Tag Archives: Containers

Turbocharge your Apache Hive queries on Amazon EMR using LLAP

Post Syndicated from Jigar Mistry original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/turbocharge-your-apache-hive-queries-on-amazon-emr-using-llap/

Apache Hive is one of the most popular tools for analyzing large datasets stored in a Hadoop cluster using SQL. Data analysts and scientists use Hive to query, summarize, explore, and analyze big data.

With the introduction of Hive LLAP (Low Latency Analytical Processing), the notion of Hive being just a batch processing tool has changed. LLAP uses long-lived daemons with intelligent in-memory caching to circumvent batch-oriented latency and provide sub-second query response times.

This post provides an overview of Hive LLAP, including its architecture and common use cases for boosting query performance. You will learn how to install and configure Hive LLAP on an Amazon EMR cluster and run queries on LLAP daemons.

What is Hive LLAP?

Hive LLAP was introduced in Apache Hive 2.0, which provides very fast processing of queries. It uses persistent daemons that are deployed on a Hadoop YARN cluster using Apache Slider. These daemons are long-running and provide functionality such as I/O with DataNode, in-memory caching, query processing, and fine-grained access control. And since the daemons are always running in the cluster, it saves substantial overhead of launching new YARN containers for every new Hive session, thereby avoiding long startup times.

When Hive is configured in hybrid execution mode, small and short queries execute directly on LLAP daemons. Heavy lifting (like large shuffles in the reduce stage) is performed in YARN containers that belong to the application. Resources (CPU, memory, etc.) are obtained in a traditional fashion using YARN. After the resources are obtained, the execution engine can decide which resources are to be allocated to LLAP, or it can launch Apache Tez processors in separate YARN containers. You can also configure Hive to run all the processing workloads on LLAP daemons for querying small datasets at lightning fast speeds.

LLAP daemons are launched under YARN management to ensure that the nodes don’t get overloaded with the compute resources of these daemons. You can use scheduling queues to make sure that there is enough compute capacity for other YARN applications to run.

Why use Hive LLAP?

With many options available in the market (Presto, Spark SQL, etc.) for doing interactive SQL  over data that is stored in Amazon S3 and HDFS, there are several reasons why using Hive and LLAP might be a good choice:

  • For those who are heavily invested in the Hive ecosystem and have external BI tools that connect to Hive over JDBC/ODBC connections, LLAP plugs in to their existing architecture without a steep learning curve.
  • It’s compatible with existing Hive SQL and other Hive tools, like HiveServer2, and JDBC drivers for Hive.
  • It has native support for security features with authentication and authorization (SQL standards-based authorization) using HiveServer2.
  • LLAP daemons are aware about of the columns and records that are being processed which enables you to enforce fine-grained access control.
  • It can use Hive’s vectorization capabilities to speed up queries, and Hive has better support for Parquet file format when vectorization is enabled.
  • It can take advantage of a number of Hive optimizations like merging multiple small files for query results, automatically determining the number of reducers for joins and groupbys, etc.
  • It’s optional and modular so it can be turned on or off depending on the compute and resource requirements of the cluster. This lets you to run other YARN applications concurrently without reserving a cluster specifically for LLAP.

How do you install Hive LLAP in Amazon EMR?

To install and configure LLAP on an EMR cluster, use the following bootstrap action (BA):

s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Turbocharge_Apache_Hive_on_EMR/configure-Hive-LLAP.sh

This BA downloads and installs Apache Slider on the cluster and configures LLAP so that it works with EMR Hive. For LLAP to work, the EMR cluster must have Hive, Tez, and Apache Zookeeper installed.

You can pass the following arguments to the BA.

Argument Definition Default value
--instances Number of instances of LLAP daemon Number of core/task nodes of the cluster
--cache Cache size per instance 20% of physical memory of the node
--executors Number of executors per instance Number of CPU cores of the node
--iothreads Number of IO threads per instance Number of CPU cores of the node
--size Container size per instance 50% of physical memory of the node
--xmx Working memory size 50% of container size
--log-level Log levels for the LLAP instance INFO

LLAP example

This section describes how you can try the faster Hive queries with LLAP using the TPC-DS testbench for Hive on Amazon EMR.

Use the following AWS command line interface (AWS CLI) command to launch a 1+3 nodes m4.xlarge EMR 5.6.0 cluster with the bootstrap action to install LLAP:

aws emr create-cluster --release-label emr-5.6.0 \
--applications Name=Hadoop Name=Hive Name=Hue Name=ZooKeeper Name=Tez \
--bootstrap-actions '[{"Path":"s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Turbocharge_Apache_Hive_on_EMR/configure-Hive-LLAP.sh","Name":"Custom action"}]' \ 
--ec2-attributes '{"KeyName":"<YOUR-KEY-PAIR>","InstanceProfile":"EMR_EC2_DefaultRole","SubnetId":"subnet-xxxxxxxx","EmrManagedSlaveSecurityGroup":"sg-xxxxxxxx","EmrManagedMasterSecurityGroup":"sg-xxxxxxxx"}' 
--service-role EMR_DefaultRole \
--enable-debugging \
--log-uri 's3n://<YOUR-BUCKET/' --name 'test-hive-llap' \
--instance-groups '[{"InstanceCount":1,"EbsConfiguration":{"EbsBlockDeviceConfigs":[{"VolumeSpecification":{"SizeInGB":32,"VolumeType":"gp2"},"VolumesPerInstance":1}],"EbsOptimized":true},"InstanceGroupType":"MASTER","InstanceType":"m4.xlarge","Name":"Master - 1"},{"InstanceCount":3,"EbsConfiguration":{"EbsBlockDeviceConfigs":[{"VolumeSpecification":{"SizeInGB":32,"VolumeType":"gp2"},"VolumesPerInstance":1}],"EbsOptimized":true},"InstanceGroupType":"CORE","InstanceType":"m4.xlarge","Name":"Core - 2"}]' 
--region us-east-1

After the cluster is launched, log in to the master node using SSH, and do the following:

  1. Open the hive-tpcds folder:
    cd /home/hadoop/hive-tpcds/
  2. Start Hive CLI using the testbench configuration, create the required tables, and run the sample query:

    hive –i testbench.settings
    hive> source create_tables.sql;
    hive> source query55.sql;

    This sample query runs on a 40 GB dataset that is stored on Amazon S3. The dataset is generated using the data generation tool in the TPC-DS testbench for Hive.It results in output like the following:
  3. This screenshot shows that the query finished in about 47 seconds for LLAP mode. Now, to compare this to the execution time without LLAP, you can run the same workload using only Tez containers:
    hive> set hive.llap.execution.mode=none;
    hive> source query55.sql;


    This query finished in about 80 seconds.

The difference in query execution time is almost 1.7 times when using just YARN containers in contrast to running the query on LLAP daemons. And with every rerun of the query, you notice that the execution time substantially decreases by the virtue of in-memory caching by LLAP daemons.

Conclusion

In this post, I introduced Hive LLAP as a way to boost Hive query performance. I discussed its architecture and described several use cases for the component. I showed how you can install and configure Hive LLAP on an Amazon EMR cluster and how you can run queries on LLAP daemons.

If you have questions about using Hive LLAP on Amazon EMR or would like to share your use cases, please leave a comment below.


Additional Reading

Learn how to to automatically partition Hive external tables with AWS.


About the Author

Jigar Mistry is a Hadoop Systems Engineer with Amazon Web Services. He works with customers to provide them architectural guidance and technical support for processing large datasets in the cloud using open-source applications. In his spare time, he enjoys going for camping and exploring different restaurants in the Seattle area.

 

 

 

 

Deploying an NGINX Reverse Proxy Sidecar Container on Amazon ECS

Post Syndicated from Nathan Peck original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/nginx-reverse-proxy-sidecar-container-on-amazon-ecs/

Reverse proxies are a powerful software architecture primitive for fetching resources from a server on behalf of a client. They serve a number of purposes, from protecting servers from unwanted traffic to offloading some of the heavy lifting of HTTP traffic processing.

This post explains the benefits of a reverse proxy, and explains how to use NGINX and Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS) to easily implement and deploy a reverse proxy for your containerized application.

Components

NGINX is a high performance HTTP server that has achieved significant adoption because of its asynchronous event driven architecture. It can serve thousands of concurrent requests with a low memory footprint. This efficiency also makes it ideal as a reverse proxy.

Amazon ECS is a highly scalable, high performance container management service that supports Docker containers. It allows you to run applications easily on a managed cluster of Amazon EC2 instances. Amazon ECS helps you get your application components running on instances according to a specified configuration. It also helps scale out these components across an entire fleet of instances.

Sidecar containers are a common software pattern that has been embraced by engineering organizations. It’s a way to keep server side architecture easier to understand by building with smaller, modular containers that each serve a simple purpose. Just like an application can be powered by multiple microservices, each microservice can also be powered by multiple containers that work together. A sidecar container is simply a way to move part of the core responsibility of a service out into a containerized module that is deployed alongside a core application container.

The following diagram shows how an NGINX reverse proxy sidecar container operates alongside an application server container:

In this architecture, Amazon ECS has deployed two copies of an application stack that is made up of an NGINX reverse proxy side container and an application container. Web traffic from the public goes to an Application Load Balancer, which then distributes the traffic to one of the NGINX reverse proxy sidecars. The NGINX reverse proxy then forwards the request to the application server and returns its response to the client via the load balancer.

Reverse proxy for security

Security is one reason for using a reverse proxy in front of an application container. Any web server that serves resources to the public can expect to receive lots of unwanted traffic every day. Some of this traffic is relatively benign scans by researchers and tools, such as Shodan or nmap:

[18/May/2017:15:10:10 +0000] "GET /YesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScanningForResearchPurposePleaseHaveALookAtTheUserAgentTHXYesThisIsAReallyLongRequestURLbutWeAreDoingItOnPurposeWeAreScann HTTP/1.1" 404 1389 - Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_11_1) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/46.0.2490.86 Safari/537.36
[18/May/2017:18:19:51 +0000] "GET /clientaccesspolicy.xml HTTP/1.1" 404 322 - Cloud mapping experiment. Contact [email protected]

But other traffic is much more malicious. For example, here is what a web server sees while being scanned by the hacking tool ZmEu, which scans web servers trying to find PHPMyAdmin installations to exploit:

[18/May/2017:16:27:39 +0000] "GET /mysqladmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 391 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:39 +0000] "GET /web/phpMyAdmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 394 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:39 +0000] "GET /xampp/phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 396 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:40 +0000] "GET /apache-default/phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 405 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:40 +0000] "GET /phpMyAdmin-2.10.0.0/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 397 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:40 +0000] "GET /mysql/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 386 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:41 +0000] "GET /admin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 386 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:41 +0000] "GET /forum/phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 396 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:41 +0000] "GET /typo3/phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 396 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:42 +0000] "GET /phpMyAdmin-2.10.0.1/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 399 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:44 +0000] "GET /administrator/components/com_joommyadmin/phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 418 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:18:34:45 +0000] "GET /phpmyadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 390 - ZmEu
[18/May/2017:16:27:45 +0000] "GET /w00tw00t.at.blackhats.romanian.anti-sec:) HTTP/1.1" 404 401 - ZmEu

In addition, servers can also end up receiving unwanted web traffic that is intended for another server. In a cloud environment, an application may end up reusing an IP address that was formerly connected to another service. It’s common for misconfigured or misbehaving DNS servers to send traffic intended for a different host to an IP address now connected to your server.

It’s the responsibility of anyone running a web server to handle and reject potentially malicious traffic or unwanted traffic. Ideally, the web server can reject this traffic as early as possible, before it actually reaches the core application code. A reverse proxy is one way to provide this layer of protection for an application server. It can be configured to reject these requests before they reach the application server.

Reverse proxy for performance

Another advantage of using a reverse proxy such as NGINX is that it can be configured to offload some heavy lifting from your application container. For example, every HTTP server should support gzip. Whenever a client requests gzip encoding, the server compresses the response before sending it back to the client. This compression saves network bandwidth, which also improves speed for clients who now don’t have to wait as long for a response to fully download.

NGINX can be configured to accept a plaintext response from your application container and gzip encode it before sending it down to the client. This allows your application container to focus 100% of its CPU allotment on running business logic, while NGINX handles the encoding with its efficient gzip implementation.

An application may have security concerns that require SSL termination at the instance level instead of at the load balancer. NGINX can also be configured to terminate SSL before proxying the request to a local application container. Again, this also removes some CPU load from the application container, allowing it to focus on running business logic. It also gives you a cleaner way to patch any SSL vulnerabilities or update SSL certificates by updating the NGINX container without needing to change the application container.

NGINX configuration

Configuring NGINX for both traffic filtering and gzip encoding is shown below:

http {
  # NGINX will handle gzip compression of responses from the app server
  gzip on;
  gzip_proxied any;
  gzip_types text/plain application/json;
  gzip_min_length 1000;
 
  server {
    listen 80;
 
    # NGINX will reject anything not matching /api
    location /api {
      # Reject requests with unsupported HTTP method
      if ($request_method !~ ^(GET|POST|HEAD|OPTIONS|PUT|DELETE)$) {
        return 405;
      }
 
      # Only requests matching the whitelist expectations will
      # get sent to the application server
      proxy_pass http://app:3000;
      proxy_http_version 1.1;
      proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
      proxy_set_header Connection 'upgrade';
      proxy_set_header Host $host;
      proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
      proxy_cache_bypass $http_upgrade;
    }
  }
}

The above configuration only accepts traffic that matches the expression /api and has a recognized HTTP method. If the traffic matches, it is forwarded to a local application container accessible at the local hostname app. If the client requested gzip encoding, the plaintext response from that application container is gzip-encoded.

Amazon ECS configuration

Configuring ECS to run this NGINX container as a sidecar is also simple. ECS uses a core primitive called the task definition. Each task definition can include one or more containers, which can be linked to each other:

 {
  "containerDefinitions": [
     {
       "name": "nginx",
       "image": "<NGINX reverse proxy image URL here>",
       "memory": "256",
       "cpu": "256",
       "essential": true,
       "portMappings": [
         {
           "containerPort": "80",
           "protocol": "tcp"
         }
       ],
       "links": [
         "app"
       ]
     },
     {
       "name": "app",
       "image": "<app image URL here>",
       "memory": "256",
       "cpu": "256",
       "essential": true
     }
   ],
   "networkMode": "bridge",
   "family": "application-stack"
}

This task definition causes ECS to start both an NGINX container and an application container on the same instance. Then, the NGINX container is linked to the application container. This allows the NGINX container to send traffic to the application container using the hostname app.

The NGINX container has a port mapping that exposes port 80 on a publically accessible port but the application container does not. This means that the application container is not directly addressable. The only way to send it traffic is to send traffic to the NGINX container, which filters that traffic down. It only forwards to the application container if the traffic passes the whitelisted rules.

Conclusion

Running a sidecar container such as NGINX can bring significant benefits by making it easier to provide protection for application containers. Sidecar containers also improve performance by freeing your application container from various CPU intensive tasks. Amazon ECS makes it easy to run sidecar containers, and automate their deployment across your cluster.

To see the full code for this NGINX sidecar reference, or to try it out yourself, you can check out the open source NGINX reverse proxy reference architecture on GitHub.

– Nathan
 @nathankpeck

[$] Flatpaks for Fedora 27

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/728699/rss

A proposal
to add Flatpak as an option for
distributing desktop applications in Fedora 27 has recently made an
appearance. It is meant as an experiment
of sorts to see how well Flatpak and RPM will play together—and to fix any
problems found.
There is a view that containers are the future, on the desktop as well as
the server; Flatpaks would provide Fedora one possible path toward that future.
The proposal sparked a huge thread on the Fedora devel
mailing list; while the proposal itself doesn’t really change much for
those uninterested in Flatpaks, some are concerned with where Fedora
packaging might be headed once the experiment ends.

Deploying Java Microservices on Amazon EC2 Container Service

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/deploying-java-microservices-on-amazon-ec2-container-service/

This post and accompanying code graciously contributed by:

Huy Huynh
Sr. Solutions Architect
Magnus Bjorkman
Solutions Architect

Java is a popular language used by many enterprises today. To simplify and accelerate Java application development, many companies are moving from a monolithic to microservices architecture. For some, it has become a strategic imperative. Containerization technology, such as Docker, lets enterprises build scalable, robust microservice architectures without major code rewrites.

In this post, I cover how to containerize a monolithic Java application to run on Docker. Then, I show how to deploy it on AWS using Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS), a high-performance container management service. Finally, I show how to break the monolith into multiple services, all running in containers on Amazon ECS.

Application Architecture

For this example, I use the Spring Pet Clinic, a monolithic Java application for managing a veterinary practice. It is a simple REST API, which allows the client to manage and view Owners, Pets, Vets, and Visits.

It is a simple three-tier architecture:

  • Client
    You simulate this by using curl commands.
  • Web/app server
    This is the Java and Spring-based application that you run using the embedded Tomcat. As part of this post, you run this within Docker containers.
  • Database server
    This is the relational database for your application that stores information about owners, pets, vets, and visits. For this post, use MySQL RDS.

I decided to not put the database inside a container as containers were designed for applications and are transient in nature. The choice was made even easier because you have a fully managed database service available with Amazon RDS.

RDS manages the work involved in setting up a relational database, from provisioning the infrastructure capacity that you request to installing the database software. After your database is up and running, RDS automates common administrative tasks, such as performing backups and patching the software that powers your database. With optional Multi-AZ deployments, Amazon RDS also manages synchronous data replication across Availability Zones with automatic failover.

Walkthrough

You can find the code for the example covered in this post at amazon-ecs-java-microservices on GitHub.

Prerequisites

You need the following to walk through this solution:

  • An AWS account
  • An access key and secret key for a user in the account
  • The AWS CLI installed

Also, install the latest versions of the following:

  • Java
  • Maven
  • Python
  • Docker

Step 1: Move the existing Java Spring application to a container deployed using Amazon ECS

First, move the existing monolith application to a container and deploy it using Amazon ECS. This is a great first step before breaking the monolith apart because you still get some benefits before breaking apart the monolith:

  • An improved pipeline. The container also allows an engineering organization to create a standard pipeline for the application lifecycle.
  • No mutations to machines.

You can find the monolith example at 1_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic.

Container deployment overview

The following diagram is an overview of what the setup looks like for Amazon ECS and related services:

This setup consists of the following resources:

  • The client application that makes a request to the load balancer.
  • The load balancer that distributes requests across all available ports and instances registered in the application’s target group using round-robin.
  • The target group that is updated by Amazon ECS to always have an up-to-date list of all the service containers in the cluster. This includes the port on which they are accessible.
  • One Amazon ECS cluster that hosts the container for the application.
  • A VPC network to host the Amazon ECS cluster and associated security groups.

Each container has a single application process that is bound to port 8080 within its namespace. In reality, all the containers are exposed on a different, randomly assigned port on the host.

The architecture is containerized but still monolithic because each container has all the same features of the rest of the containers

The following is also part of the solution but not depicted in the above diagram:

  • One Amazon EC2 Container Registry (Amazon ECR) repository for the application.
  • A service/task definition that spins up containers on the instances of the Amazon ECS cluster.
  • A MySQL RDS instance that hosts the applications schema. The information about the MySQL RDS instance is sent in through environment variables to the containers, so that the application can connect to the MySQL RDS instance.

I have automated setup with the 1_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic/ecs-cluster.cf AWS CloudFormation template and a Python script.

The Python script calls the CloudFormation template for the initial setup of the VPC, Amazon ECS cluster, and RDS instance. It then extracts the outputs from the template and uses those for API calls to create Amazon ECR repositories, tasks, services, Application Load Balancer, and target groups.

Environment variables and Spring properties binding

As part of the Python script, you pass in a number of environment variables to the container as part of the task/container definition:

'environment': [
{
'name': 'SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE',
'value': 'mysql'
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_URL',
'value': my_sql_options['dns_name']
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_USERNAME',
'value': my_sql_options['username']
},
{
'name': 'SPRING_DATASOURCE_PASSWORD',
'value': my_sql_options['password']
}
],

The preceding environment variables work in concert with the Spring property system. The value in the variable SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE, makes Spring use the MySQL version of the application property file. The other environment files override the following properties in that file:

  • spring.datasource.url
  • spring.datasource.username
  • spring.datasource.password

Optionally, you can also encrypt sensitive values by using Amazon EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store. Instead of handing in the password, you pass in a reference to the parameter and fetch the value as part of the container startup. For more information, see Managing Secrets for Amazon ECS Applications Using Parameter Store and IAM Roles for Tasks.

Spotify Docker Maven plugin

Use the Spotify Docker Maven plugin to create the image and push it directly to Amazon ECR. This allows you to do this as part of the regular Maven build. It also integrates the image generation as part of the overall build process. Use an explicit Dockerfile as input to the plugin.

FROM frolvlad/alpine-oraclejdk8:slim
VOLUME /tmp
ADD spring-petclinic-rest-1.7.jar app.jar
RUN sh -c 'touch /app.jar'
ENV JAVA_OPTS=""
ENTRYPOINT [ "sh", "-c", "java $JAVA_OPTS -Djava.security.egd=file:/dev/./urandom -jar /app.jar" ]

The Python script discussed earlier uses the AWS CLI to authenticate you with AWS. The script places the token in the appropriate location so that the plugin can work directly against the Amazon ECR repository.

Test setup

You can test the setup by running the Python script:
python setup.py -m setup -r <your region>

After the script has successfully run, you can test by querying an endpoint:
curl <your endpoint from output above>/owner

You can clean this up before going to the next section:
python setup.py -m cleanup -r <your region>

Step 2: Converting the monolith into microservices running on Amazon ECS

The second step is to convert the monolith into microservices. For a real application, you would likely not do this as one step, but re-architect an application piece by piece. You would continue to run your monolith but it would keep getting smaller for each piece that you are breaking apart.

By migrating microservices, you would get four benefits associated with microservices:

  • Isolation of crashes
    If one microservice in your application is crashing, then only that part of your application goes down. The rest of your application continues to work properly.
  • Isolation of security
    When microservice best practices are followed, the result is that if an attacker compromises one service, they only gain access to the resources of that service. They can’t horizontally access other resources from other services without breaking into those services as well.
  • Independent scaling
    When features are broken out into microservices, then the amount of infrastructure and number of instances of each microservice class can be scaled up and down independently.
  • Development velocity
    In a monolith, adding a new feature can potentially impact every other feature that the monolith contains. On the other hand, a proper microservice architecture has new code for a new feature going into a new service. You can be confident that any code you write won’t impact the existing code at all, unless you explicitly write a connection between two microservices.

Find the monolith example at 2_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic_Microservices.
You break apart the Spring Pet Clinic application by creating a microservice for each REST API operation, as well as creating one for the system services.

Java code changes

Comparing the project structure between the monolith and the microservices version, you can see that each service is now its own separate build.
First, the monolith version:

You can clearly see how each API operation is its own subpackage under the org.springframework.samples.petclinic package, all part of the same monolithic application.
This changes as you break it apart in the microservices version:

Now, each API operation is its own separate build, which you can build independently and deploy. You have also duplicated some code across the different microservices, such as the classes under the model subpackage. This is intentional as you don’t want to introduce artificial dependencies among the microservices and allow these to evolve differently for each microservice.

Also, make the dependencies among the API operations more loosely coupled. In the monolithic version, the components are tightly coupled and use object-based invocation.

Here is an example of this from the OwnerController operation, where the class is directly calling PetRepository to get information about pets. PetRepository is the Repository class (Spring data access layer) to the Pet table in the RDS instance for the Pet API:

@RestController
class OwnerController {

    @Inject
    private PetRepository pets;
    @Inject
    private OwnerRepository owners;
    private static final Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(OwnerController.class);

    @RequestMapping(value = "/owner/{ownerId}/getVisits", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public ResponseEntity<List<Visit>> getOwnerVisits(@PathVariable int ownerId){
        List<Pet> petList = this.owners.findById(ownerId).getPets();
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        petList.forEach(pet -> visitList.addAll(pet.getVisits()));
        return new ResponseEntity<List<Visit>>(visitList, HttpStatus.OK);
    }
}

In the microservice version, call the Pet API operation and not PetRepository directly. Decouple the components by using interprocess communication; in this case, the Rest API. This provides for fault tolerance and disposability.

@RestController
class OwnerController {

    @Value("#{environment['SERVICE_ENDPOINT'] ?: 'localhost:8080'}")
    private String serviceEndpoint;

    @Inject
    private OwnerRepository owners;
    private static final Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(OwnerController.class);

    @RequestMapping(value = "/owner/{ownerId}/getVisits", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public ResponseEntity<List<Visit>> getOwnerVisits(@PathVariable int ownerId){
        List<Pet> petList = this.owners.findById(ownerId).getPets();
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        petList.forEach(pet -> {
            logger.info(getPetVisits(pet.getId()).toString());
            visitList.addAll(getPetVisits(pet.getId()));
        });
        return new ResponseEntity<List<Visit>>(visitList, HttpStatus.OK);
    }

    private List<Visit> getPetVisits(int petId){
        List<Visit> visitList = new ArrayList<Visit>();
        RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate();
        Pet pet = restTemplate.getForObject("http://"+serviceEndpoint+"/pet/"+petId, Pet.class);
        logger.info(pet.getVisits().toString());
        return pet.getVisits();
    }
}

You now have an additional method that calls the API. You are also handing in the service endpoint that should be called, so that you can easily inject dynamic endpoints based on the current deployment.

Container deployment overview

Here is an overview of what the setup looks like for Amazon ECS and the related services:

This setup consists of the following resources:

  • The client application that makes a request to the load balancer.
  • The Application Load Balancer that inspects the client request. Based on routing rules, it directs the request to an instance and port from the target group that matches the rule.
  • The Application Load Balancer that has a target group for each microservice. The target groups are used by the corresponding services to register available container instances. Each target group has a path, so when you call the path for a particular microservice, it is mapped to the correct target group. This allows you to use one Application Load Balancer to serve all the different microservices, accessed by the path. For example, https:///owner/* would be mapped and directed to the Owner microservice.
  • One Amazon ECS cluster that hosts the containers for each microservice of the application.
  • A VPC network to host the Amazon ECS cluster and associated security groups.

Because you are running multiple containers on the same instances, use dynamic port mapping to avoid port clashing. By using dynamic port mapping, the container is allocated an anonymous port on the host to which the container port (8080) is mapped. The anonymous port is registered with the Application Load Balancer and target group so that traffic is routed correctly.

The following is also part of the solution but not depicted in the above diagram:

  • One Amazon ECR repository for each microservice.
  • A service/task definition per microservice that spins up containers on the instances of the Amazon ECS cluster.
  • A MySQL RDS instance that hosts the applications schema. The information about the MySQL RDS instance is sent in through environment variables to the containers. That way, the application can connect to the MySQL RDS instance.

I have again automated setup with the 2_ECS_Java_Spring_PetClinic_Microservices/ecs-cluster.cf CloudFormation template and a Python script.

The CloudFormation template remains the same as in the previous section. In the Python script, you are now building five different Java applications, one for each microservice (also includes a system application). There is a separate Maven POM file for each one. The resulting Docker image gets pushed to its own Amazon ECR repository, and is deployed separately using its own service/task definition. This is critical to get the benefits described earlier for microservices.

Here is an example of the POM file for the Owner microservice:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <groupId>org.springframework.samples</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-petclinic-rest</artifactId>
    <version>1.7</version>
    <parent>
        <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
        <version>1.5.2.RELEASE</version>
    </parent>
    <properties>
        <!-- Generic properties -->
        <java.version>1.8</java.version>
        <docker.registry.host>${env.docker_registry_host}</docker.registry.host>
    </properties>
    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.inject</groupId>
            <artifactId>javax.inject</artifactId>
            <version>1</version>
        </dependency>
        <!-- Spring and Spring Boot dependencies -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-actuator</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-rest</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-cache</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-jpa</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-test</artifactId>
            <scope>test</scope>
        </dependency>
        <!-- Databases - Uses HSQL by default -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.hsqldb</groupId>
            <artifactId>hsqldb</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>mysql</groupId>
            <artifactId>mysql-connector-java</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <!-- caching -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.cache</groupId>
            <artifactId>cache-api</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.ehcache</groupId>
            <artifactId>ehcache</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <!-- end of webjars -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-devtools</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>
    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
                <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>com.spotify</groupId>
                <artifactId>docker-maven-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>0.4.13</version>
                <configuration>
                    <imageName>${env.docker_registry_host}/${project.artifactId}</imageName>
                    <dockerDirectory>src/main/docker</dockerDirectory>
                    <useConfigFile>true</useConfigFile>
                    <registryUrl>${env.docker_registry_host}</registryUrl>
                    <!--dockerHost>https://${docker.registry.host}</dockerHost-->
                    <resources>
                        <resource>
                            <targetPath>/</targetPath>
                            <directory>${project.build.directory}</directory>
                            <include>${project.build.finalName}.jar</include>
                        </resource>
                    </resources>
                    <forceTags>false</forceTags>
                    <imageTags>
                        <imageTag>${project.version}</imageTag>
                    </imageTags>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
</project>

Test setup

You can test this by running the Python script:

python setup.py -m setup -r <your region>

After the script has successfully run, you can test by querying an endpoint:

curl <your endpoint from output above>/owner

Conclusion

Migrating a monolithic application to a containerized set of microservices can seem like a daunting task. Following the steps outlined in this post, you can begin to containerize monolithic Java apps, taking advantage of the container runtime environment, and beginning the process of re-architecting into microservices. On the whole, containerized microservices are faster to develop, easier to iterate on, and more cost effective to maintain and secure.

This post focused on the first steps of microservice migration. You can learn more about optimizing and scaling your microservices with components such as service discovery, blue/green deployment, circuit breakers, and configuration servers at http://aws.amazon.com/containers.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 3

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/07/07/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-3/

Many in the US were on holiday for Independence Day earlier this week, but that didn’t slow us down: team Stockholm even shipped a new Grafana release. This issue of timeShift has plenty of great articles to highlight. If you know of a recent article about Grafana, or are writing one yourself, please get in touch, we’d be happy to feature it here.


Grafana 4.4 Released

Grafana v4.4 is now Available for download

Dashboard history and version control is here! A big thanks to Walmart Labs for their massive code contribution.

Check out what’s new in Grafana 4.4 in the release announcement.


From the Blogosphere

Plugins and Dashboards

We are excited that there have been over 100,000 plugin installations since we launched the new plugable architecture in Grafana v3. You can discover and install plugins in your own on-premises or Hosted Grafana instance from our website. Below are some recent additions and updates.

Zabbix Updated to v3.5.0 CHANGELOG.md

  • rate() function, which calculates per-second rate for growing counters.
  • Template query format. New format is {group}{host}{app}{item}. It allows to use names with dot.
  • Improved performance of groupBy() functions (at 6-10x faster than old).
  • lots of bug fixes and more

In addition to the plugins available for download, there are hundreds of pre-made dashboards ready for you to import into Grafana to get up and running quickly. Check out some of the popular dashboards.

Server Metrics (Collectd) Collectd/Graphite Server metrics dashboard (Load,CPU, Memory, Temp etc).

Data Source: Graphite | Collector: Collectd

Apache Overview System stats for uptime, cpu count, RAM, free memory %, and panels for load, I/O and network traffic. Apache workers and scoreboard panels and uptime and CPU load single stats.

Data Source: InfluxDB | Collector: Telegraf

Node Exporter Server Metrics A simple dashboard configured to be able to view multiple servers side by side.

Data Source: Prometheus | Collector: Nodeexporter

This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we’ll recognize a Grafana contributor and thank them for all of their PRs, bug reports and feedback. Many of the fixes and improvements come from our fantastic community!

ryantxu (Ryan McKinley)

Ryan has contributed PR’s to Grafana as well as being the author of 4 well-maintained plugins (Ajax Panel, Discrete Panel, Plotly Panel and Influx Admin plugins). Thank you for all your hard work!

What do you think?

Anything in particular you’d like to see in this series of posts? Too long? Too short? Boring? Let us know. Comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. With your help, we can make this a worthwhile resource.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Manage Kubernetes Clusters on AWS Using Kops

Post Syndicated from Arun Gupta original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/kubernetes-clusters-aws-kops/

Any containerized application typically consists of multiple containers. There is a container for the application itself, one for database, possibly another for web server, and so on. During development, its normal to build and test this multi-container application on a single host. This approach works fine during early dev and test cycles but becomes a single point of failure for production where the availability of the application is critical. In such cases, this multi-container application is deployed on multiple hosts. There is a need for an external tool to manage such a multi-container multi-host deployment. Container orchestration frameworks provides the capability of cluster management, scheduling containers on different hosts, service discovery and load balancing, crash recovery and other related functionalities. There are multiple options for container orchestration on Amazon Web Services: Amazon ECS, Docker for AWS, and DC/OS.

Another popular option for container orchestration on AWS is Kubernetes. There are multiple ways to run a Kubernetes cluster on AWS. This multi-part blog series provides a brief overview and explains some of these approaches in detail. This first post explains how to create a Kubernetes cluster on AWS using kops.

Kubernetes and Kops overview

Kubernetes is an open source, container orchestration platform. Applications packaged as Docker images can be easily deployed, scaled, and managed in a Kubernetes cluster. Some of the key features of Kubernetes are:

  • Self-healing
    Failed containers are restarted to ensure that the desired state of the application is maintained. If a node in the cluster dies, then the containers are rescheduled on a different node. Containers that do not respond to application-defined health check are terminated, and thus rescheduled.
  • Horizontal scaling
    Number of containers can be easily scaled up and down automatically based upon CPU utilization, or manually using a command.
  • Service discovery and load balancing
    Multiple containers can be grouped together discoverable using a DNS name. The service can be load balanced with integration to the native LB provided by the cloud provider.
  • Application upgrades and rollbacks
    Applications can be upgraded to a newer version without an impact to the existing one. If something goes wrong, Kubernetes rolls back the change.

Kops, short for Kubernetes Operations, is a set of tools for installing, operating, and deleting Kubernetes clusters in the cloud. A rolling upgrade of an older version of Kubernetes to a new version can also be performed. It also manages the cluster add-ons. After the cluster is created, the usual kubectl CLI can be used to manage resources in the cluster.

Download Kops and Kubectl

There is no need to download the Kubernetes binary distribution for creating a cluster using kops. However, you do need to download the kops CLI. It then takes care of downloading the right Kubernetes binary in the cloud, and provisions the cluster.

The different download options for kops are explained at github.com/kubernetes/kops#installing. On MacOS, the easiest way to install kops is using the brew package manager.

brew update && brew install kops

The version of kops can be verified using the kops version command, which shows:

Version 1.6.1

In addition, download kubectl. This is required to manage the Kubernetes cluster. The latest version of kubectl can be downloaded using the following command:

curl -LO https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/$(curl -s https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/stable.txt)/bin/darwin/amd64/kubectl

Make sure to include the directory where kubectl is downloaded in your PATH.

IAM user permission

The IAM user to create the Kubernetes cluster must have the following permissions:

  • AmazonEC2FullAccess
  • AmazonRoute53FullAccess
  • AmazonS3FullAccess
  • IAMFullAccess
  • AmazonVPCFullAccess

Alternatively, a new IAM user may be created and the policies attached as explained at github.com/kubernetes/kops/blob/master/docs/aws.md#setup-iam-user.

Create an Amazon S3 bucket for the Kubernetes state store

Kops needs a “state store” to store configuration information of the cluster.  For example, how many nodes, instance type of each node, and Kubernetes version. The state is stored during the initial cluster creation. Any subsequent changes to the cluster are also persisted to this store as well. As of publication, Amazon S3 is the only supported storage mechanism. Create a S3 bucket and pass that to the kops CLI during cluster creation.

This post uses the bucket name kubernetes-aws-io. Bucket names must be unique; you have to use a different name. Create an S3 bucket:

aws s3api create-bucket --bucket kubernetes-aws-io

I strongly recommend versioning this bucket in case you ever need to revert or recover a previous version of the cluster. This can be enabled using the AWS CLI as well:

aws s3api put-bucket-versioning --bucket kubernetes-aws-io --versioning-configuration Status=Enabled

For convenience, you can also define KOPS_STATE_STORE environment variable pointing to the S3 bucket. For example:

export KOPS_STATE_STORE=s3://kubernetes-aws-io

This environment variable is then used by the kops CLI.

DNS configuration

As of Kops 1.6.1, a top-level domain or a subdomain is required to create the cluster. This domain allows the worker nodes to discover the master and the master to discover all the etcd servers. This is also needed for kubectl to be able to talk directly with the master.

This domain may be registered with AWS, in which case a Route 53 hosted zone is created for you. Alternatively, this domain may be at a different registrar. In this case, create a Route 53 hosted zone. Specify the name server (NS) records from the created zone as NS records with the domain registrar.

This post uses a kubernetes-aws.io domain registered at a third-party registrar.

Generate a Route 53 hosted zone using the AWS CLI. Download jq to run this command:

ID=$(uuidgen) && \
aws route53 create-hosted-zone \
--name cluster.kubernetes-aws.io \
--caller-reference $ID \
| jq .DelegationSet.NameServers

This shows an output such as the following:

[
"ns-94.awsdns-11.com",
"ns-1962.awsdns-53.co.uk",
"ns-838.awsdns-40.net",
"ns-1107.awsdns-10.org"
]

Create NS records for the domain with your registrar. Different options on how to configure DNS for the cluster are explained at github.com/kubernetes/kops/blob/master/docs/aws.md#configure-dns.

Experimental support to create a gossip-based cluster was added in Kops 1.6.2. This post uses a DNS-based approach, as that is more mature and well tested.

Create the Kubernetes cluster

The Kops CLI can be used to create a highly available cluster, with multiple master nodes spread across multiple Availability Zones. Workers can be spread across multiple zones as well. Some of the tasks that happen behind the scene during cluster creation are:

  • Provisioning EC2 instances
  • Setting up AWS resources such as networks, Auto Scaling groups, IAM users, and security groups
  • Installing Kubernetes.

Start the Kubernetes cluster using the following command:

kops create cluster \
--name cluster.kubernetes-aws.io \
--zones us-west-2a \
--state s3://kubernetes-aws-io \
--yes

In this command:

  • --zones
    Defines the zones in which the cluster is going to be created. Multiple comma-separated zones can be specified to span the cluster across multiple zones.
  • --name
    Defines the cluster’s name.
  • --state
    Points to the S3 bucket that is the state store.
  • --yes
    Immediately creates the cluster. Otherwise, only the cloud resources are created and the cluster needs to be started explicitly using the command kops update --yes. If the cluster needs to be edited, then the kops edit cluster command can be used.

This starts a single master and two worker node Kubernetes cluster. The master is in an Auto Scaling group and the worker nodes are in a separate group. By default, the master node is m3.medium and the worker node is t2.medium. Master and worker nodes are assigned separate IAM roles as well.

Wait for a few minutes for the cluster to be created. The cluster can be verified using the command kops validate cluster --state=s3://kubernetes-aws-io. It shows the following output:

Using cluster from kubectl context: cluster.kubernetes-aws.io

Validating cluster cluster.kubernetes-aws.io

INSTANCE GROUPS
NAME                 ROLE      MACHINETYPE    MIN    MAX    SUBNETS
master-us-west-2a    Master    m3.medium      1      1      us-west-2a
nodes                Node      t2.medium      2      2      us-west-2a

NODE STATUS
NAME                                           ROLE      READY
ip-172-20-38-133.us-west-2.compute.internal    node      True
ip-172-20-38-177.us-west-2.compute.internal    master    True
ip-172-20-46-33.us-west-2.compute.internal     node      True

Your cluster cluster.kubernetes-aws.io is ready

It shows the different instances started for the cluster, and their roles. If multiple cluster states are stored in the same bucket, then --name <NAME> can be used to specify the exact cluster name.

Check all nodes in the cluster using the command kubectl get nodes:

NAME                                          STATUS         AGE       VERSION
ip-172-20-38-133.us-west-2.compute.internal   Ready,node     14m       v1.6.2
ip-172-20-38-177.us-west-2.compute.internal   Ready,master   15m       v1.6.2
ip-172-20-46-33.us-west-2.compute.internal    Ready,node     14m       v1.6.2

Again, the internal IP address of each node, their current status (master or node), and uptime are shown. The key information here is the Kubernetes version for each node in the cluster, 1.6.2 in this case.

The kubectl value included in the PATH earlier is configured to manage this cluster. Resources such as pods, replica sets, and services can now be created in the usual way.

Some of the common options that can be used to override the default cluster creation are:

  • --kubernetes-version
    The version of Kubernetes cluster. The exact versions supported are defined at github.com/kubernetes/kops/blob/master/channels/stable.
  • --master-size and --node-size
    Define the instance of master and worker nodes.
  • --master-count and --node-count
    Define the number of master and worker nodes. By default, a master is created in each zone specified by --master-zones. Multiple master nodes can be created by a higher number using --master-count or specifying multiple Availability Zones in --master-zones.

A three-master and five-worker node cluster, with master nodes spread across different Availability Zones, can be created using the following command:

kops create cluster \
--name cluster2.kubernetes-aws.io \
--zones us-west-2a,us-west-2b,us-west-2c \
--node-count 5 \
--state s3://kubernetes-aws-io \
--yes

Both the clusters are sharing the same state store but have different names. This also requires you to create an additional Amazon Route 53 hosted zone for the name.

By default, the resources required for the cluster are directly created in the cloud. The --target option can be used to generate the AWS CloudFormation scripts instead. These scripts can then be used by the AWS CLI to create resources at your convenience.

Get a complete list of options for cluster creation with kops create cluster --help.

More details about the cluster can be seen using the command kubectl cluster-info:

Kubernetes master is running at https://api.cluster.kubernetes-aws.io
KubeDNS is running at https://api.cluster.kubernetes-aws.io/api/v1/proxy/namespaces/kube-system/services/kube-dns

To further debug and diagnose cluster problems, use 'kubectl cluster-info dump'.

Check the client and server version using the command kubectl version:

Client Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"6", GitVersion:"v1.6.4", GitCommit:"d6f433224538d4f9ca2f7ae19b252e6fcb66a3ae", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2017-05-19T18:44:27Z", GoVersion:"go1.7.5", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"darwin/amd64"}
Server Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"6", GitVersion:"v1.6.2", GitCommit:"477efc3cbe6a7effca06bd1452fa356e2201e1ee", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2017-04-19T20:22:08Z", GoVersion:"go1.7.5", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}

Both client and server version are 1.6 as shown by the Major and Minor attribute values.

Upgrade the Kubernetes cluster

Kops can be used to create a Kubernetes 1.4.x, 1.5.x, or an older version of the 1.6.x cluster using the --kubernetes-version option. The exact versions supported are defined at github.com/kubernetes/kops/blob/master/channels/stable.

Or, you may have used kops to create a cluster a while ago, and now want to upgrade to the latest recommended version of Kubernetes. Kops supports rolling cluster upgrades where the master and worker nodes are upgraded one by one.

As of kops 1.6.1, upgrading a cluster is a three-step process.

First, check and apply the latest recommended Kubernetes update.

kops upgrade cluster \
--name cluster2.kubernetes-aws.io \
--state s3://kubernetes-aws-io \
--yes

The --yes option immediately applies the changes. Not specifying the --yes option shows only the changes that are applied.

Second, update the state store to match the cluster state. This can be done using the following command:

kops update cluster \
--name cluster2.kubernetes-aws.io \
--state s3://kubernetes-aws-io \
--yes

Lastly, perform a rolling update for all cluster nodes using the kops rolling-update command:

kops rolling-update cluster \
--name cluster2.kubernetes-aws.io \
--state s3://kubernetes-aws-io \
--yes

Previewing the changes before updating the cluster can be done using the same command but without specifying the --yes option. This shows the following output:

NAME                 STATUS        NEEDUPDATE    READY    MIN    MAX    NODES
master-us-west-2a    NeedsUpdate   1             0        1      1      1
nodes                NeedsUpdate   2             0        2      2      2

Using --yes updates all nodes in the cluster, first master and then worker. There is a 5-minute delay between restarting master nodes, and a 2-minute delay between restarting nodes. These values can be altered using --master-interval and --node-interval options, respectively.

Only the worker nodes may be updated by using the --instance-group node option.

Delete the Kubernetes cluster

Typically, the Kubernetes cluster is a long-running cluster to serve your applications. After its purpose is served, you may delete it. It is important to delete the cluster using the kops command. This ensures that all resources created by the cluster are appropriately cleaned up.

The command to delete the Kubernetes cluster is:

kops delete cluster --state=s3://kubernetes-aws-io --yes

If multiple clusters have been created, then specify the cluster name as in the following command:

kops delete cluster cluster2.kubernetes-aws.io --state=s3://kubernetes-aws-io --yes

Conclusion

This post explained how to manage a Kubernetes cluster on AWS using kops. Kubernetes on AWS users provides a self-published list of companies using Kubernetes on AWS.

Try starting a cluster, create a few Kubernetes resources, and then tear it down. Kops on AWS provides a more comprehensive tutorial for setting up Kubernetes clusters. Kops docs are also helpful for understanding the details.

In addition, the Kops team hosts office hours to help you get started, from guiding you with your first pull request. You can always join the #kops channel on Kubernetes slack to ask questions. If nothing works, then file an issue at github.com/kubernetes/kops/issues.

Future posts in this series will explain other ways of creating and running a Kubernetes cluster on AWS.

— Arun

Blue/Green Deployments with Amazon EC2 Container Service

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/bluegreen-deployments-with-amazon-ecs/

This post and accompanying code was generously contributed by:

Jeremy Cowan
Solutions Architect
Anuj Sharma
DevOps Cloud Architect
Peter Dalbhanjan
Solutions Architect

Deploying software updates in traditional non-containerized environments is hard and fraught with risk. When you write your deployment package or script, you have to assume that the target machine is in a particular state. If your staging environment is not an exact mirror image of your production environment, your deployment could fail. These failures frequently cause outages that persist until you re-deploy the last known good version of your application. If you are an Operations Manager, this is what keeps you up at night.

Increasingly, customers want to do testing in production environments without exposing customers to the new version until the release has been vetted. Others want to expose a small percentage of their customers to the new release to gather feedback about a feature before it’s released to the broader population. This is often referred to as canary analysis or canary testing. In this post, I introduce patterns to implement blue/green and canary deployments using Application Load Balancers and target groups.

If you’d like to try this approach to blue/green deployments, we have open sourced the code and AWS CloudFormation templates in the ecs-blue-green-deployment GitHub repo. The workflow builds an automated CI/CD pipeline that deploys your service onto an ECS cluster and offers a controlled process to swap target groups when you’re ready to promote the latest version of your code to production. You can quickly set up the environment in three steps and see the blue/green swap in action. We’d love for you to try it and send us your feedback!

Benefits of blue/green

Blue/green deployments are a type of immutable deployment that help you deploy software updates with less risk. The risk is reduced by creating separate environments for the current running or “blue” version of your application, and the new or “green” version of your application.

This type of deployment gives you an opportunity to test features in the green environment without impacting the current running version of your application. When you’re satisfied that the green version is working properly, you can gradually reroute the traffic from the old blue environment to the new green environment by modifying DNS. By following this method, you can update and roll back features with near zero downtime.

A typical blue/green deployment involves shifting traffic between 2 distinct environments.

This ability to quickly roll traffic back to the still-operating blue environment is one of the key benefits of blue/green deployments. With blue/green, you should be able to roll back to the blue environment at any time during the deployment process. This limits downtime to the time it takes to realize there’s an issue in the green environment and shift the traffic back to the blue environment. Furthermore, the impact of the outage is limited to the portion of traffic going to the green environment, not all traffic. If the blast radius of deployment errors is reduced, so is the overall deployment risk.

Containers make it simpler

Historically, blue/green deployments were not often used to deploy software on-premises because of the cost and complexity associated with provisioning and managing multiple environments. Instead, applications were upgraded in place.

Although this approach worked, it had several flaws, including the ability to roll back quickly from failures. Rollbacks typically involved re-deploying a previous version of the application, which could affect the length of an outage caused by a bad release. Fixing the issue took precedence over the need to debug, so there were fewer opportunities to learn from your mistakes.

Containers can ease the adoption of blue/green deployments because they’re easily packaged and behave consistently as they’re moved between environments. This consistency comes partly from their immutability. To change the configuration of a container, update its Dockerfile and rebuild and re-deploy the container rather than updating the software in place.

Containers also provide process and namespace isolation for your applications, which allows you to run multiple versions of them side by side on the same Docker host without conflicts. Given their small sizes relative to virtual machines, you can binpack more containers per host than VMs. This lets you make more efficient use of your computing resources, reducing the cost of blue/green deployments.

Fully Managed Updates with Amazon ECS

Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) performs rolling updates when you update an existing Amazon ECS service. A rolling update involves replacing the current running version of the container with the latest version. The number of containers Amazon ECS adds or removes from service during a rolling update is controlled by adjusting the minimum and maximum number of healthy tasks allowed during service deployments.

When you update your service’s task definition with the latest version of your container image, Amazon ECS automatically starts replacing the old version of your container with the latest version. During a deployment, Amazon ECS drains connections from the current running version and registers your new containers with the Application Load Balancer as they come online.

Target groups

A target group is a logical construct that allows you to run multiple services behind the same Application Load Balancer. This is possible because each target group has its own listener.

When you create an Amazon ECS service that’s fronted by an Application Load Balancer, you have to designate a target group for your service. Ordinarily, you would create a target group for each of your Amazon ECS services. However, the approach we’re going to explore here involves creating two target groups: one for the blue version of your service, and one for the green version of your service. We’re also using a different listener port for each target group so that you can test the green version of your service using the same path as the blue service.

With this configuration, you can run both environments in parallel until you’re ready to cut over to the green version of your service. You can also do things such as restricting access to the green version to testers on your internal network, using security group rules and placement constraints. For example, you can target the green version of your service to only run on instances that are accessible from your corporate network.

Swapping Over

When you’re ready to replace the old blue service with the new green service, call the ModifyListener API operation to swap the listener’s rules for the target group rules. The change happens instantaneously. Afterward, the green service is running in the target group with the port 80 listener and the blue service is running in the target group with the port 8080 listener. The diagram below is an illustration of the approach described.

Scenario

Two services are defined, each with their own target group registered to the same Application Load Balancer but listening on different ports. Deployment is completed by swapping the listener rules between the two target groups.

The second service is deployed with a new target group listening on a different port but registered to the same Application Load Balancer.

By using 2 listeners, requests to blue services are directed to the target group with the port 80 listener, while requests to the green services are directed to target group with the port 8080 listener.

After automated or manual testing, the deployment can be completed by swapping the listener rules on the Application Load Balancer and sending traffic to the green service.

Caveats

There are a few caveats to be mindful of when using this approach. This method:

  • Assumes that your application code is completely stateless. Store state outside of the container.
  • Doesn’t gracefully drain connections. The swapping of target groups is sudden and abrupt. Therefore, be cautious about using this approach if your service has long-running transactions.
  • Doesn’t allow you to perform canary deployments. While the method gives you the ability to quickly switch between different versions of your service, it does not allow you to divert a portion of the production traffic to a canary or control the rate at which your service is deployed across the cluster.

Canary testing

While this type of deployment automates much of the heavy lifting associated with rolling deployments, it doesn’t allow you to interrupt the deployment if you discover an issue midstream. Rollbacks using the standard Amazon ECS deployment require updating the service’s task definition with the last known good version of the container. Then, you wait for Amazon ECS to schedule and deploy it across the cluster. If the latest version introduces a breaking change that went undiscovered during testing, this might be too slow.

With canary testing, if you discover the green environment is not operating as expected, there is no impact on the blue environment. You can route traffic back to it, minimizing impaired operation or downtime, and limiting the blast radius of impact.

This type of deployment is particularly useful for A/B testing where you want to expose a new feature to a subset of users to get their feedback before making it broadly available.

For canary style deployments, you can use a variation of the blue/green swap that involves deploying the blue and the green service to the same target group. Although this method is not as fast as the swap, it allows you to control the rate at which your containers are replaced by adjusting the task count for each service. Furthermore, it gives you the ability to roll back by adjusting the number of tasks for the blue and green services respectively. Unlike the swap approach described above, connections to your containers are drained gracefully. We plan to address canary style deployments for Amazon ECS in a future post.

Conclusion

With AWS, you can operationalize your blue/green deployments using Amazon ECS, an Application Load Balancer, and target groups. I encourage you to adapt the code published to the ecs-blue-green-deployment GitHub repo for your use cases and look forward to reading your feedback.

If you’re interested in learning more, I encourage you to read the Blue/Green Deployments on AWS and Practicing Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery on AWS whitepapers.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Containers microconference accepted into Linux Plumbers Conference

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/726823/rss

A microconference on containers will be featured at this year’s Linux Plumbers Conference, which will be held in Los Angeles, CA, US on
13-15 September in conjunction with The Linux Foundation Open Source
Summit. “The agenda for this year will focus on unsolved issues and other
problem areas in the Linux kernel container interfaces with the goal of
allowing all container runtimes and orchestration systems to provide
enhanced services.  Of particular interest is the unprivileged use of
container APIs in which we can use both to enable self-containerising
applications as well as to deprivilege (make more secure) container
orchestration systems.  In addition we will be discussing the potential
addition of new namespaces: (LSM for per-container security modules;
IMA for per-container integrity and appraisal, file capabilities to
allow setcap binaries to run within unprivileged containers)
.”

[$] Distributing filesystem images and updates with casync

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/726625/rss

Recently, Lennart Poettering announced
a new tool called casync for efficiently distributing filesystem and disk
images. Deployment of virtual machines or containers often requires such
an image to be distributed for them. These images typically contain most
or all of an entire operating system and its requisite data files; they can
be quite large. The images also often need updates, which can take up
considerable bandwidth depending on how efficient the update mechanism
is. Poettering developed casync as an efficient tool for distributing such
filesystem images, as well as for their updates.

mkosi — A Tool for Generating OS Images

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/mkosi-a-tool-for-generating-os-images.html

Introducing mkosi

After blogging about
casync
I realized I never blogged about the
mkosi tool that combines nicely
with it. mkosi has been around for a while already, and its time to
make it a bit better known. mkosi stands for Make Operating System
Image
, and is a tool for precisely that: generating an OS tree or
image that can be booted.

Yes, there are many tools like mkosi, and a number of them are quite
well known and popular. But mkosi has a number of features that I
think make it interesting for a variety of use-cases that other tools
don’t cover that well.

What is mkosi?

What are those use-cases, and what does mkosi precisely set apart?
mkosi is definitely a tool with a focus on developer’s needs for
building OS images, for testing and debugging, but also for generating
production images with cryptographic protection. A typical use-case
would be to add a mkosi.default file to an existing project (for
example, one written in C or Python), and thus making it easy to
generate an OS image for it. mkosi will put together the image with
development headers and tools, compile your code in it, run your test
suite, then throw away the image again, and build a new one, this time
without development headers and tools, and install your build
artifacts in it. This final image is then “production-ready”, and only
contains your built program and the minimal set of packages you
configured otherwise. Such an image could then be deployed with
casync (or any other tool of course) to be delivered to your set of
servers, or IoT devices or whatever you are building.

mkosi is supposed to be legacy-free: the focus is clearly on
today’s technology, not yesteryear’s. Specifically this means that
we’ll generate GPT partition tables, not MBR/DOS ones. When you tell
mkosi to generate a bootable image for you, it will make it bootable
on EFI, not on legacy BIOS. The GPT images generated follow
specifications such as the Discoverable Partitions
Specification
,
so that /etc/fstab can remain unpopulated and tools such as
systemd-nspawn can automatically dissect the image and boot from
them.

So, let’s have a look on the specific images it can generate:

  1. Raw GPT disk image, with ext4 as root
  2. Raw GPT disk image, with btrfs as root
  3. Raw GPT disk image, with a read-only squashfs as root
  4. A plain directory on disk containing the OS tree directly (this is useful for creating generic container images)
  5. A btrfs subvolume on disk, similar to the plain directory
  6. A tarball of a plain directory

When any of the GPT choices above are selected, a couple of additional
options are available:

  1. A swap partition may be added in
  2. The system may be made bootable on EFI systems
  3. Separate partitions for /home and /srv may be added in
  4. The root, /home and /srv partitions may be optionally encrypted with LUKS
  5. The root partition may be protected using dm-verity, thus making offline attacks on the generated system hard
  6. If the image is made bootable, the dm-verity root hash is automatically added to the kernel command line, and the kernel together with its initial RAM disk and the kernel command line is optionally cryptographically signed for UEFI SecureBoot

Note that mkosi is distribution-agnostic. It currently can build
images based on the following Linux distributions:

  1. Fedora
  2. Debian
  3. Ubuntu
  4. ArchLinux
  5. openSUSE

Note though that not all distributions are supported at the same
feature level currently. Also, as mkosi is based on dnf
--installroot
, debootstrap, pacstrap and zypper, and those
packages are not packaged universally on all distributions, you might
not be able to build images for all those distributions on arbitrary
host distributions.

The GPT images are put together in a way that they aren’t just
compatible with UEFI systems, but also with VM and container managers
(that is, at least the smart ones, i.e. VM managers that know UEFI,
and container managers that grok GPT disk images) to a large
degree. In fact, the idea is that you can use mkosi to build a
single GPT image that may be used to:

  1. Boot on bare-metal boxes
  2. Boot in a VM
  3. Boot in a systemd-nspawn container
  4. Directly run a systemd service off, using systemd’s RootImage= unit file setting

Note that in all four cases the dm-verity data is automatically used
if available to ensure the image is not tampered with (yes, you read
that right, systemd-nspawn and systemd’s RootImage= setting
automatically do dm-verity these days if the image has it.)

Mode of Operation

The simplest usage of mkosi is by simply invoking it without
parameters (as root):

# mkosi

Without any configuration this will create a GPT disk image for you,
will call it image.raw and drop it in the current directory. The
distribution used will be the same one as your host runs.

Of course in most cases you want more control about how the image is
put together, i.e. select package sets, select the distribution, size
partitions and so on. Most of that you can actually specify on the
command line, but it is recommended to instead create a couple of
mkosi.$SOMETHING files and directories in some directory. Then,
simply change to that directory and run mkosi without any further
arguments. The tool will then look in the current working directory
for these files and directories and make use of them (similar to how
make looks for a Makefile…). Every single file/directory is
optional, but if they exist they are honored. Here’s a list of the
files/directories mkosi currently looks for:

  1. mkosi.default — This is the main configuration file, here you
    can configure what kind of image you want, which distribution, which
    packages and so on.

  2. mkosi.extra/ — If this directory exists, then mkosi will copy
    everything inside it into the images built. You can place arbitrary
    directory hierarchies in here, and they’ll be copied over whatever is
    already in the image, after it was put together by the distribution’s
    package manager. This is the best way to drop additional static files
    into the image, or override distribution-supplied ones.

  3. mkosi.build — This executable file is supposed to be a build
    script. When it exists, mkosi will build two images, one after the
    other in the mode already mentioned above: the first version is the
    build image, and may include various build-time dependencies such as
    a compiler or development headers. The build script is also copied
    into it, and then run inside it. The script should then build
    whatever shall be built and place the result in $DESTDIR (don’t
    worry, popular build tools such as Automake or Meson all honor
    $DESTDIR anyway, so there’s not much to do here explicitly). It may
    also run a test suite, or anything else you like. After the script
    finished, the build image is removed again, and a second image (the
    final image) is built. This time, no development packages are
    included, and the build script is not copied into the image again —
    however, the build artifacts from the first run (i.e. those placed in
    $DESTDIR) are copied into the image.

  4. mkosi.postinst — If this executable script exists, it is invoked
    inside the image (inside a systemd-nspawn invocation) and can
    adjust the image as it likes at a very late point in the image
    preparation. If mkosi.build exists, i.e. the dual-phased
    development build process used, then this script will be invoked
    twice: once inside the build image and once inside the final
    image. The first parameter passed to the script clarifies which phase
    it is run in.

  5. mkosi.nspawn — If this file exists, it should contain a
    container configuration file for systemd-nspawn (see
    systemd.nspawn(5)
    for details), which shall be shipped along with the final image and
    shall be included in the check-sum calculations (see below).

  6. mkosi.cache/ — If this directory exists, it is used as package
    cache directory for the builds. This directory is effectively bind
    mounted into the image at build time, in order to speed up building
    images. The package installers of the various distributions will
    place their package files here, so that subsequent runs can reuse
    them.

  7. mkosi.passphrase — If this file exists, it should contain a
    pass-phrase to use for the LUKS encryption (if that’s enabled for the
    image built). This file should not be readable to other users.

  8. mkosi.secure-boot.crt and mkosi.secure-boot.key should be an
    X.509 key pair to use for signing the kernel and initrd for UEFI
    SecureBoot, if that’s enabled.

How to use it

So, let’s come back to our most trivial example, without any of the
mkosi.$SOMETHING files around:

# mkosi

As mentioned, this will create a build file image.raw in the current
directory. How do we use it? Of course, we could dd it onto some USB
stick and boot it on a bare-metal device. However, it’s much simpler
to first run it in a container for testing:

# systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

And there you go: the image should boot up, and just work for you.

Now, let’s make things more interesting. Let’s still not use any of
the mkosi.$SOMETHING files around:

# mkosi -t raw_btrfs --bootable -o foobar.raw
# systemd-nspawn -bi foobar.raw

This is similar as the above, but we made three changes: it’s no
longer GPT + ext4, but GPT + btrfs. Moreover, the system is made
bootable on UEFI systems, and finally, the output is now called
foobar.raw.

Because this system is bootable on UEFI systems, we can run it in KVM:

qemu-kvm -m 512 -smp 2 -bios /usr/share/edk2/ovmf/OVMF_CODE.fd -drive format=raw,file=foobar.raw

This will look very similar to the systemd-nspawn invocation, except
that this uses full VM virtualization rather than container
virtualization. (Note that the way to run a UEFI qemu/kvm instance
appears to change all the time and is different on the various
distributions. It’s quite annoying, and I can’t really tell you what
the right qemu command line is to make this work on your system.)

Of course, it’s not all raw GPT disk images with mkosi. Let’s try
a plain directory image:

# mkosi -d fedora -t directory -o quux
# systemd-nspawn -bD quux

Of course, if you generate the image as plain directory you can’t boot
it on bare-metal just like that, nor run it in a VM.

A more complex command line is the following:

# mkosi -d fedora -t raw_squashfs --checksum --xz --package=openssh-clients --package=emacs

In this mode we explicitly pick Fedora as the distribution to use, ask
mkosi to generate a compressed GPT image with a root squashfs,
compress the result with xz, and generate a SHA256SUMS file with
the hashes of the generated artifacts. The package will contain the
SSH client as well as everybody’s favorite editor.

Now, let’s make use of the various mkosi.$SOMETHING files. Let’s
say we are working on some Automake-based project and want to make it
easy to generate a disk image off the development tree with the
version you are hacking on. Create a configuration file:

# cat > mkosi.default <<EOF
[Distribution]
Distribution=fedora
Release=24

[Output]
Format=raw_btrfs
Bootable=yes

[Packages]
# The packages to appear in both the build and the final image
Packages=openssh-clients httpd
# The packages to appear in the build image, but absent from the final image
BuildPackages=make gcc libcurl-devel
EOF

And let’s add a build script:

# cat > mkosi.build <<EOF
#!/bin/sh
./autogen.sh
./configure --prefix=/usr
make -j `nproc`
make install
EOF
# chmod +x mkosi.build

And with all that in place we can now build our project into a disk image, simply by typing:

# mkosi

Let’s try it out:

# systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

Of course, if you do this you’ll notice that building an image like
this can be quite slow. And slow build times are actively hurtful to
your productivity as a developer. Hence let’s make things a bit
faster. First, let’s make use of a package cache shared between runs:

# mkdir mkosi.cache

Building images now should already be substantially faster (and
generate less network traffic) as the packages will now be downloaded
only once and reused. However, you’ll notice that unpacking all those
packages and the rest of the work is still quite slow. But mkosi can
help you with that. Simply use mkosi‘s incremental build feature. In
this mode mkosi will make a copy of the build and final images
immediately before dropping in your build sources or artifacts, so
that building an image becomes a lot quicker: instead of always
starting totally from scratch a build will now reuse everything it can
reuse from a previous run, and immediately begin with building your
sources rather than the build image to build your sources in. To
enable the incremental build feature use -i:

# mkosi -i

Note that if you use this option, the package list is not updated
anymore from your distribution’s servers, as the cached copy is made
after all packages are installed, and hence until you actually delete
the cached copy the distribution’s network servers aren’t contacted
again and no RPMs or DEBs are downloaded. This means the distribution
you use becomes “frozen in time” this way. (Which might be a bad
thing, but also a good thing, as it makes things kinda reproducible.)

Of course, if you run mkosi a couple of times you’ll notice that it
won’t overwrite the generated image when it already exists. You can
either delete the file yourself first (rm image.raw) or let mkosi
do it for you right before building a new image, with mkosi -f. You
can also tell mkosi to not only remove any such pre-existing images,
but also remove any cached copies of the incremental feature, by using
-f twice.

I wrote mkosi originally in order to test systemd, and quickly
generate a disk image of various distributions with the most current
systemd version from git, without all that affecting my host system. I
regularly use mkosi for that today, in incremental mode. The two
commands I use most in that context are:

# mkosi -if && systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

And sometimes:

# mkosi -iff && systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

The latter I use only if I want to regenerate everything based on the
very newest set of RPMs provided by Fedora, instead of a cached
snapshot of it.

BTW, the mkosi files for systemd are included in the systemd git
tree:
mkosi.default
and
mkosi.build. This
way, any developer who wants to quickly test something with current
systemd git, or wants to prepare a patch based on it and test it can
check out the systemd repository and simply run mkosi in it and a
few minutes later he has a bootable image he can test in
systemd-nspawn or KVM. casync has similar files:
mkosi.default,
mkosi.build.

Random Interesting Features

  1. As mentioned already, mkosi will generate dm-verity enabled
    disk images if you ask for it. For that use the --verity switch on
    the command line or Verity= setting in mkosi.default. Of course,
    dm-verity implies that the root volume is read-only. In this mode
    the top-level dm-verity hash will be placed along-side the output
    disk image in a file named the same way, but with the .roothash
    suffix. If the image is to be created bootable, the root hash is also
    included on the kernel command line in the roothash= parameter,
    which current systemd versions can use to both find and activate the
    root partition in a dm-verity protected way. BTW: it’s a good idea
    to combine this dm-verity mode with the raw_squashfs image mode,
    to generate a genuinely protected, compressed image suitable for
    running in your IoT device.

  2. As indicated above, mkosi can automatically create a check-sum
    file SHA256SUMS for you (--checksum) covering all the files it
    outputs (which could be the image file itself, a matching .nspawn
    file using the mkosi.nspawn file mentioned above, as well as the
    .roothash file for the dm-verity root hash.) It can then
    optionally sign this with gpg (--sign). Note that systemd‘s
    machinectl pull-tar and machinectl pull-raw command can download
    these files and the SHA256SUMS file automatically and verify things
    on download. With other words: what mkosi outputs is perfectly
    ready for downloads using these two systemd commands.

  3. As mentioned, mkosi is big on supporting UEFI SecureBoot. To
    make use of that, place your X.509 key pair in two files
    mkosi.secureboot.crt and mkosi.secureboot.key, and set
    SecureBoot= or --secure-boot. If so, mkosi will sign the
    kernel/initrd/kernel command line combination during the build. Of
    course, if you use this mode, you should also use
    Verity=/--verity=, otherwise the setup makes only partial
    sense. Note that mkosi will not help you with actually enrolling
    the keys you use in your UEFI BIOS.

  4. mkosi has minimal support for GIT checkouts: when it recognizes
    it is run in a git checkout and you use the mkosi.build script
    stuff, the source tree will be copied into the build image, but will
    all files excluded by .gitignore removed.

  5. There’s support for encryption in place. Use --encrypt= or
    Encrypt=. Note that the UEFI ESP is never encrypted though, and the
    root partition only if explicitly requested. The /home and /srv
    partitions are unconditionally encrypted if that’s enabled.

  6. Images may be built with all documentation removed.

  7. The password for the root user and additional kernel command line
    arguments may be configured for the image to generate.

Minimum Requirements

Current mkosi requires Python 3.5, and has a number of dependencies,
listed in the
README. Most
notably you need a somewhat recent systemd version to make use of its
full feature set: systemd 233. Older versions are already packaged for
various distributions, but much of what I describe above is only
available in the most recent release mkosi 3.

The UEFI SecureBoot support requires sbsign which currently isn’t
available in Fedora, but there’s a
COPR
.

Future

It is my intention to continue turning mkosi into a tool suitable
for:

  1. Testing and debugging projects
  2. Building images for secure devices
  3. Building portable service images
  4. Building images for secure VMs and containers

One of the biggest goals I have for the future is to teach mkosi and
systemd/sd-boot native support for A/B IoT style partition
setups. The idea is that the combination of systemd, casync and
mkosi provides generic building blocks for building secure,
auto-updating devices in a generic way from, even though all pieces
may be used individually, too.

FAQ

  1. Why are you reinventing the wheel again? This is exactly like
    $SOMEOTHERPROJECT!
    — Well, to my knowledge there’s no tool that
    integrates this nicely with your project’s development tree, and can
    do dm-verity and UEFI SecureBoot and all that stuff for you. So
    nope, I don’t think this exactly like $SOMEOTHERPROJECT, thank you
    very much.

  2. What about creating MBR/DOS partition images? — That’s really
    out of focus to me. This is an exercise in figuring out how generic
    OSes and devices in the future should be built and an attempt to
    commoditize OS image building. And no, the future doesn’t speak MBR,
    sorry. That said, I’d be quite interested in adding support for
    booting on Raspberry Pi, possibly using a hybrid approach, i.e. using
    a GPT disk label, but arranging things in a way that the Raspberry Pi
    boot protocol (which is built around DOS partition tables), can still
    work.

  3. Is this portable? — Well, depends what you mean by
    portable. No, this tool runs on Linux only, and as it uses
    systemd-nspawn during the build process it doesn’t run on
    non-systemd systems either. But then again, you should be able to
    create images for any architecture you like with it, but of course if
    you want the image bootable on bare-metal systems only systems doing
    UEFI are supported (but systemd-nspawn should still work fine on
    them).

  4. Where can I get this stuff? — Try
    GitHub. And some distributions
    carry packaged versions, but I think none of them the current v3
    yet.

  5. Is this a systemd project? — Yes, it’s hosted under the
    systemd GitHub umbrella. And yes,
    during run-time systemd-nspawn in a current version is required. But
    no, the code-bases are separate otherwise, already because systemd
    is a C project, and mkosi Python.

  6. Requiring systemd 233 is a pretty steep requirement, no?
    Yes, but the feature we need kind of matters (systemd-nspawn‘s
    --overlay= switch), and again, this isn’t supposed to be a tool for
    legacy systems.

  7. Can I run the resulting images in LXC or Docker? — Humm, I am
    not an LXC nor Docker guy. If you select directory or subvolume
    as image type, LXC should be able to boot the generated images just
    fine, but I didn’t try. Last time I looked, Docker doesn’t permit
    running proper init systems as PID 1 inside the container, as they
    define their own run-time without intention to emulate a proper
    system. Hence, no I don’t think it will work, at least not with an
    unpatched Docker version. That said, again, don’t ask me questions
    about Docker, it’s not precisely my area of expertise, and quite
    frankly I am not a fan. To my knowledge neither LXC nor Docker are
    able to run containers directly off GPT disk images, hence the
    various raw_xyz image types are definitely not compatible with
    either. That means if you want to generate a single raw disk image
    that can be booted unmodified both in a container and on bare-metal,
    then systemd-nspawn is the container manager to go for
    (specifically, its -i/--image= switch).

Should you care? Is this a tool for you?

Well, that’s up to you really.

If you hack on some complex project and need a quick way to compile
and run your project on a specific current Linux distribution, then
mkosi is an excellent way to do that. Simply drop the mkosi.default
and mkosi.build files in your git tree and everything will be
easy. (And of course, as indicated above: if the project you are
hacking on happens to be called systemd or casync be aware that
those files are already part of the git tree — you can just use them.)

If you hack on some embedded or IoT device, then mkosi is a great
choice too, as it will make it reasonably easy to generate secure
images that are protected against offline modification, by using
dm-verity and UEFI SecureBoot.

If you are an administrator and need a nice way to build images for a
VM or systemd-nspawn container, or a portable service then mkosi
is an excellent choice too.

If you care about legacy computers, old distributions, non-systemd
init systems, old VM managers, Docker, … then no, mkosi is not for
you, but there are plenty of well-established alternatives around that
cover that nicely.

And never forget: mkosi is an Open Source project. We are happy to
accept your patches and other contributions.

Oh, and one unrelated last thing: don’t forget to submit your talk
proposal

and/or buy a ticket for
All Systems Go! 2017 in Berlin — the
conference where things like systemd, casync and mkosi are
discussed, along with a variety of other Linux userspace projects used
for building systems.

mkosi — A Tool for Generating OS Images

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/mkosi-a-tool-for-generating-os-images.html

Introducing mkosi

After blogging about
casync
I realized I never blogged about the
mkosi tool that combines nicely
with it. mkosi has been around for a while already, and its time to
make it a bit better known. mkosi stands for Make Operating System
Image
, and is a tool for precisely that: generating an OS tree or
image that can be booted.

Yes, there are many tools like mkosi, and a number of them are quite
well known and popular. But mkosi has a number of features that I
think make it interesting for a variety of use-cases that other tools
don’t cover that well.

What is mkosi?

What are those use-cases, and what does mkosi precisely set apart?
mkosi is definitely a tool with a focus on developer’s needs for
building OS images, for testing and debugging, but also for generating
production images with cryptographic protection. A typical use-case
would be to add a mkosi.default file to an existing project (for
example, one written in C or Python), and thus making it easy to
generate an OS image for it. mkosi will put together the image with
development headers and tools, compile your code in it, run your test
suite, then throw away the image again, and build a new one, this time
without development headers and tools, and install your build
artifacts in it. This final image is then “production-ready”, and only
contains your built program and the minimal set of packages you
configured otherwise. Such an image could then be deployed with
casync (or any other tool of course) to be delivered to your set of
servers, or IoT devices or whatever you are building.

mkosi is supposed to be legacy-free: the focus is clearly on
today’s technology, not yesteryear’s. Specifically this means that
we’ll generate GPT partition tables, not MBR/DOS ones. When you tell
mkosi to generate a bootable image for you, it will make it bootable
on EFI, not on legacy BIOS. The GPT images generated follow
specifications such as the Discoverable Partitions
Specification
,
so that /etc/fstab can remain unpopulated and tools such as
systemd-nspawn can automatically dissect the image and boot from
them.

So, let’s have a look on the specific images it can generate:

  1. Raw GPT disk image, with ext4 as root
  2. Raw GPT disk image, with btrfs as root
  3. Raw GPT disk image, with a read-only squashfs as root
  4. A plain directory on disk containing the OS tree directly (this is useful for creating generic container images)
  5. A btrfs subvolume on disk, similar to the plain directory
  6. A tarball of a plain directory

When any of the GPT choices above are selected, a couple of additional
options are available:

  1. A swap partition may be added in
  2. The system may be made bootable on EFI systems
  3. Separate partitions for /home and /srv may be added in
  4. The root, /home and /srv partitions may be optionally encrypted with LUKS
  5. The root partition may be protected using dm-verity, thus making offline attacks on the generated system hard
  6. If the image is made bootable, the dm-verity root hash is automatically added to the kernel command line, and the kernel together with its initial RAM disk and the kernel command line is optionally cryptographically signed for UEFI SecureBoot

Note that mkosi is distribution-agnostic. It currently can build
images based on the following Linux distributions:

  1. Fedora
  2. Debian
  3. Ubuntu
  4. ArchLinux
  5. openSUSE

Note though that not all distributions are supported at the same
feature level currently. Also, as mkosi is based on dnf
--installroot
, debootstrap, pacstrap and zypper, and those
packages are not packaged universally on all distributions, you might
not be able to build images for all those distributions on arbitrary
host distributions. For example, Fedora doesn’t package zypper,
hence you cannot build an openSUSE image easily on Fedora, but you can
still build Fedora (obviously…), Debian, Ubuntu and ArchLinux images
on it just fine.

The GPT images are put together in a way that they aren’t just
compatible with UEFI systems, but also with VM and container managers
(that is, at least the smart ones, i.e. VM managers that know UEFI,
and container managers that grok GPT disk images) to a large
degree. In fact, the idea is that you can use mkosi to build a
single GPT image that may be used to:

  1. Boot on bare-metal boxes
  2. Boot in a VM
  3. Boot in a systemd-nspawn container
  4. Directly run a systemd service off, using systemd’s RootImage= unit file setting

Note that in all four cases the dm-verity data is automatically used
if available to ensure the image is not tempered with (yes, you read
that right, systemd-nspawn and systemd’s RootImage= setting
automatically do dm-verity these days if the image has it.)

Mode of Operation

The simplest usage of mkosi is by simply invoking it without
parameters (as root):

# mkosi

Without any configuration this will create a GPT disk image for you,
will call it image.raw and drop it in the current directory. The
distribution used will be the same one as your host runs.

Of course in most cases you want more control about how the image is
put together, i.e. select package sets, select the distribution, size
partitions and so on. Most of that you can actually specify on the
command line, but it is recommended to instead create a couple of
mkosi.$SOMETHING files and directories in some directory. Then,
simply change to that directory and run mkosi without any further
arguments. The tool will then look in the current working directory
for these files and directories and make use of them (similar to how
make looks for a Makefile…). Every single file/directory is
optional, but if they exist they are honored. Here’s a list of the
files/directories mkosi currently looks for:

  1. mkosi.default — This is the main configuration file, here you
    can configure what kind of image you want, which distribution, which
    packages and so on.

  2. mkosi.extra/ — If this directory exists, then mkosi will copy
    everything inside it into the images built. You can place arbitrary
    directory hierarchies in here, and they’ll be copied over whatever is
    already in the image, after it was put together by the distribution’s
    package manager. This is the best way to drop additional static files
    into the image, or override distribution-supplied ones.

  3. mkosi.build — This executable file is supposed to be a build
    script. When it exists, mkosi will build two images, one after the
    other in the mode already mentioned above: the first version is the
    build image, and may include various build-time dependencies such as
    a compiler or development headers. The build script is also copied
    into it, and then run inside it. The script should then build
    whatever shall be built and place the result in $DESTDIR (don’t
    worry, popular build tools such as Automake or Meson all honor
    $DESTDIR anyway, so there’s not much to do here explicitly). It may
    also run a test suite, or anything else you like. After the script
    finished, the build image is removed again, and a second image (the
    final image) is built. This time, no development packages are
    included, and the build script is not copied into the image again —
    however, the build artifacts from the first run (i.e. those placed in
    $DESTDIR) are copied into the image.

  4. mkosi.postinst — If this executable script exists, it is invoked
    inside the image (inside a systemd-nspawn invocation) and can
    adjust the image as it likes at a very late point in the image
    preparation. If mkosi.build exists, i.e. the dual-phased
    development build process used, then this script will be invoked
    twice: once inside the build image and once inside the final
    image. The first parameter passed to the script clarifies which phase
    it is run in.

  5. mkosi.nspawn — If this file exists, it should contain a
    container configuration file for systemd-nspawn (see
    systemd.nspawn(5)
    for details), which shall be shipped along with the final image and
    shall be included in the check-sum calculations (see below).

  6. mkosi.cache/ — If this directory exists, it is used as package
    cache directory for the builds. This directory is effectively bind
    mounted into the image at build time, in order to speed up building
    images. The package installers of the various distributions will
    place their package files here, so that subsequent runs can reuse
    them.

  7. mkosi.passphrase — If this file exists, it should contain a
    pass-phrase to use for the LUKS encryption (if that’s enabled for the
    image built). This file should not be readable to other users.

  8. mkosi.secure-boot.crt and mkosi.secure-boot.key should be an
    X.509 key pair to use for signing the kernel and initrd for UEFI
    SecureBoot, if that’s enabled.

How to use it

So, let’s come back to our most trivial example, without any of the
mkosi.$SOMETHING files around:

# mkosi

As mentioned, this will create a build file image.raw in the current
directory. How do we use it? Of course, we could dd it onto some USB
stick and boot it on a bare-metal device. However, it’s much simpler
to first run it in a container for testing:

# systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

And there you go: the image should boot up, and just work for you.

Now, let’s make things more interesting. Let’s still not use any of
the mkosi.$SOMETHING files around:

# mkosi -t raw_btrfs --bootable -o foobar.raw
# systemd-nspawn -bi foobar.raw

This is similar as the above, but we made three changes: it’s no
longer GPT + ext4, but GPT + btrfs. Moreover, the system is made
bootable on UEFI systems, and finally, the output is now called
foobar.raw.

Because this system is bootable on UEFI systems, we can run it in KVM:

qemu-kvm -m 512 -smp 2 -bios /usr/share/edk2/ovmf/OVMF_CODE.fd -drive format=raw,file=foobar.raw

This will look very similar to the systemd-nspawn invocation, except
that this uses full VM virtualization rather than container
virtualization. (Note that the way to run a UEFI qemu/kvm instance
appears to change all the time and is different on the various
distributions. It’s quite annoying, and I can’t really tell you what
the right qemu command line is to make this work on your system.)

Of course, it’s not all raw GPT disk images with mkosi. Let’s try
a plain directory image:

# mkosi -d fedora -t directory -o quux
# systemd-nspawn -bD quux

Of course, if you generate the image as plain directory you can’t boot
it on bare-metal just like that, nor run it in a VM.

A more complex command line is the following:

# mkosi -d fedora -t raw_squashfs --checksum --xz --package=openssh-clients --package=emacs

In this mode we explicitly pick Fedora as the distribution to use, ask
mkosi to generate a compressed GPT image with a root squashfs,
compress the result with xz, and generate a SHA256SUMS file with
the hashes of the generated artifacts. The package will contain the
SSH client as well as everybody’s favorite editor.

Now, let’s make use of the various mkosi.$SOMETHING files. Let’s
say we are working on some Automake-based project and want to make it
easy to generate a disk image off the development tree with the
version you are hacking on. Create a configuration file:

# cat > mkosi.default <<EOF
[Distribution]
Distribution=fedora
Release=24

[Output]
Format=raw_btrfs
Bootable=yes

[Packages]
# The packages to appear in both the build and the final image
Packages=openssh-clients httpd
# The packages to appear in the build image, but absent from the final image
BuildPackages=make gcc libcurl-devel
EOF

And let’s add a build script:

# cat > mkosi.build <<EOF
#!/bin/sh
cd $SRCDIR
./autogen.sh
./configure --prefix=/usr
make -j `nproc`
make install
EOF
# chmod +x mkosi.build

And with all that in place we can now build our project into a disk image, simply by typing:

# mkosi

Let’s try it out:

# systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

Of course, if you do this you’ll notice that building an image like
this can be quite slow. And slow build times are actively hurtful to
your productivity as a developer. Hence let’s make things a bit
faster. First, let’s make use of a package cache shared between runs:

# mkdir mkosi.chache

Building images now should already be substantially faster (and
generate less network traffic) as the packages will now be downloaded
only once and reused. However, you’ll notice that unpacking all those
packages and the rest of the work is still quite slow. But mkosi can
help you with that. Simply use mkosi‘s incremental build feature. In
this mode mkosi will make a copy of the build and final images
immediately before dropping in your build sources or artifacts, so
that building an image becomes a lot quicker: instead of always
starting totally from scratch a build will now reuse everything it can
reuse from a previous run, and immediately begin with building your
sources rather than the build image to build your sources in. To
enable the incremental build feature use -i:

# mkosi -i

Note that if you use this option, the package list is not updated
anymore from your distribution’s servers, as the cached copy is made
after all packages are installed, and hence until you actually delete
the cached copy the distribution’s network servers aren’t contacted
again and no RPMs or DEBs are downloaded. This means the distribution
you use becomes “frozen in time” this way. (Which might be a bad
thing, but also a good thing, as it makes things kinda reproducible.)

Of course, if you run mkosi a couple of times you’ll notice that it
won’t overwrite the generated image when it already exists. You can
either delete the file yourself first (rm image.raw) or let mkosi
do it for you right before building a new image, with mkosi -f. You
can also tell mkosi to not only remove any such pre-existing images,
but also remove any cached copies of the incremental feature, by using
-f twice.

I wrote mkosi originally in order to test systemd, and quickly
generate a disk image of various distributions with the most current
systemd version from git, without all that affecting my host system. I
regularly use mkosi for that today, in incremental mode. The two
commands I use most in that context are:

# mkosi -if && systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

And sometimes:

# mkosi -iff && systemd-nspawn -bi image.raw

The latter I use only if I want to regenerate everything based on the
very newest set of RPMs provided by Fedora, instead of a cached
snapshot of it.

BTW, the mkosi files for systemd are included in the systemd git
tree:
mkosi.default
and
mkosi.build. This
way, any developer who wants to quickly test something with current
systemd git, or wants to prepare a patch based on it and test it can
check out the systemd repository and simply run mkosi in it and a
few minutes later he has a bootable image he can test in
systemd-nspawn or KVM. casync has similar files:
mkosi.default,
mkosi.build.

Random Interesting Features

  1. As mentioned already, mkosi will generate dm-verity enabled
    disk images if you ask for it. For that use the --verity switch on
    the command line or Verity= setting in mkosi.default. Of course,
    dm-verity implies that the root volume is read-only. In this mode
    the top-level dm-verity hash will be placed along-side the output
    disk image in a file named the same way, but with the .roothash
    suffix. If the image is to be created bootable, the root hash is also
    included on the kernel command line in the roothash= parameter,
    which current systemd versions can use to both find and activate the
    root partition in a dm-verity protected way. BTW: it’s a good idea
    to combine this dm-verity mode with the raw_squashfs image mode,
    to generate a genuinely protected, compressed image suitable for
    running in your IoT device.

  2. As indicated above, mkosi can automatically create a check-sum
    file SHA256SUMS for you (--checksum) covering all the files it
    outputs (which could be the image file itself, a matching .nspawn
    file using the mkosi.nspawn file mentioned above, as well as the
    .roothash file for the dm-verity root hash.) It can then
    optionally sign this with gpg (--sign). Note that systemd‘s
    machinectl pull-tar and machinectl pull-raw command can download
    these files and the SHA256SUMS file automatically and verify things
    on download. With other words: what mkosi outputs is perfectly
    ready for downloads using these two systemd commands.

  3. As mentioned, mkosi is big on supporting UEFI SecureBoot. To
    make use of that, place your X.509 key pair in two files
    mkosi.secureboot.crt and mkosi.secureboot.key, and set
    SecureBoot= or --secure-boot. If so, mkosi will sign the
    kernel/initrd/kernel command line combination during the build. Of
    course, if you use this mode, you should also use
    Verity=/--verity=, otherwise the setup makes only partial
    sense. Note that mkosi will not help you with actually enrolling
    the keys you use in your UEFI BIOS.

  4. mkosi has minimal support for GIT checkouts: when it recognizes
    it is run in a git checkout and you use the mkosi.build script
    stuff, the source tree will be copied into the build image, but will
    all files excluded by .gitignore removed.

  5. There’s support for encryption in place. Use --encrypt= or
    Encrypt=. Note that the UEFI ESP is never encrypted though, and the
    root partition only if explicitly requested. The /home and /srv
    partitions are unconditionally encrypted if that’s enabled.

  6. Images may be built with all documentation removed.

  7. The password for the root user and additional kernel command line
    arguments may be configured for the image to generate.

Minimum Requirements

Current mkosi requires Python 3.5, and has a number of dependencies,
listed in the
README. Most
notably you need a somewhat recent systemd version to make use of its
full feature set: systemd 233. Older versions are already packaged for
various distributions, but much of what I describe above is only
available in the most recent release mkosi 3.

The UEFI SecureBoot support requires sbsign which currently isn’t
available in Fedora, but there’s a
COPR
.

Future

It is my intention to continue turning mkosi into a tool suitable
for:

  1. Testing and debugging projects
  2. Building images for secure devices
  3. Building portable service images
  4. Building images for secure VMs and containers

One of the biggest goals I have for the future is to teach mkosi and
systemd/sd-boot native support for A/B IoT style partition
setups. The idea is that the combination of systemd, casync and
mkosi provides generic building blocks for building secure,
auto-updating devices in a generic way from, even though all pieces
may be used individually, too.

FAQ

  1. Why are you reinventing the wheel again? This is exactly like
    $SOMEOTHERPROJECT!
    — Well, to my knowledge there’s no tool that
    integrates this nicely with your project’s development tree, and can
    do dm-verity and UEFI SecureBoot and all that stuff for you. So
    nope, I don’t think this exactly like $SOMEOTHERPROJECT, thank you
    very much.

  2. What about creating MBR/DOS partition images? — That’s really
    out of focus to me. This is an exercise in figuring out how generic
    OSes and devices in the future should be built and an attempt to
    commoditize OS image building. And no, the future doesn’t speak MBR,
    sorry. That said, I’d be quite interested in adding support for
    booting on Raspberry Pi, possibly using a hybrid approach, i.e. using
    a GPT disk label, but arranging things in a way that the Raspberry Pi
    boot protocol (which is built around DOS partition tables), can still
    work.

  3. Is this portable? — Well, depends what you mean by
    portable. No, this tool runs on Linux only, and as it uses
    systemd-nspawn during the build process it doesn’t run on
    non-systemd systems either. But then again, you should be able to
    create images for any architecture you like with it, but of course if
    you want the image bootable on bare-metal systems only systems doing
    UEFI are supported (but systemd-nspawn should still work fine on
    them).

  4. Where can I get this stuff? — Try
    GitHub. And some distributions
    carry packaged versions, but I think none of them the current v3
    yet.

  5. Is this a systemd project? — Yes, it’s hosted under the
    systemd GitHub umbrella. And yes,
    during run-time systemd-nspawn in a current version is required. But
    no, the code-bases are separate otherwise, already because systemd
    is a C project, and mkosi Python.

  6. Requiring systemd 233 is a pretty steep requirement, no?
    Yes, but the feature we need kind of matters (systemd-nspawn‘s
    --overlay= switch), and again, this isn’t supposed to be a tool for
    legacy systems.

  7. Can I run the resulting images in LXC or Docker? — Humm, I am
    not an LXC nor Docker guy. If you select directory or subvolume
    as image type, LXC should be able to boot the generated images just
    fine, but I didn’t try. Last time I looked, Docker doesn’t permit
    running proper init systems as PID 1 inside the container, as they
    define their own run-time without intention to emulate a proper
    system. Hence, no I don’t think it will work, at least not with an
    unpatched Docker version. That said, again, don’t ask me questions
    about Docker, it’s not precisely my area of expertise, and quite
    frankly I am not a fan. To my knowledge neither LXC nor Docker are
    able to run containers directly off GPT disk images, hence the
    various raw_xyz image types are definitely not compatible with
    either. That means if you want to generate a single raw disk image
    that can be booted unmodified both in a container and on bare-metal,
    then systemd-nspawn is the container manager to go for
    (specifically, its -i/--image= switch).

Should you care? Is this a tool for you?

Well, that’s up to you really.

If you hack on some complex project and need a quick way to compile
and run your project on a specific current Linux distribution, then
mkosi is an excellent way to do that. Simply drop the mkosi.default
and mkosi.build files in your git tree and everything will be
easy. (And of course, as indicated above: if the project you are
hacking on happens to be called systemd or casync be aware that
those files are already part of the git tree — you can just use them.)

If you hack on some embedded or IoT device, then mkosi is a great
choice too, as it will make it reasonably easy to generate secure
images that are protected against offline modification, by using
dm-verity and UEFI SecureBoot.

If you are an administrator and need a nice way to build images for a
VM or systemd-nspawn container, or a portable service then mkosi
is an excellent choice too.

If you care about legacy computers, old distributions, non-systemd
init systems, old VM managers, Docker, … then no, mkosi is not for
you, but there are plenty of well-established alternatives around that
cover that nicely.

And never forget: mkosi is an Open Source project. We are happy to
accept your patches and other contributions.

Oh, and one unrelated last thing: don’t forget to submit your talk
proposal

and/or buy a ticket for
All Systems Go! 2017 in Berlin — the
conference where things like systemd, casync and mkosi are
discussed, along with a variety of other Linux userspace projects used
for building systems.

Synchronizing Amazon S3 Buckets Using AWS Step Functions

Post Syndicated from Andy Katz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/synchronizing-amazon-s3-buckets-using-aws-step-functions/

Constantin Gonzalez is a Principal Solutions Architect at AWS

In my free time, I run a small blog that uses Amazon S3 to host static content and Amazon CloudFront to distribute it world-wide. I use a home-grown, static website generator to create and upload my blog content onto S3.

My blog uses two S3 buckets: one for staging and testing, and one for production. As a website owner, I want to update the production bucket with all changes from the staging bucket in a reliable and efficient way, without having to create and populate a new bucket from scratch. Therefore, to synchronize files between these two buckets, I use AWS Lambda and AWS Step Functions.

In this post, I show how you can use Step Functions to build a scalable synchronization engine for S3 buckets and learn some common patterns for designing Step Functions state machines while you do so.

Step Functions overview

Step Functions makes it easy to coordinate the components of distributed applications and microservices using visual workflows. Building applications from individual components that each perform a discrete function lets you scale and change applications quickly.

While this particular example focuses on synchronizing objects between two S3 buckets, it can be generalized to any other use case that involves coordinated processing of any number of objects in S3 buckets, or other, similar data processing patterns.

Bucket replication options

Before I dive into the details on how this particular example works, take a look at some alternatives for copying or replicating data between two Amazon S3 buckets:

  • The AWS CLI provides customers with a powerful aws s3 sync command that can synchronize the contents of one bucket with another.
  • S3DistCP is a powerful tool for users of Amazon EMR that can efficiently load, save, or copy large amounts of data between S3 buckets and HDFS.
  • The S3 cross-region replication functionality enables automatic, asynchronous copying of objects across buckets in different AWS regions.

In this use case, you are looking for a slightly different bucket synchronization solution that:

  • Works within the same region
  • Is more scalable than a CLI approach running on a single machine
  • Doesn’t require managing any servers
  • Uses a more finely grained cost model than the hourly based Amazon EMR approach

You need a scalable, serverless, and customizable bucket synchronization utility.

Solution architecture

Your solution needs to do three things:

  1. Copy all objects from a source bucket into a destination bucket, but leave out objects that are already present, for efficiency.
  2. Delete all "orphaned" objects from the destination bucket that aren’t present on the source bucket, because you don’t want obsolete objects lying around.
  3. Keep track of all objects for #1 and #2, regardless of how many objects there are.

In the beginning, you read in the source and destination buckets as parameters and perform basic parameter validation. Then, you operate two separate, independent loops, one for copying missing objects and one for deleting obsolete objects. Each loop is a sequence of Step Functions states that read in chunks of S3 object lists and use the continuation token to decide in a choice state whether to continue the loop or not.

This solution is based on the following architecture that uses Step Functions, Lambda, and two S3 buckets:

As you can see, this setup involves no servers, just two main building blocks:

  • Step Functions manages the overall flow of synchronizing the objects from the source bucket with the destination bucket.
  • A set of Lambda functions carry out the individual steps necessary to perform the work, such as validating input, getting lists of objects from source and destination buckets, copying or deleting objects in batches, and so on.

To understand the synchronization flow in more detail, look at the Step Functions state machine diagram for this example.

Walkthrough

Here’s a detailed discussion of how this works.

To follow along, use the code in the sync-buckets-state-machine GitHub repo. The code comes with a ready-to-run deployment script in Python that takes care of all the IAM roles, policies, Lambda functions, and of course the Step Functions state machine deployment using AWS CloudFormation, as well as instructions on how to use it.

Fine print: Use at your own risk

Before I start, here are some disclaimers:

  • Educational purposes only.

    The following example and code are intended for educational purposes only. Make sure that you customize, test, and review it on your own before using any of this in production.

  • S3 object deletion.

    In particular, using the code included below may delete objects on S3 in order to perform synchronization. Make sure that you have backups of your data. In particular, consider using the Amazon S3 Versioning feature to protect yourself against unintended data modification or deletion.

Step Functions execution starts with an initial set of parameters that contain the source and destination bucket names in JSON:

{
    "source":       "my-source-bucket-name",
    "destination":  "my-destination-bucket-name"
}

Armed with this data, Step Functions execution proceeds as follows.

Step 1: Detect the bucket region

First, you need to know the regions where your buckets reside. In this case, take advantage of the Step Functions Parallel state. This allows you to use a Lambda function get_bucket_location.py inside two different, parallel branches of task states:

  • FindRegionForSourceBucket
  • FindRegionForDestinationBucket

Each task state receives one bucket name as an input parameter, then detects the region corresponding to "their" bucket. The output of these functions is collected in a result array containing one element per parallel function.

Step 2: Combine the parallel states

The output of a parallel state is a list with all the individual branches’ outputs. To combine them into a single structure, use a Lambda function called combine_dicts.py in its own CombineRegionOutputs task state. The function combines the two outputs from step 1 into a single JSON dict that provides you with the necessary region information for each bucket.

Step 3: Validate the input

In this walkthrough, you only support buckets that reside in the same region, so you need to decide if the input is valid or if the user has given you two buckets in different regions. To find out, use a Lambda function called validate_input.py in the ValidateInput task state that tests if the two regions from the previous step are equal. The output is a Boolean.

Step 4: Branch the workflow

Use another type of Step Functions state, a Choice state, which branches into a Failure state if the comparison in step 3 yields false, or proceeds with the remaining steps if the comparison was successful.

Step 5: Execute in parallel

The actual work is happening in another Parallel state. Both branches of this state are very similar to each other and they re-use some of the Lambda function code.

Each parallel branch implements a looping pattern across the following steps:

  1. Use a Pass state to inject either the string value "source" (InjectSourceBucket) or "destination" (InjectDestinationBucket) into the listBucket attribute of the state document.

    The next step uses either the source or the destination bucket, depending on the branch, while executing the same, generic Lambda function. You don’t need two Lambda functions that differ only slightly. This step illustrates how to use Pass states as a way of injecting constant parameters into your state machine and as a way of controlling step behavior while re-using common step execution code.

  2. The next step UpdateSourceKeyList/UpdateDestinationKeyList lists objects in the given bucket.

    Remember that the previous step injected either "source" or "destination" into the state document’s listBucket attribute. This step uses the same list_bucket.py Lambda function to list objects in an S3 bucket. The listBucket attribute of its input decides which bucket to list. In the left branch of the main parallel state, use the list of source objects to work through copying missing objects. The right branch uses the list of destination objects, to check if they have a corresponding object in the source bucket and eliminate any orphaned objects. Orphans don’t have a source object of the same S3 key.

  3. This step performs the actual work. In the left branch, the CopySourceKeys step uses the copy_keys.py Lambda function to go through the list of source objects provided by the previous step, then copies any missing object into the destination bucket. Its sister step in the other branch, DeleteOrphanedKeys, uses its destination bucket key list to test whether each object from the destination bucket has a corresponding source object, then deletes any orphaned objects.

  4. The S3 ListObjects API action is designed to be scalable across many objects in a bucket. Therefore, it returns object lists in chunks of configurable size, along with a continuation token. If the API result has a continuation token, it means that there are more objects in this list. You can work from token to token to continue getting object list chunks, until you get no more continuation tokens.

By breaking down large amounts of work into chunks, you can make sure each chunk is completed within the timeframe allocated for the Lambda function, and within the maximum input/output data size for a Step Functions state.

This approach comes with a slight tradeoff: the more objects you process at one time in a given chunk, the faster you are done. There’s less overhead for managing individual chunks. On the other hand, if you process too many objects within the same chunk, you risk going over time and space limits of the processing Lambda function or the Step Functions state so the work cannot be completed.

In this particular case, use a Lambda function that maximizes the number of objects listed from the S3 bucket that can be stored in the input/output state data. This is currently up to 32,768 bytes, assuming (based on some experimentation) that the execution of the COPY/DELETE requests in the processing states can always complete in time.

A more sophisticated approach would use the Step Functions retry/catch state attributes to account for any time limits encountered and adjust the list size accordingly through some list site adjusting.

Step 6: Test for completion

Because the presence of a continuation token in the S3 ListObjects output signals that you are not done processing all objects yet, use a Choice state to test for its presence. If a continuation token exists, it branches into the UpdateSourceKeyList step, which uses the token to get to the next chunk of objects. If there is no token, you’re done. The state machine then branches into the FinishCopyBranch/FinishDeleteBranch state.

By using Choice states like this, you can create loops exactly like the old times, when you didn’t have for statements and used branches in assembly code instead!

Step 7: Success!

Finally, you’re done, and can step into your final Success state.

Lessons learned

When implementing this use case with Step Functions and Lambda, I learned the following things:

  • Sometimes, it is necessary to manipulate the JSON state of a Step Functions state machine with just a few lines of code that hardly seem to warrant their own Lambda function. This is ok, and the cost is actually pretty low given Lambda’s 100 millisecond billing granularity. The upside is that functions like these can be helpful to make the data more palatable for the following steps or for facilitating Choice states. An example here would be the combine_dicts.py function.
  • Pass states can be useful beyond debugging and tracing, they can be used to inject arbitrary values into your state JSON and guide generic Lambda functions into doing specific things.
  • Choice states are your friend because you can build while-loops with them. This allows you to reliably grind through large amounts of data with the patience of an engine that currently supports execution times of up to 1 year.

    Currently, there is an execution history limit of 25,000 events. Each Lambda task state execution takes up 5 events, while each choice state takes 2 events for a total of 7 events per loop. This means you can loop about 3500 times with this state machine. For even more scalability, you can split up work across multiple Step Functions executions through object key sharding or similar approaches.

  • It’s not necessary to spend a lot of time coding exception handling within your Lambda functions. You can delegate all exception handling to Step Functions and instead simplify your functions as much as possible.

  • Step Functions are great replacements for shell scripts. This could have been a shell script, but then I would have had to worry about where to execute it reliably, how to scale it if it went beyond a few thousand objects, etc. Think of Step Functions and Lambda as tools for scripting at a cloud level, beyond the boundaries of servers or containers. "Serverless" here also means "boundary-less".

Summary

This approach gives you scalability by breaking down any number of S3 objects into chunks, then using Step Functions to control logic to work through these objects in a scalable, serverless, and fully managed way.

To take a look at the code or tweak it for your own needs, use the code in the sync-buckets-state-machine GitHub repo.

To see more examples, please visit the Step Functions Getting Started page.

Enjoy!

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 1

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/06/23/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-1/

Introducing timeShift

TimeShift is a new blog series we’ve created to provide a weekly curated list of links and articles centered around Grafana and the growing Grafana community. Each week we come across great articles from people who have written about how they are using Grafana, how to build effective dashboards, and a lot of discussion about the state of open source monitoring. We want to collect this information in one place and post an article every Friday afternoon highlighting some of this great content.

From the Blogosphere

We see a lot of articles covering the devops side of monitoring, but it’s interesting to see how people are using Grafana for different use cases.

Plugins and Dashboards

We are excited that there have been over 100,000 plugin installations since we launched the new plugable architecture in Grafana v3. You can discover and install plugins in your own on-premises or Hosted Grafana instance from our website. Below are some recent additions and updates.

Carpet plot A varient of the heatmap graph panel with additional display options.

DalmatinerDB No-fluff, purpose-built metric database.

Gnocchi This plugin was renamed. Users should uninstall the old version and install this new version.

This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we’ll recognize a Grafana contributor and thank them for all of their PRs, bug reports and feedback. A majority of fixes and improvements come from our fantastic community!

thuck (Denis Doria)

Thank you for all of your PRs!

What do you think?

Anything in particular you’d like to see in this series of posts? Too long? Too short? Boring as shit? Let us know. Comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. With your help, we can make this a worthwhile resource.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

DevOps Cafe Episode 72 – Kelsey Hightower

Post Syndicated from DevOpsCafeAdmin original http://devopscafe.org/show/2017/6/18/devops-cafe-episode-72-kelsey-hightower.html

You can’t contain(er) Kelsey.

John and Damon chat with Kelsey Hightower (Google) about the future of operations, kubernetes, docker, containers, self-learning, and more!
  

  

Direct download

Follow John Willis on Twitter: @botchagalupe
Follow Damon Edwards on Twitter: @damonedwards 
Follow Kelsey Hightower on Twitter: @kelseyhightower

Notes:

 

Please tweet or leave comments or questions below and we’ll read them on the show!