Gartner naming AWS a Leader for the thirteenth consecutive year. See Sebastian’s blog post to learn more. AWS has been named a Leader for the ninth consecutive year in the 2023 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Cloud Database Management Systems, and we have been positioned highest for ability to execute by providing a comprehensive set of services for your data foundation across all workloads, use cases, and data types. See Rahul Pathak’s blog post to learn more.

AWS also has been named a Leader in data clean room technology according to the IDC MarketScape: Worldwide Data Clean Room Technology 2024 Vendor Assessment (January 2024). This report evaluated data clean room technology vendors for use cases across industries. See the AWS for Industries Blog channel post to learn more.

Last Week’s Launches
Here are some launches that got my attention:

A new Local Zone in Houston, Texas – Local Zones are an AWS infrastructure deployment that places compute, storage, database, and other select services closer to large population, industry, and IT centers where no AWS Region exists. AWS Local Zones are available in the US in 15 other metro areas and globally in an additional 17 metros areas, allowing you to deliver low-latency applications to end users worldwide. You can enable the new Local Zone in Houston (us-east-1-iah-2a) from the Zones tab in the Amazon EC2 console settings.

AWS CloudFormation IaC generator – You can generate a template using AWS resources provisioned in your account that are not already managed by CloudFormation. With this launch, you can onboard workloads to Infrastructure as Code (IaC) in minutes, eliminating weeks of manual effort. You can then leverage the IaC benefits of automation, safety, and scalability for the workloads. Use the template to import resources into CloudFormation or replicate resources in a new account or Region. See the user guide and blog post to learn more.

A new look-and-feel of Amazon Bedrock console – Amazon Bedrock now offers an enhanced console experience with updated UI improves usability, responsiveness, and accessibility with more seamless support for dark mode. To get started with the new experience, visit the Amazon Bedrock console.

2024-bedrock-visual-refresh

One-click WAF integration on ALB – Application Load Balancer (ALB) now supports console integration with AWS WAF that allows you to secure your applications behind ALB with a single click. This integration enables AWS WAF protections as a first line of defense against common web threats for your applications that use ALB. You can use this one-click security protection provided by AWS WAF from the integrated services section of the ALB console for both new and existing load balancers.

Up to 49% price reduction for AWS Fargate Windows containers on Amazon ECS – Windows containers running on Fargate are now billed per second for infrastructure and Windows Server licenses that their containerized application requests. Along with the infrastructure pricing for on-demand, we are also reducing the minimum billing duration for Windows containers to 5 minutes (from 15 minutes) for any Fargate Windows tasks starting February 1st, 2024 (12:00am UTC). The infrastructure pricing and minimum billing period changes will automatically reflect in your monthly AWS bill. For more information on the specific price reductions, see our pricing page.

Introducing Amazon Data Firehose – We are renaming Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose to Amazon Data Firehose. Amazon Data Firehose is the easiest way to capture, transform, and deliver data streams into Amazon S3, Amazon Redshift, Amazon OpenSearch Service, Splunk, Snowflake, and other 3rd party analytics services. The name change is effective in the AWS Management Console, documentations, and product pages.

AWS Transfer Family integrations with Amazon EventBridge – AWS Transfer Family now enables conditional workflows by publishing SFTP, FTPS, and FTP file transfer events in near real-time, SFTP connectors file transfer event notifications, and Applicability Statement 2 (AS2) transfer operations to Amazon EventBridge. You can orchestrate your file transfer and file-processing workflows in AWS using Amazon EventBridge, or any workflow orchestration service of your choice that integrates with these events.

For a full list of AWS announcements, be sure to keep an eye on the What’s New at AWS page.

Other AWS News
Some other updates and news that you might have missed:

NFL’s digital athlete in the Super Bowl – AWS is working with the National Football League (NFL) to take player health and safety to the next level. Using AI and machine learning, they are creating a precise picture of each player in training, practice, and games. You could see this technology in action, especially with the Super Bowl on the last Sunday!

Amazon’s commiting the responsible AI – On February 7, Amazon joined the U.S. Artificial Intelligence Safety Institute Consortium, established by the National Institute of Standards of Technology (NIST), to further our government and industry collaboration to advance safe and secure artificial intelligence (AI). Amazon will contribute compute credits to help develop tools to evaluate AI safety and help the institute set an interoperable and trusted foundation for responsible AI development and use.

Compliance updates in South Korea – AWS has completed the 2023 South Korea Cloud Service Providers (CSP) Safety Assessment Program, also known as the Regulation on Supervision on Electronic Financial Transactions (RSEFT) Audit Program. AWS is committed to helping our customers adhere to applicable regulations and guidelines, and we help ensure that our financial customers have a hassle-free experience using the cloud. Also, AWS has successfully renewed certification under the Korea Information Security Management System (K-ISMS) standard (effective from December 16, 2023, to December 15, 2026).

Join AWS Cloud Clubs CaptainsAWS Cloud Clubs are student-led user groups for post-secondary level students and independent learners. Interested in founding or co-founding a Cloud Club in your university or region? We are accepting applications from February 5-18, 2024.

Upcoming AWS Events
Check your calendars and sign up for upcoming AWS events:

AWS Innovate AI/ML and Data Edition – Join our free online conference to learn how you and your organization can leverage the latest advances in generative AI. You can register upcoming AWS Innovate Online event that fits your timezone in Asia Pacific & Japan (February 22), EMEA (February 29), and Americas (March 14).

AWS Public Sector events – Join us at the AWS Public Sector Symposium Brussels (March 12) to discover how the AWS Cloud can help you improve resiliency, develop sustainable solutions, and achieve your mission. AWS Public Sector Day London (March 19) gathers professionals from government, healthcare, and education sectors to tackle pressing challenges in United Kingdom public services.

Kicking off AWS Global Summits – AWS Summits are a series of free online and in-person events that bring the cloud computing community together to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS. Below is a list of available AWS Summit events taking place in April:

You can browse all upcoming AWS-led in-person and virtual events, and developer-focused events such as AWS DevDay.

That’s all for this week. Check back next Monday for another Week in Review!

— Channy

This post is part of our Week in Review series. Check back each week for a quick roundup of interesting news and announcements from AWS!

Amazon ECS supports a native integration with Amazon EBS volumes for data-intensive workloads

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-ecs-supports-a-native-integration-with-amazon-ebs-volumes-for-data-intensive-workloads/

Today we are announcing that Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS) supports an integration with Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS), making it easier to run a wider range of data processing workloads. You can provision Amazon EBS storage for your ECS tasks running on AWS Fargate and Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) without needing to manage storage or compute.

Many organizations choose to deploy their applications as containerized packages, and with the introduction of Amazon ECS integration with Amazon EBS, organizations can now run more types of workloads than before.

You can run data workloads requiring storage that supports high transaction volumes and throughput, such as extract, transform, and load (ETL) jobs for big data, which need to fetch existing data, perform processing, and store this processed data for downstream use. Because the storage lifecycle is fully managed by Amazon ECS, you don’t need to build any additional scaffolding to manage infrastructure updates, and as a result, your data processing workloads are now more resilient while simultaneously requiring less effort to manage.

Now you can choose from a variety of storage options for your containerized applications running on Amazon ECS:

  • Your Fargate tasks get 20 GiB of ephemeral storage by default. For applications that need additional storage space to download large container images or for scratch work, you can configure up to 200 GiB of ephemeral storage for your Fargate tasks.
  • For applications that span many tasks that need concurrent access to a shared dataset, you can configure Amazon ECS to mount the Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS) file system to your ECS tasks running on both EC2 and Fargate. Common examples of such workloads include web applications such as content management systems, internal DevOps tools, and machine learning (ML) frameworks. Amazon EFS is designed to be available across a Region and can be simultaneously attached to many tasks.
  • For applications that need high-performance, low-cost storage that does not need to be shared across tasks, you can configure Amazon ECS to provision and attach Amazon EBS storage to your tasks running on both Amazon EC2 and Fargate. Amazon EBS is designed to provide block storage with low latency and high performance within an Availability Zone.

To learn more, see Using data volumes in Amazon ECS tasks and persistent storage best practices in the AWS documentation.

Getting started with EBS volume integration to your ECS tasks
You can configure the volume mount point for your container in the task definition and pass Amazon EBS storage requirements for your Amazon ECS task at runtime. For most use cases, you can get started by simply providing the size of the volume needed for the task. Optionally, you can configure all EBS volume attributes and the file system you want the volume formatted with.

1. Create a task definition
Go to the Amazon ECS console, navigate to Task definitions, and choose Create new task definition.

In the Storage section, choose Configure at deployment to set EBS volume as a new configuration type. You can provision and attach one volume per task for Linux file systems.

When you choose Configure at task definition creation, you can configure existing storage options such as bind mounts, Docker volumes, EFS volumes, Amazon FSx for Windows File Server volumes, or Fargate ephemeral storage.

Now you can select a container in the task definition, the source EBS volume, and provide a mount path where the volume will be mounted in the task.

You can also use $aws ecs register-task-definition --cli-input-json file://example.json command line to register a task definition to add an EBS volume. The following snippet is a sample, and task definitions are saved in JSON format.

{
    "family": "nginx"
    ...
    "containerDefinitions": [
        {
            ...
            "mountPoints": [
                "containerPath": "/foo",
                "sourceVoumne": "new-ebs-volume"
            ],
            "name": "nginx",
            "image": "nginx"
        }
    ],
    "volumes": [
       {
           "name": "/foo",
           "configuredAtRuntime": true
       }
    ]
}

2. Deploy and run your task with EBS volume
Now you can run a task by selecting your task in your ECS cluster. Go to your ECS cluster and choose Run new task. Note that you can select the compute options, the launch type, and your task definition.

Note: While this example goes through deploying a standalone task with an attached EBS volume, you can also configure a new or existing ECS service to use EBS volumes with the desired configuration.

You have a new Volume section where you can configure the additional storage. The volume name, type, and mount points are those that you defined in your task definition. Choose your EBS volume types, sizes (GiB), IOPs, and the desired throughput.

You cannot attach an existing EBS volume to an ECS task. But if you want to create a volume from an existing snapshot, you have the option to choose your snapshot ID. If you want to create a new volume, then you can leave this field empty. You can choose the file system type, either ext3 or ext4 file systems on Linux.

By default, when a task is terminated, Amazon ECS deletes the attached volume. If you need the data in the EBS volume to be retained after the task exits, check Delete on termination. Also, you need to create an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) role for volume management that contains the relevant permissions to allow Amazon ECS to make API calls on your behalf. For more information on this policy, see infrastructure role in the AWS documentation.

You can also configure encryption on your EBS volumes using either Amazon managed keys and customer managed keys. To learn more about the options, see our Amazon EBS encryption in the AWS documentation.

After configuring all task settings, choose Create to start your task.

3. Deploy and run your task with EBS volume
Once your task has started, you can see the volume information on the task definition details page. Choose a task and select the Volumes tab to find your created EBS volume details.

Your team can organize the development and operations of EBS volumes more efficiently. For example, application developers can configure the path where your application expects storage to be available in the task definition, and DevOps engineers can configure the actual EBS volume attributes at runtime when the application is deployed.

This allows DevOps engineers to deploy the same task definition to different environments with differing EBS volume configurations, for example, gp3 volumes in the development environments and io2 volumes in production.

Now available
Amazon ECS integration with Amazon EBS is available in nine AWS Regions: US East (Ohio), US East (N. Virginia), US West (Oregon), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Europe (Frankfurt), Europe (Ireland), and Europe (Stockholm). You only pay for what you use, including EBS volumes and snapshots. To learn more, see the Amazon EBS pricing page and Amazon EBS volumes in ECS in the AWS documentation.

Give it a try now and send feedback to our public roadmap, AWS re:Post for Amazon ECS, or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

P.S. Special thanks to Maish Saidel-Keesing, a senior enterprise developer advocate at AWS for his contribution in writing this blog post.

Happy New Year! AWS Weekly Roundup – January 8, 2024

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/happy-new-year-aws-weekly-roundup-january-8-2024/

Happy New Year! Cloud technologies, machine learning, and generative AI have become more accessible, impacting nearly every aspect of our lives. Amazon CTO Dr. Werner Vogels offers four tech predictions for 2024 and beyond:

  • Generative AI becomes culturally aware
  • FemTech finally takes off
  • AI assistants redefine developer productivity
  • Education evolves to match the speed of technology

Read how these technology trends will converge to help solve some of society’s most difficult problems. Download the Werner Vogels’ Tech Predictions for 2024 and Beyond ebook or read Werner’s All Things Distributed blog.

AWS re:Invent 2023To hear insights from AWS and industry thought leaders, grow your skills, and get inspired, watch AWS re:Invent 2023 videos on demand for keynotes, innovation talks, breakout sessions, and AWS Hero guide playlists.

Launches from the last few weeks
Since our last week in review on December 18, 2023, I’d like to highlight some launches from year end, as well as last week:

New AWS Canada West (Calgary) Region – We are opening a new and second Region and in Canada, AWS Canada West (Calgary). At the end of 2023, AWS had 33 AWS Regions and 105 Availability Zones (AZs) globally. We preannounced 12 additional AZs in four future Regions in Malaysia, New Zealand, Thailand, and the AWS European Sovereign Cloud. We will share more information on these Regions in 2024. Please stay tuned.

DNS over HTTPS in Amazon Route 53 Resolver – You can use the DNS over HTTPS (DoH) protocol for both inbound and outbound Route 53 Resolver endpoints. As the name suggests, DoH supports HTTP or HTTP/2 over TLS to encrypt the data exchanged for Domain Name System (DNS) resolutions.

Automatic enrollment to Amazon RDS Extended Support – Your MySQL 5.7 and PostgreSQL 11 database instances running on Amazon Aurora and Amazon RDS will be automatically enrolled into Amazon RDS Extended Support starting on February 29, 2024. You can have more control over when you want to upgrade the major version of your database after the community end of life (EoL).

New Amazon CloudWatch Network Monitor – This is a new feature of Amazon CloudWatch that helps monitor network availability and performance between AWS and your on-premises environments. Network Monitor needs zero manual instrumentation and gives you access to real-time network visibility to proactively and quickly identify issues within the AWS network and your own hybrid environment. For more information, read Monitor hybrid connectivity with Amazon CloudWatch Network Monitor.

Amazon Aurora PostgreSQL integrations with Amazon Bedrock – You can use two methods to integrate Aurora PostgreSQL databases with Amazon Bedrock to power generative AI applications. You can use the SQL query with Aurora ML integration with Amazon Bedrock and Aurora vector store with Knowledge Bases for Amazon Bedrock for Retrieval Augmented Generation (RAG).

New WordPress setup on Amazon Lightsail – Set up your WordPress website on Amazon Lightsail with the new workflow to eliminate complexity and time spent configuring your website. The workflow allows you to complete all the necessary steps, including setting up a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate to secure your website with HTTPS.

For a full list of AWS announcements, be sure to keep an eye on the What’s New at AWS page.

Other AWS News
Here are some other news items that you may find interesting in the new year:

Book recommendations for AWS customer executives – Plan for the new year and catch up on what others are doing and thinking. AWS Enterprise Strategy team recommends what books are most important for our AWS customer executives to read.

Best practices for scaling AWS CDK adoption with Platform Engineering – A recent evolution in DevOps is the introduction of platform engineering teams to build services, toolchains, and documentation to support workload teams. This blog post introduces strategies and best practices for accelerating CDK adoption within your organization. You can learn how to scale the lessons learned from the pilot project across your organization through platform engineering.

High performance running HPC applications on AWS Graviton instances – When running the Parallel Lattice Boltzmann Solver (Palabos) on Amazon EC2 Hpc7g instances to solve computational fluid dynamics (CFD) problems, performance increased by up to 70% and price performance was up to 3x better than on the previous generation of Graviton instances.

The new AWS open source newsletter, #181 – Check up on all the latest open source content, which this week includes AWS Amplify, Amazon Corretto, dbt, Apache Flink, Karpenter, LangChain, Pinecone, and more.

Upcoming AWS Events
Check your calendars and sign up for these AWS events in the new year:

AWS at CES 2024 (January 9-12) – AWS will be representing some of the latest cloud services and solutions that are purpose built for the automotive, mobility, transportation, and manufacturing industries. Join us to learn about the latest cloud capabilities across generative AI, software define vehicles, product engineering, sustainability, new digital customer experiences, connected mobility, autonomous driving, and so much more in Amazon Experience Area.

APJ Builders Online Series (January 18) – This online conference is designed for you to learn core AWS concepts, and step-by-step architectural best practices, including demonstrations to help you get started and accelerate your success on AWS.

You can browse all upcoming AWS-led in-person and virtual events, and developer-focused events such as AWS DevDay.

That’s all for this week. Check back next Monday for another Week in Review!

— Channy

This post is part of our Week in Review series. Check back each week for a quick roundup of interesting news and announcements from AWS!

Your MySQL 5.7 and PostgreSQL 11 databases will be automatically enrolled into Amazon RDS Extended Support

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/your-mysql-5-7-and-postgresql-11-databases-will-be-automatically-enrolled-into-amazon-rds-extended-support/

Today, we are announcing that your MySQL 5.7 and PostgreSQL 11 database instances running on Amazon Aurora and Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) will be automatically enrolled into Amazon RDS Extended Support starting on February 29, 2024.

This will help avoid unplanned downtime and compatibility issues that can arise with automatically upgrading to a new major version. This provides you with more control over when you want to upgrade the major version of your database.

This automatic enrollment may mean that you will experience higher charges when RDS Extended Support begins. You can avoid these charges by upgrading your database to a newer DB version before the start of RDS Extended Support.

What is Amazon RDS Extended Support?
In September 2023, we announced Amazon RDS Extended Support, which allows you to continue running your database on a major engine version past its RDS end of standard support date on Amazon Aurora or Amazon RDS at an additional cost.

Until community end of life (EoL), the MySQL and PostgreSQL open source communities manage common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE) identification, patch generation, and bug fixes for the respective engines. The communities release a new minor version every quarter containing these security patches and bug fixes until the database major version reaches community end of life. After the community end of life date, CVE patches or bug fixes are no longer available and the community considers those engines unsupported. For example, MySQL 5.7 and PostgreSQL 11 are no longer supported by the communities as of October and November 2023 respectively. We are grateful to the communities for their continued support of these major versions and a transparent process and timeline for transitioning to the newest major version.

With RDS Extended Support, Amazon Aurora and RDS takes on engineering the critical CVE patches and bug fixes for up to three years beyond a major version’s community EoL. For those 3 years, Amazon Aurora and RDS will work to identify CVEs and bugs in the engine, generate patches and release them to you as quickly as possible. Under RDS Extended Support, we will continue to offer support, such that the open source community’s end of support for an engine’s major version does not leave your applications exposed to critical security vulnerabilities or unresolved bugs.

You might wonder why we are charging for RDS Extended Support rather than providing it as part of the RDS service. It’s because the engineering work for maintaining security and functionality of community EoL engines requires AWS to invest developer resources for critical CVE patches and bug fixes. This is why RDS Extended Support is only charging customers who need the additional flexibility to stay on a version past community EoL.

RDS Extended Support may be useful to help you meet your business requirements for your applications if you have particular dependencies on a specific MySQL or PostgreSQL major version, such as compatibility with certain plugins or custom features. If you are currently running on-premises database servers or self-managed Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instances, you can migrate to Amazon Aurora MySQL-Compatible Edition, Amazon Aurora PostgreSQL-Compatible Edition, Amazon RDS for MySQL, Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL beyond the community EoL date, and continue to use these versions these versions with RDS Extended Support while benefiting from a managed service. If you need to migrate many databases, you can also utilize RDS Extended Support to split your migration into phases, ensuring a smooth transition without overwhelming IT resources.

In 2024, RDS Extended Support will be available for RDS for MySQL major versions 5.7 and higher, RDS for PostgreSQL major versions 11 and higher, Aurora MySQL-compatible version 2 and higher, and Aurora PostgreSQL-compatible version 11 and higher. For a list of all future supported versions, see Supported MySQL major versions on Amazon RDS and Amazon Aurora major versions in the AWS documentation.

Community major version RDS/Aurora version Community end of life date End of RDS standard support date Start of RDS Extended Support pricing End of RDS Extended Support
MySQL 5.7 RDS for MySQL 5.7 October 2023 February 29, 2024 March 1, 2024 February 28, 2027
Aurora MySQL 2 October 31, 2024 December 1, 2024
PostgreSQL 11 RDS for PostgreSQL 11 November 2023 March 31, 2024 April 1, 2024 March 31, 2027
Aurora PostgreSQL 11 February 29, 2024

RDS Extended Support is priced per vCPU per hour. Learn more about pricing details and timelines for RDS Extended Support at Amazon Aurora pricing, RDS for MySQL pricing, and RDS for PostgreSQL pricing. For more information, see the blog posts about Amazon RDS Extended Support for MySQL and PostgreSQL databases in the AWS Database Blog.

Why are we automatically enrolling all databases to Amazon RDS Extended Support?
We had originally informed you that RDS Extended Support would provide the opt-in APIs and console features in December 2023. In that announcement, we said that if you decided not to opt your database in to RDS Extended Support, it would automatically upgrade to a newer engine version starting on March 1, 2024. For example, you would be upgraded from Aurora MySQL 2 or RDS for MySQL 5.7 to Aurora MySQL 3 or RDS for MySQL 8.0 and from Aurora PostgreSQL 11 or RDS for PostgreSQL 11 to Aurora PostgreSQL 15 and RDS for PostgreSQL 15, respectively.

However, we heard lots of feedback from customers that these automatic upgrades may cause their applications to experience breaking changes and other unpredictable behavior between major versions of community DB engines. For example, an unplanned major version upgrade could introduce compatibility issues or downtime if applications are not ready for MySQL 8.0 or PostgreSQL 15.

Automatic enrollment in RDS Extended Support gives you additional time and more control to organize, plan, and test your database upgrades on your own timeline, providing you flexibility on when to transition to new major versions while continuing to receive critical security and bug fixes from AWS.

If you’re worried about increased costs due to automatic enrollment in RDS Extended Support, you can avoid RDS Extended Support and associated charges by upgrading before the end of RDS standard support.

How to upgrade your database to avoid RDS Extended Support charges
Although RDS Extended Support helps you schedule your upgrade on your own timeline, sticking with older versions indefinitely means missing out on the best price-performance for your database workload and incurring additional costs from RDS Extended Support.

MySQL 8.0 on Aurora MySQL, also known as Aurora MySQL 3, unlocks support for popular Aurora features, such as Global Database, Amazon RDS Proxy, Performance Insights, Parallel Query, and Serverless v2 deployments. Upgrading to RDS for MySQL 8.0 provides features including up to three times higher performance versus MySQL 5.7, such as Multi-AZ cluster deployments, Optimized Reads, Optimized Writes, and support for AWS Graviton2 and Graviton3-based instances.

PostgreSQL 15 on Aurora PostgreSQL supports the Aurora I/O Optimized configuration, Aurora Serverless v2, Babelfish for Aurora PostgreSQL, pgvector extension, Trusted Language Extensions for PostgreSQL (TLE), and AWS Graviton3-based instances as well as community enhancements. Upgrading to RDS for PostgreSQL 15 provides features such as Multi-AZ DB cluster deployments, RDS Optimized Reads, HypoPG extension, pgvector extension, TLEs for PostgreSQL, and AWS Graviton3-based instances.

Major version upgrades may make database changes that are not backward-compatible with existing applications. You should manually modify your database instance to upgrade to the major version. It is strongly recommended that you thoroughly test any major version upgrade on non-production instances before applying it to production to ensure compatibility with your applications. For more information about an in-place upgrade from MySQL 5.7 to 8.0, see the incompatibilities between the two versions, Aurora MySQL in-place major version upgrade, and RDS for MySQL upgrades in the AWS documentation. For the in-place upgrade from PostgreSQL 11 to 15, you can use the pg_upgrade method.

To minimize downtime during upgrades, we recommend using Fully Managed Blue/Green Deployments in Amazon Aurora and Amazon RDS. With just a few steps, you can use Amazon RDS Blue/Green Deployments to create a separate, synchronized, fully managed staging environment that mirrors the production environment. This involves launching a parallel green environment with upper version replicas of your production databases lower version. After validating the green environment, you can shift traffic over to it. Then, the blue environment can be decommissioned. To learn more, see Blue/Green Deployments for Aurora MySQL and Aurora PostgreSQL or Blue/Green Deployments for RDS for MySQL and RDS for PostgreSQL in the AWS documentation. In most cases, Blue/Green Deployments are the best option to reduce downtime, except for limited cases in Amazon Aurora or Amazon RDS.

For more information on performing a major version upgrade in each DB engine, see the following guides in the AWS documentation.

Now available
Amazon RDS Extended Support is now available for all customers running Amazon Aurora and Amazon RDS instances using MySQL 5.7, PostgreSQL 11, and higher major versions in AWS Regions, including the AWS GovCloud (US) Regions beyond the end of the standard support date in 2024. You don’t need to opt in to RDS Extended Support, and you get the flexibility to upgrade your databases and continued support for up to 3 years.

Learn more about RDS Extended Support in the Amazon Aurora User Guide and the Amazon RDS User Guide. For pricing details and timelines for RDS Extended Support, see Amazon Aurora pricing, RDS for MySQL pricing, and RDS for PostgreSQL pricing.

Please send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon RDS and Amazon Aurora or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

New for AWS Amplify – Query MySQL and PostgreSQL database for AWS CDK

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-for-aws-amplify-query-mysql-and-postgresql-database-for-aws-cdk/

Today we are announcing the general availability to connect and query your existing MySQL and PostgreSQL databases with support for AWS Cloud Development Kit (AWS CDK), a new feature to create a real-time, secure GraphQL API for your relational database within or outside Amazon Web Services (AWS). You can now generate the entire API for all relational database operations with just your database endpoint and credentials. When your database schema changes, you can run a command to apply the latest table schema changes.

In 2021, we announced AWS Amplify GraphQL Transformer version 2, enabling developers to develop more feature-rich, flexible, and extensible GraphQL-based app backends even with minimal cloud expertise. This new GraphQL Transformer was redesigned from the ground up to generate extensible pipeline resolvers to route a GraphQL API request, apply business logic, such as authorization, and communicate with the underlying data source, such as Amazon DynamoDB.

However, customers wanted to use relational database sources for their GraphQL APIs such as their Amazon RDS or Amazon Aurora databases in addition to Amazon DynamoDB. You can now use @model types of Amplify GraphQL APIs for both relational database and DynamoDB data sources. Relational database information is generated to a separate schema.sql.graphql file. You can continue to use the regular schema.graphql files to create and manage DynamoDB-backed types.

When you simply provide any MySQL or PostgreSQL database information, whether behind a virtual private cloud (VPC) or publicly accessible on the internet, AWS Amplify automatically generates a modifiable GraphQL API that securely connects to your database tables and exposes create, read, update, or delete (CRUD) queries and mutations. You can also rename your data models to be more idiomatic for the frontend. For example, a database table is called “todos” (plural, lowercase) but is exposed as “ToDo” (singular, PascalCase) to the client.

With one line of code, you can add any of the existing Amplify GraphQL authorization rules to your API, making it seamless to build use cases such as owner-based authorization or public read-only patterns. Because the generated API is built on AWS AppSync‘ GraphQL capabilities, secure real-time subscriptions are available out of the box. You can subscribe to any CRUD events from any data model with a few lines of code.

Getting started with your MySQL database in AWS CDK
The AWS CDK lets you build reliable, scalable, cost-effective applications in the cloud with the considerable expressive power of a programming language. To get started, install the AWS CDK on your local machine.

$ npm install -g aws-cdk

Run the following command to verify the installation is correct and print the version number of the AWS CDK.

$ cdk –version

Next, create a new directory for your app:

$ mkdir amplify-api-cdk
$ cd amplify-api-cdk

Initialize a CDK app by using the cdk init command.

$ cdk init app --language typescript

Install Amplify’s GraphQL API construct in the new CDK project:

$ npm install @aws-amplify/graphql-api-construct

Open the main stack file in your CDK project (usually located in lib/<your-project-name>-stack.ts). Import the necessary constructs at the top of the file:

import {
    AmplifyGraphqlApi,
    AmplifyGraphqlDefinition
} from '@aws-amplify/graphql-api-construct';

Generate a GraphQL schema for a new relational database API by executing the following SQL statement on your MySQL database. Make sure to output the results to a .csv file, including column headers, and replace <database-name> with the name of your database, schema, or both.

SELECT
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.TABLE_NAME,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.COLUMN_NAME,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.COLUMN_DEFAULT,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.ORDINAL_POSITION,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.DATA_TYPE,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.COLUMN_TYPE,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.IS_NULLABLE,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.STATISTICS.INDEX_NAME,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.STATISTICS.NON_UNIQUE,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.STATISTICS.SEQ_IN_INDEX,
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.STATISTICS.NULLABLE
      FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
      LEFT JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.STATISTICS ON INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.TABLE_NAME=INFORMATION_SCHEMA.STATISTICS.TABLE_NAME AND INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.COLUMN_NAME=INFORMATION_SCHEMA.STATISTICS.COLUMN_NAME
      WHERE INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS.TABLE_SCHEMA = '<database-name>';

Run the following command, replacing <path-schema.csv> with the path to the .csv file created in the previous step.

$ npx @aws-amplify/cli api generate-schema \
    --sql-schema <path-to-schema.csv> \
    --engine-type mysql –out lib/schema.sql.graphql

You can open schema.sql.graphql file to see the imported data model from your MySQL database schema.

input AMPLIFY {
     engine: String = "mysql"
     globalAuthRule: AuthRule = {allow: public}
}

type Meals @model {
     id: Int! @primaryKey
     name: String!
}

type Restaurants @model {
     restaurant_id: Int! @primaryKey
     address: String!
     city: String!
     name: String!
     phone_number: String!
     postal_code: String!
     ...
}

If you haven’t already done so, go to the Parameter Store in the AWS Systems Manager console and create a parameter for the connection details of your database, such as hostname/url, database name, port, username, and password. These will be required in the next step for Amplify to successfully connect to your database and perform GraphQL queries or mutations against it.

In the main stack class, add the following code to define a new GraphQL API. Replace the dbConnectionConfg options with the parameter paths created in the previous step.

new AmplifyGraphqlApi(this, "MyAmplifyGraphQLApi", {
  apiName: "MySQLApi",
  definition: AmplifyGraphqlDefinition.fromFilesAndStrategy(
    [path.join(__dirname, "schema.sql.graphql")],
    {
      name: "MyAmplifyGraphQLSchema",
      dbType: "MYSQL",
      dbConnectionConfig: {
        hostnameSsmPath: "/amplify-cdk-app/hostname",
        portSsmPath: "/amplify-cdk-app/port",
        databaseNameSsmPath: "/amplify-cdk-app/database",
        usernameSsmPath: "/amplify-cdk-app/username",
        passwordSsmPath: "/amplify-cdk-app/password",
      },
    }
  ),
  authorizationModes: { apiKeyConfig: { expires: cdk.Duration.days(7) } },
  translationBehavior: { sandboxModeEnabled: true },
});

This configuration assums that your database is accessible from the internet. Also, the default authorization mode is set to Api Key for AWS AppSync and the sandbox mode is enabled to allow public access on all models. This is useful for testing your API before adding more fine-grained authorization rules.

Finally, deploy your GraphQL API to AWS Cloud.

$ cdk deploy

You can now go to the AWS AppSync console and find your created GraphQL API.

Choose your project and the Queries menu. You can see newly created GraphQL APIs compatible with your tables of MySQL database, such as getMeals to get one item or listRestaurants to list all items.

For example, when you select items with fields of address, city, name, phone_number, and so on, you can see a new GraphQL query. Choose the Run button and you can see the query results from your MySQL database.

When you query your MySQL database, you can see the same results.

How to customize your GraphQL schema for your database
To add a custom query or mutation in your SQL, open the generated schema.sql.graphql file and use the @sql(statement: "") pass in parameters using the :<variable> notation.

type Query {
     listRestaurantsInState(state: String): Restaurants @sql("SELECT * FROM Restaurants WHERE state = :state;”)
}

For longer, more complex SQL queries, you can reference SQL statements in the customSqlStatements config option. The reference value must match the name of a property mapped to a SQL statement. In the following example, a searchPosts property on customSqlStatements is being referenced:

type Query {
      searchPosts(searchTerm: String): [Post]
      @sql(reference: "searchPosts")
}

Here is how the SQL statement is mapped in the API definition.

new AmplifyGraphqlApi(this, "MyAmplifyGraphQLApi", { 
    apiName: "MySQLApi",
    definition: AmplifyGraphqlDefinition.fromFilesAndStrategy( [path.join(__dirname, "schema.sql.graphql")],
    {
        name: "MyAmplifyGraphQLSchema",
        dbType: "MYSQL",
        dbConnectionConfig: {
        //	...ssmPaths,
     }, customSqlStatements: {
        searchPosts: // property name matches the reference value in schema.sql.graphql 
        "SELECT * FROM posts WHERE content LIKE CONCAT('%', :searchTerm, '%');",
     },
    }
  ),
//...
});

The SQL statement will be executed as if it were defined inline in the schema. The same rules apply in terms of using parameters, ensuring valid SQL syntax, and matching return types. Using a reference file keeps your schema clean and allows the reuse of SQL statements across fields. It is best practice for longer, more complicated SQL queries.

Or you can change a field and model name using the @refersTo directive. If you don’t provide the @refersTo directive, AWS Amplify assumes that the model name and field name exactly match the database table and column names.

type Todo @model @refersTo(name: "todos") {
     content: String
     done: Boolean
}

When you want to create relationships between two database tables, use the @hasOne and @hasMany directives to establish a 1:1 or 1:M relationship. Use the @belongsTo directive to create a bidirectional relationship back to the relationship parent. For example, you can make a 1:M relationship between a restaurant and its meals menus.

type Meals @model {
     id: Int! @primaryKey
     name: String!
     menus: [Restaurants] @hasMany(references: ["restaurant_id"])
}

type Restaurants @model {
     restaurant_id: Int! @primaryKey
     address: String!
     city: String!
     name: String!
     phone_number: String!
     postal_code: String!
     meals: Meals @belongsTo(references: ["restaurant_id"])
     ...
}

Whenever you make any change to your GraphQL schema or database schema in your DB instances, you should deploy your changes to the cloud:

Whenever you make any change to your GraphQL schema or database schema in your DB instances, you should re-run the SQL script and export to .csv step mentioned earlier in this guide to re-generate your schema.sql.graphql file and then deploy your changes to the cloud:

$ cdk deploy

To learn more, see Connect API to existing MySQL or PostgreSQL database in the AWS Amplify documentation.

Now available
The relational database support for AWS Amplify now works with any MySQL and PostgreSQL databases hosted anywhere within Amazon VPC or even outside of AWS Cloud.

Give it a try and send feedback to AWS re:Post for AWS Amplify, the GitHub repository of Amplify GraphQL API, or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

P.S. Specially thanks to René Huangtian Brandel, a principal product manager at AWS for his contribution to write sample codes.

New myApplications in the AWS Management Console simplifies managing your application resources

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-myapplications-in-the-aws-management-console-simplifies-managing-your-application-resources/

Today, we are announcing the general availability of myApplications supporting application operations, a new set of capabilities that help you get started with your applications on AWS, operate them with less effort, and move faster at scale. With myApplication in the AWS Management Console, you can more easily manage and monitor the cost, health, security posture, and performance of your applications on AWS.

The myApplications experience is available in the Console Home, where you can access an Applications widget that lists the applications in an account. Now, you can create your applications more easily using the Create application wizard, connecting resources in your AWS account from one view in the console. The created application will automatically display in myApplications, and you can take action on your applications.

When you choose your application in the Applications widget in the console, you can see an at-a-glance view of key application metrics widgets in the applications dashboard. Here you can find, debug operational issues, and optimize your applications.

With a single action on the applications dashboard, you can dive deeper to act on specific resources in the relevant services, such as Amazon CloudWatch for application performance, AWS Cost Explorer for cost and usage, and AWS Security Hub for security findings.

Getting started with myApplications
To get started, on the AWS Management Console Home, choose Create application in the Applications widget. In the first step, input your application name and description.

In the next step, you can add your resources. Before you can search and add resources, you should turn on and set up AWS Resource Explorer, a managed capability that simplifies the search and discovery of your AWS resources across AWS Regions.

Choose Add resources and select the resources to add to your applications. You can also search by keyword, tag, or AWS CloudFormation stack to integrate groups of resources to manage the full lifecycle of your application.

After confirming, your resources are added, new awsApplication tags applied, and the myApplications dashboard will be automatically generated.

Now, let’s see which widgets can be useful.

The Application summary widget displays the name, description, and tag so you know which application you are working on. The Cost and usage widget visualizes your AWS resource costs and usage from AWS Cost Explorer, including the application’s current and forecasted month-end costs, top five billed services, and a monthly application resource cost trend chart. You can monitor spend, look for anomalies, and click to take action where needed.

The Compute widget summarizes of application compute resources, information about which are in alarm, and trend charts from CloudWatch showing basic metrics such as Amazon EC2 instance CPU utilization and AWS Lambda invocations. You also can assess application operations, look for anomalies, and take action.

The Monitoring and Operations widget displays alarms and alerts for resources associated with your application, service level objectives (SLOs), and standardized application performance metrics from CloudWatch Application Signals. You can monitor ongoing issues, assess trends, and quickly identify and drill down on any issues that might impact your application.

The Security widget shows the highest priority security findings identified by AWS Security Hub. Findings are listed by severity and service, so you can monitor their security posture and click to take action where needed.

The DevOps widget summarizes operational insights from AWS System Manager Application Manager, such as fleet management, state management, patch management, and configuration management status so you can assess compliance and take action.

You can also use the Tagging widget to assist you in reviewing and applying tags to your application.

Now available
You can enjoy this new myApplications capability, a new application-centric experience to easily manage and monitor applications on AWS. myApplications capability is available in the following AWS Regions: US East (Ohio, N. Virginia), US West (N. California, Oregon), South America (São Paulo), Asia Pacific (Hyderabad, Jakarta, Mumbai, Osaka, Seoul, Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo), Europe (Frankfurt, Ireland, London, Paris, Stockholm), Middle East (Bahrain) Regions.

AWS Premier Tier Services Partners— Escala24x7, IBM, Tech Mahindra, and Xebia will support application operations with complementary features and services.

Give it a try now in the AWS Management Console and send feedback to AWS re:Post for AWS Management Console, using the feedback link on the myApplications dashboard, or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

Announcing Amazon OpenSearch Service zero-ETL integration with Amazon S3 (preview)

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-opensearch-service-zero-etl-integration-with-amazon-s3-preview/

Today we are announcing a preview of Amazon OpenSearch Service zero-ETL integration with Amazon S3, a new way to query operational logs in Amazon S3 and S3-based data lakes without needing to switch between services. You can now analyze infrequently queried data in cloud object stores and simultaneously use the operational analytics and visualization capabilities of OpenSearch Service.

Amazon OpenSearch Service direct queries with Amazon S3 provides a zero-ETL integration to reduce the operational complexity of duplicating data or managing multiple analytics tools by enabling customers to directly query their operational data, reducing costs and time to action. This zero-ETL integration will be configurable within OpenSearch Service, where you can take advantage of various log type templates, including predefined dashboards, and configure data accelerations tailored to that log type. Templates include VPC Flow Logs, Elastic Load Balancing logs, and NGINX logs, and accelerations include skipping indexes, materialized views, and covered indexes.

With direct queries with Amazon S3, you can perform complex queries critical to security forensic and threat analysis that correlate data across multiple data sources, which aids teams in investigating service downtime and security events. After creating an integration, you can start querying their data directly from the OpenSearch Dashboards or OpenSearch API. You can easily audit connections to ensure that they are set up in a scalable, cost-efficient, and secure way.

Getting started with direct queries with Amazon S3
You can easily get started by creating a new Amazon S3 direct query data source for OpenSearch Service through the AWS Management Console or the API. Each new data source uses AWS Glue Data Catalog to manage tables that represent S3 buckets. Once you create a data source, you can configure Amazon S3 tables and data indexing and query data in OpenSearch Dashboards.

1. Create a data source in OpenSearch Service
Before you create a data source, you should have an OpenSearch Service domain with version 2.11 or later and a target Amazon S3 table in AWS Glue Data Catalog with the appropriate IAM permissions. IAM will need access to the desired S3 bucket(s) and read and write access to AWS Glue Data Catalog. To learn more about IAM prerequisites, see Creating a data source in the AWS documentation.

Go to the OpenSearch Service console and choose the domain you want to set up a new data source for. In the domain details page, choose the Connections tab below the general information and see the Direct Query section.

To create a new data source, choose Create, input the name of your new data source, select the data source type as Amazon S3 with AWS Glue Data Catalog, and choose the IAM role for your data source.

Once you create a data source, you can go to the OpenSearch Dashboards of the domain, which you use to configure access control, define tables, set up log type–based dashboards for popular log types, and query your data.

2. Configuring your data source in OpenSearch Dashboards
To configure data source in OpenSearch Dashboards, choose Configure in the console and go to OpenSearch Dashboards. In the left-hand navigation of OpenSearch Dashboards, under Management, choose Data sources. Under Manage data sources, choose the name of the data source you created in the console.

Direct queries from OpenSearch Service to Amazon S3 use Spark tables within AWS Glue Data Catalog. To create a new table you want to direct query, go to the Query Workbench in the Open Search Plugins menu.

Now run as in the following SQL statement to create http_logs table and run MSCK REPAIR TABLE mys3.default.http_logs command to update the metadata in the catalog

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE IF NOT EXISTS mys3.default.http_logs (
   `@timestamp` TIMESTAMP,
    clientip STRING,
    request STRING, 
    status INT, 
    size INT, 
    year INT, 
    month INT, 
    day INT) 
USING json PARTITIONED BY(year, month, day) OPTIONS (path 's3://mys3/data/http_log/http_logs_partitioned_json_bz2/', compression 'bzip2')

To ensure a fast experience with your data in Amazon S3, you can set up any of three different types of accelerations to index data into OpenSearch Service, such as skipping indexes, materialized views, and covering indexes. To create OpenSearch indexes from external data connections for better performance, choose the Accelerate Table.

  • Skipping indexes allow you to index only the metadata of the data stored in Amazon S3. Skipping indexes help quickly identify data stored by narrowing down a specific location of where the data is stored.
  • Materialized views enable you to use complex queries such as aggregations, which can be used for querying or powering dashboard visualizations. Materialized views ingest data into OpenSearch Service for anomaly detection or geospatial capabilities.
  • Covering indexes will ingest all the data from the specified table column. Covering indexes are the most performant of the three indexing types.

3. Query your data source in OpenSearch Dashboards
After you set up your tables, you can query your data using Discover. You can run a sample SQL query for the http_logs table you created in AWS Glue Data Catalog tables.

To learn more, see Working with Amazon OpenSearch Service direct queries with Amazon S3 in the AWS documentation.

Join the preview
Amazon OpenSearch Service zero-ETL integration with Amazon S3 is now previewed in the AWS US East (Ohio), US East (N. Virginia), US West (Oregon), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Europe (Frankfurt), and Europe (Ireland) Regions.

OpenSearch Service separately charges for only the compute needed as OpenSearch Compute Units to query your external data as well as maintain indexes in OpenSearch Service. For more information, see Amazon OpenSearch Service Pricing.

Give it a try and send feedback to the AWS re:Post for Amazon OpenSearch Service or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

Vector search for Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility) is now generally available

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/vector-search-for-amazon-documentdb-with-mongodb-compatibility-is-now-generally-available/

Today, we are announcing the general availability of vector search for Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility), a new built-in capability that lets you store, index, and search millions of vectors with millisecond response times within your document database.

Vector search is an emerging technique used in machine learning (ML) to find similar data points to given data by comparing their vector representations using distance or similarity metrics. Vectors are numerical representation of unstructured data created from large language models (LLM) hosted in Amazon Bedrock, Amazon SageMaker, and other open source or proprietary ML services. This approach is useful in creating generative artificial intelligence (AI) applications, such as intuitive search, product recommendation, personalization, and chatbots using Retrieval Augmented Generation (RAG) model approach. For example, if your data set contained individual documents for movies, you could semantically search for movies similar to Titanic based on shared context such as “boats”, “tragedy”, or “movies based on true stories” instead of simply matching keywords.

With vector search for Amazon DocumentDB, you can effectively search the database based on nuanced meaning and context without spending time and cost to manage a separate vector database infrastructure. You also benefit from the fully managed, scalable, secure, and highly available JSON-based document database that Amazon DocumentDB provides.

Getting started with vector search on Amazon DocumentDB
The vector search feature is available on your Amazon DocumentDB 5.0 instance-based clusters. To implement a vector search application, you generate vectors using embedding models for fields inside your document and store vectors side by side your source data inside Amazon DocumentDB.

Next, you create a vector index on a vector field that will help retrieve similar vectors and can search the Amazon DocumentDB database using semantic search. Finally, user-submitted queries are converted to vectors using the same embedding model to get semantically similar documents and return them to the client.

Let’s look at how to implement a simple semantic search application using vector search on Amazon DocumentDB.

Step 1. Create vector embeddings using the Amazon Titan Embeddings model
Let’s use the Amazon Titan Embeddings model to create an embedding vector. Amazon Titan Embeddings model is available in Amazon Bedrock, a serverless generative AI service. You can easily access it using a single API and without managing any infrastructure.

prompt = "I love dog and cat."
response = bedrock_runtime.invoke_model(
    body= json.dumps({"inputText": prompt}), 
    modelId='amazon.titan-embed-text-v1', 
    accept='application/json', 
    contentType='application/json'
)
response_body = json.loads(response['body'].read())
embedding = response_body.get('embedding')

The returned vector embedding will look similar to this:

[0.82421875, -0.6953125, -0.115722656, 0.87890625, 0.05883789, -0.020385742, 0.32421875, -0.00078201294, -0.40234375, 0.44140625, ...]

Step 2. Insert vector embeddings and create a vector index
You can add generated vector embeddings using the insertMany( [{},...,{}] ) operation with a list of the documents that you want added to your collection in Amazon DocumentDB.

db.collection.insertMany([
    {sentence: "I love a dog and cat.", vectorField: [0.82421875, -0.6953125,...]},
    {sentence: "My dog is very cute.", vectorField: [0.05883789, -0.020385742,...]},
    {sentence: "I write with a pen.", vectorField: [-0.020385742, 0.32421875,...]},
  ...
]);

You can create a vector index using the createIndex command. Amazon DocumentDB performs an approximate nearest neighbor (ANN) search using the inverted file with flat compression (IVFFLAT) vector index. The feature supports three distance metrics: euclidean, cosine, and inner product. We will use the euclidean distance, a measure of the straight-line distance between two points in space. The smaller the euclidean distance, the closer the vectors are to each other.

db.collection.createIndex (
   { vectorField: "vector" },
   { "name": "index name",
     "vectorOptions": {
        "dimensions": 100, // the number of vector data dimensions
        "similarity": "euclidean", // Or cosine and dotProduct
        "lists": 100 
      }
   }
);

Step 3.  Search vector embeddings from Amazon DocumentDB
You can now search for similar vectors within your documents using a new aggregation pipeline operator within $search. The example code to search “I like pets” is as follows:

db.collection.aggregate ({
  $search: {
    "vectorSearch": {
      "vector": [0.82421875, -0.6953125,...], // Search for ‘I like pets’
      "path": vectorField,
      "k": 5,
      "similarity": "euclidean", // Or cosine and dotProduct
      "probes": 1 // the number of clusters for vector search
      }
     }
   });

This returns search results such as “I love a dog and cat.” which is semantically similar.

To learn more, see Amazon DocumentDB documentation. To see a more practical example—a semantic movie search with Amazon DocumentDB—find the Python source codes and data-sets in the GitHub repository.

Now available
Vector search for Amazon DocumentDB is now available at no additional cost to all customers using Amazon DocumentDB 5.0 instance-based clusters in all AWS Regions where Amazon DocumentDB is available. Standard compute, I/O, storage, and backup charges will apply as you store, index, and search vector embeddings on Amazon DocumentDB.

To learn more, see the Amazon DocumentDB documentation and send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon DocumentDB or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

Vector engine for Amazon OpenSearch Serverless is now available

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/vector-engine-for-amazon-opensearch-serverless-is-now-generally-available/

Today we are announcing the general availability of the vector engine for Amazon OpenSearch Serverless with new features. In July 2023, we introduced the preview release of the vector engine for Amazon OpenSearch Serverless, a simple, scalable, and high-performing similarity search capability. The vector engine makes it easy for you to build modern machine learning (ML) augmented search experiences and generative artificial intelligence (generative AI) applications without needing to manage the underlying vector database infrastructure.

You can now store, update, and search billions of vector embeddings with thousands of dimensions in milliseconds. The highly performant similarity search capability of vector engine enables generative AI-powered applications to deliver accurate and reliable results with consistent milliseconds-scale response times.

The vector engine also enables you to optimize and tune results with hybrid search by combining vector search and full-text search in the same query, removing the need to manage and maintain separate data stores or a complex application stack. The vector engine provides a secure, reliable, scalable, and enterprise-ready platform to cost effectively build a prototyping application and then seamlessly scale to production.

You can now get started in minutes with the vector engine by creating a specialized vector engine–based collection, which is a logical grouping of embeddings that works together to support a workload.

The vector engine uses OpenSearch Compute Units (OCUs), compute capacity unit, to ingest and run similarity search queries. One OCU can handle up to 2 million vectors for 128 dimensions or 500,000 for 768 dimensions at 99 percent recall rate.

The vector engine built on OpenSearch Serverless is a highly available service by default. It requires a minimum of four OCUs (2 OCUs for the ingest, including primary and standby, and 2 OCUs for the search with two active replicas across Availability Zones) for the first collection in an account. All subsequent collections using the same AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) key can share those OCUs.

What’s new at GA?
Since the preview, the vector engine for Amazon OpenSearch Serverless became one of the vector database options in the knowledge base of Amazon Bedrock to build generative AI applications using a Retrieval Augmented Generation (RAG) concept.

Here are some new or improved features for this GA release:

Disable redundant replica (development and test focused) option
As we announced in our preview blog post, this feature eliminates the need to have redundant OCUs in another Availability Zone solely for availability purposes. A collection can be deployed with two OCUs – one for indexing and one for search. This cuts the costs in half compared to default deployment with redundant replicas. The reduced cost makes this configuration suitable and economical for development and testing workloads.

With this option, we will still provide durability guarantees since the vector engine persists all the data in Amazon S3, but single-AZ failures would impact your availability.

If you want to disable a redundant replica, uncheck Enable redundancy when creating a new vector search
collection.

Fractional OCU for the development and test focused option
Support for fractional OCU billing for development and test focused workloads (that is, no redundant replica option) reduces the floor price for vector search collection. The vector engine will initially deploy smaller 0.5 OCUs while providing the same capabilities at lower scale and will scale up to a full OCU and beyond to meet your workload demand. This option will further reduce the monthly costs when experimenting with using the vector engine.

Automatic scaling for a billion scale
With vector engine’s seamless auto-scaling, you no longer have to reindex for scaling purposes. At preview, we were supporting about 20 million vector embeddings. With the general availability of vector engine, we have raised the limits to support a billion vector scale.

Now available
The vector engine for Amazon OpenSearch Serverless is now available in all AWS Regions where Amazon OpenSearch Serverless is available.

To get started, you can refer to the following resources:

Give it a try and send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon OpenSearch Service or through your usual AWS support contacts.

Channy

Amazon Bedrock now provides access to Anthropic’s latest model, Claude 2.1

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-bedrock-now-provides-access-to-anthropics-latest-model-claude-2-1/

Today, we’re announcing the availability of Anthropic’s Claude 2.1 foundation model (FM) in Amazon Bedrock. Last week, Anthropic introduced its latest model, Claude 2.1, delivering key capabilities for enterprises such as an industry-leading 200,000 token context window (2x the context of Claude 2.0), reduced rates of hallucination, improved accuracy over long documents, system prompts, and a beta tool use feature for function calling and workflow orchestration.

With Claude 2.1’s availability in Amazon Bedrock, you can build enterprise-ready generative artificial intelligence (AI) applications using more honest and reliable AI systems from Anthropic. You can now use the Claude 2.1 model provided by Anthropic in the Amazon Bedrock console.

Here are some key highlights about the new Claude 2.1 model in Amazon Bedrock:

200,000 token context window – Enterprise applications demand larger context windows and more accurate outputs when working with long documents such as product guides, technical documentation, or financial or legal statements. Claude 2.1 supports 200,000 tokens, the equivalent of roughly 150,000 words or over 500 pages of documents. When uploading extensive information to Claude, you can summarize, perform Q&A, forecast trends, and compare and contrast multiple documents for drafting business plans and analyzing complex contracts.

Strong accuracy upgrades – Claude 2.1 has also made significant gains in honesty, with a 2x decrease in hallucination rates, 50 percent fewer hallucinations in open-ended conversation and document Q&A, a 30 percent reduction in incorrect answers, and a 3–4 times lower rate of mistakenly concluding that a document supports a particular claim compared to Claude 2.0. Claude increasingly knows what it doesn’t know and will more likely demur rather than hallucinate. With this improved accuracy, you can build more reliable, mission-critical applications for your customers and employees.

System prompts – Claude 2.1 now supports system prompts, a new feature that can improve Claude’s performance in a variety of ways, including greater character depth and role adherence in role-playing scenarios, particularly over longer conversations, as well as stricter adherence to guidelines, rules, and instructions. This represents a structural change, but not a content change from former ways of prompting Claude.

Tool use for function calling and workflow orchestration – Available as a beta feature, Claude 2.1 can now integrate with your existing internal processes, products, and APIs to build generative AI applications. Claude 2.1 accurately retrieves and processes data from additional knowledge sources as well as invokes functions for a given task.  Claude 2.1 can answer questions by searching databases using private APIs and a web search API, translate natural language requests into structured API calls, or connect to product datasets to make recommendations and help customers complete purchases. Access to this feature is currently limited to select early access partners, with plans for open access in the near future. If you are interested in gaining early access, please contact your AWS account team.

To learn more about Claude 2.1’s features and capabilities, visit Anthropic Claude on Amazon Bedrock and the Amazon Bedrock documentation.

Claude 2.1 in action
To get started with Claude 2.1 in Amazon Bedrock, go to the Amazon Bedrock console. Choose Model access on the bottom left pane, then choose Manage model access on the top right side, submit your use case, and request model access to the Anthropic Claude model. It may take several minutes to get access to models. If you already have access to the Claude model, you don’t need to request access separately for Claude 2.1.

To test Claude 2.1 in chat mode, choose Text or Chat under Playgrounds in the left menu pane. Then select Anthropic and then Claude v2.1.

By choosing View API request, you can also access the model via code examples in the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) and AWS SDKs. Here is a sample of the AWS CLI command:

$ aws bedrock-runtime invoke-model \
      --model-id anthropic.claude-v2:1 \
      --body "{\"prompt\":\"Human: \\n\\nHuman: Tell me funny joke about outer space!\n\nAssistant:", "max_tokens_to_sample": 50}' \
      --cli-binary-format raw-in-base64-out \
      invoke-model-output.txt

You can use system prompt engineering techniques provided by the Claude 2.1 model, where you place your inputs and documents before any questions that reference or utilize that content. Inputs can be natural language text, structured documents, or code snippets using <document>, <papers>, <books>, or <code> tags, and so on. You can also use conversational text, such as chat history, and Retrieval Augmented Generation (RAG) results, such as chunked documents.

Here is a system prompt example for support agents to respond to customer questions based on corporate documents.

Here are some documents for you to reference for your task:
<documents>
 <document index="1">
  <document_content>
  (the text content of the document - could be a passage, web page, article, etc)
   </document_content>
<document index="2">
  <source>https://mycompany.repository/userguide/what-is-it.html</source>
</document>
<document index="3">
  <source>https://mycompany.repository/docs/techspec.pdf</source>
 </document>
...
</documents>

You are Larry, and you are a customer advisor with deep knowledge of your company's products. Larry has a great deal of patience with his customers, even when they say nonsense or are sarcastic. Larry's answers are polite but sometimes funny. However, he only answers questions about the company's products and doesn't know much about other questions. Use the provided documentation to answer user questions.

Human: Your product is making a weird stuttering sound when I operate. What might be the problem?

To learn more about prompt engineering on Amazon Bedrock, see the Prompt engineering guidelines included in the Amazon Bedrock documentation. You can learn general prompt techniques, templates, and examples for Amazon Bedrock text models, including Claude.

Now available
Claude 2.1 is available today in the US East (N. Virginia) and US West (Oregon) Regions.

You only pay for what you use, with no time-based term commitments for on-demand mode. For text generation models, you are charged for every input token processed and every output token generated. Or you can choose the provisioned throughput mode to meet your application’s performance requirements in exchange for a time-based term commitment. To learn more, see Amazon Bedrock Pricing.

Give Anthropic Claude 2.1 a try in Amazon Bedrock console today and send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon Bedrock or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

New generative AI capabilities for Amazon DataZone to further simplify data cataloging and discovery (preview)

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-generative-ai-capabilities-for-amazon-datazone-to-further-simplify-data-cataloging-and-discovery-preview/

Today, we are announcing a preview of an automation feature backed by generative artificial intelligence (AI) for Amazon DataZone that will dramatically decrease the amount of time needed to provide context for organizational data. The new feature can automate the traditionally labor-intensive process of data cataloging. Powered by the large language models (LLMs) of Amazon Bedrock, it generates detailed descriptions of data assets and their schemas, and suggests analytical use cases. You can generate a comprehensive business context with a single click.

We heard from customers that data consumers such as data analysts, scientists, and engineers in organizations struggle to understand the data’s relevance with little metadata. As a result, they either spend more time interpreting the data, or they return to data producers with continued questions. So, data producers such as data owners, engineers, and analysts who own the data and make it available for consumers need to manually enter detailed context for higher-priority data to make data shareable and discoverable. This is time-consuming and the number one problem customers have when trying to collate their data in a system for self-service by consumers.

When we launched the general availability of Amazon DataZone in October 2023, we introduced the first feature that brings generative AI capabilities to automate the generation of the table name and column names of a business catalog asset. In the data portal of Amazon DataZone, the green brain icon indicates automatically generated metadata suggestions. You could accept, edit, or reject each suggestion recommended by Amazon DataZone.

What’s new with today’s preview announcement?
Now, in addition to column and table names, you can automatically generate more detailed descriptions of the table and schema, as well as suggested uses.

In the Business Metadata tab in the data portal, when you choose Generate summary, new content will be generated to explain the table and its metadata.

You can also accept, edit, and reject this recommendation.

When you choose the Schema tab, you can also see new Description recommendations as well as the Name. You can review generated metadata and choose to accept, edit, or reject the recommendation.

This new feature will enhance data discoverability and reduce on back-and-forth communications between data consumers and producers. You will have a richer search experience based on extensive data insights in the future.

Join the preview
The new metadata generation ability is now previewed in the AWS US East (N. Virginia) and US West (Oregon) Regions. With this new generative AI capability, you can reduce time-to-insight by accelerating data cataloging and boosting data discovery. To learn more, visit the Amazon DataZone: Automate Data Discovery.

Give it a try and send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon DataZone or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy

Amazon DynamoDB zero-ETL integration with Amazon OpenSearch Service is now available

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-dynamodb-zero-etl-integration-with-amazon-opensearch-service-is-now-generally-available/

Today, we are announcing the general availability of Amazon DynamoDB zero-ETL integration with Amazon OpenSearch Service, which lets you perform a search on your DynamoDB data by automatically replicating and transforming it without custom code or infrastructure. This zero-ETL integration reduces the operational burden and cost involved in writing code for a data pipeline architecture, keeping the data in sync, and updating code with frequent application changes, enabling you to focus on your application.

With this zero-ETL integration, Amazon DynamoDB customers can now use the powerful search features of Amazon OpenSearch Service, such as full-text search, fuzzy search, auto-complete, and vector search for machine learning (ML) capabilities to offer new experiences that boost user engagement and improve satisfaction with their applications.

This zero-ETL integration uses Amazon OpenSearch Ingestion to synchronize the data between Amazon DynamoDB and Amazon OpenSearch Service. You choose the DynamoDB table whose data needs to be synchronized and Amazon OpenSearch Ingestion synchronizes the data to an Amazon OpenSearch managed cluster or serverless collection within seconds of it being available.

You can also specify index mapping templates to ensure that your Amazon DynamoDB fields are mapped to the correct fields in your Amazon OpenSearch Service indexes. Also, you can synchronize data from multiple DynamoDB tables into one Amazon OpenSearch Service managed cluster or serverless collection to offer holistic insights across several applications.

Getting started with this zero-ETL integration
With a few clicks, you can synchronize data from DynamoDB to OpenSearch Service. To create an integration between DynamoDB and OpenSearch Service, choose the Integrations menu in the left pane of the DynamoDB console and the DynamoDB table whose data you want to synchronize.

You must turn on point-in-time recovery (PITR) and the DynamoDB Streams feature. This feature allows you to capture item-level changes in your table and push the changes to a stream. Choose Turn on for PITR and enable DynamoDB Streams in the Exports and streams tab.

After turning on PITR and DynamoDB Stream, choose Create to set up an OpenSearch Ingestion pipeline in your account that replicates the data to an OpenSearch Service managed domain.

In the first step, enter a unique pipeline name and set up pipeline capacity and compute resources to automatically scale your pipeline based on the current ingestion workload.

Now you can configure the pre-defined pipeline configuration in YAML file format. You can browse resources to look up and paste information to build the pipeline configuration. This pipeline is a combination of a source part from DyanmoDB settings and a sink part for OpenSearch Service.

You must set multiple IAM roles (sts_role_arn) with the necessary permissions to read data from the DynamoDB table and write to an OpenSearch domain. This role is then assumed by OpenSearch Ingestion pipelines to ensure that the right security posture is always maintained when moving the data from source to destination. To learn more, see Setting up roles and users in Amazon OpenSearch Ingestion in the AWS documentation.

After entering all required values, you can validate the pipeline configuration to ensure that your configuration is valid. To learn more, see Creating Amazon OpenSearch Ingestion pipelines in the AWS documentation.

Take a few minutes to set up the OpenSearch Ingestion pipeline, and you can see your integration is completed in the DynamoDB table.

Now you can search synchronized items in the OpenSearch Dashboards.

Things to know
Here are a couple of things that you should know about this feature:

  • Custom schema – You can specify your custom data schema along with the index mappings used by OpenSearch Ingestion when writing data from Amazon DynamoDB to OpenSearch Service. This experience is added to the console within Amazon DynamoDB so that you have full control over the format of indices that are created on OpenSearch Service.
  • Pricing – There will be no additional cost to use this feature apart from the cost of the existing underlying components. Note that Amazon OpenSearch Ingestion charges OpenSearch Compute Units (OCUs) which will be used to replicate data between Amazon DynamoDB and Amazon OpenSearch Service. Furthermore, this feature uses Amazon DynamoDB streams for the change data capture (CDC) and you will incur the standard costs for Amazon DynamoDB Streams.
  • Monitoring – You can monitor the state of the pipelines by checking the status of the integration on the DynamoDB console or using the OpenSearch Ingestion dashboard. Additionally, you can use Amazon CloudWatch to provide real-time metrics and logs, which lets you to set up alerts in case of a breach of user-defined thresholds.

Now available
Amazon DynamoDB zero-ETL integration with Amazon OpenSearch Service is now generally available in all AWS Regions where OpenSearch Ingestion is available today.

Channy

Reserve quantum computers, get guidance and cutting-edge capabilities with Amazon Braket Direct

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/reserve-quantum-computers-get-expertise-and-cutting-edge-capabilities-with-amazon-braket-direct/

Today, we are announcing the availability of Braket Direct, a new Amazon Braket program that helps quantum researchers dive deeper into quantum computing. This program lets you get dedicated, private access to the full capacity of various quantum processing units (QPUs) without any queues or wait times, connect with quantum computing specialists to receive expert guidance for your workloads, and get early access to features and devices with limited availability to conduct cutting-edge research on today’s noisy quantum devices.

Since its launch in 2020, Amazon Braket has democratized access to quantum computing by offering on-demand access to various QPUs using shared, public availability windows, where you only pay for the duration of your reservation.

You can now use Braket Direct to reserve the entire dedicated machine for a period of time on IonQ Aria, QuEra Aquila, and Rigetti Aspen-M-3 devices for running your most complex, long-running, time-sensitive workloads, or conducting live events such as training workshops and hackathons, where you pay only for what you reserve.

To further your research, you can now engage directly with Braket’s experts through free office hours or one-on-one, hands-on reservation prep sessions. For deeper research collaborations, you can connect with specialists from quantum hardware providers such as IonQ, Oxford Quantum Circuits, QuEra, Rigetti, or Amazon Quantum Solutions Lab, our dedicated professional services team.

Finally, to truly push the boundaries, you can gain access to experimental capabilities that have limited or reduced availability starting with IonQ’s highest fidelity, 30-qubit Forte device.

Braket Direct expands on our commitment to accelerate research and innovation in quantum computing without requiring any upfront fees or long-term commitments.

Getting started with Braket Direct
To get started, go to the Amazon Braket console and choose Braket Direct in the left pane. You can see new features such as quantum hardware reservation, expert advice and get access to next-generation quantum hardware and features.

1. Request a quantum hardware reservation
To create a reservation, choose Reserve device and select the Device that you would like to reserve. Provide your contact information, including your name and email address, any details about the workload that you would like to execute using your reservation, such as desired reservation length, relevant constraints, and desired schedule.

Braket Direct assures that you have the full capacity of the QPU during your reservation and the predictability that your workloads will execute when your reservation begins.

If you are interested in connecting with a Braket expert for a one-on-one reservation prep session after your reservation is confirmed, you can select that option at no additional cost.

Choose Submit to complete your reservation request. A Braket team member will email you within 2–3 business days, pending request verification. To make the most of your reservation, you can choose to pre-create your tasks and jobs prior to a reservation to maximize use of the time.

To learn more about your quantum tasks and hybrid jobs to execute in a device reservation, see Get started with Braket Direct in the AWS documentation.

2. Get support from quantum computing experts
You can get in touch with quantum experts and get advice about your workload. With Braket office hours, Braket experts can help you go from ideation to execution faster at no additional cost. Explore your device to fit your use case, identify options to make best use of Braket for your algorithm, and get recommendations on how to use certain Braket features like Hybrid Jobs, Braket Pulse, or Analog Hamiltonian Simulation.

To book an upcoming Braket office hours slot, choose Sign up and fill out your contact information, workload details, and any desired discussion topics. You will receive a calendar invitation to the next available slot by email.

To take advantage of experts from quantum hardware providers, choose Connect and browse their professional services listings on AWS Marketplace.

The Amazon Quantum Solutions Lab is a collaborative research and professional services team staffed with quantum computing experts who can assist you in more effectively exploring quantum computing, engaging in quantum research, and assessing the current performance of this technology. To contact the Quantum Solutions Lab, select Connect and fill out contact information and use case details. The team will email you with next steps.

3. Access to cutting-edge capabilities
To move your research quicker, you can get early access to innovative new capabilities. With Braket Direct, you can easily request access to cutting-edge capabilities, such as new quantum devices with limited availability, directly in the Braket console. Today, you can get reservation-only access to IonQ’s highest-fidelity Forte QPU. Due to its limited availability, this device is currently only available through Braket Direct reservations.

Now available
Braket Direct is now generally available in all AWS Regions where Amazon Braket is available. To learn more, see the Braket Direct page and pricing page.

Give it a try and send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon Braket, Quantum Computing Stack Exchange, or through your usual AWS Support contacts.

Channy