Tag Archives: AWS Identity and Access Management

Now Use AWS IAM to Delete a Service-Linked Role When You No Longer Require an AWS Service to Perform Actions on Your Behalf

Post Syndicated from Ujjwal Pugalia original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/now-use-aws-iam-to-delete-a-service-linked-role-when-you-no-longer-require-an-aws-service-to-perform-actions-on-your-behalf/

Earlier this year, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) introduced service-linked roles, which provide you an easy and secure way to delegate permissions to AWS services. Each service-linked role delegates permissions to an AWS service, which is called its linked service. Service-linked roles help with monitoring and auditing requirements by providing a transparent way to understand all actions performed on your behalf because AWS CloudTrail logs all actions performed by the linked service using service-linked roles. For information about which services support service-linked roles, see AWS Services That Work with IAM. Over time, more AWS services will support service-linked roles.

Today, IAM added support for the deletion of service-linked roles through the IAM console and the IAM API/CLI. This means you now can revoke permissions from the linked service to create and manage AWS resources in your account. When you delete a service-linked role, the linked service no longer has the permissions to perform actions on your behalf. To ensure your AWS services continue to function as expected when you delete a service-linked role, IAM validates that you no longer have resources that require the service-linked role to function properly. This prevents you from inadvertently revoking permissions required by an AWS service to manage your existing AWS resources and helps you maintain your resources in a consistent state. If there are any resources in your account that require the service-linked role, you will receive an error when you attempt to delete the service-linked role, and the service-linked role will remain in your account. If you do not have any resources that require the service-linked role, you can delete the service-linked role and IAM will remove the service-linked role from your account.

In this blog post, I show how to delete a service-linked role by using the IAM console. To learn more about how to delete service-linked roles by using the IAM API/CLI, see the DeleteServiceLinkedRole API documentation.

Note: The IAM console does not currently support service-linked role deletion for Amazon Lex, but you can delete your service-linked role by using the Amazon Lex console. To learn more, see Service Permissions.

How to delete a service-linked role by using the IAM console

If you no longer need to use an AWS service that uses a service-linked role, you can remove permissions from that service by deleting the service-linked role through the IAM console. To delete a service-linked role, you must have permissions for the iam:DeleteServiceLinkedRole action. For example, the following IAM policy grants the permission to delete service-linked roles used by Amazon Redshift. To learn more about working with IAM policies, see Working with Policies.

{ 
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "AllowDeletionOfServiceLinkedRolesForRedshift",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": ["iam:DeleteServiceLinkedRole"],
            "Resource": ["arn:aws:iam::*:role/aws-service-role/redshift.amazonaws.com/AWSServiceRoleForRedshift*"]
	 }
    ]
}

To delete a service-linked role by using the IAM console:

  1. Navigate to the IAM console and choose Roles from the navigation pane.

Screenshot of the Roles page in the IAM console

  1. Choose the service-linked role you want to delete and then choose Delete role. In this example, I choose the  AWSServiceRoleForRedshift service-linked role.

Screenshot of the AWSServiceRoleForRedshift service-linked role

  1. A dialog box asks you to confirm that you want to delete the service-linked role you have chosen. In the Last activity column, you can see when the AWS service last used the service-linked role, which tells you when the linked service last used the service-linked role to perform an action on your behalf. If you want to continue to delete the service-linked role, choose Yes, delete to delete the service-linked role.

Screenshot of the "Delete role" window

  1. IAM then checks whether you have any resources that require the service-linked role you are trying to delete. While IAM checks, you will see the status message, Deletion in progress, below the role name. Screenshot showing "Deletion in progress"
  1. If no resources require the service-linked role, IAM deletes the role from your account and displays a success message on the console.

Screenshot of the success message

  1. If there are AWS resources that require the service-linked role you are trying to delete, you will see the status message, Deletion failed, below the role name.

Screenshot showing the "Deletion failed"

  1. If you choose View details, you will see a message that explains the deletion failed because there are resources that use the service-linked role.
    Screenshot showing details about why the role deletion failed
  2. Choose View Resources to view the Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) of the first five resources that require the service-linked role. You can delete the service-linked role only after you delete all resources that require the service-linked role. In this example, only one resource requires the service-linked role.

Conclusion

Service-linked roles make it easier for you to delegate permissions to AWS services to create and manage AWS resources on your behalf and to understand all actions the service will perform on your behalf. If you no longer need to use an AWS service that uses a service-linked role, you can remove permissions from that service by deleting the service-linked role through the IAM console. However, before you delete a service-linked role, you must delete all the resources associated with that role to ensure that your resources remain in a consistent state.

If you have any questions, submit a comment in the “Comments” section below. If you need help working with service-linked roles, start a new thread on the IAM forum or contact AWS Support.

– Ujjwal

Greater Transparency into Actions AWS Services Perform on Your Behalf by Using AWS CloudTrail

Post Syndicated from Ujjwal Pugalia original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/get-greater-transparency-into-actions-aws-services-perform-on-your-behalf-by-using-aws-cloudtrail/

To make managing your AWS account easier, some AWS services perform actions on your behalf, including the creation and management of AWS resources. For example, AWS Elastic Beanstalk automatically handles the deployment details of capacity provisioning, load balancing, auto-scaling, and application health monitoring. To make these AWS actions more transparent, AWS adds an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) service-linked roles to your account for each linked service you use. Service-linked roles let you view all actions an AWS service performs on your behalf by using AWS CloudTrail logs. This helps you monitor and audit the actions AWS services perform on your behalf. No additional actions are required from you and you can continue using AWS services the way you do today.

To learn more about which AWS services use service-linked roles and log actions on your behalf to CloudTrail, see AWS Services That Work with IAM. Over time, more AWS services will support service-linked roles. For more information about service-linked roles, see Role Terms and Concepts.

In this blog post, I demonstrate how to view CloudTrail logs so that you can more easily monitor and audit AWS services performing actions on your behalf. First, I show how AWS creates a service-linked role in your account automatically when you configure an AWS service that supports service-linked roles. Next, I show how you can view the policies of a service-linked role that grants an AWS service permission to perform actions on your behalf. Finally, I  use the configured AWS service to perform an action and show you how the action appears in your CloudTrail logs.

How AWS creates a service-linked role in your account automatically

I will use Amazon Lex as the AWS service that performs actions on your behalf for this post. You can use Amazon Lex to create chatbots that allow for highly engaging conversational experiences through voice and text. You also can use chatbots on mobile devices, web browsers, and popular chat platform channels such as Slack. Amazon Lex uses Amazon Polly on your behalf to synthesize speech that sounds like a human voice.

Amazon Lex uses two IAM service-linked roles:

  • AWSServiceRoleForLexBots — Amazon Lex uses this service-linked role to invoke Amazon Polly to synthesize speech responses for your chatbot.
  • AWSServiceRoleForLexChannels — Amazon Lex uses this service-linked role to post text to your chatbot when managing channels such as Slack.

You don’t need to create either of these roles manually. When you create your first chatbot using the Amazon Lex console, Amazon Lex creates the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots role for you. When you first associate a chatbot with a messaging channel, Amazon Lex creates the AWSServiceRoleForLexChannels role in your account.

1. Start configuring the AWS service that supports service-linked roles

Navigate to the Amazon Lex console, and choose Get Started to navigate to the Create your Lex bot page. For this example, I choose a sample chatbot called OrderFlowers. To learn how to create a custom chatbot, see Create a Custom Amazon Lex Bot.

Screenshot of making the choice to create an OrderFlowers chatbot

2. Complete the configuration for the AWS service

When you scroll down, you will see the settings for the OrderFlowers chatbot. Notice the field for the IAM role with the value, AWSServiceRoleForLexBots. This service-linked role is “Automatically created on your behalf.” After you have entered all details, choose Create to build your sample chatbot.

Screenshot of the automatically created service-linked role

AWS has created the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role in your account. I will return to using the chatbot later in this post when I discuss how Amazon Lex performs actions on your behalf and how CloudTrail logs these actions. First, I will show how you can view the permissions for the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role by using the IAM console.

How to view actions in the IAM console that AWS services perform on your behalf

When you configure an AWS service that supports service-linked roles, AWS creates a service-linked role in your account automatically. You can view the service-linked role by using the IAM console.

1. View the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role on the IAM console

Go to the IAM console, and choose AWSServiceRoleForLexBots on the Roles page. You can confirm that this role is a service-linked role by viewing the Trusted entities column.

Screenshot of the service-linked role

2.View the trusted entities that can assume the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role

Choose the Trust relationships tab on the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots role page. You can view the trusted entities that can assume the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role to perform actions on your behalf. In this example, the trusted entity is lex.amazonaws.com.

Screenshot of the trusted entities that can assume the service-linked role

3. View the policy attached to the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role

Choose AmazonLexBotPolicy on the Permissions tab to view the policy attached to the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role. You can view the policy summary to see that AmazonLexBotPolicy grants permission to Amazon Lex to use Amazon Polly.

Screenshot showing that AmazonLexBotPolicy grants permission to Amazon Lex to use Amazon Polly

4. View the actions that the service-linked role grants permissions to use

Choose Polly to view the action, SynthesizeSpeech, that the AmazonLexBotPolicy grants permission to Amazon Lex to perform on your behalf. Amazon Lex uses this permission to synthesize speech responses for your chatbot. I show later in this post how you can monitor this SynthesizeSpeech action in your CloudTrail logs.

Screenshot showing the the action, SynthesizeSpeech, that the AmazonLexBotPolicy grants permission to Amazon Lex to perform on your behalf

Now that I know the trusted entity and the policy attached to the service-linked role, let’s go back to the chatbot I created earlier and see how CloudTrail logs the actions that Amazon Lex performs on my behalf.

How to use CloudTrail to view actions that AWS services perform on your behalf

As discussed already, I created an OrderFlowers chatbot on the Amazon Lex console. I will use the chatbot and display how the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role helps me track actions in CloudTrail. First, though, I must have an active CloudTrail trail created that stores the logs in an Amazon S3 bucket. I will use a trail called TestTrail and an S3 bucket called account-ids-slr.

1. Use the Amazon Lex chatbot via the Amazon Lex console

In Step 2 in the first section of this post, when I chose Create, Amazon Lex built the OrderFlowers chatbot. After the chatbot was built, the right pane showed that a Test Bot was created. Now, I choose the microphone symbol in the right pane and provide voice input to test the OrderFlowers chatbot. In this example, I tell the chatbot, “I would like to order some flowers.” The bot replies to me by asking, “What type of flowers would you like to order?”

Screenshot of voice input to test the OrderFlowers chatbot

When the chatbot replies using voice, Amazon Lex uses Amazon Polly to synthesize speech from text to voice. Amazon Lex assumes the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role to perform the SynthesizeSpeech action.

2. Check CloudTrail to view actions performed on your behalf

Now that I have created the chatbot, let’s see which actions were logged in CloudTrail. Choose CloudTrail from the Services drop-down menu to reach the CloudTrail console. Choose Trails and choose the S3 bucket in which you are storing your CloudTrail logs.

Screenshot of the TestTrail trail

In the S3 bucket, you will find log entries for the SynthesizeSpeech event. This means that CloudTrail logged the action when Amazon Lex assumed the AWSServiceRoleForLexBots service-linked role to invoke Amazon Polly to synthesize speech responses for your chatbot. You can monitor and audit this invocation, and it provides you with transparency into Amazon Polly’s SynthesizeSpeech action that Amazon Lex invoked on your behalf. The applicable CloudTrail log section follows and I have emphasized the key lines.

{  
         "eventVersion":"1.05",
         "userIdentity":{  
           "type":"AssumedRole",
            "principalId":"{principal-id}:OrderFlowers",
            "arn":"arn:aws:sts::{account-id}:assumed-role/AWSServiceRoleForLexBots/OrderFlowers",
            "accountId":"{account-id}",
            "accessKeyId":"{access-key-id}",
            "sessionContext":{  
               "attributes":{  
                  "mfaAuthenticated":"false",
                  "creationDate":"2017-09-17T17:30:05Z"
               },
               "sessionIssuer":{  
                  "type":"Role",
                  "principalId":"{principal-id}",
                  "arn":"arn:aws:iam:: {account-id}:role/aws-service-role/lex.amazonaws.com/AWSServiceRoleForLexBots",
                  "accountId":"{account-id",
                  "userName":"AWSServiceRoleForLexBots"
               }
            },
            "invokedBy":"lex.amazonaws.com"
         },
         "eventTime":"2017-09-17T17:30:05Z",
         "eventSource":"polly.amazonaws.com",
         "eventName":"SynthesizeSpeech",
         "awsRegion":"us-east-1",
         "sourceIPAddress":"lex.amazonaws.com",
         "userAgent":"lex.amazonaws.com",
         "requestParameters":{  
            "outputFormat":"mp3",
            "textType":"text",
            "voiceId":"Salli",
            "text":"**********"
         },
         "responseElements":{  
            "requestCharacters":45,
            "contentType":"audio/mpeg"
         },
         "requestID":"{request-id}",
         "eventID":"{event-id}",
         "eventType":"AwsApiCall",
         "recipientAccountId":"{account-id}"
      }

Conclusion

Service-linked roles make it easier for you to track and view actions that linked AWS services perform on your behalf by using CloudTrail. When an AWS service supports service-linked roles to enable this additional logging, you will see a service-linked role added to your account.

If you have comments about this post, submit a comment in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about working with service-linked roles, start a new thread on the IAM forum or contact AWS Support.

– Ujjwal

AWS IAM Policy Summaries Now Help You Identify Errors and Correct Permissions in Your IAM Policies

Post Syndicated from Joy Chatterjee original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/iam-policy-summaries-now-help-you-identify-errors-and-correct-permissions-in-your-iam-policies/

In March, we made it easier to view and understand the permissions in your AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policies by using IAM policy summaries. Today, we updated policy summaries to help you identify and correct errors in your IAM policies. When you set permissions using IAM policies, for each action you specify, you must match that action to supported resources or conditions. Now, you will see a warning if these policy elements (Actions, Resources, and Conditions) defined in your IAM policy do not match.

When working with policies, you may find that although the policy has valid JSON syntax, it does not grant or deny the desired permissions because the Action element does not have an applicable Resource element or Condition element defined in the policy. For example, you may want to create a policy that allows users to view a specific Amazon EC2 instance. To do this, you create a policy that specifies ec2:DescribeInstances for the Action element and the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the instance for the Resource element. When testing this policy, you find AWS denies this access because ec2:DescribeInstances does not support resource-level permissions and requires access to list all instances. Therefore, to grant access to this Action element, you need to specify a wildcard (*) in the Resource element of your policy for this Action element in order for the policy to function correctly.

To help you identify and correct permissions, you will now see a warning in a policy summary if the policy has either of the following:

  • An action that does not support the resource specified in a policy.
  • An action that does not support the condition specified in a policy.

In this blog post, I walk through two examples of how you can use policy summaries to help identify and correct these types of errors in your IAM policies.

How to use IAM policy summaries to debug your policies

Example 1: An action does not support the resource specified in a policy

Let’s say a human resources (HR) representative, Casey, needs access to the personnel files stored in HR’s Amazon S3 bucket. To do this, I create the following policy to grant all actions that begin with s3:List. In addition, I grant access to s3:GetObject in the Action element of the policy. To ensure that Casey has access only to a specific bucket and not others, I specify the bucket ARN in the Resource element of the policy.

Note: This policy does not grant the desired permissions.

This policy does not work. Do not copy.
{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "ThisPolicyDoesNotGrantAllListandGetActions",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": ["s3:List*",
                       "s3:GetObject"],
            "Resource": ["arn:aws:s3:::HumanResources"]
        }
    ]
}

After I create the policy, HRBucketPermissions, I select this policy from the Policies page to view the policy summary. From here, I check to see if there are any warnings or typos in the policy. I see a warning at the top of the policy detail page because the policy does not grant some permissions specified in the policy, which is caused by a mismatch among the actions, resources, or conditions.

Screenshot showing the warning at the top of the policy

To view more details about the warning, I choose Show remaining so that I can understand why the permissions do not appear in the policy summary. As shown in the following screenshot, I see no access to the services that are not granted by the IAM policy in the policy, which is expected. However, next to S3, I see a warning that one or more S3 actions do not have an applicable resource.

Screenshot showing that one or more S3 actions do not have an applicable resource

To understand why the specific actions do not have a supported resource, I choose S3 from the list of services and choose Show remaining. I type List in the filter to understand why some of the list actions are not granted by the policy. As shown in the following screenshot, I see these warnings:

  • This action does not support resource-level permissions. This means the action does not support resource-level permissions and requires a wildcard (*) in the Resource element of the policy.
  • This action does not have an applicable resource. This means the action supports resource-level permissions, but not the resource type defined in the policy. In this example, I specified an S3 bucket for an action that supports only an S3 object resource type.

From these warnings, I see that s3:ListAllMyBuckets, s3:ListBucketMultipartUploadsParts3:ListObjects , and s3:GetObject do not support an S3 bucket resource type, which results in Casey not having access to the S3 bucket. To correct the policy, I choose Edit policy and update the policy with three statements based on the resource that the S3 actions support. Because Casey needs access to view and read all of the objects in the HumanResources bucket, I add a wildcard (*) for the S3 object path in the Resource ARN.

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "TheseActionsSupportBucketResourceType",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": ["s3:ListBucket",
                       "s3:ListBucketByTags",
                       "s3:ListBucketMultipartUploads",
                       "s3:ListBucketVersions"],
            "Resource": ["arn:aws:s3:::HumanResources"]
        },{
            "Sid": "TheseActionsRequireAllResources",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": ["s3:ListAllMyBuckets",
                       "s3:ListMultipartUploadParts",
                       "s3:ListObjects"],
            "Resource": [ "*"]
        },{
            "Sid": "TheseActionsRequireSupportsObjectResourceType",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": ["s3:GetObject"],
            "Resource": ["arn:aws:s3:::HumanResources/*"]
        }
    ]
}

After I make these changes, I see the updated policy summary and see that warnings are no longer displayed.

Screenshot of the updated policy summary that no longer shows warnings

In the previous example, I showed how to identify and correct permissions errors that include actions that do not support a specified resource. In the next example, I show how to use policy summaries to identify and correct a policy that includes actions that do not support a specified condition.

Example 2: An action does not support the condition specified in a policy

For this example, let’s assume Bob is a project manager who requires view and read access to all the code builds for his team. To grant him this access, I create the following JSON policy that specifies all list and read actions to AWS CodeBuild and defines a condition to limit access to resources in the us-west-2 Region in which Bob’s team develops.

This policy does not work. Do not copy. 
{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "ListReadAccesstoCodeServices",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "codebuild:List*",
                "codebuild:BatchGet*"
            ],
            "Resource": ["*"], 
             "Condition": {
                "StringEquals": {
                    "ec2:Region": "us-west-2"
                }
            }
        }
    ]	
}

After I create the policy, PMCodeBuildAccess, I select this policy from the Policies page to view the policy summary in the IAM console. From here, I check to see if the policy has any warnings or typos. I see an error at the top of the policy detail page because the policy does not grant any permissions.

Screenshot with an error showing the policy does not grant any permissions

To view more details about the error, I choose Show remaining to understand why no permissions result from the policy. I see this warning: One or more conditions do not have an applicable action. This means that the condition is not supported by any of the actions defined in the policy.

From the warning message (see preceding screenshot), I realize that ec2:Region is not a supported condition for any actions in CodeBuild. To correct the policy, I separate the list actions that do not support resource-level permissions into a separate Statement element and specify * as the resource. For the remaining CodeBuild actions that support resource-level permissions, I use the ARN to specify the us-west-2 Region in the project resource type.

CORRECT POLICY 
{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "TheseActionsSupportAllResources",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "codebuild:ListBuilds",
                "codebuild:ListProjects",
                "codebuild:ListRepositories",
                "codebuild:ListCuratedEnvironmentImages",
                "codebuild:ListConnectedOAuthAccounts"
            ],
            "Resource": ["*"] 
        }, {
            "Sid": "TheseActionsSupportAResource",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "codebuild:ListBuildsForProject",
                "codebuild:BatchGet*"
            ],
            "Resource": ["arn:aws:codebuild:us-west-2:123456789012:project/*"] 
        }

    ]	
}

After I make the changes, I view the updated policy summary and see that no warnings are displayed.

Screenshot showing the updated policy summary with no warnings

When I choose CodeBuild from the list of services, I also see that for the actions that support resource-level permissions, the access is limited to the us-west-2 Region.

Screenshow showing that for the Actions that support resource-level permissions, the access is limited to the us-west-2 region.

Conclusion

Policy summaries make it easier to view and understand the permissions and resources in your IAM policies by displaying the permissions granted by the policies. As I’ve demonstrated in this post, you can also use policy summaries to help you identify and correct your IAM policies. To understand the types of warnings that policy summaries support, you can visit Troubleshoot IAM Policies. To view policy summaries in your AWS account, sign in to the IAM console and navigate to any policy on the Policies page of the IAM console or the Permissions tab on a user’s page.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or suggestions for this solution, start a new thread on the IAM forum or contact AWS Support.

– Joy

New AWS DevOps Blog Post: How to Help Secure Your Code in a Cross-Region/Cross-Account Deployment Solution on AWS

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/new-aws-devops-blog-post-how-to-help-secure-your-code-in-a-cross-regioncross-account-deployment-solution/

Security image

You can help to protect your data in a number of ways while it is in transit and at rest, such as by using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or client-side encryption. AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) is a managed service that makes it easy for you to create, control, rotate, and use your encryption keys. AWS KMS allows you to create custom keys, which you can share with AWS Identity and Access Management users and roles in your AWS account or in an AWS account owned by someone else.

In a new AWS DevOps Blog post, BK Chaurasiya describes a solution for building a cross-region/cross-account code deployment solution on AWS. BK explains options for helping to protect your source code as it travels between regions and between AWS accounts.

For more information, see the full AWS DevOps Blog post.

– Craig

New – VPC Endpoints for DynamoDB

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-vpc-endpoints-for-dynamodb/

Starting today Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) Endpoints for Amazon DynamoDB are available in all public AWS regions. You can provision an endpoint right away using the AWS Management Console or the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI). There are no additional costs for a VPC Endpoint for DynamoDB.

Many AWS customers run their applications within a Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) for security or isolation reasons. Previously, if you wanted your EC2 instances in your VPC to be able to access DynamoDB, you had two options. You could use an Internet Gateway (with a NAT Gateway or assigning your instances public IPs) or you could route all of your traffic to your local infrastructure via VPN or AWS Direct Connect and then back to DynamoDB. Both of these solutions had security and throughput implications and it could be difficult to configure NACLs or security groups to restrict access to just DynamoDB. Here is a picture of the old infrastructure.

Creating an Endpoint

Let’s create a VPC Endpoint for DynamoDB. We can make sure our region supports the endpoint with the DescribeVpcEndpointServices API call.


aws ec2 describe-vpc-endpoint-services --region us-east-1
{
    "ServiceNames": [
        "com.amazonaws.us-east-1.dynamodb",
        "com.amazonaws.us-east-1.s3"
    ]
}

Great, so I know my region supports these endpoints and I know what my regional endpoint is. I can grab one of my VPCs and provision an endpoint with a quick call to the CLI or through the console. Let me show you how to use the console.

First I’ll navigate to the VPC console and select “Endpoints” in the sidebar. From there I’ll click “Create Endpoint” which brings me to this handy console.

You’ll notice the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy section for the endpoint. This supports all of the fine grained access control that DynamoDB supports in regular IAM policies and you can restrict access based on IAM policy conditions.

For now I’ll give full access to my instances within this VPC and click “Next Step”.

This brings me to a list of route tables in my VPC and asks me which of these route tables I want to assign my endpoint to. I’ll select one of them and click “Create Endpoint”.

Keep in mind the note of warning in the console: if you have source restrictions to DynamoDB based on public IP addresses the source IP of your instances accessing DynamoDB will now be their private IP addresses.

After adding the VPC Endpoint for DynamoDB to our VPC our infrastructure looks like this.

That’s it folks! It’s that easy. It’s provided at no cost. Go ahead and start using it today. If you need more details you can read the docs here.

Newly Updated: Example AWS IAM Policies for You to Use and Customize

Post Syndicated from Deren Smith original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/newly-updated-example-policies-for-you-to-use-and-customize/

To help you grant access to specific resources and conditions, the Example Policies page in the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) documentation now includes more than thirty policies for you to use or customize to meet your permissions requirements. The AWS Support team developed these policies from their experiences working with AWS customers over the years. The example policies cover common permissions use cases you might encounter across services such as Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon EC2, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon RDS, Amazon S3, and IAM.

In this blog post, I introduce the updated Example Policies page and explain how to use and customize these policies for your needs.

The new Example Policies page

The Example Policies page in the IAM User Guide now provides an overview of the example policies and includes a link to view each policy on a separate page. Note that each of these policies has been reviewed and approved by AWS Support. If you would like to submit a policy that you have found to be particularly useful, post it on the IAM forum.

To give you an idea of the policies we have included on this page, the following are a few of the EC2 policies on the page:

To see the full list of available policies, see the Example Polices page.

In the following section, I demonstrate how to use a policy from the Example Policies page and customize it for your needs.

How to customize an example policy for your needs

Suppose you want to allow an IAM user, Bob, to start and stop EC2 instances with a specific resource tag. After looking through the Example Policies page, you see the policy, Allows Starting or Stopping EC2 Instances a User Has Tagged, Programmatically and in the Console.

To apply this policy to your specific use case:

  1. Navigate to the Policies section of the IAM console.
  2. Choose Create policy.
    Screenshot of choosing "Create policy"
  3. Choose the Select button next to Create Your Own Policy. You will see an empty policy document with boxes for Policy Name, Description, and Policy Document, as shown in the following screenshot.
  4. Type a name for the policy, copy the policy from the Example Policies page, and paste the policy in the Policy Document box. In this example, I use “start-stop-instances-for-owner-tag” as the policy name and “Allows users to start or stop instances if the instance tag Owner has the value of their user name” as the description.
  5. Update the placeholder text in the policy (see the full policy that follows this step). For example, replace <REGION> with a region from AWS Regions and Endpoints and <ACCOUNTNUMBER> with your 12-digit account number. The IAM policy variable, ${aws:username}, is a dynamic property in the policy that automatically applies to the user to which it is attached. For example, when the policy is attached to Bob, the policy replaces ${aws:username} with Bob. If you do not want to use the key value pair of Owner and ${aws:username}, you can edit the policy to include your desired key value pair. For example, if you want to use the key value pair, CostCenter:1234, you can modify “ec2:ResourceTag/Owner”: “${aws:username}” to “ec2:ResourceTag/CostCenter”: “1234”.
    {
        "Version": "2012-10-17",
        "Statement": [
           {
          "Effect": "Allow",
          "Action": [
              "ec2:StartInstances",
              "ec2:StopInstances"
          ],
                 "Resource": "arn:aws:ec2:<REGION>:<ACCOUNTNUMBER>:instance/*",
                 "Condition": {
              "StringEquals": {
                  "ec2:ResourceTag/Owner": "${aws:username}"
              }
          }
            },
            {
                 "Effect": "Allow",
                 "Action": "ec2:DescribeInstances",
                 "Resource": "*"
            }
        ]
    }

  6. After you have edited the policy, choose Create policy.

You have created a policy that allows an IAM user to stop and start EC2 instances in your account, as long as these instances have the correct resource tag and the policy is attached to your IAM users. You also can attach this policy to an IAM group and apply the policy to users by adding them to that group.

Summary

We updated the Example Policies page in the IAM User Guide so that you have a central location where you can find examples of the most commonly requested and used IAM policies. In addition to these example policies, we recommend that you review the list of AWS managed policies, including the AWS managed policies for job functions. You can choose these predefined policies from the IAM console and associate them with your IAM users, groups, and roles.

We will add more IAM policies to the Example Policies page over time. If you have a useful policy you would like to share with others, post it on the IAM forum. If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below.

– Deren

New Information in the AWS IAM Console Helps You Follow IAM Best Practices

Post Syndicated from Rob Moncur original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/newly-updated-features-in-the-aws-iam-console-help-you-adhere-to-iam-best-practices/

Today, we added new information to the Users section of the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) console to make it easier for you to follow IAM best practices. With this new information, you can more easily monitor users’ activity in your AWS account and identify access keys and passwords that you should rotate regularly. You can also better audit users’ MFA device usage and keep track of their group memberships. In this post, I show how you can use this new information to help you follow IAM best practices.

Monitor activity in your AWS account

The IAM best practice, monitor activity in your AWS account, encourages you to monitor user activity in your AWS account by using services such as AWS CloudTrail and AWS Config. In addition to monitoring usage in your AWS account, you should be aware of inactive users so that you can remove them from your account. By only retaining necessary users, you can help maintain the security of your AWS account.

To help you find users that are inactive, we added three new columns to the IAM user table: Last activity, Console last sign-in, and Access key last used.
Screenshot showing three new columns in the IAM user table

  1. Last activity – This column tells you how long it has been since the user has either signed in to the AWS Management Console or accessed AWS programmatically with their access keys. Use this column to find users who might be inactive, and consider removing them from your AWS account.
  2. Console last sign-in – This column displays the time since the user’s most recent console sign-in. Consider removing passwords from users who are not signing in to the console.
  3. Access key last used – This column displays the time since a user last used access keys. Use this column to find any access keys that are not being used, and deactivate or remove them.

Rotate credentials regularly

The IAM best practice, rotate credentials regularly, recommends that all users in your AWS account change passwords and access keys regularly. With this practice, if a password or access key is compromised without your knowledge, you can limit how long the credentials can be used to access your resources. To help your management efforts, we added three new columns to the IAM user table: Access key age, Password age, and Access key ID.

Screenshot showing three new columns in the IAM user table

  1. Access key age – This column shows how many days it has been since the oldest active access key was created for a user. With this information, you can audit access keys easily across all your users and identify the access keys that may need to be rotated.

Based on the number of days since the access key has been rotated, a green, yellow, or red icon is displayed. To see the corresponding time frame for each icon, pause your mouse pointer on the Access key age column heading to see the tooltip, as shown in the following screenshot.

Icons showing days since the oldest active access key was created

  1. Password age – This column shows the number of days since a user last changed their password. With this information, you can audit password rotation and identify users who have not changed their password recently. The easiest way to make sure that your users are rotating their password often is to establish an account password policy that requires users to change their password after a specified time period.
  2. Access key ID – This column displays the access key IDs for users and the current status (Active/Inactive) of those access key IDs. This column makes it easier for you to locate and see the state of access keys for each user, which is useful for auditing. To find a specific access key ID, use the search box above the table.

Enable MFA for privileged users

Another IAM best practice is to enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) for privileged IAM users. With MFA, users have a device that generates a unique authentication code (a one-time password [OTP]). Users must provide both their normal credentials (such as their user name and password) and the OTP when signing in.

To help you see if MFA has been enabled for your users, we’ve improved the MFA column to show you if MFA is enabled and which type of MFA (hardware, virtual, or SMS) is enabled for each user, where applicable.

Screenshot showing the improved "MFA" column

Use groups to assign permissions to IAM users

Instead of defining permissions for individual IAM users, it’s usually more convenient to create groups that relate to job functions (such as administrators, developers, and accountants), define the relevant permissions for each group, and then assign IAM users to those groups. All the users in an IAM group inherit the permissions assigned to the group. This way, if you need to modify permissions, you can make the change once for everyone in a group instead of making the change one time for each user. As people move around in your company, you can change the group membership of the IAM user.

To better understand which groups your users belong to, we’ve made updates:

  1. Groups – This column now lists the groups of which a user is a member. This information makes it easier to understand and compare multiple users’ permissions at once.
  2. Group count – This column shows the number of groups to which each user belongs.Screenshot showing the updated "Groups" and "Group count" columns

Customize your view

Choosing which columns you see in the User table is easy to do. When you click the button with the gear icon in the upper right corner of the table, you can choose the columns you want to see, as shown in the following screenshots.

Screenshot showing gear icon  Screenshot of "Manage columns" dialog box

Conclusion

We made these improvements to the Users section of the IAM console to make it easier for you to follow IAM best practices in your AWS account. Following these best practices can help you improve the security of your AWS resources and make your account easier to manage.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions or suggestions, please start a new thread on the IAM forum.

– Rob

AWS Hot Startups – June 2017

Post Syndicated from Tina Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hot-startups-june-2017/

Thanks for stopping by for another round of AWS Hot Startups! This month we are featuring:

  • CloudRanger – helping companies understand the cloud with visual representation.
  • quintly – providing social media analytics for brands on a single dashboard.
  • Tango Card – reinventing rewards programs for businesses and their customers worldwide.

Don’t forget to check out May’s Hot Startups in case you missed them.

CloudRanger (Letterkenny, Ireland)   

The idea for CloudRanger started where most great ideas do – at a bar in Las Vegas. During a late-night conversation with his friends at re:Invent 2014, Dave Gildea (Founder and CEO) used cocktail napkins and drink coasters to visually illustrate servers and backups, and the light on his phone to represent scheduling. By the end of the night, the idea for automated visual server management was born. With CloudRanger, companies can easily create backup and retention policies, visual scheduling, and simple restoration of snapshots and AMIs. The team behind CloudRanger believes that when servers and cloud resources are represented visually, they are easier to manage and understand. Users are able to see their servers, which turns them into a tangible and important piece of business inventory.

CloudRanger is an excellent platform for MSPs who manage many different AWS accounts, and need a quick method to display many servers and audit certain attributes. The company’s goal is to give anyone the ability to create backup policies in multiple regions, apply them using a tag-based methodology, and manage backups. Servers can be scheduled from one simple dashboard, and restoration is easy and step-by-step. With CloudRanger’s visual representation of resources, customers are encouraged to fully understand their backup policies, schedules, and servers.

As an AWS Partner, CloudRanger has built a globally redundant system after going all-in with AWS. They are using over 25 AWS services for everything including enterprise-level security, automation and 24/7 runtimes, and an emphasis on Machine Learning for efficiency in the sales process. CloudRanger continues to rely more on AWS as new services and features are released, and are replacing current services with AWS CodePipeline and AWS CodeBuild. CloudRanger was also named Startup Company of the Year at a recent Irish tech event!

To learn more about CloudRanger, visit their website.

quintly (Cologne, Germany)

In 2010, brothers Alexander Peiniger and Frederik Peiniger started a journey to help companies track their social media profiles and improve their strategies against competitors. The startup began under the name “Social.Media.Tracking” and then “AllFacebook Stats” before officially becoming quintly in 2013. With quintly, brands and agencies can analyze, benchmark, and optimize their social media activities on a global scale. The innovative dashboarding system gives clients an overview across all social media profiles on the most important networks (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google+, LinkedIn, Instagram, etc.) and then derives an optimal social media strategy from those profiles. Today, quintly has users in over 180 countries and paying clients in over 65 countries including major agency networks and Fortune 500 companies.

Getting an overview of a brand’s social media activities can be time-consuming, and turning insights into actions is a challenge that not all brands master. Quintly offers a variety of features designed to help clients improve their social media reach. With their web-based SaaS product, brands and agencies can compare their social media performance against competitors and their best practices. Not only can clients learn from their own historic performance, but they can leverage data from any other brand around the world.

Since the company’s founding, quintly built and operates its SaaS offering on top of AWS services, leveraging Amazon EC2, Amazon ECS, Elastic Load Balancing, and Amazon Route53 to host their Docker-based environment. Large amounts of data are stored in Amazon DynamoDB and Amazon RDS, and they use Amazon CloudWatch to monitor and seamlessly scale to the current needs. In addition, quintly is using Amazon Machine Learning to add additional attributes to the data and to drive better decisions for their clients. With the help of AWS, quintly has been able to focus on their core business while having a scalable and well-performing solution to solve their technical needs.

For more on quintly, check out their Social Media Analytics blog.

Tango Card (Seattle, Washington)

Based in the heart of West Seattle, Tango Card is revolutionizing rewards programs for companies around the world. Too often customers redeem points in a loyalty or rebate program only to wait weeks for their prize to arrive. Companies generously give their employees appreciation gifts, but the gifts can be generic and impersonal. With Tango Card, companies can choose from a variety of rewards that fit the needs of their specific program, event, or business incentive. The extensive Rewards Catalog includes options for e-gift cards that are sure to excite any recipient. There are plenty of options for everyone from traditional e-gift cards to nonprofit donations to cash equivalent rewards.

Tango Card uses a combination of desired rewards, modern technology, and expert service to change the rewards and incentive experience. The Reward Delivery Platform offers solutions including Blast Rewards, Reward Link, and Rewards as a Service API (RaaS). Blast Rewards enables companies to purchase and send e-gift cards in bulk in just one business day. Reward Link lets recipients choose from an assortment of e-gift cards, prepaid cards, digital checks, and donations and is delivered instantly. Finally, Rewards as a Service is a robust digital gift card API that is built to support apps and platforms. With RaaS, Tango Card can send out e-gift cards on company-branded email templates or deliver them directly within a user interface.

The entire Tango Card Reward Delivery Platform leverages many AWS services. They use Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) for rapid deployment of containerized micro services, and Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) for low overhead managed databases. Tango Card is also leveraging Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), AWS Key Management Service (KMS), and AWS Identity and Access Management (IMS).

To learn more about Tango Card, check out their blog!

I would also like to thank Alexander Moss-Bolanos for helping with the Hot Startups posts this year.

Thanks for reading and we’ll see you next month!

-Tina Barr