Tag Archives: AWS Certificate Manager

Maintaining Transport Layer Security all the way to your container part 2: Using AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/maintaining-transport-layer-security-all-the-way-to-your-container-part-2-using-aws-certificate-manager-private-certificate-authority/

This post contributed by AWS Senior Cloud Infrastructure Architect Anabell St Vincent and AWS Solutions Architect Alex Kimber.

The previous post, Maintaining Transport Layer Security All the Way to Your Container, covered how the layer 4 Network Load Balancer can be used to maintain Transport Layer Security (TLS) all the way from the client to running containers.

In this post, we discuss the various options available for ensuring that certificates can be securely and reliably made available to containers. By simplifying the process of distributing or generating certificates and other secrets, it’s easier for you to build inherently secure architectures without compromising scalability.

There are several ways to achieve this:

1. Storing the certificate and private key in the Docker image

Certificates and keys can be included in the Docker image and made available to the container at runtime. This approach makes the deployment of containers with certificates and keys simple and easy.

However, there are some drawbacks. First, the certificates and keys need to be created, stored securely, and then included in the Docker image. There are some manual or additional automation steps required to securely create, retrieve, and include them for every new revision of the Docker image.

The following example Docker file creates an NGINX container that has the certificate and the key included:

FROM nginx:alpine

# Copy in secret materials
RUN mkdir -p /root/certs/nginxdemotls.com
COPY nginxdemotls.com.key /root/certs/nginxdemotls.com/nginxdemotls.com.key
COPY nginxdemotls.com.crt /root/certs/nginxdemotls.com/nginxdemotls.com.crt
RUN chmod 400 /root/certs/nginxdemotls.com/nginxdemotls.com.key

# Copy in nginx configuration files
COPY nginx.conf /etc/nginx/nginx.conf
COPY nginxdemo.conf /etc/nginx/conf.d
COPY nginxdemotls.conf /etc/nginx/conf.d

# Create folders to hold web content and copy in HTML files.
RUN mkdir -p /var/www/nginxdemo.com
RUN mkdir -p /var/www/nginxdemotls.com

COPY index.html /var/www/nginxdemo.com/index.html
COPY indextls.html /var/www/nginxdemotls.com/index.html

From a security perspective, this approach has additional drawbacks. Because certificates and private keys are bundled with the Docker images, anyone with access to a Docker image can also retrieve the certificate and private key.
The other drawback is the updated certificates are not replaced automatically and the Docker image must be re-created to include any updated certificates. Running containers must either be restarted with the new image, or have the certificates updated.

2. Storing the certificates in AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store and Amazon S3

The post Managing Secrets for Amazon ECS Applications Using Parameter Store and IAM Roles for Tasks explains how you can use Systems Manager Parameter Store to store secrets. Some customers use Parameter Store to keep their secrets for simpler retrieval, as well as fine-grained access control. Parameter Store allows for securing data using AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) for the encryption. Each encryption key created in KMS can be accessed and controlled using AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles in addition to key policy functionality within KMS. This approach allows for resource-level permissions to each item that is stored in Parameter Store, based on the KMS key used for the encryption.

Some certificates can be stored in Parameter Store using the ‘Secure String’ type and using KMS for encryption. With this approach, you can make an API call to retrieve the certificate when the container is deployed. As mentioned earlier, the access to the certificate can be based on the role used to retrieve the certificate. The advantage of this approach is that the certificate can be replaced. The next time the container is deployed, it picks up the new certificate and there is no need to update the Docker image.

Currently, there is a limitation of 4,096 characters that can be stored in Parameter Store. This may not be sufficient for some type of certificates. For example, some x509 certs include the chain and so can exceed the 4,096 character limit. To avoid any character size limitation, Amazon S3 can be used to store the certificate with Parameter Store. The certificate can be stored on Amazon S3, encrypted with KMS and the private key, or the password can be stored in Parameter Store.

With this approach, there is no limitation on certificate length and the private key remains secured with KMS. However, it does involve some additional complexity in setting up the process of creating the certificates, storing them in S3, and then storing the password or private keys in Parameter Store. That is in addition to securing, trusting, and auditing the system handling the private keys and certificates.

3. Storing the certificates in AWS Secrets Manager

AWS Secrets Manager offers a number of features to allow you to store and manage credentials, keys, and other secret materials. This eliminates the need to store these materials with the application code and instead allows them to be referenced on demand. By centralizing the management of secret materials, this single service can manage fine-grained access control through granular IAM policies as well as the revocation and rotation, all through API calls.

All materials stored in the AWS Secrets Manager are encrypted with the customer’s choice of KMS key. The post AWS Secrets Manager: Store, Distribute, and Rotate Credentials Securely shows how AWS Secrets Manager can be used to store RDS database credentials. However, the same process can apply to TLS certificates and keys.

Secrets currently have a limit of 4,096 characters. This approach may be unsuitable for some x509 certificates that include the chain and can exceed this limit. This limit applies to the sum of all key-value pairs within a single secret, so certificates and keys may need to be stored in separate secrets.

After the secure material is in place, it can be retrieved by the container instance at runtime via the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) or directly from within the application code. All that’s required is for the container task role to have the requisite permissions in IAM to read the secrets.

With the exception of rotating RDS credentials, AWS Secrets Manager requires the user to provide Lambda function code, which is called on a configurable schedule to manage the rotation. This rotation would need to consider the generation of new keys and certificates and redeploying the containers.

4. Using self-signed certificates, generated as the Docker container is created

The advantage of this approach is that it allows the use of TLS communications without any of the complexity of distributing certificates or private keys. However, this approach does require implicit trust of the server. Some applications may generate warnings that there is no acceptable root of trust.

5. Building and managing a private certificate authority

A private certificate authority (CA) can offer greater security and flexibility than the solutions outlined earlier. Typically, a private CA solution would manage the following for each ‘Common name’:

  • A private key
  • A certificate, created with the private key
  • Lists of certificates issued and those that have been revoked
  • Policies for managing certificates, for example which services have the right to make a request for a new certificate
  • Audit logs to track the lifecycle of certificates, in particular to ensure timely renewal where necessary

It is possible for an organization to build and maintain their own certificate issuing platform. This approach requires the implementation of a platform that is highly available and secure. These types of systems add to the overall overhead of maintaining infrastructures from a security, availability, scalability, and maintenance perspective. Some customers have also implemented Lambda functions to achieve the same functionality when it comes to issuing private certificates.

While it’s possible to build a private CA for internal services, there are some challenges to be aware of. Any solution should provide a number of features that are key to ensuring appropriate management of the certificates throughout their lifecycle.

For instance, the solution must support the creation, tracking, distribution, renewal, and revocation of certificates. All of these operations must be provided with the requisite security and authentication controls to ensure that certificates are distributed appropriately.

Scalability is another consideration. As applications become increasingly stateless and elastic, it’s conceivable that certificates may be required for every new container instance or wildcard certificates created to support an environment. Whatever CA solution is implemented must be ready to accommodate such a load while also providing high availability.

These types of approaches have drawbacks from various perspectives:

  • Custom code can be hard to maintain
  • Additional security measures must be implemented
  • Certificate renewal and revocation mechanisms also must be implemented
  • The platform must be maintained and kept up-to-date from a patching perspective while maintaining high availability

6. Using the new ACM Private CA to issue private certificates

ACM Private CA offers a secure, managed infrastructure to support the issuance and revocation of private digital certificates. It supports RSA and ECDSA key types for CA keys used for the creation of new certificates, as well as certificate revocation lists (CRLs) to inform clients when a certificate should no longer be trusted. Currently, ACM Private CA does not offer root CA support.

The following screenshot shows a subordinate certificate that is available for use:

The private key for any private CA that you create with ACM Private CA is created and stored in a FIPS 140-2 Level 3 Hardware Security Module (HSM) managed by AWS. The ACM Private CA is also integrated with AWS CloudTrail, which allows you to record the audit trail of API calls made using the AWS Management Console, AWS CLI, and AWS SDKs.

Setting up ACM Private CA requires a root CA. This can be used to sign a certificate signing request (CSR) for the new subordinate (CA), which is then imported into ACM Private CA. After this is complete, it’s possible for containers within your platform to generate their own key-value pairs at runtime using OpenSSL. They can then use the key-value pairs to make their own CSR and ultimately receive their own certificate.

More specifically, the container would complete the following steps at runtime:

  1. Add OpenSSL to the Docker image (if it is not already included).
  2. Generate a key-value pair (a cryptographically related private and public key).
  3. Use that private key to make a CSR.
  4. Call the ACM Private CA API or CLI issue-certificate operation, which issues a certificate based on the CSR.
  5. Call the ACM Private CA API or CLI get-certificate operation, which returns an issued certificate.

The following diagram shows these steps:

The authorization to successfully request a certificate is controlled via IAM policies, which can be attached via a role to the Amazon ECS task. Containers require the ‘Allow’ effect for at least the acm-pca:GetCertificate and acm:IssueCertificate actions. The following is a sample IAM policy:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": "acm-pca:*",
            "Resource": "arn:aws:acm-pca:us-east-1:1234567890:certificate-authority/2c4ccba1-215e-418a-a654-aaaaaaaa"
        }
    ]
}

For additional security, it is possible to store the certificate and keys in a temporary volume mounted in memory through the ‘tmpfs’ parameter. With this option enabled, the secure material is never written to the filesystem of the host machine.

Note: This feature is not currently available for containers run on AWS Fargate.

The task now has the necessary materials and starts up. Clients should be able to establish the trust hierarchy from the server, through ACM Private CA to the root or intermediate CA.

One consideration to be aware of is that ACM Private CA currently has a limit of 50,000 certificates for each CA in each Region. If the requirement is for each, short-lived container instance to have a separate certificate, then this limit could be reached.

Summary

The approaches outlined in this post describe the available options for ensuring that generation, storage, or distribution of sensitive material is done efficiently and securely. It should also be done in a way that supports the ephemeral, automatic scaling capabilities of container-based architectures. ACM Private CA provides a single interface to manage public and now private certificates, as well as seamlessly integrating with the AWS services.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

AWS Online Tech Talks – May and Early June 2018

Post Syndicated from Devin Watson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-may-and-early-june-2018/

AWS Online Tech Talks – May and Early June 2018  

Join us this month to learn about some of the exciting new services and solution best practices at AWS. We also have our first re:Invent 2018 webinar series, “How to re:Invent”. Sign up now to learn more, we look forward to seeing you.

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks featured this month:

Analytics & Big Data

May 21, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Integrating Amazon Elasticsearch with your DevOps Tooling – Learn how you can easily integrate Amazon Elasticsearch Service into your DevOps tooling and gain valuable insight from your log data.

May 23, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTData Warehousing and Data Lake Analytics, Together – Learn how to query data across your data warehouse and data lake without moving data.

May 24, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTData Transformation Patterns in AWS – Discover how to perform common data transformations on the AWS Data Lake.

Compute

May 29, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT – Creating and Managing a WordPress Website with Amazon Lightsail – Learn about Amazon Lightsail and how you can create, run and manage your WordPress websites with Amazon’s simple compute platform.

May 30, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTAccelerating Life Sciences with HPC on AWS – Learn how you can accelerate your Life Sciences research workloads by harnessing the power of high performance computing on AWS.

Containers

May 24, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT – Building Microservices with the 12 Factor App Pattern on AWS – Learn best practices for building containerized microservices on AWS, and how traditional software design patterns evolve in the context of containers.

Databases

May 21, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTHow to Migrate from Cassandra to Amazon DynamoDB – Get the benefits, best practices and guides on how to migrate your Cassandra databases to Amazon DynamoDB.

May 23, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT5 Hacks for Optimizing MySQL in the Cloud – Learn how to optimize your MySQL databases for high availability, performance, and disaster resilience using RDS.

DevOps

May 23, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT.NET Serverless Development on AWS – Learn how to build a modern serverless application in .NET Core 2.0.

Enterprise & Hybrid

May 22, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTHybrid Cloud Customer Use Cases on AWS – Learn how customers are leveraging AWS hybrid cloud capabilities to easily extend their datacenter capacity, deliver new services and applications, and ensure business continuity and disaster recovery.

IoT

May 31, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTUsing AWS IoT for Industrial Applications – Discover how you can quickly onboard your fleet of connected devices, keep them secure, and build predictive analytics with AWS IoT.

Machine Learning

May 22, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUsing Apache Spark with Amazon SageMaker – Discover how to use Apache Spark with Amazon SageMaker for training jobs and application integration.

May 24, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntroducing AWS DeepLens – Learn how AWS DeepLens provides a new way for developers to learn machine learning by pairing the physical device with a broad set of tutorials, examples, source code, and integration with familiar AWS services.

Management Tools

May 21, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTGaining Better Observability of Your VMs with Amazon CloudWatch – Learn how CloudWatch Agent makes it easy for customers like Rackspace to monitor their VMs.

Mobile

May 29, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT – Deep Dive on Amazon Pinpoint Segmentation and Endpoint Management – See how segmentation and endpoint management with Amazon Pinpoint can help you target the right audience.

Networking

May 31, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTMaking Private Connectivity the New Norm via AWS PrivateLink – See how PrivateLink enables service owners to offer private endpoints to customers outside their company.

Security, Identity, & Compliance

May 30, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT – Introducing AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority (CA) – Learn how AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) Private Certificate Authority (CA), a managed private CA service, helps you easily and securely manage the lifecycle of your private certificates.

June 1, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntroducing AWS Firewall Manager – Centrally configure and manage AWS WAF rules across your accounts and applications.

Serverless

May 22, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTBuilding API-Driven Microservices with Amazon API Gateway – Learn how to build a secure, scalable API for your application in our tech talk about API-driven microservices.

Storage

May 30, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTAccelerate Productivity by Computing at the Edge – Learn how AWS Snowball Edge support for compute instances helps accelerate data transfers, execute custom applications, and reduce overall storage costs.

June 1, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLearn to Build a Cloud-Scale Website Powered by Amazon EFS – Technical deep dive where you’ll learn tips and tricks for integrating WordPress, Drupal and Magento with Amazon EFS.

 

 

 

 

New .BOT gTLD from Amazon

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-bot-gtld-from-amazon/

Today, I’m excited to announce the launch of .BOT, a new generic top-level domain (gTLD) from Amazon. Customers can use .BOT domains to provide an identity and portal for their bots. Fitness bots, slack bots, e-commerce bots, and more can all benefit from an easy-to-access .BOT domain. The phrase “bot” was the 4th most registered domain keyword within the .COM TLD in 2016 with more than 6000 domains per month. A .BOT domain allows customers to provide a definitive internet identity for their bots as well as enhancing SEO performance.

At the time of this writing .BOT domains start at $75 each and must be verified and published with a supported tool like: Amazon Lex, Botkit Studio, Dialogflow, Gupshup, Microsoft Bot Framework, or Pandorabots. You can expect support for more tools over time and if your favorite bot framework isn’t supported feel free to contact us here: [email protected].

Below, I’ll walk through the experience of registering and provisioning a domain for my bot, whereml.bot. Then we’ll look at setting up the domain as a hosted zone in Amazon Route 53. Let’s get started.

Registering a .BOT domain

First, I’ll head over to https://amazonregistry.com/bot, type in a new domain, and click magnifying class to make sure my domain is available and get taken to the registration wizard.

Next, I have the opportunity to choose how I want to verify my bot. I build all of my bots with Amazon Lex so I’ll select that in the drop down and get prompted for instructions specific to AWS. If I had my bot hosted somewhere else I would need to follow the unique verification instructions for that particular framework.

To verify my Lex bot I need to give the Amazon Registry permissions to invoke the bot and verify it’s existence. I’ll do this by creating an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) cross account role and providing the AmazonLexReadOnly permissions to that role. This is easily accomplished in the AWS Console. Be sure to provide the account number and external ID shown on the registration page.

Now I’ll add read only permissions to our Amazon Lex bots.

I’ll give my role a fancy name like DotBotCrossAccountVerifyRole and a description so it’s easy to remember why I made this then I’ll click create to create the role and be transported to the role summary page.

Finally, I’ll copy the ARN from the created role and save it for my next step.

Here I’ll add all the details of my Amazon Lex bot. If you haven’t made a bot yet you can follow the tutorial to build a basic bot. I can refer to any alias I’ve deployed but if I just want to grab the latest published bot I can pass in $LATEST as the alias. Finally I’ll click Validate and proceed to registering my domain.

Amazon Registry works with a partner EnCirca to register our domains so we’ll select them and optionally grab Site Builder. I know how to sling some HTML and Javascript together so I’ll pass on the Site Builder side of things.

 

After I click continue we’re taken to EnCirca’s website to finalize the registration and with any luck within a few minutes of purchasing and completing the registration we should receive an email with some good news:

Alright, now that we have a domain name let’s find out how to host things on it.

Using Amazon Route53 with a .BOT domain

Amazon Route 53 is a highly available and scalable DNS with robust APIs, healthchecks, service discovery, and many other features. I definitely want to use this to host my new domain. The first thing I’ll do is navigate to the Route53 console and create a hosted zone with the same name as my domain.


Great! Now, I need to take the Name Server (NS) records that Route53 created for me and use EnCirca’s portal to add these as the authoritative nameservers on the domain.

Now I just add my records to my hosted zone and I should be able to serve traffic! Way cool, I’ve got my very own .bot domain for @WhereML.

Next Steps

  • I could and should add to the security of my site by creating TLS certificates for people who intend to access my domain over TLS. Luckily with AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) this is extremely straightforward and I’ve got my subdomains and root domain verified in just a few clicks.
  • I could create a cloudfront distrobution to front an S3 static single page application to host my entire chatbot and invoke Amazon Lex with a cognito identity right from the browser.

Randall

AWS Certificate Manager Launches Private Certificate Authority

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-certificate-manager-launches-private-certificate-authority/

Today we’re launching a new feature for AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), Private Certificate Authority (CA). This new service allows ACM to act as a private subordinate CA. Previously, if a customer wanted to use private certificates, they needed specialized infrastructure and security expertise that could be expensive to maintain and operate. ACM Private CA builds on ACM’s existing certificate capabilities to help you easily and securely manage the lifecycle of your private certificates with pay as you go pricing. This enables developers to provision certificates in just a few simple API calls while administrators have a central CA management console and fine grained access control through granular IAM policies. ACM Private CA keys are stored securely in AWS managed hardware security modules (HSMs) that adhere to FIPS 140-2 Level 3 security standards. ACM Private CA automatically maintains certificate revocation lists (CRLs) in Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) and lets administrators generate audit reports of certificate creation with the API or console. This service is packed full of features so let’s jump in and provision a CA.

Provisioning a Private Certificate Authority (CA)

First, I’ll navigate to the ACM console in my region and select the new Private CAs section in the sidebar. From there I’ll click Get Started to start the CA wizard. For now, I only have the option to provision a subordinate CA so we’ll select that and use my super secure desktop as the root CA and click Next. This isn’t what I would do in a production setting but it will work for testing out our private CA.

Now, I’ll configure the CA with some common details. The most important thing here is the Common Name which I’ll set as secure.internal to represent my internal domain.

Now I need to choose my key algorithm. You should choose the best algorithm for your needs but know that ACM has a limitation today that it can only manage certificates that chain up to to RSA CAs. For now, I’ll go with RSA 2048 bit and click Next.

In this next screen, I’m able to configure my certificate revocation list (CRL). CRLs are essential for notifying clients in the case that a certificate has been compromised before certificate expiration. ACM will maintain the revocation list for me and I have the option of routing my S3 bucket to a custome domain. In this case I’ll create a new S3 bucket to store my CRL in and click Next.

Finally, I’ll review all the details to make sure I didn’t make any typos and click Confirm and create.

A few seconds later and I’m greeted with a fancy screen saying I successfully provisioned a certificate authority. Hooray! I’m not done yet though. I still need to activate my CA by creating a certificate signing request (CSR) and signing that with my root CA. I’ll click Get started to begin that process.

Now I’ll copy the CSR or download it to a server or desktop that has access to my root CA (or potentially another subordinate – so long as it chains to a trusted root for my clients).

Now I can use a tool like openssl to sign my cert and generate the certificate chain.


$openssl ca -config openssl_root.cnf -extensions v3_intermediate_ca -days 3650 -notext -md sha256 -in csr/CSR.pem -out certs/subordinate_cert.pem
Using configuration from openssl_root.cnf
Enter pass phrase for /Users/randhunt/dev/amzn/ca/private/root_private_key.pem:
Check that the request matches the signature
Signature ok
The Subject's Distinguished Name is as follows
stateOrProvinceName   :ASN.1 12:'Washington'
localityName          :ASN.1 12:'Seattle'
organizationName      :ASN.1 12:'Amazon'
organizationalUnitName:ASN.1 12:'Engineering'
commonName            :ASN.1 12:'secure.internal'
Certificate is to be certified until Mar 31 06:05:30 2028 GMT (3650 days)
Sign the certificate? [y/n]:y


1 out of 1 certificate requests certified, commit? [y/n]y
Write out database with 1 new entries
Data Base Updated

After that I’ll copy my subordinate_cert.pem and certificate chain back into the console. and click Next.

Finally, I’ll review all the information and click Confirm and import. I should see a screen like the one below that shows my CA has been activated successfully.

Now that I have a private CA we can provision private certificates by hopping back to the ACM console and creating a new certificate. After clicking create a new certificate I’ll select the radio button Request a private certificate then I’ll click Request a certificate.

From there it’s just similar to provisioning a normal certificate in ACM.

Now I have a private certificate that I can bind to my ELBs, CloudFront Distributions, API Gateways, and more. I can also export the certificate for use on embedded devices or outside of ACM managed environments.

Available Now
ACM Private CA is a service in and of itself and it is packed full of features that won’t fit into a blog post. I strongly encourage the interested readers to go through the developer guide and familiarize themselves with certificate based security. ACM Private CA is available in in US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Canada (Central), EU (Frankfurt) and EU (Ireland). Private CAs cost $400 per month (prorated) for each private CA. You are not charged for certificates created and maintained in ACM but you are charged for certificates where you have access to the private key (exported or created outside of ACM). The pricing per certificate is tiered starting at $0.75 per certificate for the first 1000 certificates and going down to $0.001 per certificate after 10,000 certificates.

I’m excited to see administrators and developers take advantage of this new service. As always please let us know what you think of this service on Twitter or in the comments below.

Randall

Preparing for AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) Support of Certificate Transparency

Post Syndicated from Jonathan Kozolchyk original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-get-ready-for-certificate-transparency/

 

Update from March 27, 2018: On March 27, 2018, we updated ACM APIs so that you can disable Certificate Transparency logging on a per-certificate basis.


Starting April 30, 2018, Google Chrome will require all publicly trusted certificates issued after this date to be logged in at least two Certificate Transparency logs. This means that any certificate issued that is not logged will result in an error message in Google Chrome. Beginning April 24, 2018, Amazon will log all new and renewed certificates in at least two public logs unless you disable Certificate Transparency logging.

Without Certificate Transparency, it can be difficult for a domain owner to know if an unexpected certificate was issued for their domain. Under the current system, no record is kept of certificates being issued, and domain owners do not have a reliable way to identify rogue certificates.

To address this situation, Certificate Transparency creates a cryptographically secure log of each certificate issued. Domain owners can search the log to identify unexpected certificates, whether issued by mistake or malice. Domain owners can also identify Certificate Authorities (CAs) that are improperly issuing certificates. In this blog post, I explain more about Certificate Transparency and tell you how to prepare for it.

How does Certificate Transparency work?

When a CA issues a publicly trusted certificate, the CA must submit the certificate to one or more Certificate Transparency log servers. The Certificate Transparency log server responds with a signed certificate timestamp (SCT) that confirms the log server will add the certificate to the list of known certificates. The SCT is then embedded in the certificate and delivered automatically to a browser. The SCT is like a receipt that proves the certificate was published into the Certificate Transparency log. Starting April 30, Google Chrome will require an SCT as proof that the certificate was published to a Certificate Transparency log in order to trust the certificate without displaying an error message.

What is Amazon doing to support Certificate Transparency?

Certificate Transparency is a good practice. It enables AWS customers to be more confident that an unauthorized certificate hasn’t been issued by a CA. Beginning on April 24, 2018, Amazon will log all new and renewed certificates in at least two Certificate Transparency logs unless you disable Certificate Transparency logging.

We recognize that there can be times when our customers do not want to log certificates. For example, if you are building a website for an unreleased product and have registered the subdomain, newproduct.example.com, requesting a logged certificate for your domain will make it publicly known that the new product is coming. Certificate Transparency logging also can expose server hostnames that you want to keep private. Hostnames such as payments.example.com can reveal the purpose of a server and provide attackers with information about your private network. These logs do not contain the private key for your certificate. For these reasons, on March 27, 2018 we updated ACM APIs so that you can disable Certificate Transparency logging on a per-certificate basis using the ACM APIs or with the AWS CLI. Doing so will lead to errors in Google Chrome, which may be preferable to exposing the information.

Please refer to ACM documentation for specifics on how to opt out of Certificate Transparency logging.

Conclusion

Beginning April 24, 2018, ACM will begin logging all new and renewed certificates by default. If you don’t want a certificate to be logged, you’ll be able to opt out using the AWS API or CLI. However, for Google Chrome to trust the certificate, all issued or imported certificates must have the SCT information embedded in them by April 30, 2018.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions, start a new thread in the ACM forum.

– Jonathan

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Now Open AWS EU (Paris) Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-eu-paris-region/

Today we are launching our 18th AWS Region, our fourth in Europe. Located in the Paris area, AWS customers can use this Region to better serve customers in and around France.

The Details
The new EU (Paris) Region provides a broad suite of AWS services including Amazon API Gateway, Amazon Aurora, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon CloudWatch, CloudWatch Events, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), EC2 Container Registry, Amazon ECS, Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon EMR, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon Glacier, Amazon Kinesis Streams, Polly, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Route 53, Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Direct Connect, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS Key Management Service (KMS), AWS Lambda, AWS Marketplace, AWS OpsWorks Stacks, AWS Personal Health Dashboard, AWS Server Migration Service, AWS Service Catalog, AWS Shield Standard, AWS Snowball, AWS Snowball Edge, AWS Snowmobile, AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Support (including AWS Trusted Advisor), Elastic Load Balancing, and VM Import.

The Paris Region supports all sizes of C5, M5, R4, T2, D2, I3, and X1 instances.

There are also four edge locations for Amazon Route 53 and Amazon CloudFront: three in Paris and one in Marseille, all with AWS WAF and AWS Shield. Check out the AWS Global Infrastructure page to learn more about current and future AWS Regions.

The Paris Region will benefit from three AWS Direct Connect locations. Telehouse Voltaire is available today. AWS Direct Connect will also become available at Equinix Paris in early 2018, followed by Interxion Paris.

All AWS infrastructure regions around the world are designed, built, and regularly audited to meet the most rigorous compliance standards and to provide high levels of security for all AWS customers. These include ISO 27001, ISO 27017, ISO 27018, SOC 1 (Formerly SAS 70), SOC 2 and SOC 3 Security & Availability, PCI DSS Level 1, and many more. This means customers benefit from all the best practices of AWS policies, architecture, and operational processes built to satisfy the needs of even the most security sensitive customers.

AWS is certified under the EU-US Privacy Shield, and the AWS Data Processing Addendum (DPA) is GDPR-ready and available now to all AWS customers to help them prepare for May 25, 2018 when the GDPR becomes enforceable. The current AWS DPA, as well as the AWS GDPR DPA, allows customers to transfer personal data to countries outside the European Economic Area (EEA) in compliance with European Union (EU) data protection laws. AWS also adheres to the Cloud Infrastructure Service Providers in Europe (CISPE) Code of Conduct. The CISPE Code of Conduct helps customers ensure that AWS is using appropriate data protection standards to protect their data, consistent with the GDPR. In addition, AWS offers a wide range of services and features to help customers meet the requirements of the GDPR, including services for access controls, monitoring, logging, and encryption.

From Our Customers
Many AWS customers are preparing to use this new Region. Here’s a small sample:

Societe Generale, one of the largest banks in France and the world, has accelerated their digital transformation while working with AWS. They developed SG Research, an application that makes reports from Societe Generale’s analysts available to corporate customers in order to improve the decision-making process for investments. The new AWS Region will reduce latency between applications running in the cloud and in their French data centers.

SNCF is the national railway company of France. Their mobile app, powered by AWS, delivers real-time traffic information to 14 million riders. Extreme weather, traffic events, holidays, and engineering works can cause usage to peak at hundreds of thousands of users per second. They are planning to use machine learning and big data to add predictive features to the app.

Radio France, the French public radio broadcaster, offers seven national networks, and uses AWS to accelerate its innovation and stay competitive.

Les Restos du Coeur, a French charity that provides assistance to the needy, delivering food packages and participating in their social and economic integration back into French society. Les Restos du Coeur is using AWS for its CRM system to track the assistance given to each of their beneficiaries and the impact this is having on their lives.

AlloResto by JustEat (a leader in the French FoodTech industry), is using AWS to to scale during traffic peaks and to accelerate their innovation process.

AWS Consulting and Technology Partners
We are already working with a wide variety of consulting, technology, managed service, and Direct Connect partners in France. Here’s a partial list:

AWS Premier Consulting PartnersAccenture, Capgemini, Claranet, CloudReach, DXC, and Edifixio.

AWS Consulting PartnersABC Systemes, Atos International SAS, CoreExpert, Cycloid, Devoteam, LINKBYNET, Oxalide, Ozones, Scaleo Information Systems, and Sopra Steria.

AWS Technology PartnersAxway, Commerce Guys, MicroStrategy, Sage, Software AG, Splunk, Tibco, and Zerolight.

AWS in France
We have been investing in Europe, with a focus on France, for the last 11 years. We have also been developing documentation and training programs to help our customers to improve their skills and to accelerate their journey to the AWS Cloud.

As part of our commitment to AWS customers in France, we plan to train more than 25,000 people in the coming years, helping them develop highly sought after cloud skills. They will have access to AWS training resources in France via AWS Academy, AWSome days, AWS Educate, and webinars, all delivered in French by AWS Technical Trainers and AWS Certified Trainers.

Use it Today
The EU (Paris) Region is open for business now and you can start using it today!

Jeff;

 

Easier Certificate Validation Using DNS with AWS Certificate Manager

Post Syndicated from Todd Cignetti original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/easier-certificate-validation-using-dns-with-aws-certificate-manager/

Secure Sockets Layer/Transport Layer Security (SSL/TLS) certificates are used to secure network communications and establish the identity of websites over the internet. Before issuing a certificate for your website, Amazon must validate that you control the domain name for your site. You can now use AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) Domain Name System (DNS) validation to establish that you control a domain name when requesting SSL/TLS certificates with ACM. Previously ACM supported only email validation, which required the domain owner to receive an email for each certificate request and validate the information in the request before approving it.

With DNS validation, you write a CNAME record to your DNS configuration to establish control of your domain name. After you have configured the CNAME record, ACM can automatically renew DNS-validated certificates before they expire, as long as the DNS record has not changed. To make it even easier to validate your domain, ACM can update your DNS configuration for you if you manage your DNS records with Amazon Route 53. In this blog post, I demonstrate how to request a certificate for a website by using DNS validation. To perform the equivalent steps using the AWS CLI or AWS APIs and SDKs, see AWS Certificate Manager in the AWS CLI Reference and the ACM API Reference.

Requesting an SSL/TLS certificate by using DNS validation

In this section, I walk you through the four steps required to obtain an SSL/TLS certificate through ACM to identify your site over the internet. SSL/TLS provides encryption for sensitive data in transit and authentication by using certificates to establish the identity of your site and secure connections between browsers and applications and your site. DNS validation and SSL/TLS certificates provisioned through ACM are free.

Step 1: Request a certificate

To get started, sign in to the AWS Management Console and navigate to the ACM console. Choose Get started to request a certificate.

Screenshot of getting started in the ACM console

If you previously managed certificates in ACM, you will instead see a table with your certificates and a button to request a new certificate. Choose Request a certificate to request a new certificate.

Screenshot of choosing "Request a certificate"

Type the name of your domain in the Domain name box and choose Next. In this example, I type www.example.com. You must use a domain name that you control. Requesting certificates for domains that you don’t control violates the AWS Service Terms.

Screenshot of entering a domain name

Step 2: Select a validation method

With DNS validation, you write a CNAME record to your DNS configuration to establish control of your domain name. Choose DNS validation, and then choose Review.

Screenshot of selecting validation method

Step 3: Review your request

Review your request and choose Confirm and request to request the certificate.

Screenshot of reviewing request and confirming it

Step 4: Submit your request

After a brief delay while ACM populates your domain validation information, choose the down arrow (highlighted in the following screenshot) to display all the validation information for your domain.

Screenshot of validation information

ACM displays the CNAME record you must add to your DNS configuration to validate that you control the domain name in your certificate request. If you use a DNS provider other than Route 53 or if you use a different AWS account to manage DNS records in Route 53, copy the DNS CNAME information from the validation information, or export it to a file (choose Export DNS configuration to a file) and write it to your DNS configuration. For information about how to add or modify DNS records, check with your DNS provider. For more information about using DNS with Route 53 DNS, see the Route 53 documentation.

If you manage DNS records for your domain with Route 53 in the same AWS account, choose Create record in Route 53 to have ACM update your DNS configuration for you.

After updating your DNS configuration, choose Continue to return to the ACM table view.

ACM then displays a table that includes all your certificates. The certificate you requested is displayed so that you can see the status of your request. After you write the DNS record or have ACM write the record for you, it typically takes DNS 30 minutes to propagate the record, and it might take several hours for Amazon to validate it and issue the certificate. During this time, ACM shows the Validation status as Pending validation. After ACM validates the domain name, ACM updates the Validation status to Success. After the certificate is issued, the certificate status is updated to Issued. If ACM cannot validate your DNS record and issue the certificate after 72 hours, the request times out, and ACM displays a Timed out validation status. To recover, you must make a new request. Refer to the Troubleshooting Section of the ACM User Guide for instructions about troubleshooting validation or issuance failures.

Screenshot of a certificate issued and validation successful

You now have an ACM certificate that you can use to secure your application or website. For information about how to deploy certificates with other AWS services, see the documentation for Amazon CloudFront, Amazon API Gateway, Application Load Balancers, and Classic Load Balancers. Note that your certificate must be in the US East (N. Virginia) Region to use the certificate with CloudFront.

ACM automatically renews certificates that are deployed and in use with other AWS services as long as the CNAME record remains in your DNS configuration. To learn more about ACM DNS validation, see the ACM FAQs and the ACM documentation.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about this blog post, start a new thread on the ACM forum or contact AWS Support.

– Todd

The 10 Most Viewed Security-Related AWS Knowledge Center Articles and Videos for November 2017

Post Syndicated from Maggie Burke original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/the-10-most-viewed-security-related-aws-knowledge-center-articles-and-videos-for-november-2017/

AWS Knowledge Center image

The AWS Knowledge Center helps answer the questions most frequently asked by AWS Support customers. The following 10 Knowledge Center security articles and videos have been the most viewed this month. It’s likely you’ve wondered about a few of these topics yourself, so here’s a chance to learn the answers!

  1. How do I create an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy to restrict access for an IAM user, group, or role to a particular Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC)?
    Learn how to apply a custom IAM policy to restrict IAM user, group, or role permissions for creating and managing Amazon EC2 instances in a specified VPC.
  2. How do I use an MFA token to authenticate access to my AWS resources through the AWS CLI?
    One IAM best practice is to protect your account and its resources by using a multi-factor authentication (MFA) device. If you plan use the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) while using an MFA device, you must create a temporary session token.
  3. Can I restrict an IAM user’s EC2 access to specific resources?
    This article demonstrates how to link multiple AWS accounts through AWS Organizations and isolate IAM user groups in their own accounts.
  4. I didn’t receive a validation email for the SSL certificate I requested through AWS Certificate Manager (ACM)—where is it?
    Can’t find your ACM validation emails? Be sure to check the email address to which you requested that ACM send validation emails.
  5. How do I create an IAM policy that has a source IP restriction but still allows users to switch roles in the AWS Management Console?
    Learn how to write an IAM policy that not only includes a source IP restriction but also lets your users switch roles in the console.
  6. How do I allow users from another account to access resources in my account through IAM?
    If you have the 12-digit account number and permissions to create and edit IAM roles and users for both accounts, you can permit specific IAM users to access resources in your account.
  7. What are the differences between a service control policy (SCP) and an IAM policy?
    Learn how to distinguish an SCP from an IAM policy.
  8. How do I share my customer master keys (CMKs) across multiple AWS accounts?
    To grant another account access to your CMKs, create an IAM policy on the secondary account that grants access to use your CMKs.
  9. How do I set up AWS Trusted Advisor notifications?
    Learn how to receive free weekly email notifications from Trusted Advisor.
  10. How do I use AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) encryption context to protect the integrity of encrypted data?
    Encryption context name-value pairs used with AWS KMS encryption and decryption operations provide a method for checking ciphertext authenticity. Learn how to use encryption context to help protect your encrypted data.

The AWS Security Blog will publish an updated version of this list regularly going forward. You also can subscribe to the AWS Knowledge Center Videos playlist on YouTube.

– Maggie

Building a Multi-region Serverless Application with Amazon API Gateway and AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Stefano Buliani original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-a-multi-region-serverless-application-with-amazon-api-gateway-and-aws-lambda/

This post written by: Magnus Bjorkman – Solutions Architect

Many customers are looking to run their services at global scale, deploying their backend to multiple regions. In this post, we describe how to deploy a Serverless API into multiple regions and how to leverage Amazon Route 53 to route the traffic between regions. We use latency-based routing and health checks to achieve an active-active setup that can fail over between regions in case of an issue. We leverage the new regional API endpoint feature in Amazon API Gateway to make this a seamless process for the API client making the requests. This post does not cover the replication of your data, which is another aspect to consider when deploying applications across regions.

Solution overview

Currently, the default API endpoint type in API Gateway is the edge-optimized API endpoint, which enables clients to access an API through an Amazon CloudFront distribution. This typically improves connection time for geographically diverse clients. By default, a custom domain name is globally unique and the edge-optimized API endpoint would invoke a Lambda function in a single region in the case of Lambda integration. You can’t use this type of endpoint with a Route 53 active-active setup and fail-over.

The new regional API endpoint in API Gateway moves the API endpoint into the region and the custom domain name is unique per region. This makes it possible to run a full copy of an API in each region and then use Route 53 to use an active-active setup and failover. The following diagram shows how you do this:

Active/active multi region architecture

  • Deploy your Rest API stack, consisting of API Gateway and Lambda, in two regions, such as us-east-1 and us-west-2.
  • Choose the regional API endpoint type for your API.
  • Create a custom domain name and choose the regional API endpoint type for that one as well. In both regions, you are configuring the custom domain name to be the same, for example, helloworldapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com
  • Use the host name of the custom domain names from each region, for example, xxxxxx.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com and xxxxxx.execute-api.us-west-2.amazonaws.com, to configure record sets in Route 53 for your client-facing domain name, for example, helloworldapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com

The above solution provides an active-active setup for your API across the two regions, but you are not doing failover yet. For that to work, set up a health check in Route 53:

Route 53 Health Check

A Route 53 health check must have an endpoint to call to check the health of a service. You could do a simple ping of your actual Rest API methods, but instead provide a specific method on your Rest API that does a deep ping. That is, it is a Lambda function that checks the status of all the dependencies.

In the case of the Hello World API, you don’t have any other dependencies. In a real-world scenario, you could check on dependencies as databases, other APIs, and external dependencies. Route 53 health checks themselves cannot use your custom domain name endpoint’s DNS address, so you are going to directly call the API endpoints via their region unique endpoint’s DNS address.

Walkthrough

The following sections describe how to set up this solution. You can find the complete solution at the blog-multi-region-serverless-service GitHub repo. Clone or download the repository locally to be able to do the setup as described.

Prerequisites

You need the following resources to set up the solution described in this post:

  • AWS CLI
  • An S3 bucket in each region in which to deploy the solution, which can be used by the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM). You can use the following CloudFormation templates to create buckets in us-east-1 and us-west-2:
    • us-east-1:
    • us-west-2:
  • A hosted zone registered in Amazon Route 53. This is used for defining the domain name of your API endpoint, for example, helloworldapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com. You can use a third-party domain name registrar and then configure the DNS in Amazon Route 53, or you can purchase a domain directly from Amazon Route 53.

Deploy API with health checks in two regions

Start by creating a small “Hello World” Lambda function that sends back a message in the region in which it has been deployed.


"""Return message."""
import logging

logging.basicConfig()
logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.setLevel(logging.INFO)

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    """Lambda handler for getting the hello world message."""

    region = context.invoked_function_arn.split(':')[3]

    logger.info("message: " + "Hello from " + region)
    
    return {
		"message": "Hello from " + region
    }

Also create a Lambda function for doing a health check that returns a value based on another environment variable (either “ok” or “fail”) to allow for ease of testing:


"""Return health."""
import logging
import os

logging.basicConfig()
logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.setLevel(logging.INFO)

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    """Lambda handler for getting the health."""

    logger.info("status: " + os.environ['STATUS'])
    
    return {
		"status": os.environ['STATUS']
    }

Deploy both of these using an AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM) template. SAM is a CloudFormation extension that is optimized for serverless, and provides a standard way to create a complete serverless application. You can find the full helloworld-sam.yaml template in the blog-multi-region-serverless-service GitHub repo.

A few things to highlight:

  • You are using inline Swagger to define your API so you can substitute the current region in the x-amazon-apigateway-integration section.
  • Most of the Swagger template covers CORS to allow you to test this from a browser.
  • You are also using substitution to populate the environment variable used by the “Hello World” method with the region into which it is being deployed.

The Swagger allows you to use the same SAM template in both regions.

You can only use SAM from the AWS CLI, so do the following from the command prompt. First, deploy the SAM template in us-east-1 with the following commands, replacing “<your bucket in us-east-1>” with a bucket in your account:


> cd helloworld-api
> aws cloudformation package --template-file helloworld-sam.yaml --output-template-file /tmp/cf-helloworld-sam.yaml --s3-bucket <your bucket in us-east-1> --region us-east-1
> aws cloudformation deploy --template-file /tmp/cf-helloworld-sam.yaml --stack-name multiregionhelloworld --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM --region us-east-1

Second, do the same in us-west-2:


> aws cloudformation package --template-file helloworld-sam.yaml --output-template-file /tmp/cf-helloworld-sam.yaml --s3-bucket <your bucket in us-west-2> --region us-west-2
> aws cloudformation deploy --template-file /tmp/cf-helloworld-sam.yaml --stack-name multiregionhelloworld --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM --region us-west-2

The API was created with the default endpoint type of Edge Optimized. Switch it to Regional. In the Amazon API Gateway console, select the API that you just created and choose the wheel-icon to edit it.

API Gateway edit API settings

In the edit screen, select the Regional endpoint type and save the API. Do the same in both regions.

Grab the URL for the API in the console by navigating to the method in the prod stage.

API Gateway endpoint link

You can now test this with curl:


> curl https://2wkt1cxxxx.execute-api.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/prod/helloworld
{"message": "Hello from us-west-2"}

Write down the domain name for the URL in each region (for example, 2wkt1cxxxx.execute-api.us-west-2.amazonaws.com), as you need that later when you deploy the Route 53 setup.

Create the custom domain name

Next, create an Amazon API Gateway custom domain name endpoint. As part of using this feature, you must have a hosted zone and domain available to use in Route 53 as well as an SSL certificate that you use with your specific domain name.

You can create the SSL certificate by using AWS Certificate Manager. In the ACM console, choose Get started (if you have no existing certificates) or Request a certificate. Fill out the form with the domain name to use for the custom domain name endpoint, which is the same across the two regions:

Amazon Certificate Manager request new certificate

Go through the remaining steps and validate the certificate for each region before moving on.

You are now ready to create the endpoints. In the Amazon API Gateway console, choose Custom Domain Names, Create Custom Domain Name.

API Gateway create custom domain name

A few things to highlight:

  • The domain name is the same as what you requested earlier through ACM.
  • The endpoint configuration should be regional.
  • Select the ACM Certificate that you created earlier.
  • You need to create a base path mapping that connects back to your earlier API Gateway endpoint. Set the base path to v1 so you can version your API, and then select the API and the prod stage.

Choose Save. You should see your newly created custom domain name:

API Gateway custom domain setup

Note the value for Target Domain Name as you need that for the next step. Do this for both regions.

Deploy Route 53 setup

Use the global Route 53 service to provide DNS lookup for the Rest API, distributing the traffic in an active-active setup based on latency. You can find the full CloudFormation template in the blog-multi-region-serverless-service GitHub repo.

The template sets up health checks, for example, for us-east-1:


HealthcheckRegion1:
  Type: "AWS::Route53::HealthCheck"
  Properties:
    HealthCheckConfig:
      Port: "443"
      Type: "HTTPS_STR_MATCH"
      SearchString: "ok"
      ResourcePath: "/prod/healthcheck"
      FullyQualifiedDomainName: !Ref Region1HealthEndpoint
      RequestInterval: "30"
      FailureThreshold: "2"

Use the health check when you set up the record set and the latency routing, for example, for us-east-1:


Region1EndpointRecord:
  Type: AWS::Route53::RecordSet
  Properties:
    Region: us-east-1
    HealthCheckId: !Ref HealthcheckRegion1
    SetIdentifier: "endpoint-region1"
    HostedZoneId: !Ref HostedZoneId
    Name: !Ref MultiregionEndpoint
    Type: CNAME
    TTL: 60
    ResourceRecords:
      - !Ref Region1Endpoint

You can create the stack by using the following link, copying in the domain names from the previous section, your existing hosted zone name, and the main domain name that is created (for example, hellowordapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com):

The following screenshot shows what the parameters might look like:
Serverless multi region Route 53 health check

Specifically, the domain names that you collected earlier would map according to following:

  • The domain names from the API Gateway “prod”-stage go into Region1HealthEndpoint and Region2HealthEndpoint.
  • The domain names from the custom domain name’s target domain name goes into Region1Endpoint and Region2Endpoint.

Using the Rest API from server-side applications

You are now ready to use your setup. First, demonstrate the use of the API from server-side clients. You can demonstrate this by using curl from the command line:


> curl https://hellowordapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com/v1/helloworld/
{"message": "Hello from us-east-1"}

Testing failover of Rest API in browser

Here’s how you can use this from the browser and test the failover. Find all of the files for this test in the browser-client folder of the blog-multi-region-serverless-service GitHub repo.

Use this html file:


<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8"/>
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge"/>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1"/>
    <title>Multi-Region Client</title>
</head>
<body>
<div>
   <h1>Test Client</h1>

    <p id="client_result">

    </p>

    <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.3/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script src="settings.js"></script>
    <script src="client.js"></script>
</body>
</html>

The html file uses this JavaScript file to repeatedly call the API and print the history of messages:


var messageHistory = "";

(function call_service() {

   $.ajax({
      url: helloworldMultiregionendpoint+'v1/helloworld/',
      dataType: "json",
      cache: false,
      success: function(data) {
         messageHistory+="<p>"+data['message']+"</p>";
         $('#client_result').html(messageHistory);
      },
      complete: function() {
         // Schedule the next request when the current one's complete
         setTimeout(call_service, 10000);
      },
      error: function(xhr, status, error) {
         $('#client_result').html('ERROR: '+status);
      }
   });

})();

Also, make sure to update the settings in settings.js to match with the API Gateway endpoints for the DNS-proxy and the multi-regional endpoint for the Hello World API: var helloworldMultiregionendpoint = "https://hellowordapi.replacewithyourcompanyname.com/";

You can now open the HTML file in the browser (you can do this directly from the file system) and you should see something like the following screenshot:

Serverless multi region browser test

You can test failover by changing the environment variable in your health check Lambda function. In the Lambda console, select your health check function and scroll down to the Environment variables section. For the STATUS key, modify the value to fail.

Lambda update environment variable

You should see the region switch in the test client:

Serverless multi region broker test switchover

During an emulated failure like this, the browser might take some additional time to switch over due to connection keep-alive functionality. If you are using a browser like Chrome, you can kill all the connections to see a more immediate fail-over: chrome://net-internals/#sockets

Summary

You have implemented a simple way to do multi-regional serverless applications that fail over seamlessly between regions, either being accessed from the browser or from other applications/services. You achieved this by using the capabilities of Amazon Route 53 to do latency based routing and health checks for fail-over. You unlocked the use of these features in a serverless application by leveraging the new regional endpoint feature of Amazon API Gateway.

The setup was fully scripted using CloudFormation, the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM), and the AWS CLI, and it can be integrated into deployment tools to push the code across the regions to make sure it is available in all the needed regions. For more information about cross-region deployments, see Building a Cross-Region/Cross-Account Code Deployment Solution on AWS on the AWS DevOps blog.

How to Prepare for AWS’s Move to Its Own Certificate Authority

Post Syndicated from Jonathan Kozolchyk original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-prepare-for-aws-move-to-its-own-certificate-authority/

AWS Certificate Manager image

 

Update from March 28, 2018: We updated the Amazon Trust Services table by replacing an out-of-date value with a new value.


Transport Layer Security (TLS, formerly called Secure Sockets Layer [SSL]) is essential for encrypting information that is exchanged on the internet. For example, Amazon.com uses TLS for all traffic on its website, and AWS uses it to secure calls to AWS services.

An electronic document called a certificate verifies the identity of the server when creating such an encrypted connection. The certificate helps establish proof that your web browser is communicating securely with the website that you typed in your browser’s address field. Certificate Authorities, also known as CAs, issue certificates to specific domains. When a domain presents a certificate that is issued by a trusted CA, your browser or application knows it’s safe to make the connection.

In January 2016, AWS launched AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), a service that lets you easily provision, manage, and deploy SSL/TLS certificates for use with AWS services. These certificates are available for no additional charge through Amazon’s own CA: Amazon Trust Services. For browsers and other applications to trust a certificate, the certificate’s issuer must be included in the browser’s trust store, which is a list of trusted CAs. If the issuing CA is not in the trust store, the browser will display an error message (see an example) and applications will show an application-specific error. To ensure the ubiquity of the Amazon Trust Services CA, AWS purchased the Starfield Services CA, a root found in most browsers and which has been valid since 2005. This means you shouldn’t have to take any action to use the certificates issued by Amazon Trust Services.

AWS has been offering free certificates to AWS customers from the Amazon Trust Services CA. Now, AWS is in the process of moving certificates for services such as Amazon EC2 and Amazon DynamoDB to use certificates from Amazon Trust Services as well. Most software doesn’t need to be changed to handle this transition, but there are exceptions. In this blog post, I show you how to verify that you are prepared to use the Amazon Trust Services CA.

How to tell if the Amazon Trust Services CAs are in your trust store

The following table lists the Amazon Trust Services certificates. To verify that these certificates are in your browser’s trust store, click each Test URL in the following table to verify that it works for you. When a Test URL does not work, it displays an error similar to this example.

Distinguished name SHA-256 hash of subject public key information Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 1,O=Amazon,C=US fbe3018031f9586bcbf41727e417b7d1c45c2f47f93be372a17b96b50757d5a2 Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 2,O=Amazon,C=US 7f4296fc5b6a4e3b35d3c369623e364ab1af381d8fa7121533c9d6c633ea2461 Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 3,O=Amazon,C=US 36abc32656acfc645c61b71613c4bf21c787f5cabbee48348d58597803d7abc9 Test URL
CN=Amazon Root CA 4,O=Amazon,C=US f7ecded5c66047d28ed6466b543c40e0743abe81d109254dcf845d4c2c7853c5 Test URL
CN=Starfield Services Root Certificate Authority – G2,O=Starfield Technologies\, Inc.,L=Scottsdale,ST=Arizona,C=US 2b071c59a0a0ae76b0eadb2bad23bad4580b69c3601b630c2eaf0613afa83f92 Test URL
Starfield Class 2 Certification Authority 15f14ac45c9c7da233d3479164e8137fe35ee0f38ae858183f08410ea82ac4b4 Not available*

* Note: Amazon doesn’t own this root and doesn’t have a test URL for it. The certificate can be downloaded from here.

You can calculate the SHA-256 hash of Subject Public Key Information as follows. With the PEM-encoded certificate stored in certificate.pem, run the following openssl commands:

openssl x509 -in certificate.pem -noout -pubkey | openssl asn1parse -noout -inform pem -out certificate.key
openssl dgst -sha256 certificate.key

As an example, with the Starfield Class 2 Certification Authority self-signed cert in a PEM encoded file sf-class2-root.crt, you can use the following openssl commands:

openssl x509 -in sf-class2-root.crt -noout -pubkey | openssl asn1parse -noout -inform pem -out sf-class2-root.key
openssl dgst -sha256 sf-class2-root.key ~
SHA256(sf-class2-root.key)= 15f14ac45c9c7da233d3479164e8137fe35ee0f38ae858183f08410ea82ac4b4

What to do if the Amazon Trust Services CAs are not in your trust store

If your tests of any of the Test URLs failed, you must update your trust store. The easiest way to update your trust store is to upgrade the operating system or browser that you are using.

You will find the Amazon Trust Services CAs in the following operating systems (release dates are in parentheses):

  • Microsoft Windows versions that have January 2005 or later updates installed, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, and newer versions
  • Mac OS X 10.4 with Java for Mac OS X 10.4 Release 5, Mac OS X 10.5 and newer versions
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 (March 2007), Linux 6, and Linux 7 and CentOS 5, CentOS 6, and CentOS 7
  • Ubuntu 8.10
  • Debian 5.0
  • Amazon Linux (all versions)
  • Java 1.4.2_12, Java 5 update 2, and all newer versions, including Java 6, Java 7, and Java 8

All modern browsers trust Amazon’s CAs. You can update the certificate bundle in your browser simply by updating your browser. You can find instructions for updating the following browsers on their respective websites:

If your application is using a custom trust store, you must add the Amazon root CAs to your application’s trust store. The instructions for doing this vary based on the application or platform. Please refer to the documentation for the application or platform you are using.

AWS SDKs and CLIs

Most AWS SDKs and CLIs are not impacted by the transition to the Amazon Trust Services CA. If you are using a version of the Python AWS SDK or CLI released before October 29, 2013, you must upgrade. The .NET, Java, PHP, Go, JavaScript, and C++ SDKs and CLIs do not bundle any certificates, so their certificates come from the underlying operating system. The Ruby SDK has included at least one of the required CAs since June 10, 2015. Before that date, the Ruby V2 SDK did not bundle certificates.

Certificate pinning

If you are using a technique called certificate pinning to lock down the CAs you trust on a domain-by-domain basis, you must adjust your pinning to include the Amazon Trust Services CAs. Certificate pinning helps defend you from an attacker using misissued certificates to fool an application into creating a connection to a spoofed host (an illegitimate host masquerading as a legitimate host). The restriction to a specific, pinned certificate is made by checking that the certificate issued is the expected certificate. This is done by checking that the hash of the certificate public key received from the server matches the expected hash stored in the application. If the hashes do not match, the code stops the connection.

AWS recommends against using certificate pinning because it introduces a potential availability risk. If the certificate to which you pin is replaced, your application will fail to connect. If your use case requires pinning, we recommend that you pin to a CA rather than to an individual certificate. If you are pinning to an Amazon Trust Services CA, you should pin to all CAs shown in the table earlier in this post.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about this post, start a new thread on the ACM forum.

– Jonathan

Implementing Default Directory Indexes in Amazon S3-backed Amazon CloudFront Origins Using [email protected]

Post Syndicated from Ronnie Eichler original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/implementing-default-directory-indexes-in-amazon-s3-backed-amazon-cloudfront-origins-using-lambdaedge/

With the recent launch of [email protected], it’s now possible for you to provide even more robust functionality to your static websites. Amazon CloudFront is a content distribution network service. In this post, I show how you can use [email protected] along with the CloudFront origin access identity (OAI) for Amazon S3 and still provide simple URLs (such as www.example.com/about/ instead of www.example.com/about/index.html).

Background

Amazon S3 is a great platform for hosting a static website. You don’t need to worry about managing servers or underlying infrastructure—you just publish your static to content to an S3 bucket. S3 provides a DNS name such as <bucket-name>.s3-website-<AWS-region>.amazonaws.com. Use this name for your website by creating a CNAME record in your domain’s DNS environment (or Amazon Route 53) as follows:

www.example.com -> <bucket-name>.s3-website-<AWS-region>.amazonaws.com

You can also put CloudFront in front of S3 to further scale the performance of your site and cache the content closer to your users. CloudFront can enable HTTPS-hosted sites, by either using a custom Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate or a managed certificate from AWS Certificate Manager. In addition, CloudFront also offers integration with AWS WAF, a web application firewall. As you can see, it’s possible to achieve some robust functionality by using S3, CloudFront, and other managed services and not have to worry about maintaining underlying infrastructure.

One of the key concerns that you might have when implementing any type of WAF or CDN is that you want to force your users to go through the CDN. If you implement CloudFront in front of S3, you can achieve this by using an OAI. However, in order to do this, you cannot use the HTTP endpoint that is exposed by S3’s static website hosting feature. Instead, CloudFront must use the S3 REST endpoint to fetch content from your origin so that the request can be authenticated using the OAI. This presents some challenges in that the REST endpoint does not support redirection to a default index page.

CloudFront does allow you to specify a default root object (index.html), but it only works on the root of the website (such as http://www.example.com > http://www.example.com/index.html). It does not work on any subdirectory (such as http://www.example.com/about/). If you were to attempt to request this URL through CloudFront, CloudFront would do a S3 GetObject API call against a key that does not exist.

Of course, it is a bad user experience to expect users to always type index.html at the end of every URL (or even know that it should be there). Until now, there has not been an easy way to provide these simpler URLs (equivalent to the DirectoryIndex Directive in an Apache Web Server configuration) to users through CloudFront. Not if you still want to be able to restrict access to the S3 origin using an OAI. However, with the release of [email protected], you can use a JavaScript function running on the CloudFront edge nodes to look for these patterns and request the appropriate object key from the S3 origin.

Solution

In this example, you use the compute power at the CloudFront edge to inspect the request as it’s coming in from the client. Then re-write the request so that CloudFront requests a default index object (index.html in this case) for any request URI that ends in ‘/’.

When a request is made against a web server, the client specifies the object to obtain in the request. You can use this URI and apply a regular expression to it so that these URIs get resolved to a default index object before CloudFront requests the object from the origin. Use the following code:

'use strict';
exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    
    // Extract the request from the CloudFront event that is sent to [email protected] 
    var request = event.Records[0].cf.request;

    // Extract the URI from the request
    var olduri = request.uri;

    // Match any '/' that occurs at the end of a URI. Replace it with a default index
    var newuri = olduri.replace(/\/$/, '\/index.html');
    
    // Log the URI as received by CloudFront and the new URI to be used to fetch from origin
    console.log("Old URI: " + olduri);
    console.log("New URI: " + newuri);
    
    // Replace the received URI with the URI that includes the index page
    request.uri = newuri;
    
    // Return to CloudFront
    return callback(null, request);

};

To get started, create an S3 bucket to be the origin for CloudFront:

Create bucket

On the other screens, you can just accept the defaults for the purposes of this walkthrough. If this were a production implementation, I would recommend enabling bucket logging and specifying an existing S3 bucket as the destination for access logs. These logs can be useful if you need to troubleshoot issues with your S3 access.

Now, put some content into your S3 bucket. For this walkthrough, create two simple webpages to demonstrate the functionality:  A page that resides at the website root, and another that is in a subdirectory.

<s3bucketname>/index.html

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Root home page</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Hello, this page resides in the root directory.</p>
    </body>
</html>

<s3bucketname>/subdirectory/index.html

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Subdirectory home page</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Hello, this page resides in the /subdirectory/ directory.</p>
    </body>
</html>

When uploading the files into S3, you can accept the defaults. You add a bucket policy as part of the CloudFront distribution creation that allows CloudFront to access the S3 origin. You should now have an S3 bucket that looks like the following:

Root of bucket

Subdirectory in bucket

Next, create a CloudFront distribution that your users will use to access the content. Open the CloudFront console, and choose Create Distribution. For Select a delivery method for your content, under Web, choose Get Started.

On the next screen, you set up the distribution. Below are the options to configure:

  • Origin Domain Name:  Select the S3 bucket that you created earlier.
  • Restrict Bucket Access: Choose Yes.
  • Origin Access Identity: Create a new identity.
  • Grant Read Permissions on Bucket: Choose Yes, Update Bucket Policy.
  • Object Caching: Choose Customize (I am changing the behavior to avoid having CloudFront cache objects, as this could affect your ability to troubleshoot while implementing the Lambda code).
    • Minimum TTL: 0
    • Maximum TTL: 0
    • Default TTL: 0

You can accept all of the other defaults. Again, this is a proof-of-concept exercise. After you are comfortable that the CloudFront distribution is working properly with the origin and Lambda code, you can re-visit the preceding values and make changes before implementing it in production.

CloudFront distributions can take several minutes to deploy (because the changes have to propagate out to all of the edge locations). After that’s done, test the functionality of the S3-backed static website. Looking at the distribution, you can see that CloudFront assigns a domain name:

CloudFront Distribution Settings

Try to access the website using a combination of various URLs:

http://<domainname>/:  Works

› curl -v http://d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net/
*   Trying 54.192.192.214...
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Connected to d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net (54.192.192.214) port 80 (#0)
> GET / HTTP/1.1
> Host: d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net
> User-Agent: curl/7.51.0
> Accept: */*
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< ETag: "cb7e2634fe66c1fd395cf868087dd3b9"
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
< Server: AmazonS3
< X-Cache: Miss from cloudfront
< X-Amz-Cf-Id: -D2FSRwzfcwyKZKFZr6DqYFkIf4t7HdGw2MkUF5sE6YFDxRJgi0R1g==
< Content-Length: 209
< Content-Type: text/html
< Last-Modified: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 19:21:16 GMT
< Via: 1.1 6419ba8f3bd94b651d416054d9416f1e.cloudfront.net (CloudFront), 1.1 iad6-proxy-3.amazon.com:80 (Cisco-WSA/9.1.2-010)
< Connection: keep-alive
<
<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Root home page</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Hello, this page resides in the root directory.</p>
    </body>
</html>
* Curl_http_done: called premature == 0
* Connection #0 to host d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net left intact

This is because CloudFront is configured to request a default root object (index.html) from the origin.

http://<domainname>/subdirectory/:  Doesn’t work

› curl -v http://d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net/subdirectory/
*   Trying 54.192.192.214...
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Connected to d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net (54.192.192.214) port 80 (#0)
> GET /subdirectory/ HTTP/1.1
> Host: d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net
> User-Agent: curl/7.51.0
> Accept: */*
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< ETag: "d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e"
< x-amz-server-side-encryption: AES256
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
< Server: AmazonS3
< X-Cache: Miss from cloudfront
< X-Amz-Cf-Id: Iqf0Gy8hJLiW-9tOAdSFPkL7vCWBrgm3-1ly5tBeY_izU82ftipodA==
< Content-Length: 0
< Content-Type: application/x-directory
< Last-Modified: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 19:21:24 GMT
< Via: 1.1 6419ba8f3bd94b651d416054d9416f1e.cloudfront.net (CloudFront), 1.1 iad6-proxy-3.amazon.com:80 (Cisco-WSA/9.1.2-010)
< Connection: keep-alive
<
* Curl_http_done: called premature == 0
* Connection #0 to host d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net left intact

If you use a tool such like cURL to test this, you notice that CloudFront and S3 are returning a blank response. The reason for this is that the subdirectory does exist, but it does not resolve to an S3 object. Keep in mind that S3 is an object store, so there are no real directories. User interfaces such as the S3 console present a hierarchical view of a bucket with folders based on the presence of forward slashes, but behind the scenes the bucket is just a collection of keys that represent stored objects.

http://<domainname>/subdirectory/index.html:  Works

› curl -v http://d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net/subdirectory/index.html
*   Trying 54.192.192.130...
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Connected to d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net (54.192.192.130) port 80 (#0)
> GET /subdirectory/index.html HTTP/1.1
> Host: d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net
> User-Agent: curl/7.51.0
> Accept: */*
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< Date: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:35:15 GMT
< ETag: "ddf87c487acf7cef9d50418f0f8f8dae"
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
< Server: AmazonS3
< X-Cache: RefreshHit from cloudfront
< X-Amz-Cf-Id: bkh6opXdpw8pUomqG3Qr3UcjnZL8axxOH82Lh0OOcx48uJKc_Dc3Cg==
< Content-Length: 227
< Content-Type: text/html
< Last-Modified: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 19:21:45 GMT
< Via: 1.1 3f2788d309d30f41de96da6f931d4ede.cloudfront.net (CloudFront), 1.1 iad6-proxy-3.amazon.com:80 (Cisco-WSA/9.1.2-010)
< Connection: keep-alive
<
<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Subdirectory home page</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Hello, this page resides in the /subdirectory/ directory.</p>
    </body>
</html>
* Curl_http_done: called premature == 0
* Connection #0 to host d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net left intact

This request works as expected because you are referencing the object directly. Now, you implement the [email protected] function to return the default index.html page for any subdirectory. Looking at the example JavaScript code, here’s where the magic happens:

var newuri = olduri.replace(/\/$/, '\/index.html');

You are going to use a JavaScript regular expression to match any ‘/’ that occurs at the end of the URI and replace it with ‘/index.html’. This is the equivalent to what S3 does on its own with static website hosting. However, as I mentioned earlier, you can’t rely on this if you want to use a policy on the bucket to restrict it so that users must access the bucket through CloudFront. That way, all requests to the S3 bucket must be authenticated using the S3 REST API. Because of this, you implement a [email protected] function that takes any client request ending in ‘/’ and append a default ‘index.html’ to the request before requesting the object from the origin.

In the Lambda console, choose Create function. On the next screen, skip the blueprint selection and choose Author from scratch, as you’ll use the sample code provided.

Next, configure the trigger. Choosing the empty box shows a list of available triggers. Choose CloudFront and select your CloudFront distribution ID (created earlier). For this example, leave Cache Behavior as * and CloudFront Event as Origin Request. Select the Enable trigger and replicate box and choose Next.

Lambda Trigger

Next, give the function a name and a description. Then, copy and paste the following code:

'use strict';
exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    
    // Extract the request from the CloudFront event that is sent to [email protected] 
    var request = event.Records[0].cf.request;

    // Extract the URI from the request
    var olduri = request.uri;

    // Match any '/' that occurs at the end of a URI. Replace it with a default index
    var newuri = olduri.replace(/\/$/, '\/index.html');
    
    // Log the URI as received by CloudFront and the new URI to be used to fetch from origin
    console.log("Old URI: " + olduri);
    console.log("New URI: " + newuri);
    
    // Replace the received URI with the URI that includes the index page
    request.uri = newuri;
    
    // Return to CloudFront
    return callback(null, request);

};

Next, define a role that grants permissions to the Lambda function. For this example, choose Create new role from template, Basic Edge Lambda permissions. This creates a new IAM role for the Lambda function and grants the following permissions:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "logs:CreateLogGroup",
                "logs:CreateLogStream",
                "logs:PutLogEvents"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:logs:*:*:*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

In a nutshell, these are the permissions that the function needs to create the necessary CloudWatch log group and log stream, and to put the log events so that the function is able to write logs when it executes.

After the function has been created, you can go back to the browser (or cURL) and re-run the test for the subdirectory request that failed previously:

› curl -v http://d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net/subdirectory/
*   Trying 54.192.192.202...
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Connected to d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net (54.192.192.202) port 80 (#0)
> GET /subdirectory/ HTTP/1.1
> Host: d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net
> User-Agent: curl/7.51.0
> Accept: */*
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< Date: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 21:18:44 GMT
< ETag: "ddf87c487acf7cef9d50418f0f8f8dae"
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
< Server: AmazonS3
< X-Cache: Miss from cloudfront
< X-Amz-Cf-Id: rwFN7yHE70bT9xckBpceTsAPcmaadqWB9omPBv2P6WkIfQqdjTk_4w==
< Content-Length: 227
< Content-Type: text/html
< Last-Modified: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 19:21:45 GMT
< Via: 1.1 3572de112011f1b625bb77410b0c5cca.cloudfront.net (CloudFront), 1.1 iad6-proxy-3.amazon.com:80 (Cisco-WSA/9.1.2-010)
< Connection: keep-alive
<
<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Subdirectory home page</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Hello, this page resides in the /subdirectory/ directory.</p>
    </body>
</html>
* Curl_http_done: called premature == 0
* Connection #0 to host d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net left intact

You have now configured a way for CloudFront to return a default index page for subdirectories in S3!

Summary

In this post, you used [email protected] to be able to use CloudFront with an S3 origin access identity and serve a default root object on subdirectory URLs. To find out some more about this use-case, see [email protected] integration with CloudFront in our documentation.

If you have questions or suggestions, feel free to comment below. For troubleshooting or implementation help, check out the Lambda forum.

Application Load Balancers Now Support Multiple TLS Certificates With Smart Selection Using SNI

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-application-load-balancer-sni/

Today we’re launching support for multiple TLS/SSL certificates on Application Load Balancers (ALB) using Server Name Indication (SNI). You can now host multiple TLS secured applications, each with its own TLS certificate, behind a single load balancer. In order to use SNI, all you need to do is bind multiple certificates to the same secure listener on your load balancer. ALB will automatically choose the optimal TLS certificate for each client. These new features are provided at no additional charge.

If you’re looking for a TL;DR on how to use this new feature just click here. If you’re like me and you’re a little rusty on the specifics of Transport Layer Security (TLS) then keep reading.

TLS? SSL? SNI?

People tend to use the terms SSL and TLS interchangeably even though the two are technically different. SSL technically refers to a predecessor of the TLS protocol. To keep things simple I’ll be using the term TLS for the rest of this post.

TLS is a protocol for securely transmitting data like passwords, cookies, and credit card numbers. It enables privacy, authentication, and integrity of the data being transmitted. TLS uses certificate based authentication where certificates are like ID cards for your websites. You trust the person that signed and issued the certificate, the certificate authority (CA), so you trust that the data in the certificate is correct. When a browser connects to your TLS-enabled ALB, ALB presents a certificate that contains your site’s public key, which has been cryptographically signed by a CA. This way the client can be sure it’s getting the ‘real you’ and that it’s safe to use your site’s public key to establish a secure connection.

With SNI support we’re making it easy to use more than one certificate with the same ALB. The most common reason you might want to use multiple certificates is to handle different domains with the same load balancer. It’s always been possible to use wildcard and subject-alternate-name (SAN) certificates with ALB, but these come with limitations. Wildcard certificates only work for related subdomains that match a simple pattern and while SAN certificates can support many different domains, the same certificate authority has to authenticate each one. That means you have reauthenticate and reprovision your certificate everytime you add a new domain.

One of our most frequent requests on forums, reddit, and in my e-mail inbox has been to use the Server Name Indication (SNI) extension of TLS to choose a certificate for a client. Since TLS operates at the transport layer, below HTTP, it doesn’t see the hostname requested by a client. SNI works by having the client tell the server “This is the domain I expect to get a certificate for” when it first connects. The server can then choose the correct certificate to respond to the client. All modern web browsers and a large majority of other clients support SNI. In fact, today we see SNI supported by over 99.5% of clients connecting to CloudFront.

Smart Certificate Selection on ALB

ALB’s smart certificate selection goes beyond SNI. In addition to containing a list of valid domain names, certificates also describe the type of key exchange and cryptography that the server supports, as well as the signature algorithm (SHA2, SHA1, MD5) used to sign the certificate. To establish a TLS connection, a client starts a TLS handshake by sending a “ClientHello” message that outlines the capabilities of the client: the protocol versions, extensions, cipher suites, and compression methods. Based on what an individual client supports, ALB’s smart selection algorithm chooses a certificate for the connection and sends it to the client. ALB supports both the classic RSA algorithm and the newer, hipper, and faster Elliptic-curve based ECDSA algorithm. ECDSA support among clients isn’t as prevalent as SNI, but it is supported by all modern web browsers. Since it’s faster and requires less CPU, it can be particularly useful for ultra-low latency applications and for conserving the amount of battery used by mobile applications. Since ALB can see what each client supports from the TLS handshake, you can upload both RSA and ECDSA certificates for the same domains and ALB will automatically choose the best one for each client.

Using SNI with ALB

I’ll use a few example websites like VimIsBetterThanEmacs.com and VimIsTheBest.com. I’ve purchased and hosted these domains on Amazon Route 53, and provisioned two separate certificates for them in AWS Certificate Manager (ACM). If I want to securely serve both of these sites through a single ALB, I can quickly add both certificates in the console.

First, I’ll select my load balancer in the console, go to the listeners tab, and select “view/edit certificates”.

Next, I’ll use the “+” button in the top left corner to select some certificates then I’ll click the “Add” button.

There are no more steps. If you’re not really a GUI kind of person you’ll be pleased to know that it’s also simple to add new certificates via the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) (or SDKs).

aws elbv2 add-listener-certificates --listener-arn <listener-arn> --certificates CertificateArn=<cert-arn>

Things to know

  • ALB Access Logs now include the client’s requested hostname and the certificate ARN used. If the “hostname” field is empty (represented by a “-“) the client did not use the SNI extension in their request.
  • You can use any of your certificates in ACM or IAM.
  • You can bind multiple certificates for the same domain(s) to a secure listener. Your ALB will choose the optimal certificate based on multiple factors including the capabilities of the client.
  • If the client does not support SNI your ALB will use the default certificate (the one you specified when you created the listener).
  • There are three new ELB API calls: AddListenerCertificates, RemoveListenerCertificates, and DescribeListenerCertificates.
  • You can bind up to 25 certificates per load balancer (not counting the default certificate).
  • These new features are supported by AWS CloudFormation at launch.

You can see an example of these new features in action with a set of websites created by my colleague Jon Zobrist: https://www.exampleloadbalancer.com/.

Overall, I will personally use this feature and I’m sure a ton of AWS users will benefit from it as well. I want to thank the Elastic Load Balancing team for all their hard work in getting this into the hands of our users.

Randall

How to Configure an LDAPS Endpoint for Simple AD

Post Syndicated from Cameron Worrell original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-configure-an-ldaps-endpoint-for-simple-ad/

Simple AD, which is powered by Samba  4, supports basic Active Directory (AD) authentication features such as users, groups, and the ability to join domains. Simple AD also includes an integrated Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) server. LDAP is a standard application protocol for the access and management of directory information. You can use the BIND operation from Simple AD to authenticate LDAP client sessions. This makes LDAP a common choice for centralized authentication and authorization for services such as Secure Shell (SSH), client-based virtual private networks (VPNs), and many other applications. Authentication, the process of confirming the identity of a principal, typically involves the transmission of highly sensitive information such as user names and passwords. To protect this information in transit over untrusted networks, companies often require encryption as part of their information security strategy.

In this blog post, we show you how to configure an LDAPS (LDAP over SSL/TLS) encrypted endpoint for Simple AD so that you can extend Simple AD over untrusted networks. Our solution uses Elastic Load Balancing (ELB) to send decrypted LDAP traffic to HAProxy running on Amazon EC2, which then sends the traffic to Simple AD. ELB offers integrated certificate management, SSL/TLS termination, and the ability to use a scalable EC2 backend to process decrypted traffic. ELB also tightly integrates with Amazon Route 53, enabling you to use a custom domain for the LDAPS endpoint. The solution needs the intermediate HAProxy layer because ELB can direct traffic only to EC2 instances. To simplify testing and deployment, we have provided an AWS CloudFormation template to provision the ELB and HAProxy layers.

This post assumes that you have an understanding of concepts such as Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) and its components, including subnets, routing, Internet and network address translation (NAT) gateways, DNS, and security groups. You should also be familiar with launching EC2 instances and logging in to them with SSH. If needed, you should familiarize yourself with these concepts and review the solution overview and prerequisites in the next section before proceeding with the deployment.

Note: This solution is intended for use by clients requiring an LDAPS endpoint only. If your requirements extend beyond this, you should consider accessing the Simple AD servers directly or by using AWS Directory Service for Microsoft AD.

Solution overview

The following diagram and description illustrates and explains the Simple AD LDAPS environment. The CloudFormation template creates the items designated by the bracket (internal ELB load balancer and two HAProxy nodes configured in an Auto Scaling group).

Diagram of the the Simple AD LDAPS environment

Here is how the solution works, as shown in the preceding numbered diagram:

  1. The LDAP client sends an LDAPS request to ELB on TCP port 636.
  2. ELB terminates the SSL/TLS session and decrypts the traffic using a certificate. ELB sends the decrypted LDAP traffic to the EC2 instances running HAProxy on TCP port 389.
  3. The HAProxy servers forward the LDAP request to the Simple AD servers listening on TCP port 389 in a fixed Auto Scaling group configuration.
  4. The Simple AD servers send an LDAP response through the HAProxy layer to ELB. ELB encrypts the response and sends it to the client.

Note: Amazon VPC prevents a third party from intercepting traffic within the VPC. Because of this, the VPC protects the decrypted traffic between ELB and HAProxy and between HAProxy and Simple AD. The ELB encryption provides an additional layer of security for client connections and protects traffic coming from hosts outside the VPC.

Prerequisites

  1. Our approach requires an Amazon VPC with two public and two private subnets. The previous diagram illustrates the environment’s VPC requirements. If you do not yet have these components in place, follow these guidelines for setting up a sample environment:
    1. Identify a region that supports Simple AD, ELB, and NAT gateways. The NAT gateways are used with an Internet gateway to allow the HAProxy instances to access the internet to perform their required configuration. You also need to identify the two Availability Zones in that region for use by Simple AD. You will supply these Availability Zones as parameters to the CloudFormation template later in this process.
    2. Create or choose an Amazon VPC in the region you chose. In order to use Route 53 to resolve the LDAPS endpoint, make sure you enable DNS support within your VPC. Create an Internet gateway and attach it to the VPC, which will be used by the NAT gateways to access the internet.
    3. Create a route table with a default route to the Internet gateway. Create two NAT gateways, one per Availability Zone in your public subnets to provide additional resiliency across the Availability Zones. Together, the routing table, the NAT gateways, and the Internet gateway enable the HAProxy instances to access the internet.
    4. Create two private routing tables, one per Availability Zone. Create two private subnets, one per Availability Zone. The dual routing tables and subnets allow for a higher level of redundancy. Add each subnet to the routing table in the same Availability Zone. Add a default route in each routing table to the NAT gateway in the same Availability Zone. The Simple AD servers use subnets that you create.
    5. The LDAP service requires a DNS domain that resolves within your VPC and from your LDAP clients. If you do not have an existing DNS domain, follow the steps to create a private hosted zone and associate it with your VPC. To avoid encryption protocol errors, you must ensure that the DNS domain name is consistent across your Route 53 zone and in the SSL/TLS certificate (see Step 2 in the “Solution deployment” section).
  2. Make sure you have completed the Simple AD Prerequisites.
  3. We will use a self-signed certificate for ELB to perform SSL/TLS decryption. You can use a certificate issued by your preferred certificate authority or a certificate issued by AWS Certificate Manager (ACM).
    Note: To prevent unauthorized connections directly to your Simple AD servers, you can modify the Simple AD security group on port 389 to block traffic from locations outside of the Simple AD VPC. You can find the security group in the EC2 console by creating a search filter for your Simple AD directory ID. It is also important to allow the Simple AD servers to communicate with each other as shown on Simple AD Prerequisites.

Solution deployment

This solution includes five main parts:

  1. Create a Simple AD directory.
  2. Create a certificate.
  3. Create the ELB and HAProxy layers by using the supplied CloudFormation template.
  4. Create a Route 53 record.
  5. Test LDAPS access using an Amazon Linux client.

1. Create a Simple AD directory

With the prerequisites completed, you will create a Simple AD directory in your private VPC subnets:

  1. In the Directory Service console navigation pane, choose Directories and then choose Set up directory.
  2. Choose Simple AD.
    Screenshot of choosing "Simple AD"
  3. Provide the following information:
    • Directory DNS – The fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the directory, such as corp.example.com. You will use the FQDN as part of the testing procedure.
    • NetBIOS name – The short name for the directory, such as CORP.
    • Administrator password – The password for the directory administrator. The directory creation process creates an administrator account with the user name Administrator and this password. Do not lose this password because it is nonrecoverable. You also need this password for testing LDAPS access in a later step.
    • Description – An optional description for the directory.
    • Directory Size – The size of the directory.
      Screenshot of the directory details to provide
  4. Provide the following information in the VPC Details section, and then choose Next Step:
    • VPC – Specify the VPC in which to install the directory.
    • Subnets – Choose two private subnets for the directory servers. The two subnets must be in different Availability Zones. Make a note of the VPC and subnet IDs for use as CloudFormation input parameters. In the following example, the Availability Zones are us-east-1a and us-east-1c.
      Screenshot of the VPC details to provide
  5. Review the directory information and make any necessary changes. When the information is correct, choose Create Simple AD.

It takes several minutes to create the directory. From the AWS Directory Service console , refresh the screen periodically and wait until the directory Status value changes to Active before continuing. Choose your Simple AD directory and note the two IP addresses in the DNS address section. You will enter them when you run the CloudFormation template later.

Note: Full administration of your Simple AD implementation is out of scope for this blog post. See the documentation to add users, groups, or instances to your directory. Also see the previous blog post, How to Manage Identities in Simple AD Directories.

2. Create a certificate

In the previous step, you created the Simple AD directory. Next, you will generate a self-signed SSL/TLS certificate using OpenSSL. You will use the certificate with ELB to secure the LDAPS endpoint. OpenSSL is a standard, open source library that supports a wide range of cryptographic functions, including the creation and signing of x509 certificates. You then import the certificate into ACM that is integrated with ELB.

  1. You must have a system with OpenSSL installed to complete this step. If you do not have OpenSSL, you can install it on Amazon Linux by running the command, sudo yum install openssl. If you do not have access to an Amazon Linux instance you can create one with SSH access enabled to proceed with this step. Run the command, openssl version, at the command line to see if you already have OpenSSL installed.
    [[email protected] ~]$ openssl version
    OpenSSL 1.0.1k-fips 8 Jan 2015

  2. Create a private key using the command, openssl genrsa command.
    [[email protected] tmp]$ openssl genrsa 2048 > privatekey.pem
    Generating RSA private key, 2048 bit long modulus
    ......................................................................................................................................................................+++
    ..........................+++
    e is 65537 (0x10001)

  3. Generate a certificate signing request (CSR) using the openssl req command. Provide the requested information for each field. The Common Name is the FQDN for your LDAPS endpoint (for example, ldap.corp.example.com). The Common Name must use the domain name you will later register in Route 53. You will encounter certificate errors if the names do not match.
    [[email protected] tmp]$ openssl req -new -key privatekey.pem -out server.csr
    You are about to be asked to enter information that will be incorporated into your certificate request.

  4. Use the openssl x509 command to sign the certificate. The following example uses the private key from the previous step (privatekey.pem) and the signing request (server.csr) to create a public certificate named server.crt that is valid for 365 days. This certificate must be updated within 365 days to avoid disruption of LDAPS functionality.
    [[email protected] tmp]$ openssl x509 -req -sha256 -days 365 -in server.csr -signkey privatekey.pem -out server.crt
    Signature ok
    subject=/C=XX/L=Default City/O=Default Company Ltd/CN=ldap.corp.example.com
    Getting Private key

  5. You should see three files: privatekey.pem, server.crt, and server.csr.
    [[email protected] tmp]$ ls
    privatekey.pem server.crt server.csr

    Restrict access to the private key.

    [[email protected] tmp]$ chmod 600 privatekey.pem

    Keep the private key and public certificate for later use. You can discard the signing request because you are using a self-signed certificate and not using a Certificate Authority. Always store the private key in a secure location and avoid adding it to your source code.

  6. In the ACM console, choose Import a certificate.
  7. Using your favorite Linux text editor, paste the contents of your server.crt file in the Certificate body box.
  8. Using your favorite Linux text editor, paste the contents of your privatekey.pem file in the Certificate private key box. For a self-signed certificate, you can leave the Certificate chain box blank.
  9. Choose Review and import. Confirm the information and choose Import.

3. Create the ELB and HAProxy layers by using the supplied CloudFormation template

Now that you have created your Simple AD directory and SSL/TLS certificate, you are ready to use the CloudFormation template to create the ELB and HAProxy layers.

  1. Load the supplied CloudFormation template to deploy an internal ELB and two HAProxy EC2 instances into a fixed Auto Scaling group. After you load the template, provide the following input parameters. Note: You can find the parameters relating to your Simple AD from the directory details page by choosing your Simple AD in the Directory Service console.
Input parameter Input parameter description
HAProxyInstanceSize The EC2 instance size for HAProxy servers. The default size is t2.micro and can scale up for large Simple AD environments.
MyKeyPair The SSH key pair for EC2 instances. If you do not have an existing key pair, you must create one.
VPCId The target VPC for this solution. Must be in the VPC where you deployed Simple AD and is available in your Simple AD directory details page.
SubnetId1 The Simple AD primary subnet. This information is available in your Simple AD directory details page.
SubnetId2 The Simple AD secondary subnet. This information is available in your Simple AD directory details page.
MyTrustedNetwork Trusted network Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) to allow connections to the LDAPS endpoint. For example, use the VPC CIDR to allow clients in the VPC to connect.
SimpleADPriIP The primary Simple AD Server IP. This information is available in your Simple AD directory details page.
SimpleADSecIP The secondary Simple AD Server IP. This information is available in your Simple AD directory details page.
LDAPSCertificateARN The Amazon Resource Name (ARN) for the SSL certificate. This information is available in the ACM console.
  1. Enter the input parameters and choose Next.
  2. On the Options page, accept the defaults and choose Next.
  3. On the Review page, confirm the details and choose Create. The stack will be created in approximately 5 minutes.

4. Create a Route 53 record

The next step is to create a Route 53 record in your private hosted zone so that clients can resolve your LDAPS endpoint.

  1. If you do not have an existing DNS domain for use with LDAP, create a private hosted zone and associate it with your VPC. The hosted zone name should be consistent with your Simple AD (for example, corp.example.com).
  2. When the CloudFormation stack is in CREATE_COMPLETE status, locate the value of the LDAPSURL on the Outputs tab of the stack. Copy this value for use in the next step.
  3. On the Route 53 console, choose Hosted Zones and then choose the zone you used for the Common Name box for your self-signed certificate. Choose Create Record Set and enter the following information:
    1. Name – The label of the record (such as ldap).
    2. Type – Leave as A – IPv4 address.
    3. Alias – Choose Yes.
    4. Alias Target – Paste the value of the LDAPSURL on the Outputs tab of the stack.
  4. Leave the defaults for Routing Policy and Evaluate Target Health, and choose Create.
    Screenshot of finishing the creation of the Route 53 record

5. Test LDAPS access using an Amazon Linux client

At this point, you have configured your LDAPS endpoint and now you can test it from an Amazon Linux client.

  1. Create an Amazon Linux instance with SSH access enabled to test the solution. Launch the instance into one of the public subnets in your VPC. Make sure the IP assigned to the instance is in the trusted IP range you specified in the CloudFormation parameter MyTrustedNetwork in Step 3.b.
  2. SSH into the instance and complete the following steps to verify access.
    1. Install the openldap-clients package and any required dependencies:
      sudo yum install -y openldap-clients.
    2. Add the server.crt file to the /etc/openldap/certs/ directory so that the LDAPS client will trust your SSL/TLS certificate. You can copy the file using Secure Copy (SCP) or create it using a text editor.
    3. Edit the /etc/openldap/ldap.conf file and define the environment variables BASE, URI, and TLS_CACERT.
      • The value for BASE should match the configuration of the Simple AD directory name.
      • The value for URI should match your DNS alias.
      • The value for TLS_CACERT is the path to your public certificate.

Here is an example of the contents of the file.

BASE dc=corp,dc=example,dc=com
URI ldaps://ldap.corp.example.com
TLS_CACERT /etc/openldap/certs/server.crt

To test the solution, query the directory through the LDAPS endpoint, as shown in the following command. Replace corp.example.com with your domain name and use the Administrator password that you configured with the Simple AD directory

$ ldapsearch -D "[email protected]corp.example.com" -W sAMAccountName=Administrator

You should see a response similar to the following response, which provides the directory information in LDAP Data Interchange Format (LDIF) for the administrator distinguished name (DN) from your Simple AD LDAP server.

# extended LDIF
#
# LDAPv3
# base <dc=corp,dc=example,dc=com> (default) with scope subtree
# filter: sAMAccountName=Administrator
# requesting: ALL
#

# Administrator, Users, corp.example.com
dn: CN=Administrator,CN=Users,DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com
objectClass: top
objectClass: person
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: user
description: Built-in account for administering the computer/domain
instanceType: 4
whenCreated: 20170721123204.0Z
uSNCreated: 3223
name: Administrator
objectGUID:: l3h0HIiKO0a/ShL4yVK/vw==
userAccountControl: 512
…

You can now use the LDAPS endpoint for directory operations and authentication within your environment. If you would like to learn more about how to interact with your LDAPS endpoint within a Linux environment, here are a few resources to get started:

Troubleshooting

If you receive an error such as the following error when issuing the ldapsearch command, there are a few things you can do to help identify issues.

ldap_sasl_bind(SIMPLE): Can't contact LDAP server (-1)
  • You might be able to obtain additional error details by adding the -d1 debug flag to the ldapsearch command in the previous section.
    $ ldapsearch -D "[email protected]" -W sAMAccountName=Administrator –d1

  • Verify that the parameters in ldap.conf match your configured LDAPS URI endpoint and that all parameters can be resolved by DNS. You can use the following dig command, substituting your configured endpoint DNS name.
    $ dig ldap.corp.example.com

  • Confirm that the client instance from which you are connecting is in the CIDR range of the CloudFormation parameter, MyTrustedNetwork.
  • Confirm that the path to your public SSL/TLS certificate configured in ldap.conf as TLS_CAERT is correct. You configured this in Step 5.b.3. You can check your SSL/TLS connection with the command, substituting your configured endpoint DNS name for the string after –connect.
    $ echo -n | openssl s_client -connect ldap.corp.example.com:636

  • Verify that your HAProxy instances have the status InService in the EC2 console: Choose Load Balancers under Load Balancing in the navigation pane, highlight your LDAPS load balancer, and then choose the Instances

Conclusion

You can use ELB and HAProxy to provide an LDAPS endpoint for Simple AD and transport sensitive authentication information over untrusted networks. You can explore using LDAPS to authenticate SSH users or integrate with other software solutions that support LDAP authentication. This solution’s CloudFormation template is available on GitHub.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, start a new thread on the Directory Service forum.

– Cameron and Jeff

How to Control TLS Ciphers in Your AWS Elastic Beanstalk Application by Using AWS CloudFormation

Post Syndicated from Paco Hope original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-control-tls-ciphers-in-your-aws-elastic-beanstalk-application-by-using-aws-cloudformation/

Securing data in transit is critical to the integrity of transactions on the Internet. Whether you log in to an account with your user name and password or give your credit card details to a retailer, you want your data protected as it travels across the Internet from place to place. One of the protocols in widespread use to protect data in transit is Transport Layer Security (TLS). Every time you access a URL that begins with “https” instead of just “http”, you are using a TLS-secured connection to a website.

To demonstrate that your application has a strong TLS configuration, you can use services like the one provided by SSL Labs. There are also open source, command-line-oriented TLS testing programs such as testssl.sh (which I do not cover in this post) and sslscan (which I cover later in this post). The goal of testing your TLS configuration is to provide evidence that weak cryptographic ciphers are disabled in your TLS configuration and only strong ciphers are enabled. In this blog post, I show you how to control the TLS security options for your secure load balancer in AWS CloudFormation, pass the TLS certificate and host name for your secure AWS Elastic Beanstalk application to the CloudFormation script as parameters, and then confirm that only strong TLS ciphers are enabled on the launched application by testing it with SSLLabs.

Background

In some situations, it’s not enough to simply turn on TLS with its default settings and call it done. Over the years, a number of vulnerabilities have been discovered in the TLS protocol itself with codenames such as CRIME, POODLE, and Logjam. Though some vulnerabilities were in specific implementations, such as OpenSSL, others were vulnerabilities in the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or TLS protocol itself.

The only way to avoid some TLS vulnerabilities is to ensure your web server uses only the latest version of TLS. Some organizations want to limit their TLS configuration to the highest possible security levels to satisfy company policies, regulatory requirements, or other information security requirements. In practice, such limitations usually mean using TLS version 1.2 (at the time of this writing, TLS 1.3 is in the works) and using only strong cryptographic ciphers. Note that forcing a high-security TLS connection in this manner limits which types of devices can connect to your web server. I address this point at the end of this post.

The default TLS configuration in most web servers is compatible with the broadest set of clients (such as web browsers, mobile devices, and point-of-sale systems). As a result, older ciphers and protocol versions are usually enabled. This is true for the Elastic Load Balancing load balancer that is created in your Elastic Beanstalk application as well as for web server software such as Apache and nginx.  For example, TLS versions 1.0 and 1.1 are enabled in addition to 1.2. The RC4 cipher is permitted, even though that cipher is too weak for the most demanding security requirements. If your application needs to prioritize the security of connections over compatibility with legacy devices, you must adjust the TLS encryption settings on your application. The solution in this post helps you make those adjustments.

Prerequisites for the solution

Before you implement this solution, you must have a few prerequisites in place:

  1. You must have a hosted zone in Amazon Route 53 where the name of the secure application will be created. I use example.com as my domain name in this post and assume that I host example.com publicly in Route 53. To learn more about creating and hosting a zone publicly in Route 53, see Working with Public Hosted Zones.
  2. You must choose a name to be associated with the secure app. In this case, I use secure.example.com as the DNS name to be associated with the secure app. This means that I’m trying to create an Elastic Beanstalk application whose URL will be https://secure.example.com/.
  3. You must have a TLS certificate hosted in AWS Certificate Manager (ACM). This certificate must be issued with the name you decided in Step 2. If you are new to ACM, see Getting Started. If you are already familiar with ACM, request a certificate and get its Amazon Resource Name (ARN).Look up the ARN for the certificate that you created by opening the ACM console. The ARN looks something like: arn:aws:acm:eu-west-1:111122223333:certificate/12345678-abcd-1234-abcd-1234abcd1234.

Implementing the solution

You can use two approaches to control the TLS ciphers used by your load balancer: one is to use a predefined protocol policy from AWS, and the other is to write your own protocol policy that lists exactly which ciphers should be enabled. There are many ciphers and options that can be set, so the appropriate AWS predefined policy is often the simplest policy to use. If you have to comply with an information security policy that requires enabling or disabling specific ciphers, you will probably find it easiest to write a custom policy listing only the ciphers that are acceptable to your requirements.

AWS released two predefined TLS policies on March 10, 2017: ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-1-2017-01 and ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01. These policies restrict TLS negotiations to TLS 1.1 and 1.2, respectively. You can find a good comparison of the ciphers that these policies enable and disable in the HTTPS listener documentation for Elastic Load Balancing. If your requirements are simply “support TLS 1.1 and later” or “support TLS 1.2 and later,” those AWS predefined cipher policies are the best place to start. If you need to control your cipher choice with a custom policy, I show you in this post which lines of the CloudFormation template to change.

Download the predefined policy CloudFormation template

Many AWS customers rely on CloudFormation to launch their AWS resources, including their Elastic Beanstalk applications. To change the ciphers and protocol versions supported on your load balancer, you must put those options in a CloudFormation template. You can store your site’s TLS certificate in ACM and create the corresponding DNS alias record in the correct zone in Route 53.

To start, download the CloudFormation template that I have provided for this blog post, or deploy the template directly in your environment. This template creates a CloudFormation stack in your default VPC that contains two resources: an Elastic Beanstalk application that deploys a standard sample PHP application, and a Route 53 record in a hosted zone. This CloudFormation template selects the AWS predefined policy called ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01 and deploys it.

Launching the sample application from the CloudFormation console

In the CloudFormation console, choose Create Stack. You can either upload the template through your browser, or load the template into an Amazon S3 bucket and type the S3 URL in the Specify an Amazon S3 template URL box.

After you click Next, you will see that there are three parameters defined: CertificateARN, ELBHostName, and HostedDomainName. Set the CertificateARN parameter to the ARN of the certificate you want to use for your application. Set the ELBHostName parameter to the hostname part of the URL. For example, if your URL were https://secure.example.com/, the HostedDomainName parameter would be example.com and the ELBHostName parameter would be secure.

For the sample application, choose Next and then choose Create, and the CloudFormation stack will be created. For your own applications, you might need to set other options such as a database, VPC options, or Amazon SNS notifications. For more details, see AWS Elastic Beanstalk Environment Configuration. To deploy an application other than our sample PHP application, create your own application source bundle.

Launching the sample application from the command line

In addition to launching the sample application from the console, you can specify the parameters from the command line. Because the template uses parameters, you can launch multiple copies of the application, specifying different parameters for each copy. To launch the application from a Linux command line with the AWS CLI, insert the correct values for your application, as shown in the following command.

aws cloudformation create-stack --stack-name "SecureSampleApplication" \
--template-url https://<URL of your CloudFormation template in S3> \
--parameters ParameterKey=CertificateARN,ParameterValue=<Your ARN> \
ParameterKey=ELBHostName,ParameterValue=<Your Host Name> \
ParameterKey=HostedDomainName,ParameterValue=<Your Domain Name>

When that command exits, it prints the StackID of the stack it created. Save that StackID for later so that you can fetch the stack’s outputs from the command line.

Using a custom cipher specification

If you want to specify your own cipher choices, you can use the same CloudFormation template and change two lines. Let’s assume your information security policies require you to disable any ciphers that use Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) mode encryption. These ciphers are enabled in the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01 managed policy, so to satisfy that security requirement, you have to modify the CloudFormation template to use your own protocol policy.

In the template, locate the three lines that define the TLSHighPolicy.

- Namespace:  aws:elb:policies:TLSHighPolicy
OptionName: SSLReferencePolicy
Value:      ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01

Change the OptionName and Value for the TLSHighPolicy. Instead of referring to the AWS predefined policy by name, explicitly list all the ciphers you want to use. Change those three lines so they look like the following.

- Namespace: aws:elb:policies:TLSHighPolicy
OptionName: SSLProtocols
Value:  Protocol-TLSv1.2,Server-Defined-Cipher-Order,ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384,ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256,ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384,ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256

This protocol policy stipulates that the load balancer should:

  • Negotiate connections using only TLS 1.2.
  • Ignore any attempts by the client (for example, the web browser or mobile device) to negotiate a weaker cipher.
  • Accept four specific, strong combinations of cipher and key exchange—and nothing else.

The protocol policy enables only TLS 1.2, strong ciphers that do not use CBC mode encryption, and strong key exchange.

Connect to the secure application

When your CloudFormation stack is in the CREATE_COMPLETED state, you will find three outputs:

  1. The public DNS name of the load balancer
  2. The secure URL that was created
  3. TestOnSSLLabs output that contains a direct link for testing your configuration

You can either enter the secure URL in a web browser (for example, https://secure.example.com/), or click the link in the Outputs to open your sample application and see the demo page. Note that you must use HTTPS—this template has disabled HTTP on port 80 and only listens with HTTPS on port 443.

If you launched your application through the command line, you can view the CloudFormation outputs using the command line as well. You need to know the StackId of the stack you launched and insert it in the following stack-name parameter.

aws cloudformation describe-stacks --stack-name "<ARN of Your Stack>" \
--query 'Stacks[0].Outputs'

Test your application over the Internet with SSLLabs

The easiest way to confirm that the load balancer is using the secure ciphers that we chose is to enter the URL of the load balancer in the form on SSL Labs’ SSL Server Test page. If you do not want the name of your load balancer to be shared publicly on SSLLabs.com, select the Do not show the results on the boards check box. After a minute or two of testing, SSLLabs gives you a detailed report of every cipher it tried and how your load balancer responded. This test simulates many devices that might connect to your website, including mobile phones, desktop web browsers, and software libraries such as Java and OpenSSL. The report tells you whether these clients would be able to connect to your application successfully.

Assuming all went well, you should receive an A grade for the sample application. The biggest contributors to the A grade are:

  • Supporting only TLS 1.2, and not TLS 1.1, TLS 1.0, or SSL 3.0
  • Supporting only strong ciphers such as AES, and not weaker ciphers such as RC4
  • Having an X.509 public key certificate issued correctly by ACM

How to test your application privately with sslscan

You might not be able to reach your Elastic Beanstalk application from the Internet because it might be in a private subnet that is only accessible internally. If you want to test the security of your load balancer’s configuration privately, you can use one of the open source command-line tools such as sslscan. You can install and run the sslscan command on any Amazon EC2 Linux instance or even from your own laptop. Be sure that the Elastic Beanstalk application you want to test will accept an HTTPS connection from your Amazon Linux EC2 instance or from your laptop.

The easiest way to get sslscan on an Amazon Linux EC2 instance is to:

  1. Enable the Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) repository.
  2. Run sudo yum install sslscan.
  3. After the command runs successfully, run sslscan secure.example.com to scan your application for supported ciphers.

The results are similar to Qualys’ results at SSLLabs.com, but the sslscan tool does not summarize and evaluate the results to assign a grade. It just reports whether your application accepted a connection using the cipher that it tried. You must decide for yourself whether that set of accepted connections represents the right level of security for your application. If you have been asked to build a secure load balancer that meets specific security requirements, the output from sslscan helps to show how the security of your application is configured.

The following sample output shows a small subset of the total output of the sslscan tool.

Accepted TLS12 256 bits AES256-GCM-SHA384
Accepted TLS12 256 bits AES256-SHA256
Accepted TLS12 256 bits AES256-SHA
Rejected TLS12 256 bits CAMELLIA256-SHA
Failed TLS12 256 bits PSK-AES256-CBC-SHA
Rejected TLS12 128 bits ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
Rejected TLS12 128 bits ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
Rejected TLS12 128 bits ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256

An Accepted connection is one that was successful: the load balancer and the client were both able to use the indicated cipher. Failed and Rejected connections are connections whose load balancer would not accept the level of security that the client was requesting. As a result, the load balancer closed the connection instead of communicating insecurely. The difference between Failed and Rejected is based one whether the TLS connection was closed cleanly.

Comparing the two policies

The main difference between our custom policy and the AWS predefined policy is whether or not CBC ciphers are accepted. The test results with both policies are identical except for the results shown in the following table. The only change in the policy, and therefore the only change in the results, is that the cipher suites using CBC ciphers have been disabled.

Cipher Suite Name Encryption Algorithm Key Size (bits) ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01 Custom Policy
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384 AESGCM 256 Enabled Enabled
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384 AES 256 Enabled Disabled
AES256-GCM-SHA384 AESGCM 256 Enabled Disabled
AES256-SHA256 AES 256 Enabled Disabled
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256 AESGCM 128 Enabled Enabled
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256 AES 128 Enabled Disabled
AES128-GCM-SHA256 AESGCM 128 Enabled Disabled
AES128-SHA256 AES 128 Enabled Disabled

Strong ciphers and compatibility

The custom policy described in the previous section prevents legacy devices and older versions of software and web browsers from connecting. The output at SSLLabs provides a list of devices and applications (such as Internet Explorer 10 on Windows 7) that cannot connect to an application that uses the TLS policy. By design, the load balancer will refuse to connect to a device that is unable to negotiate a connection at the required levels of security. Users who use legacy software and devices will see different errors, depending on which device or software they use (for example, Internet Explorer on Windows, Chrome on Android, or a legacy mobile application). The error messages will be some variation of “connection failed” because the Elastic Load Balancer closes the connection without responding to the user’s request. This behavior can be problematic for websites that must be accessible to older desktop operating systems or older mobile devices.

If you need to support legacy devices, adjust the TLSHighPolicy in the CloudFormation template. For example, if you need to support web browsers on Windows 7 systems (and you cannot enable TLS 1.2 support on those systems), you can change the policy to enable TLS 1.1. To do this, change the value of SSLReferencePolicy to ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-1-2017-01.

Enabling legacy protocol versions such as TLS version 1.1 will allow older devices to connect, but then the application may not be compliant with the information security policies or business requirements that require strong ciphers.

Conclusion

Using Elastic Beanstalk, Route 53, and ACM can help you launch secure applications that are designed to not only protect data but also meet regulatory compliance requirements and your information security policies. The TLS policy, either custom or predefined, allows you to control exactly which cryptographic ciphers are enabled on your Elastic Load Balancer. The TLS test results provide you with clear evidence you can use to demonstrate compliance with security policies or requirements. The parameters in this post’s CloudFormation template also make it adaptable and reusable for multiple applications. You can use the same template to launch different applications on different secure URLs by simply changing the parameters that you pass to the template.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, start a new thread on the CloudFormation forum.

– Paco

New – AWS Resource Tagging API

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-aws-resource-tagging-api/

AWS customers frequently use tags to organize their Amazon EC2 instances, Amazon EBS volumes, Amazon S3 buckets, and other resources. Over the past couple of years we have been working to make tagging more useful and more powerful. For example, we have added support for tagging during Auto Scaling, the ability to use up to 50 tags per resource, console-based support for the creation of resources that share a common tag (also known as resource groups), and the option to use Config Rules to enforce the use of tags.

As customers grow to the point where they are managing thousands of resources, each with up to 50 tags, they have been looking to us for additional tooling and options to simplify their work. Today I am happy to announce that our new Resource Tagging API is now available. You can use these APIs from the AWS SDKs or via the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI). You now have programmatic access to the same resource group operations that had been accessible only from the AWS Management Console.

Recap: Console-Based Resource Group Operations
Before I get in to the specifics of the new API functions, I thought you would appreciate a fresh look at the console-based grouping and tagging model. I already have the ability to find and then tag AWS resources using a search that spans one or more regions. For example, I can select a long list of regions and then search them for my EC2 instances like this:

After I locate and select all of the desired resources, I can add a new tag key by clicking Create a new tag key and entering the desired tag key:

Then I enter a value for each instance (the new ProjectCode column):

Then I can create a resource group that contains all of the resources that are tagged with P100:

After I have created the resource group, I can locate all of the resources by clicking on the Resource Groups menu:

To learn more about this feature, read Resource Groups and Tagging for AWS.

New API for Resource Tagging
The API that we are announcing today gives you power to tag, untag, and locate resources using tags, all from your own code. With these new API functions, you are now able to operate on multiple resource types with a single set of functions.

Here are the new functions:

TagResources – Add tags to up to 20 resources at a time.

UntagResources – Remove tags from up to 20 resources at a time.

GetResources – Get a list of resources, with optional filtering by tags and/or resource types.

GetTagKeys – Get a list of all of the unique tag keys used in your account.

GetTagValues – Get all tag values for a specified tag key.

These functions support the following AWS services and resource types:

AWS Service Resource Types
Amazon CloudFront Distribution.
Amazon EC2 AMI, Customer Gateway, DHCP Option, EBS Volume, Instance, Internet Gateway, Network ACL, Network Interface, Reserved Instance, Reserved Instance Listing, Route Table, Security Group – EC2 Classic, Security Group – VPC, Snapshot, Spot Batch, Spot Instance Request, Spot Instance, Subnet, Virtual Private Gateway, VPC, VPN Connection.
Amazon ElastiCache Cluster, Snapshot.
Amazon Elastic File System Filesystem.
Amazon Elasticsearch Service Domain.
Amazon EMR Cluster.
Amazon Glacier Vault.
Amazon Inspector Assessment.
Amazon Kinesis Stream.
Amazon Machine Learning Batch Prediction, Data Source, Evaluation, ML Model.
Amazon Redshift Cluster.
Amazon Relational Database Service DB Instance, DB Option Group, DB Parameter Group, DB Security Group, DB Snapshot, DB Subnet Group, Event Subscription, Read Replica, Reserved DB Instance.
Amazon Route 53 Domain, Health Check, Hosted Zone.
Amazon S3 Bucket.
Amazon WorkSpaces WorkSpace.
AWS Certificate Manager Certificate.
AWS CloudHSM HSM.
AWS Directory Service Directory.
AWS Storage Gateway Gateway, Virtual Tape, Volume.
Elastic Load Balancing Load Balancer, Target Group.

Things to Know
Here are a couple of things to keep in mind when you build code or write scripts that use the new API functions or the CLI equivalents:

Compatibility – The older, service-specific functions remain available and you can continue to use them.

Write Permission – The new tagging API adds another layer of permission on top of existing policies that are specific to a single AWS service. For example, you will need to have access to tag:tagResources and EC2:createTags in order to add a tag to an EC2 instance.

Read Permission – You will need to have access to tag:GetResources, tag:GetTagKeys, and tag:GetTagValues in order to call functions that access tags and tag values.

Pricing – There is no charge for the use of these functions or for tags.

Available Now
The new functions are supported by the latest versions of the AWS SDKs. You can use them to tag and access resources in all commercial AWS regions.

Jeff;

 

How to Help Protect Dynamic Web Applications Against DDoS Attacks by Using Amazon CloudFront and Amazon Route 53

Post Syndicated from Holly Willey original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-protect-dynamic-web-applications-against-ddos-attacks-by-using-amazon-cloudfront-and-amazon-route-53/

Using a content delivery network (CDN) such as Amazon CloudFront to cache and serve static text and images or downloadable objects such as media files and documents is a common strategy to improve webpage load times, reduce network bandwidth costs, lessen the load on web servers, and mitigate distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. AWS WAF is a web application firewall that can be deployed on CloudFront to help protect your application against DDoS attacks by giving you control over which traffic to allow or block by defining security rules. When users access your application, the Domain Name System (DNS) translates human-readable domain names (for example, www.example.com) to machine-readable IP addresses (for example, 192.0.2.44). A DNS service, such as Amazon Route 53, can effectively connect users’ requests to a CloudFront distribution that proxies requests for dynamic content to the infrastructure hosting your application’s endpoints.

In this blog post, I show you how to deploy CloudFront with AWS WAF and Route 53 to help protect dynamic web applications (with dynamic content such as a response to user input) against DDoS attacks. The steps shown in this post are key to implementing the overall approach described in AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency and enable the built-in, managed DDoS protection service, AWS Shield.

Background

AWS hosts CloudFront and Route 53 services on a distributed network of proxy servers in data centers throughout the world called edge locations. Using the global Amazon network of edge locations for application delivery and DNS service plays an important part in building a comprehensive defense against DDoS attacks for your dynamic web applications. These web applications can benefit from the increased security and availability provided by CloudFront and Route 53 as well as improving end users’ experience by reducing latency.

The following screenshot of an Amazon.com webpage shows how static and dynamic content can compose a dynamic web application that is delivered via HTTPS protocol for the encryption of user page requests as well as the pages that are returned by a web server.

Screenshot of an Amazon.com webpage with static and dynamic content

The following map shows the global Amazon network of edge locations available to serve static content and proxy requests for dynamic content back to the origin as of the writing of this blog post. For the latest list of edge locations, see AWS Global Infrastructure.

Map showing Amazon edge locations

How AWS Shield, CloudFront, and Route 53 work to help protect against DDoS attacks

To help keep your dynamic web applications available when they are under DDoS attack, the steps in this post enable AWS Shield Standard by configuring your applications behind CloudFront and Route 53. AWS Shield Standard protects your resources from common, frequently occurring network and transport layer DDoS attacks. Attack traffic can be geographically isolated and absorbed using the capacity in edge locations close to the source. Additionally, you can configure geographical restrictions to help block attacks originating from specific countries.

The request-routing technology in CloudFront connects each client to the nearest edge location, as determined by continuously updated latency measurements. HTTP and HTTPS requests sent to CloudFront can be monitored, and access to your application resources can be controlled at edge locations using AWS WAF. Based on conditions that you specify in AWS WAF, such as the IP addresses that requests originate from or the values of query strings, traffic can be allowed, blocked, or allowed and counted for further investigation or remediation. The following diagram shows how static and dynamic web application content can originate from endpoint resources within AWS or your corporate data center. For more details, see How CloudFront Delivers Content and How CloudFront Works with Regional Edge Caches.

Route 53 DNS requests and subsequent application traffic routed through CloudFront are inspected inline. Always-on monitoring, anomaly detection, and mitigation against common infrastructure DDoS attacks such as SYN/ACK floods, UDP floods, and reflection attacks are built into both Route 53 and CloudFront. For a review of common DDoS attack vectors, see How to Help Prepare for DDoS Attacks by Reducing Your Attack Surface. When the SYN flood attack threshold is exceeded, SYN cookies are activated to avoid dropping connections from legitimate clients. Deterministic packet filtering drops malformed TCP packets and invalid DNS requests, only allowing traffic to pass that is valid for the service. Heuristics-based anomaly detection evaluates attributes such as type, source, and composition of traffic. Traffic is scored across many dimensions, and only the most suspicious traffic is dropped. This method allows you to avoid false positives while protecting application availability.

Route 53 is also designed to withstand DNS query floods, which are real DNS requests that can continue for hours and attempt to exhaust DNS server resources. Route 53 uses shuffle sharding and anycast striping to spread DNS traffic across edge locations and help protect the availability of the service.

The next four sections provide guidance about how to deploy CloudFront, Route 53, AWS WAF, and, optionally, AWS Shield Advanced.

Deploy CloudFront

To take advantage of application delivery with DDoS mitigations at the edge, start by creating a CloudFront distribution and configuring origins:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the CloudFront console
  2. Choose Create Distribution.
  3. On the first page of the Create Distribution Wizard, in the Web section, choose Get Started.
  4. Specify origin settings for the distribution. The following screenshot of the CloudFront console shows an example CloudFront distribution configured with an Elastic Load Balancing load balancer origin, as shown in the previous diagram. I have configured this example to set the Origin SSL Protocols to use TLSv1.2 and the Origin Protocol Policy to HTTP Only. For more information about creating an HTTPS listener for your ELB load balancer and requesting a certificate from AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), see Getting Started with Elastic Load BalancingSupported Regions, and Requiring HTTPS for Communication Between CloudFront and Your Custom Origin.
  1. Specify cache behavior settings for the distribution, as shown in the following screenshot. You can configure each URL path pattern with a set of associated cache behaviors. For dynamic web applications, set the Minimum TTL to 0 so that CloudFront will make a GET request with an If-Modified-Since header back to the origin. When CloudFront proxies traffic to the origin from edge locations and back, multiple concurrent requests for the same object are collapsed into a single request. The request is sent over a persistent connection from the edge location to the region over networks monitored by AWS. The use of a large initial TCP window size in CloudFront maximizes the available bandwidth, and TCP Fast Open (TFO) reduces latency.
  2. To ensure that all traffic to CloudFront is encrypted and to enable SSL termination from clients at global edge locations, specify Redirect HTTP to HTTPS for Viewer Protocol Policy. Moving SSL termination to CloudFront offloads computationally expensive SSL negotiation, helps mitigate SSL abuse, and reduces latency with the use of OCSP stapling and session tickets. For more information about options for serving HTTPS requests, see Choosing How CloudFront Serves HTTPS Requests. For dynamic web applications, set Allowed HTTP Methods to include all methods, set Forward Headers to All, and for Query String Forwarding and Caching, choose Forward all, cache based on all.
  1. Specify distribution settings for the distribution, as shown in the following screenshot. Enter your domain names in the Alternate Domain Names box and choose Custom SSL Certificate.
  2. Choose Create Distribution. Note the x.cloudfront.net Domain Name of the distribution. In the next section, you will configure Route 53 to route traffic to this CloudFront distribution domain name.

Configure Route 53

When you created a web distribution in the previous section, CloudFront assigned a domain name to the distribution, such as d111111abcdef8.cloudfront.net. You can use this domain name in the URLs for your content, such as: http://d111111abcdef8.cloudfront.net/logo.jpg.

Alternatively, you might prefer to use your own domain name in URLs, such as: http://example.com/logo.jpg. You can accomplish this by creating a Route 53 alias resource record set that routes dynamic web application traffic to your CloudFront distribution by using your domain name. Alias resource record sets are virtual records specific to Route 53 that are used to map alias resource record sets for your domain to your CloudFront distribution. Alias resource record sets are similar to CNAME records except there is no charge for DNS queries to Route 53 alias resource record sets mapped to AWS services. Alias resource record sets are also not visible to resolvers, and they can be created for the root domain (zone apex) as well as subdomains.

A hosted zone, similar to a DNS zone file, is a collection of records that belongs to a single parent domain name. Each hosted zone has four nonoverlapping name servers in a delegation set. If a DNS query is dropped, the client automatically retries the next name server. If you have not already registered a domain name and have not configured a hosted zone for your domain, complete these two prerequisite steps before proceeding:

After you have registered your domain name and configured your public hosted zone, follow these steps to create an alias resource record set:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Route 53 console.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Hosted Zones.
  3. Choose the name of the hosted zone for the domain that you want to use to route traffic to your CloudFront distribution.
  4. Choose Create Record Set.
  5. Specify the following values:
    • Name – Type the domain name that you want to use to route traffic to your CloudFront distribution. The default value is the name of the hosted zone. For example, if the name of the hosted zone is example.com and you want to use acme.example.com to route traffic to your distribution, type acme.
    • Type – Choose A – IPv4 address. If IPv6 is enabled for the distribution and you are creating a second resource record set, choose AAAA – IPv6 address.
    • Alias – Choose Yes.
    • Alias Target – In the CloudFront distributions section, choose the name that CloudFront assigned to the distribution when you created it.
    • Routing Policy – Accept the default value of Simple.
    • Evaluate Target Health – Accept the default value of No.
  6. Choose Create.
  7. If IPv6 is enabled for the distribution, repeat Steps 4 through 6. Specify the same settings except for the Type field, as explained in Step 5.

The following screenshot of the Route 53 console shows a Route 53 alias resource record set that is configured to map a domain name to a CloudFront distribution.

If your dynamic web application requires geo redundancy, you can use latency-based routing in Route 53 to run origin servers in different AWS regions. Route 53 is integrated with CloudFront to collect latency measurements from each edge location. With Route 53 latency-based routing, each CloudFront edge location goes to the region with the lowest latency for the origin fetch.

Enable AWS WAF

AWS WAF is a web application firewall that helps detect and mitigate web application layer DDoS attacks by inspecting traffic inline. Application layer DDoS attacks use well-formed but malicious requests to evade mitigation and consume application resources. You can define custom security rules (also called web ACLs) that contain a set of conditions, rules, and actions to block attacking traffic. After you define web ACLs, you can apply them to CloudFront distributions, and web ACLs are evaluated in the priority order you specified when you configured them. Real-time metrics and sampled web requests are provided for each web ACL.

You can configure AWS WAF whitelisting or blacklisting in conjunction with CloudFront geo restriction to prevent users in specific geographic locations from accessing your application. The AWS WAF API supports security automation such as blacklisting IP addresses that exceed request limits, which can be useful for mitigating HTTP flood attacks. Use the AWS WAF Security Automations Implementation Guide to implement rate-based blacklisting.

The following diagram shows how the (a) flow of CloudFront access logs files to an Amazon S3 bucket (b) provides the source data for the Lambda log parser function (c) to identify HTTP flood traffic and update AWS WAF web ACLs. As CloudFront receives requests on behalf of your dynamic web application, it sends access logs to an S3 bucket, triggering the Lambda log parser. The Lambda function parses CloudFront access logs to identify suspicious behavior, such as an unusual number of requests or errors, and it automatically updates your AWS WAF rules to block subsequent requests from the IP addresses in question for a predefined amount of time that you specify.

Diagram of the process

In addition to automated rate-based blacklisting to help protect against HTTP flood attacks, prebuilt AWS CloudFormation templates are available to simplify the configuration of AWS WAF for a proactive application-layer security defense. The following diagram provides an overview of CloudFormation template input into the creation of the CommonAttackProtection stack that includes AWS WAF web ACLs used to block, allow, or count requests that meet the criteria defined in each rule.

Diagram of CloudFormation template input into the creation of the CommonAttackProtection stack

To implement these application layer protections, follow the steps in Tutorial: Quickly Setting Up AWS WAF Protection Against Common Attacks. After you have created your AWS WAF web ACLs, you can assign them to your CloudFront distribution by updating the settings.

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the CloudFront console.
  2. Choose the link under the ID column for your CloudFront distribution.
  3. Choose Edit under the General
  4. Choose your AWS WAF Web ACL from the drop-down
  5. Choose Yes, Edit.

Activate AWS Shield Advanced (optional)

Deploying CloudFront, Route 53, and AWS WAF as described in this post enables the built-in DDoS protections for your dynamic web applications that are included with AWS Shield Standard. (There is no upfront cost or charge for AWS Shield Standard beyond the normal pricing for CloudFront, Route 53, and AWS WAF.) AWS Shield Standard is designed to meet the needs of many dynamic web applications.

For dynamic web applications that have a high risk or history of frequent, complex, or high volume DDoS attacks, AWS Shield Advanced provides additional DDoS mitigation capacity, attack visibility, cost protection, and access to the AWS DDoS Response Team (DRT). For more information about AWS Shield Advanced pricing, see AWS Shield Advanced pricing. To activate advanced protection services, follow these steps:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the AWS WAF console.
  2. If this is your first time signing in to the AWS WAF console, choose Get started with AWS Shield Advanced. Otherwise, choose Protected resources.
  3. Choose Activate AWS Shield Advanced.
  4. Choose the resource type and resource to protect.
  5. For Name, enter a friendly name that will help you identify the AWS resources that are protected. For example, My CloudFront AWS Shield Advanced distributions.
  6. (Optional) For Web DDoS attack, select Enable. You will be prompted to associate an existing web ACL with these resources, or create a new ACL if you don’t have any yet.
  7. Choose Add DDoS protection.

Summary

In this blog post, I outline the steps to deploy CloudFront and configure Route 53 in front of your dynamic web application to leverage the global Amazon network of edge locations for DDoS resiliency. The post also provides guidance about enabling AWS WAF for application layer traffic monitoring and automated rules creation to block malicious traffic. I also cover the optional steps to activate AWS Shield Advanced, which helps build a more comprehensive defense against DDoS attacks for your dynamic web applications.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, please open a new thread on the AWS WAF forum.

– Holly