Tag Archives: AWS Shield

AWS HIPAA Eligibility Update (July 2017) – Eight Additional Services

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hipaa-eligibility-update-july-2017-eight-additional-services/

It is time for an update on our on-going effort to make AWS a great host for healthcare and life sciences applications. As you can see from our Health Customer Stories page, Philips, VergeHealth, and Cambia (to choose a few) trust AWS with Protected Health Information (PHI) and Personally Identifying Information (PII) as part of their efforts to comply with HIPAA and HITECH.

In May we announced that we added Amazon API Gateway, AWS Direct Connect, AWS Database Migration Service, and Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS) to our list of HIPAA eligible services and discussed our how customers and partners are putting them to use.

Eight More Eligible Services
Today I am happy to share the news that we are adding another eight services to the list:

Amazon CloudFront can now be utilized to enhance the delivery and transfer of Protected Health Information data to applications on the Internet. By providing a completely secure and encryptable pathway, CloudFront can now be used as a part of applications that need to cache PHI. This includes applications for viewing lab results or imaging data, and those that transfer PHI from Healthcare Information Exchanges (HIEs).

AWS WAF can now be used to protect applications running on AWS which operate on PHI such as patient care portals, patient scheduling systems, and HIEs. Requests and responses containing encrypted PHI and PII can now pass through AWS WAF.

AWS Shield can now be used to protect web applications such as patient care portals and scheduling systems that operate on encrypted PHI from DDoS attacks.

Amazon S3 Transfer Acceleration can now be used to accelerate the bulk transfer of large amounts of research, genetics, informatics, insurance, or payer/payment data containing PHI/PII information. Transfers can take place between a pair of AWS Regions or from an on-premises system and an AWS Region.

Amazon WorkSpaces can now be used by researchers, informaticists, hospital administrators and other users to analyze, visualize or process PHI/PII data using on-demand Windows virtual desktops.

AWS Directory Service can now be used to connect the authentication and authorization systems of organizations that use or process PHI/PII to their resources in the AWS Cloud. For example, healthcare providers operating hybrid cloud environments can now use AWS Directory Services to allow their users to easily transition between cloud and on-premises resources.

Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) can now be used to send notifications containing encrypted PHI/PII as part of patient care, payment processing, and mobile applications.

Amazon Cognito can now be used to authenticate users into mobile patient portal and payment processing applications that use PHI/PII identifiers for accounts.

Additional HIPAA Resources
Here are some additional resources that will help you to build applications that comply with HIPAA and HITECH:

Keep in Touch
In order to make use of any AWS service in any manner that involves PHI, you must first enter into an AWS Business Associate Addendum (BAA). You can contact us to start the process.

Jeff;

Prepare for the OWASP Top 10 Web Application Vulnerabilities Using AWS WAF and Our New White Paper

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/prepare-for-the-owasp-top-10-web-application-vulnerabilities-using-aws-waf-and-our-new-white-paper/

Are you aware of the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) and the work that they do to improve the security of web applications? Among many other things, they publish a list of the 10 most critical application security flaws, known as the OWASP Top 10. The release candidate for the 2017 version contains a consensus view of common vulnerabilities often found in web sites and web applications.

AWS WAF, as I described in my blog post, New – AWS WAF, helps to protect your application from application-layer attacks such as SQL injection and cross-site scripting. You can create custom rules to define the types of traffic that are accepted or rejected.

Our new white paper, Use AWS WAF to Mitigate OWASP’s Top 10 Web Application Vulnerabilities, shows you how to put AWS WAF to use. Going far beyond a simple recommendation to “use WAF,” it includes detailed, concrete mitigation strategies and implementation details for the most important items in the OWASP Top 10 (formally known as A1 through A10):

Download Today
The white paper provides background and context for each vulnerability, and then shows you how to create WAF rules to identify and block them. It also provides some defense-in-depth recommendations, including a very cool suggestion to use [email protected] to prevalidate the parameters supplied to HTTP requests.

The white paper links to a companion AWS CloudFormation template that creates a Web ACL, along with the recommended condition types and rules. You can use this template as a starting point for your own work, adding more condition types and rules as desired.

AWSTemplateFormatVersion: '2010-09-09'
Description: AWS WAF Basic OWASP Example Rule Set

## ::PARAMETERS::
## Template parameters to be configured by user
Parameters:
  stackPrefix:
    Type: String
    Description: The prefix to use when naming resources in this stack. Normally we would use the stack name, but since this template can be us\
ed as a resource in other stacks we want to keep the naming consistent. No symbols allowed.
    ConstraintDescription: Alphanumeric characters only, maximum 10 characters
    AllowedPattern: ^[a-zA-z0-9]+$
    MaxLength: 10
    Default: generic
  stackScope:
    Type: String
    Description: You can deploy this stack at a regional level, for regional WAF targets like Application Load Balancers, or for global targets\
, such as Amazon CloudFront distributions.
    AllowedValues:
      - Global
      - Regional
    Default: Regional
...

Attend our Webinar
If you would like to learn more about the topics discussed in this new white paper, please plan to attend our upcoming webinar, Secure Your Applications with AWS Web Application Firewall (WAF) and AWS Shield. On July 12, 2017, my colleagues Jeffrey Lyon and Sundar Jayashekar will show you how to secure your web applications and how to defend against the most common Layer 7 attacks.

Jeff;

 

 

 

In Case You Missed These: AWS Security Blog Posts from January, February, and March

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/in-case-you-missed-these-aws-security-blog-posts-from-january-february-and-march/

Image of lock and key

In case you missed any AWS Security Blog posts published so far in 2017, they are summarized and linked to below. The posts are shown in reverse chronological order (most recent first), and the subject matter ranges from protecting dynamic web applications against DDoS attacks to monitoring AWS account configuration changes and API calls to Amazon EC2 security groups.

March

March 22: How to Help Protect Dynamic Web Applications Against DDoS Attacks by Using Amazon CloudFront and Amazon Route 53
Using a content delivery network (CDN) such as Amazon CloudFront to cache and serve static text and images or downloadable objects such as media files and documents is a common strategy to improve webpage load times, reduce network bandwidth costs, lessen the load on web servers, and mitigate distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. AWS WAF is a web application firewall that can be deployed on CloudFront to help protect your application against DDoS attacks by giving you control over which traffic to allow or block by defining security rules. When users access your application, the Domain Name System (DNS) translates human-readable domain names (for example, www.example.com) to machine-readable IP addresses (for example, 192.0.2.44). A DNS service, such as Amazon Route 53, can effectively connect users’ requests to a CloudFront distribution that proxies requests for dynamic content to the infrastructure hosting your application’s endpoints. In this blog post, I show you how to deploy CloudFront with AWS WAF and Route 53 to help protect dynamic web applications (with dynamic content such as a response to user input) against DDoS attacks. The steps shown in this post are key to implementing the overall approach described in AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency and enable the built-in, managed DDoS protection service, AWS Shield.

March 21: New AWS Encryption SDK for Python Simplifies Multiple Master Key Encryption
The AWS Cryptography team is happy to announce a Python implementation of the AWS Encryption SDK. This new SDK helps manage data keys for you, and it simplifies the process of encrypting data under multiple master keys. As a result, this new SDK allows you to focus on the code that drives your business forward. It also provides a framework you can easily extend to ensure that you have a cryptographic library that is configured to match and enforce your standards. The SDK also includes ready-to-use examples. If you are a Java developer, you can refer to this blog post to see specific Java examples for the SDK. In this blog post, I show you how you can use the AWS Encryption SDK to simplify the process of encrypting data and how to protect your encryption keys in ways that help improve application availability by not tying you to a single region or key management solution.

March 21: Updated CJIS Workbook Now Available by Request
The need for guidance when implementing Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS)–compliant solutions has become of paramount importance as more law enforcement customers and technology partners move to store and process criminal justice data in the cloud. AWS services allow these customers to easily and securely architect a CJIS-compliant solution when handling criminal justice data, creating a durable, cost-effective, and secure IT infrastructure that better supports local, state, and federal law enforcement in carrying out their public safety missions. AWS has created several documents (collectively referred to as the CJIS Workbook) to assist you in aligning with the FBI’s CJIS Security Policy. You can use the workbook as a framework for developing CJIS-compliant architecture in the AWS Cloud. The workbook helps you define and test the controls you operate, and document the dependence on the controls that AWS operates (compute, storage, database, networking, regions, Availability Zones, and edge locations).

March 9: New Cloud Directory API Makes It Easier to Query Data Along Multiple Dimensions
Today, we made available a new Cloud Directory API, ListObjectParentPaths, that enables you to retrieve all available parent paths for any directory object across multiple hierarchies. Use this API when you want to fetch all parent objects for a specific child object. The order of the paths and objects returned is consistent across iterative calls to the API, unless objects are moved or deleted. In case an object has multiple parents, the API allows you to control the number of paths returned by using a paginated call pattern. In this blog post, I use an example directory to demonstrate how this new API enables you to retrieve data across multiple dimensions to implement powerful applications quickly.

March 8: How to Access the AWS Management Console Using AWS Microsoft AD and Your On-Premises Credentials
AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory, also known as AWS Microsoft AD, is a managed Microsoft Active Directory (AD) hosted in the AWS Cloud. Now, AWS Microsoft AD makes it easy for you to give your users permission to manage AWS resources by using on-premises AD administrative tools. With AWS Microsoft AD, you can grant your on-premises users permissions to resources such as the AWS Management Console instead of adding AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) user accounts or configuring AD Federation Services (AD FS) with Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML). In this blog post, I show how to use AWS Microsoft AD to enable your on-premises AD users to sign in to the AWS Management Console with their on-premises AD user credentials to access and manage AWS resources through IAM roles.

March 7: How to Protect Your Web Application Against DDoS Attacks by Using Amazon Route 53 and an External Content Delivery Network
Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are attempts by a malicious actor to flood a network, system, or application with more traffic, connections, or requests than it is able to handle. To protect your web application against DDoS attacks, you can use AWS Shield, a DDoS protection service that AWS provides automatically to all AWS customers at no additional charge. You can use AWS Shield in conjunction with DDoS-resilient web services such as Amazon CloudFront and Amazon Route 53 to improve your ability to defend against DDoS attacks. Learn more about architecting for DDoS resiliency by reading the AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency whitepaper. You also have the option of using Route 53 with an externally hosted content delivery network (CDN). In this blog post, I show how you can help protect the zone apex (also known as the root domain) of your web application by using Route 53 to perform a secure redirect to prevent discovery of your application origin.

Image of lock and key

February

February 27: Now Generally Available – AWS Organizations: Policy-Based Management for Multiple AWS Accounts
Today, AWS Organizations moves from Preview to General Availability. You can use Organizations to centrally manage multiple AWS accounts, with the ability to create a hierarchy of organizational units (OUs). You can assign each account to an OU, define policies, and then apply those policies to an entire hierarchy, specific OUs, or specific accounts. You can invite existing AWS accounts to join your organization, and you can also create new accounts. All of these functions are available from the AWS Management Console, the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), and through the AWS Organizations API.To read the full AWS Blog post about today’s launch, see AWS Organizations – Policy-Based Management for Multiple AWS Accounts.

February 23: s2n Is Now Handling 100 Percent of SSL Traffic for Amazon S3
Today, we’ve achieved another important milestone for securing customer data: we have replaced OpenSSL with s2n for all internal and external SSL traffic in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) commercial regions. This was implemented with minimal impact to customers, and multiple means of error checking were used to ensure a smooth transition, including client integration tests, catching potential interoperability conflicts, and identifying memory leaks through fuzz testing.

February 22: Easily Replace or Attach an IAM Role to an Existing EC2 Instance by Using the EC2 Console
AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles enable your applications running on Amazon EC2 to use temporary security credentials. IAM roles for EC2 make it easier for your applications to make API requests securely from an instance because they do not require you to manage AWS security credentials that the applications use. Recently, we enabled you to use temporary security credentials for your applications by attaching an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance by using the AWS CLI and SDK. To learn more, see New! Attach an AWS IAM Role to an Existing Amazon EC2 Instance by Using the AWS CLI. Starting today, you can attach an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance from the EC2 console. You can also use the EC2 console to replace an IAM role attached to an existing instance. In this blog post, I will show how to attach an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance from the EC2 console.

February 22: How to Audit Your AWS Resources for Security Compliance by Using Custom AWS Config Rules
AWS Config Rules enables you to implement security policies as code for your organization and evaluate configuration changes to AWS resources against these policies. You can use Config rules to audit your use of AWS resources for compliance with external compliance frameworks such as CIS AWS Foundations Benchmark and with your internal security policies related to the US Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP), and other regimes. AWS provides some predefined, managed Config rules. You also can create custom Config rules based on criteria you define within an AWS Lambda function. In this post, I show how to create a custom rule that audits AWS resources for security compliance by enabling VPC Flow Logs for an Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). The custom rule meets requirement 4.3 of the CIS AWS Foundations Benchmark: “Ensure VPC flow logging is enabled in all VPCs.”

February 13: AWS Announces CISPE Membership and Compliance with First-Ever Code of Conduct for Data Protection in the Cloud
I have two exciting announcements today, both showing AWS’s continued commitment to ensuring that customers can comply with EU Data Protection requirements when using our services.

February 13: How to Enable Multi-Factor Authentication for AWS Services by Using AWS Microsoft AD and On-Premises Credentials
You can now enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) for users of AWS services such as Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon QuickSight and their on-premises credentials by using your AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory (Enterprise Edition) directory, also known as AWS Microsoft AD. MFA adds an extra layer of protection to a user name and password (the first “factor”) by requiring users to enter an authentication code (the second factor), which has been provided by your virtual or hardware MFA solution. These factors together provide additional security by preventing access to AWS services, unless users supply a valid MFA code.

February 13: How to Create an Organizational Chart with Separate Hierarchies by Using Amazon Cloud Directory
Amazon Cloud Directory enables you to create directories for a variety of use cases, such as organizational charts, course catalogs, and device registries. Cloud Directory offers you the flexibility to create directories with hierarchies that span multiple dimensions. For example, you can create an organizational chart that you can navigate through separate hierarchies for reporting structure, location, and cost center. In this blog post, I show how to use Cloud Directory APIs to create an organizational chart with two separate hierarchies in a single directory. I also show how to navigate the hierarchies and retrieve data. I use the Java SDK for all the sample code in this post, but you can use other language SDKs or the AWS CLI.

February 10: How to Easily Log On to AWS Services by Using Your On-Premises Active Directory
AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory (Enterprise Edition), also known as Microsoft AD, now enables your users to log on with just their on-premises Active Directory (AD) user name—no domain name is required. This new domainless logon feature makes it easier to set up connections to your on-premises AD for use with applications such as Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon QuickSight, and it keeps the user logon experience free from network naming. This new interforest trusts capability is now available when using Microsoft AD with Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon QuickSight Enterprise Edition. In this blog post, I explain how Microsoft AD domainless logon works with AD interforest trusts, and I show an example of setting up Amazon WorkSpaces to use this capability.

February 9: New! Attach an AWS IAM Role to an Existing Amazon EC2 Instance by Using the AWS CLI
AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles enable your applications running on Amazon EC2 to use temporary security credentials that AWS creates, distributes, and rotates automatically. Using temporary credentials is an IAM best practice because you do not need to maintain long-term keys on your instance. Using IAM roles for EC2 also eliminates the need to use long-term AWS access keys that you have to manage manually or programmatically. Starting today, you can enable your applications to use temporary security credentials provided by AWS by attaching an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance. You can also replace the IAM role attached to an existing EC2 instance. In this blog post, I show how you can attach an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance by using the AWS CLI.

February 8: How to Remediate Amazon Inspector Security Findings Automatically
The Amazon Inspector security assessment service can evaluate the operating environments and applications you have deployed on AWS for common and emerging security vulnerabilities automatically. As an AWS-built service, Amazon Inspector is designed to exchange data and interact with other core AWS services not only to identify potential security findings but also to automate addressing those findings. Previous related blog posts showed how you can deliver Amazon Inspector security findings automatically to third-party ticketing systems and automate the installation of the Amazon Inspector agent on new Amazon EC2 instances. In this post, I show how you can automatically remediate findings generated by Amazon Inspector. To get started, you must first run an assessment and publish any security findings to an Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) topic. Then, you create an AWS Lambda function that is triggered by those notifications. Finally, the Lambda function examines the findings and then implements the appropriate remediation based on the type of issue.

February 6: How to Simplify Security Assessment Setup Using Amazon EC2 Systems Manager and Amazon Inspector
In a July 2016 AWS Blog post, I discussed how to integrate Amazon Inspector with third-party ticketing systems by using Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) and AWS Lambda. This AWS Security Blog post continues in the same vein, describing how to use Amazon Inspector to automate various aspects of security management. In this post, I show you how to install the Amazon Inspector agent automatically through the Amazon EC2 Systems Manager when a new Amazon EC2 instance is launched. In a subsequent post, I will show you how to update EC2 instances automatically that run Linux when Amazon Inspector discovers a missing security patch.

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January

January 30: How to Protect Data at Rest with Amazon EC2 Instance Store Encryption
Encrypting data at rest is vital for regulatory compliance to ensure that sensitive data saved on disks is not readable by any user or application without a valid key. Some compliance regulations such as PCI DSS and HIPAA require that data at rest be encrypted throughout the data lifecycle. To this end, AWS provides data-at-rest options and key management to support the encryption process. For example, you can encrypt Amazon EBS volumes and configure Amazon S3 buckets for server-side encryption (SSE) using AES-256 encryption. Additionally, Amazon RDS supports Transparent Data Encryption (TDE). Instance storage provides temporary block-level storage for Amazon EC2 instances. This storage is located on disks attached physically to a host computer. Instance storage is ideal for temporary storage of information that frequently changes, such as buffers, caches, and scratch data. By default, files stored on these disks are not encrypted. In this blog post, I show a method for encrypting data on Linux EC2 instance stores by using Linux built-in libraries. This method encrypts files transparently, which protects confidential data. As a result, applications that process the data are unaware of the disk-level encryption.

January 27: How to Detect and Automatically Remediate Unintended Permissions in Amazon S3 Object ACLs with CloudWatch Events
Amazon S3 Access Control Lists (ACLs) enable you to specify permissions that grant access to S3 buckets and objects. When S3 receives a request for an object, it verifies whether the requester has the necessary access permissions in the associated ACL. For example, you could set up an ACL for an object so that only the users in your account can access it, or you could make an object public so that it can be accessed by anyone. If the number of objects and users in your AWS account is large, ensuring that you have attached correctly configured ACLs to your objects can be a challenge. For example, what if a user were to call the PutObjectAcl API call on an object that is supposed to be private and make it public? Or, what if a user were to call the PutObject with the optional Acl parameter set to public-read, therefore uploading a confidential file as publicly readable? In this blog post, I show a solution that uses Amazon CloudWatch Events to detect PutObject and PutObjectAcl API calls in near-real time and helps ensure that the objects remain private by making automatic PutObjectAcl calls, when necessary.

January 26: Now Available: Amazon Cloud Directory—A Cloud-Native Directory for Hierarchical Data
Today we are launching Amazon Cloud Directory. This service is purpose-built for storing large amounts of strongly typed hierarchical data. With the ability to scale to hundreds of millions of objects while remaining cost-effective, Cloud Directory is a great fit for all sorts of cloud and mobile applications.

January 24: New SOC 2 Report Available: Confidentiality
As with everything at Amazon, the success of our security and compliance program is primarily measured by one thing: our customers’ success. Our customers drive our portfolio of compliance reports, attestations, and certifications that support their efforts in running a secure and compliant cloud environment. As a result of our engagement with key customers across the globe, we are happy to announce the publication of our new SOC 2 Confidentiality report. This report is available now through AWS Artifact in the AWS Management Console.

January 18: Compliance in the Cloud for New Financial Services Cybersecurity Regulations
Financial regulatory agencies are focused more than ever on ensuring responsible innovation. Consequently, if you want to achieve compliance with financial services regulations, you must be increasingly agile and employ dynamic security capabilities. AWS enables you to achieve this by providing you with the tools you need to scale your security and compliance capabilities on AWS. The following breakdown of the most recent cybersecurity regulations, NY DFS Rule 23 NYCRR 500, demonstrates how AWS continues to focus on your regulatory needs in the financial services sector.

January 9: New Amazon GameDev Blog Post: Protect Multiplayer Game Servers from DDoS Attacks by Using Amazon GameLift
In online gaming, distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks target a game’s network layer, flooding servers with requests until performance degrades considerably. These attacks can limit a game’s availability to players and limit the player experience for those who can connect. Today’s new Amazon GameDev Blog post uses a typical game server architecture to highlight DDoS attack vulnerabilities and discusses how to stay protected by using built-in AWS Cloud security, AWS security best practices, and the security features of Amazon GameLift. Read the post to learn more.

January 6: The Top 10 Most Downloaded AWS Security and Compliance Documents in 2016
The following list includes the 10 most downloaded AWS security and compliance documents in 2016. Using this list, you can learn about what other people found most interesting about security and compliance last year.

January 6: FedRAMP Compliance Update: AWS GovCloud (US) Region Receives a JAB-Issued FedRAMP High Baseline P-ATO for Three New Services
Three new services in the AWS GovCloud (US) region have received a Provisional Authority to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB) under the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP). JAB issued the authorization at the High baseline, which enables US government agencies and their service providers the capability to use these services to process the government’s most sensitive unclassified data, including Personal Identifiable Information (PII), Protected Health Information (PHI), Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI), criminal justice information (CJI), and financial data.

January 4: The Top 20 Most Viewed AWS IAM Documentation Pages in 2016
The following 20 pages were the most viewed AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) documentation pages in 2016. I have included a brief description with each link to give you a clearer idea of what each page covers. Use this list to see what other people have been viewing and perhaps to pique your own interest about a topic you’ve been meaning to research.

January 3: The Most Viewed AWS Security Blog Posts in 2016
The following 10 posts were the most viewed AWS Security Blog posts that we published during 2016. You can use this list as a guide to catch up on your blog reading or even read a post again that you found particularly useful.

January 3: How to Monitor AWS Account Configuration Changes and API Calls to Amazon EC2 Security Groups
You can use AWS security controls to detect and mitigate risks to your AWS resources. The purpose of each security control is defined by its control objective. For example, the control objective of an Amazon VPC security group is to permit only designated traffic to enter or leave a network interface. Let’s say you have an Internet-facing e-commerce website, and your security administrator has determined that only HTTP (TCP port 80) and HTTPS (TCP 443) traffic should be allowed access to the public subnet. As a result, your administrator configures a security group to meet this control objective. What if, though, someone were to inadvertently change this security group’s rules and enable FTP or other protocols to access the public subnet from any location on the Internet? That expanded access could weaken the security posture of your assets. Consequently, your administrator might need to monitor the integrity of your company’s security controls so that the controls maintain their desired effectiveness. In this blog post, I explore two methods for detecting unintended changes to VPC security groups. The two methods address not only control objectives but also control failures.

If you have questions about or issues with implementing the solutions in any of these posts, please start a new thread on the forum identified near the end of each post.

– Craig

How to Help Protect Dynamic Web Applications Against DDoS Attacks by Using Amazon CloudFront and Amazon Route 53

Post Syndicated from Holly Willey original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-protect-dynamic-web-applications-against-ddos-attacks-by-using-amazon-cloudfront-and-amazon-route-53/

Using a content delivery network (CDN) such as Amazon CloudFront to cache and serve static text and images or downloadable objects such as media files and documents is a common strategy to improve webpage load times, reduce network bandwidth costs, lessen the load on web servers, and mitigate distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. AWS WAF is a web application firewall that can be deployed on CloudFront to help protect your application against DDoS attacks by giving you control over which traffic to allow or block by defining security rules. When users access your application, the Domain Name System (DNS) translates human-readable domain names (for example, www.example.com) to machine-readable IP addresses (for example, 192.0.2.44). A DNS service, such as Amazon Route 53, can effectively connect users’ requests to a CloudFront distribution that proxies requests for dynamic content to the infrastructure hosting your application’s endpoints.

In this blog post, I show you how to deploy CloudFront with AWS WAF and Route 53 to help protect dynamic web applications (with dynamic content such as a response to user input) against DDoS attacks. The steps shown in this post are key to implementing the overall approach described in AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency and enable the built-in, managed DDoS protection service, AWS Shield.

Background

AWS hosts CloudFront and Route 53 services on a distributed network of proxy servers in data centers throughout the world called edge locations. Using the global Amazon network of edge locations for application delivery and DNS service plays an important part in building a comprehensive defense against DDoS attacks for your dynamic web applications. These web applications can benefit from the increased security and availability provided by CloudFront and Route 53 as well as improving end users’ experience by reducing latency.

The following screenshot of an Amazon.com webpage shows how static and dynamic content can compose a dynamic web application that is delivered via HTTPS protocol for the encryption of user page requests as well as the pages that are returned by a web server.

Screenshot of an Amazon.com webpage with static and dynamic content

The following map shows the global Amazon network of edge locations available to serve static content and proxy requests for dynamic content back to the origin as of the writing of this blog post. For the latest list of edge locations, see AWS Global Infrastructure.

Map showing Amazon edge locations

How AWS Shield, CloudFront, and Route 53 work to help protect against DDoS attacks

To help keep your dynamic web applications available when they are under DDoS attack, the steps in this post enable AWS Shield Standard by configuring your applications behind CloudFront and Route 53. AWS Shield Standard protects your resources from common, frequently occurring network and transport layer DDoS attacks. Attack traffic can be geographically isolated and absorbed using the capacity in edge locations close to the source. Additionally, you can configure geographical restrictions to help block attacks originating from specific countries.

The request-routing technology in CloudFront connects each client to the nearest edge location, as determined by continuously updated latency measurements. HTTP and HTTPS requests sent to CloudFront can be monitored, and access to your application resources can be controlled at edge locations using AWS WAF. Based on conditions that you specify in AWS WAF, such as the IP addresses that requests originate from or the values of query strings, traffic can be allowed, blocked, or allowed and counted for further investigation or remediation. The following diagram shows how static and dynamic web application content can originate from endpoint resources within AWS or your corporate data center. For more details, see How CloudFront Delivers Content and How CloudFront Works with Regional Edge Caches.

Route 53 DNS requests and subsequent application traffic routed through CloudFront are inspected inline. Always-on monitoring, anomaly detection, and mitigation against common infrastructure DDoS attacks such as SYN/ACK floods, UDP floods, and reflection attacks are built into both Route 53 and CloudFront. For a review of common DDoS attack vectors, see How to Help Prepare for DDoS Attacks by Reducing Your Attack Surface. When the SYN flood attack threshold is exceeded, SYN cookies are activated to avoid dropping connections from legitimate clients. Deterministic packet filtering drops malformed TCP packets and invalid DNS requests, only allowing traffic to pass that is valid for the service. Heuristics-based anomaly detection evaluates attributes such as type, source, and composition of traffic. Traffic is scored across many dimensions, and only the most suspicious traffic is dropped. This method allows you to avoid false positives while protecting application availability.

Route 53 is also designed to withstand DNS query floods, which are real DNS requests that can continue for hours and attempt to exhaust DNS server resources. Route 53 uses shuffle sharding and anycast striping to spread DNS traffic across edge locations and help protect the availability of the service.

The next four sections provide guidance about how to deploy CloudFront, Route 53, AWS WAF, and, optionally, AWS Shield Advanced.

Deploy CloudFront

To take advantage of application delivery with DDoS mitigations at the edge, start by creating a CloudFront distribution and configuring origins:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the CloudFront console
  2. Choose Create Distribution.
  3. On the first page of the Create Distribution Wizard, in the Web section, choose Get Started.
  4. Specify origin settings for the distribution. The following screenshot of the CloudFront console shows an example CloudFront distribution configured with an Elastic Load Balancing load balancer origin, as shown in the previous diagram. I have configured this example to set the Origin SSL Protocols to use TLSv1.2 and the Origin Protocol Policy to HTTP Only. For more information about creating an HTTPS listener for your ELB load balancer and requesting a certificate from AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), see Getting Started with Elastic Load BalancingSupported Regions, and Requiring HTTPS for Communication Between CloudFront and Your Custom Origin.
  1. Specify cache behavior settings for the distribution, as shown in the following screenshot. You can configure each URL path pattern with a set of associated cache behaviors. For dynamic web applications, set the Minimum TTL to 0 so that CloudFront will make a GET request with an If-Modified-Since header back to the origin. When CloudFront proxies traffic to the origin from edge locations and back, multiple concurrent requests for the same object are collapsed into a single request. The request is sent over a persistent connection from the edge location to the region over networks monitored by AWS. The use of a large initial TCP window size in CloudFront maximizes the available bandwidth, and TCP Fast Open (TFO) reduces latency.
  2. To ensure that all traffic to CloudFront is encrypted and to enable SSL termination from clients at global edge locations, specify Redirect HTTP to HTTPS for Viewer Protocol Policy. Moving SSL termination to CloudFront offloads computationally expensive SSL negotiation, helps mitigate SSL abuse, and reduces latency with the use of OCSP stapling and session tickets. For more information about options for serving HTTPS requests, see Choosing How CloudFront Serves HTTPS Requests. For dynamic web applications, set Allowed HTTP Methods to include all methods, set Forward Headers to All, and for Query String Forwarding and Caching, choose Forward all, cache based on all.
  1. Specify distribution settings for the distribution, as shown in the following screenshot. Enter your domain names in the Alternate Domain Names box and choose Custom SSL Certificate.
  2. Choose Create Distribution. Note the x.cloudfront.net Domain Name of the distribution. In the next section, you will configure Route 53 to route traffic to this CloudFront distribution domain name.

Configure Route 53

When you created a web distribution in the previous section, CloudFront assigned a domain name to the distribution, such as d111111abcdef8.cloudfront.net. You can use this domain name in the URLs for your content, such as: http://d111111abcdef8.cloudfront.net/logo.jpg.

Alternatively, you might prefer to use your own domain name in URLs, such as: http://example.com/logo.jpg. You can accomplish this by creating a Route 53 alias resource record set that routes dynamic web application traffic to your CloudFront distribution by using your domain name. Alias resource record sets are virtual records specific to Route 53 that are used to map alias resource record sets for your domain to your CloudFront distribution. Alias resource record sets are similar to CNAME records except there is no charge for DNS queries to Route 53 alias resource record sets mapped to AWS services. Alias resource record sets are also not visible to resolvers, and they can be created for the root domain (zone apex) as well as subdomains.

A hosted zone, similar to a DNS zone file, is a collection of records that belongs to a single parent domain name. Each hosted zone has four nonoverlapping name servers in a delegation set. If a DNS query is dropped, the client automatically retries the next name server. If you have not already registered a domain name and have not configured a hosted zone for your domain, complete these two prerequisite steps before proceeding:

After you have registered your domain name and configured your public hosted zone, follow these steps to create an alias resource record set:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Route 53 console.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Hosted Zones.
  3. Choose the name of the hosted zone for the domain that you want to use to route traffic to your CloudFront distribution.
  4. Choose Create Record Set.
  5. Specify the following values:
    • Name – Type the domain name that you want to use to route traffic to your CloudFront distribution. The default value is the name of the hosted zone. For example, if the name of the hosted zone is example.com and you want to use acme.example.com to route traffic to your distribution, type acme.
    • Type – Choose A – IPv4 address. If IPv6 is enabled for the distribution and you are creating a second resource record set, choose AAAA – IPv6 address.
    • Alias – Choose Yes.
    • Alias Target – In the CloudFront distributions section, choose the name that CloudFront assigned to the distribution when you created it.
    • Routing Policy – Accept the default value of Simple.
    • Evaluate Target Health – Accept the default value of No.
  6. Choose Create.
  7. If IPv6 is enabled for the distribution, repeat Steps 4 through 6. Specify the same settings except for the Type field, as explained in Step 5.

The following screenshot of the Route 53 console shows a Route 53 alias resource record set that is configured to map a domain name to a CloudFront distribution.

If your dynamic web application requires geo redundancy, you can use latency-based routing in Route 53 to run origin servers in different AWS regions. Route 53 is integrated with CloudFront to collect latency measurements from each edge location. With Route 53 latency-based routing, each CloudFront edge location goes to the region with the lowest latency for the origin fetch.

Enable AWS WAF

AWS WAF is a web application firewall that helps detect and mitigate web application layer DDoS attacks by inspecting traffic inline. Application layer DDoS attacks use well-formed but malicious requests to evade mitigation and consume application resources. You can define custom security rules (also called web ACLs) that contain a set of conditions, rules, and actions to block attacking traffic. After you define web ACLs, you can apply them to CloudFront distributions, and web ACLs are evaluated in the priority order you specified when you configured them. Real-time metrics and sampled web requests are provided for each web ACL.

You can configure AWS WAF whitelisting or blacklisting in conjunction with CloudFront geo restriction to prevent users in specific geographic locations from accessing your application. The AWS WAF API supports security automation such as blacklisting IP addresses that exceed request limits, which can be useful for mitigating HTTP flood attacks. Use the AWS WAF Security Automations Implementation Guide to implement rate-based blacklisting.

The following diagram shows how the (a) flow of CloudFront access logs files to an Amazon S3 bucket (b) provides the source data for the Lambda log parser function (c) to identify HTTP flood traffic and update AWS WAF web ACLs. As CloudFront receives requests on behalf of your dynamic web application, it sends access logs to an S3 bucket, triggering the Lambda log parser. The Lambda function parses CloudFront access logs to identify suspicious behavior, such as an unusual number of requests or errors, and it automatically updates your AWS WAF rules to block subsequent requests from the IP addresses in question for a predefined amount of time that you specify.

Diagram of the process

In addition to automated rate-based blacklisting to help protect against HTTP flood attacks, prebuilt AWS CloudFormation templates are available to simplify the configuration of AWS WAF for a proactive application-layer security defense. The following diagram provides an overview of CloudFormation template input into the creation of the CommonAttackProtection stack that includes AWS WAF web ACLs used to block, allow, or count requests that meet the criteria defined in each rule.

Diagram of CloudFormation template input into the creation of the CommonAttackProtection stack

To implement these application layer protections, follow the steps in Tutorial: Quickly Setting Up AWS WAF Protection Against Common Attacks. After you have created your AWS WAF web ACLs, you can assign them to your CloudFront distribution by updating the settings.

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the CloudFront console.
  2. Choose the link under the ID column for your CloudFront distribution.
  3. Choose Edit under the General
  4. Choose your AWS WAF Web ACL from the drop-down
  5. Choose Yes, Edit.

Activate AWS Shield Advanced (optional)

Deploying CloudFront, Route 53, and AWS WAF as described in this post enables the built-in DDoS protections for your dynamic web applications that are included with AWS Shield Standard. (There is no upfront cost or charge for AWS Shield Standard beyond the normal pricing for CloudFront, Route 53, and AWS WAF.) AWS Shield Standard is designed to meet the needs of many dynamic web applications.

For dynamic web applications that have a high risk or history of frequent, complex, or high volume DDoS attacks, AWS Shield Advanced provides additional DDoS mitigation capacity, attack visibility, cost protection, and access to the AWS DDoS Response Team (DRT). For more information about AWS Shield Advanced pricing, see AWS Shield Advanced pricing. To activate advanced protection services, follow these steps:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the AWS WAF console.
  2. If this is your first time signing in to the AWS WAF console, choose Get started with AWS Shield Advanced. Otherwise, choose Protected resources.
  3. Choose Activate AWS Shield Advanced.
  4. Choose the resource type and resource to protect.
  5. For Name, enter a friendly name that will help you identify the AWS resources that are protected. For example, My CloudFront AWS Shield Advanced distributions.
  6. (Optional) For Web DDoS attack, select Enable. You will be prompted to associate an existing web ACL with these resources, or create a new ACL if you don’t have any yet.
  7. Choose Add DDoS protection.

Summary

In this blog post, I outline the steps to deploy CloudFront and configure Route 53 in front of your dynamic web application to leverage the global Amazon network of edge locations for DDoS resiliency. The post also provides guidance about enabling AWS WAF for application layer traffic monitoring and automated rules creation to block malicious traffic. I also cover the optional steps to activate AWS Shield Advanced, which helps build a more comprehensive defense against DDoS attacks for your dynamic web applications.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, please open a new thread on the AWS WAF forum.

– Holly

How to Protect Your Web Application Against DDoS Attacks by Using Amazon Route 53 and an External Content Delivery Network

Post Syndicated from Shawn Marck original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-protect-your-web-application-against-ddos-attacks-by-using-amazon-route-53-and-a-content-delivery-network/

Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are attempts by a malicious actor to flood a network, system, or application with more traffic, connections, or requests than it is able to handle. To protect your web application against DDoS attacks, you can use AWS Shield, a DDoS protection service that AWS provides automatically to all AWS customers at no additional charge. You can use AWS Shield in conjunction with DDoS-resilient web services such as Amazon CloudFront and Amazon Route 53 to improve your ability to defend against DDoS attacks. Learn more about architecting for DDoS resiliency by reading the AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency whitepaper.

In this blog post, I show how you can help protect the zone apex (also known as the root domain) of your web application by using Route 53 to perform a secure redirect to your externally hosted content delivery network (CDN) distribution.

Background

When browsing the Internet, a user might type example.com instead of www.example.com. To make sure these requests are routed properly, it is necessary to create a Route 53 alias resource record set for the zone apex. For example.com, this would be an alias resource record set without any subdomain (www) defined. With Route 53, you can use an alias resource record set to point www or your zone apex directly at a CloudFront distribution. As a result, anyone resolving example.com or www.example.com will see only the CloudFront distribution. This makes it difficult for a malicious actor to find and attack your application origin.

You can also use Route 53 to route end users to a CDN outside AWS. The CDN provider will ask you to create a CNAME alias resource record set to point www.example.com to your CDN distribution’s hostname. Unfortunately, it is not possible to point your zone apex with a CNAME alias resource record set because a zone apex cannot be a CNAME. As a result, users who type example.com without www will not be routed to your web application unless you point the zone apex directly to your application origin.

The benefit of a secure redirect from the zone apex to www is that it helps protect your origin from being exposed to direct attacks.

Solution overview

The following solution diagram shows the AWS services this solution uses and how the solution uses them.

Diagram showing how AWS services are used in this post's solution

Here is how the process works:

  1. A user’s browser makes a DNS request to Route 53.
  2. Route 53 has a hosted zone for the example.com domain.
  3. The hosted zone serves the record:
    1. If the request is for the apex zone, the alias resource record set for the CloudFront distribution is served.
    2. If the request is for the www subdomain, the CNAME for the externally hosted CDN is served.
  4. CloudFront forwards the request to Amazon S3.
  5. S3 performs a secure redirect from example.com to www.example.com.

Note: All of the steps in this blog post’s solution use example.com as a domain name. You must replace this domain name with your own domain name.

AWS services used in this solution

You will use three AWS services in this walkthrough to build your zone apex–to–external CDN distribution redirect:

  • Route 53 – This post assumes that you are already using Route 53 to route users to your web application, which provides you with protection against common DDoS attacks, including DNS query floods. To learn more about migrating to Route 53, see Getting Started with Amazon Route 53.
  • S3 – S3 is object storage with a simple web service interface to store and retrieve any amount of data from anywhere on the web. S3 also allows you to configure a bucket for website hosting. In this walkthrough, you will use the S3 website hosting feature to redirect users from example.com to www.example.com, which points to your externally hosted CDN.
  • CloudFront – When architecting your application for DDoS resiliency, it is important to protect origin resources, such as S3 buckets, from discovery by a malicious actor. This is known as obfuscation. In this walkthrough, you will use a CloudFront distribution to obfuscate your S3 bucket.

Prerequisites

The solution in this blog post assumes that you already have the following components as part of your architecture:

  1. A Route 53 hosted zone for your domain.
  2. A CNAME alias resource record set pointing to your CDN.

Deploy the solution

In this solution, you:

  1. Create an S3 bucket with HTTP redirection. This allows requests made to your zone apex to be redirected to your www subdomain.
  2. Create and configure a CloudFront web distribution. I use a CloudFront distribution in front of my S3 web redirect so that I can leverage the advanced DDoS protection and scale that is native to CloudFront.
  3. Configure an alias resource record set in your hosted zone. Alias resource record sets are similar to CNAME records, but you can set them at the zone apex.
  4. Validate that the redirect is working.

Step 1: Create an S3 bucket with HTTP redirection

The following steps show how to configure your S3 bucket as a static website that will perform HTTP redirects to your www URL:

  1. Open the AWS Management Console. Navigate to the S3 console and create an S3 bucket in the region of your choice.
  2. Configure static website hosting to redirect all requests to another host name:
    1. Choose the S3 bucket you just created and then choose Properties.
      Screenshot showing choosing the S3 bucket and the Properties button
    2. Choose Static Website Hosting.
      Screenshot of choosing Static Website Hosting
    3. Choose Redirect all requests to another host name, and type your zone apex (root domain) in the Redirect all requests to box, as shown in the following screenshot.
      Screenshot of Static Website Hosting settings to choose

Note: At the top of this tab, you will see an endpoint. Copy the endpoint because you will need it in Step 2 when you configure the CloudFront distribution. In this example, the endpoint is example-com.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com.

Step 2: Create and configure a CloudFront web distribution

The following steps show how to create a CloudFront web distribution that protects the S3 bucket:

  1. From the AWS Management Console, choose CloudFront.
  2. On the first page of the Create Distribution Wizard, in the Web section, choose Get Started.
  3. The Create Distribution page has many values you can specify. For this walkthrough, you need to specify only two settings:
    1. Origin Settings:
      • Origin Domain Name –When you click in this box, a menu appears with AWS resources you can choose. Choose the S3 bucket you created in Step 1, or paste the endpoint URL you copied in Step 1. In this example, the endpoint is example-com.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com.
        Screenshot of Origin Domain Name
    1. Distribution Settings:
      • Alternate Domain Names (CNAMEs) – Type the root domain (for this walkthrough, it is www.example.com).
        Screenshot of Alternate Domain Names
  4. Click Create Distribution.
  5. Wait for the CloudFront distribution to deploy completely before proceeding to Step 3. After CloudFront creates your distribution, the value of the Status column for your distribution will change from InProgress to Deployed. The distribution is then ready to process requests.

Step 3: Configure an alias resource record set in your hosted zone

In this step, you use Route 53 to configure an alias resource record set for your zone apex that resolves to the CloudFront distribution you made in Step 2:

  1. From the AWS Management Console, choose Route 53 and choose Hosted zones.
  2. On the Hosted zones page, choose your domain. This takes you to the Record sets page.
    Screenshot of choosing the domain on the Hosted zones page
  3. Click Create Record Set.
  4. Leave the Name box blank and choose Alias: Yes.
  5. Click the Alias Target box, and choose the CloudFront distribution you created in Step 2. If the distribution does not appear in the list automatically, you can copy and paste the name exactly as it appears in the CloudFront console.
  6. Click Create.
    Screenshot of creating the record set

Step 4: Validate that the redirect is working

To confirm that you have correctly configured all components of this solution and your zone apex is redirecting to the www domain as expected, open a browser and navigate to your zone apex. In this walkthrough, the zone apex is http://example.com and it should redirect automatically to http://www.example.com.

Summary

In this post, I showed how you can help protect your web application against DDoS attacks by using Route 53 to perform a secure redirect to your externally hosted CDN distribution. This helps protect your origin from being exposed to direct DDoS attacks.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about implementing the solution in this blog post, start a new thread in the Route 53 forum.

– Shawn

AWS Online Tech Talks – February 2017

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-blog-february-2017-online-techtalks-series/

The New Year is underway, so there is no better time to dive into learning more about the latest AWS services. Each month, we have a series of webinars targeting best practices and new service features in AWS Cloud.

 

February Online Tech Talks (formerly known as Monthly Webinar Series)

I am excited to share the webinars schedule for the month of February. Remember all webinars noted are free, but they may fill up quickly so be sure to register ahead of time. Webinars are typically one hour in length and scheduled times are in Pacific Time (PT) time zone.

 

Webinars featured this month are as follows:

Tuesday, February 14

Mobile

10:30 AM – 11:30 AM: Test your Android App with Espresso and AWS Device Farm

 

Wednesday, February 15

Big Data

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM: Amazon Elasticsearch Service with Elasticsearch 5 and Kibana 5

Mobile

12:00 Noon – 1:00 PM: Deep Dive on AWS Mobile Hub for Enterprise Mobile Applications

 

Thursday, February 16

Security

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM: DNS DDoS mitigation using Amazon Route 53 and AWS Shield

 

Tuesday, February 21

Storage

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM: Best Practices for NoSQL Workloads on Amazon EC2 and Amazon EBS

Databases

10:30 AM – 11:30 AM: Consolidate MySQL Shards Into Amazon Aurora Using AWS Database Migration Service

IoT

12:00 Noon – 1:00 PM: Getting Started with AWS IoT

 

Wednesday, February 22

IoT

10:30 AM – 11:30 AM: Best Practices with IoT Security

Databases

12:00 Noon – 1:00 PM: Migrate from SQL Server or Oracle into Amazon Aurora using AWS Database Migration Service

 

Wednesday, February 23

Enterprise

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM: How to Prepare for AWS Certification and Advance your Career

Storage

10:30 AM – 11:30 AM: Deep Dive on Elastic File System

12:00 Noon – 1:00 PM: Optimize MySQL Workloads with Amazon Elastic Block Store

 

Wednesday, February 24

Big Data

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM: Deep Dive of Flink & Spark on Amazon EMR

10:30 AM – 11:30 AM: Deep Dive on Amazon Redshift

 

The AWS Online Tech Talks series covers a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. These technical sessions are led by AWS solutions architects and engineers and feature live demonstrations & customer examples. You can check out the AWS online series here and the AWS on-demand webinar series on the AWS YouTube channel.

Reduce DDoS Risks Using Amazon Route 53 and AWS Shield

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/reduce-ddos-risks-using-amazon-route-53-and-aws-shield/

In late October of 2016 a large-scale cyber attack consisting of multiple denial of service attacks targeted a well-known DNS provider. The attack, consisting of a flood of DNS lookups from tens of millions of IP addresses, made many Internet sites and services unavailable to users in North America and Europe. This Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack was believe to have been executed using a botnet consisting of a multitude of Internet-connected devices such as printers, camera, residential network gateways, and even baby monitors. These devices had been infected with the Mirai malware and generated several hundreds of gigabytes of traffic per second. Many corporate and educational networks simply do not have the capacity to absorb a volumetric attack of this size.

In the wake of this attack and others that have preceded it, our customers have been asking us for recommendations and best practices that will allow them to build systems that are more resilient to various types of DDoS attacks. The short-form answer involves a combination of scale, fault tolerance, and mitigation (the AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency white paper goes in to far more detail) and makes use of Amazon Route 53 and AWS Shield (read AWS Shield – Protect Your Applications from DDoS Attacks to learn more).

Scale – Route 53 is hosted at numerous AWS edge locations, creating a global surface area capable of absorbing large amounts of DNS traffic. Other edge-based services, including Amazon CloudFront and AWS WAF, also have a global surface area and are also able to handle large amounts of traffic.

Fault Tolerance – Each edge location has many connections to the Internet. This allows for diverse paths and helps to isolate and contain faults. Route 53 also uses shuffle sharding and anycast striping to increase availability. With shuffle sharding, each name server in your delegation set corresponds to a unique set of edge locations. This arrangement increases fault tolerance and minimizes overlap between AWS customers. If one name server in the delegation set is not available, the client system or application will simply retry and receive a response from a name server at a different edge location. Anycast striping is used to direct DNS requests to an optimal location. This has the effect of spreading load and reducing DNS latency.

Mitigation – AWS Shield Standard protects you from 96% of today’s most common attacks. This includes SYN/ACK floods, Reflection attacks, and HTTP slow reads. As I noted in my post above, this protection is applied automatically and transparently to your Elastic Load Balancers, CloudFront distributions, and Route 53 resources at no extra cost. Protection (including deterministic packet filtering and priority based traffic shaping) is deployed to all AWS edge locations and inspects all traffic with just microseconds of overhead, all in a totally transparent fashion. AWS Shield Advanced includes additional DDoS mitigation capability, 24×7 access to our DDoS Response Team, real time metrics and reports, and DDoS cost protection.

To learn more, read the DDoS Resiliency white paper and learn about Route 53 anycast.

Jeff;

 

AWS Reinvent 2016: Embiggen your business with AWS

Post Syndicated from Bart Thomas original http://www.anchor.com.au/blog/2016/12/aws-reinvent-2016/

Two weeks ago, Amazon Web Services ran their annual love-fest in Las Vegas and it was quite a remarkable week. On arrival, attendees (all 32,000+ of them) were given a shiny new Alexa Echo Dot, Amazon’s latest entrant into the growing market for voice controlled, AI-based smart assistants, a segment that includes Apple’s Siri, Google Assistant and Microsoft’s Cortana.

Amazon have now made it clear that they’re taking Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning very seriously, with four brand new, developer-focussed AI related services (Polly, Rekognition, Lex and MXNet) announced during the week. The free Alexa Echo Dots yet another incentive for developers to start building apps that make use of (and ultimately contribute to) Amazon’s efforts in this space.

The week was brought to a close with a spectacular party, headlined by Martin Garrix, named the world’s top DJ in 2016 by djmag.com. Goes to show that some of the worlds biggest geeks and code cutters are also capable of cutting some serious rug:

While the potential of artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies are both exciting and somewhat scary, there was plenty more to consider over the course of the week with a bevy of announcements such as new server instance types, enhanced support and orchestration for containers (Blox), low cost, simple to launch virtual servers from $5 per month (Lightsail), free of charge DDoS protection (AWS Shield), application performance monitoring and debugging (X-Ray), a new ”Internet of Things” (IoT) play to help developers build and manage smart, connected devices (Greengrass) and a fully managed continuous integration (CI) service (CodeBuild) that neatly rounds off Amazon’s DevOps-friendly suite of CI/CD services — and that’s just scratching the surface.

There’s a summary of the announcements here: https://aws.amazon.com/new/reinvent/

With videos of the sessions here: https://www.youtube.com/user/AmazonWebServices

aws-innovationFor me, the main takeaway was that the pace of technology-enabled change is continuing to accelerate and Amazon Web Services is very likely to be at the heart of it. AWS is a sales and innovation machine, continuing to put distance between themselves and their competitors — their sheer pace of innovation would appear almost impossible to compete with. The public clouds of Microsoft, IBM and Google would need years to catch up and that’s assuming AWS were sporting enough to stand still for that long.

In 2016, AWS announced around 1000 new services and updates – simply incredible if you’re a developer making use of the platform, and quite simply terrifying if you’re just about anyone else. As AWS continue their march up the value chain, those in the business of infrastructure services, monitoring, BI, data analytics, CI/CD developer tools, network security and even artificial intelligence (AI) all have very good reason to be concerned.

Interestingly, AWS reported an annual revenue run rate of nearly $13 billion with an incredible growth rate of 55% this past year, while the traditional big IT vendors – VMware, HP, Oracle, Cisco, Dell, EMC and IBM have gone backwards — dropping from a collective $221 billion revenue in 2012, to $206 billion in 2016.

Momentum for the public cloud keeps growing, and it’s easy to see why. AWS is without doubt the leader in the field and according to Andy Jassy (AWS CEO and pleasingly the very same guy who first presented Jeff Bezos with the AWS business plan) they are the fastest growing, US$1 billion-plus technology company ever, with Gartner estimating in 2015 that AWS is more than ten times the size of the next 14 competitors in the public cloud space combined – Microsoft, Google and IBM included.

Just look at these revenue and YOY growth numbers:
aws-revenueaws-yoy-growth
Source – https://www.statista.com/statistics/250520/forecast-of-amazon-web-services-revenue/

If you’re an application developer looking to win in your market, you would be remiss not to give careful consideration to building your application on top of AWS. Legacy IT infrastructure still has its place, but if your business is looking to the future then the cloud is where it’s at.

AWS’ API-driven infrastructure enables you to take your development processes and application smarts to the next level. Adopting continuous delivery allows your product and development teams to move many orders of magnitude faster than they do today, reducing outages, improving software quality and security. And once your applications are infrastructure aware (aka “cloud native”), they’ll auto-scale seamlessly with the peaks and troughs of customer demand, self-heal when things go wrong and deliver a a great experience to your customers – no matter where they are in the world.

If you’re serious about embiggening your business, you need to embiggen your product and software development capabilities, and you need to do it quickly. Wondering where you’ll get the biggest bang for your buck? AWS looks like a pretty safe bet to me.

The post AWS Reinvent 2016: Embiggen your business with AWS appeared first on AWS Managed Services by Anchor.

AWS Reinvent 2016: Embiggen your business with Amazon Web Services

Post Syndicated from Bart Thomas original https://www.anchor.com.au/blog/2016/12/aws-reinvent-2016/

Three weeks ago, Amazon Web Services ran their annual love-fest in Las Vegas and it was quite a remarkable week. On arrival, attendees (all 32,000+ of them) were given a shiny new Alexa Echo Dot, Amazon’s latest entrant into the growing market for voice controlled, AI-based smart assistants, a segment that includes Apple’s Siri, Google Assistant and Microsoft’s Cortana.

Amazon have now made it clear that they’re taking Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning very seriously, with four brand new, developer-focussed AI related services (Polly, Rekognition, Lex and MXNet) announced during the week. The free Alexa Echo Dots yet another incentive for developers to start building apps that make use of (and ultimately contribute to) Amazon’s efforts in this space.

The week was brought to a close with a spectacular party, headlined by Martin Garrix, named the world’s top DJ in 2016 by djmag.com. Goes to show that some of the worlds biggest geeks and code cutters are also capable of cutting some serious rug:

While the potential of artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies are both exciting and somewhat scary, there was plenty more to consider over the course of the week with a bevy of announcements such as new server instance types, enhanced support and orchestration for containers (Blox), low cost, simple to launch virtual servers from $5 per month (Lightsail), free of charge DDoS protection (AWS Shield), application performance monitoring and debugging (X-Ray), a new ”Internet of Things” (IoT) play to help developers build and manage smart, connected devices (Greengrass) and a fully managed continuous integration (CI) service (CodeBuild) that neatly rounds off Amazon’s DevOps-friendly suite of CI/CD services — and that’s just scratching the surface.

There’s a summary of the announcements here: https://aws.amazon.com/new/reinvent/

With videos of the sessions here: https://www.youtube.com/user/AmazonWebServices

For me, the main takeaway was that the pace of technology-enabled change is continuing to accelerate and Amazon Web Services is very likely to be at the heart of it.

AWS pace of innovation 2016

AWS pace of innovation 2016

AWS is a sales and innovation machine, continuing to put distance between themselves and their competitors — their sheer pace of innovation would appear almost impossible to compete with. The public clouds of Microsoft, IBM and Google would need years to catch up and that’s assuming AWS were sporting enough to stand still for that long.

In 2016, AWS announced around 1000 new services and updates – simply incredible if you’re company whose product and development teams are making use of the platform, and quite simply terrifying if you’re just about anyone else. As AWS continue their march up the value chain, those in the business of infrastructure services, monitoring, BI, data analytics, CI/CD developer tools, network security and even artificial intelligence (AI) all have very good reason to be concerned.

Interestingly, AWS reported an annual revenue run rate of nearly $13 billion with an incredible growth rate of 55% this past year, while the traditional big IT vendors – VMware, HP, Oracle, Cisco, Dell, EMC and IBM have gone backwards — dropping from a collective $221 billion revenue in 2012, to $206 billion in 2016.

Momentum for the public cloud keeps growing, and it’s easy to see why.

AWS is without doubt the leader in the field, and according to Andy Jassy (AWS CEO and pleasingly the very same guy who first presented Jeff Bezos with the AWS business plan) they are the fastest growing, US$1 billion-plus technology company ever, with Gartner estimating in 2015 that AWS is more than ten times the size of the next 14 competitors in the public cloud space combined – Microsoft, Google and IBM included.

Just look at these revenue and YOY growth numbers:
aws-revenueaws-yoy-growth
Source – https://www.statista.com/statistics/250520/forecast-of-amazon-web-services-revenue/

If you’re an application developer looking to win in your market, you would be remiss not to give careful consideration to building your application on top of AWS. Legacy IT infrastructure still has its place, but if your business is looking to the future then the cloud with all its automation and as-a-service goodness is where it’s at.

AWS’ API-driven infrastructure services enable you to take your development processes and application smarts to the next level. Adopting continuous delivery allows your product and development teams to move many orders of magnitude faster than they do today, reducing outages, improving software quality and security. And once your applications are infrastructure aware (aka “cloud native”), they’ll auto-scale seamlessly with the peaks and troughs of customer demand, self-heal when things go wrong and deliver a a great experience to your customers – no matter where they are in the world.

If you’re serious about embiggening your business, you need to embiggen your product and software development capabilities, and you need to do it quickly. Wondering where you’ll get the biggest bang for your buck? Where you’ll find the most efficiency gains? AWS looks like a pretty safe bet to me.

The post AWS Reinvent 2016: Embiggen your business with Amazon Web Services appeared first on AWS Managed Services by Anchor.

Now Open – AWS London Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-london-region/

Last week we launched our 15th AWS Region and today we are launching our 16th. We have expanded the AWS footprint into the United Kingdom with a new Region in London, our third in Europe. AWS customers can use the new London Region to better serve end-users in the United Kingdom and can also use it to store data in the UK.

The Details
The new London Region provides a broad suite of AWS services including Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon ECS, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), EC2 Container Registry, Amazon EMR, Amazon Glacier, Amazon Kinesis Streams, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, AWS Snowball, AWS Snowmobile, AWS Key Management Service (KMS), AWS Marketplace, AWS OpsWorks, AWS Personal Health Dashboard, AWS Shield Standard, AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Support API, Elastic Load Balancing, VM Import/Export, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Route 53, AWS WAF, AWS Trusted Advisor, and AWS Direct Connect (follow the links for pricing and other information).

The London Region supports all sizes of C4, D2, M4, T2, and X1 instances.

Check out the AWS Global Infrastructure page to learn more about current and future AWS Regions.

From Our Customers
Many AWS customers are getting ready to use this new Region. Here’s a very small sample:

Trainline is Europe’s number one independent rail ticket retailer. Every day more than 100,000 people travel using tickets bought from Trainline. Here’s what Mark Holt (CTO of Trainline) shared with us:

We recently completed the migration of 100 percent of our eCommerce infrastructure to AWS and have seen awesome results: improved security, 60 percent less downtime, significant cost savings and incredible improvements in agility. From extensive testing, we know that 0.3s of latency is worth more than 8 million pounds and so, while AWS connectivity is already blazingly fast, we expect that serving our UK customers from UK datacenters should lead to significant top-line benefits.

Kainos Evolve Electronic Medical Records (EMR) automates the creation, capture and handling of medical case notes and operational documents and records, allowing healthcare providers to deliver better patient safety and quality of care for several leading NHS Foundation Trusts and market leading healthcare technology companies.

Travis Perkins, the largest supplier of building materials in the UK, is implementing the biggest systems and business change in its history including the migration of its datacenters to AWS.

Just Eat is the world’s leading marketplace for online food delivery. Using AWS, JustEat has been able to experiment faster and reduce the time to roll out new feature updates.

OakNorth, a new bank focused on lending between £1m-£20m to entrepreneurs and growth businesses, became the UK’s first cloud-based bank in May after several months of working with AWS to drive the development forward with the regulator.

Partners
I’m happy to report that we are already working with a wide variety of consulting, technology, managed service, and Direct Connect partners in the United Kingdom. Here’s a partial list:

  • AWS Premier Consulting Partners – Accenture, Claranet, Cloudreach, CSC, Datapipe, KCOM, Rackspace, and Slalom.
  • AWS Consulting Partners – Attenda, Contino, Deloitte, KPMG, LayerV, Lemongrass, Perfect Image, and Version 1.
  • AWS Technology Partners – Splunk, Sage, Sophos, Trend Micro, and Zerolight.
  • AWS Managed Service Partners – Claranet, Cloudreach, KCOM, and Rackspace.
  • AWS Direct Connect Partners – AT&T, BT, Hutchison Global Communications, Level 3, Redcentric, and Vodafone.

Here are a few examples of what our partners are working on:

KCOM is a professional services provider offering consultancy, architecture, project delivery and managed service capabilities to large UK-based enterprise businesses. The scalability and flexibility of AWS gives them a significant competitive advantage with their enterprise and public sector customers. The new Region will allow KCOM to build innovative solutions for their public sector clients while meeting local regulatory requirements.

Splunk is a member of the AWS Partner Network and a market leader in analyzing machine data to deliver operational intelligence for security, IT, and the business. They use cloud computing and big data analytics to help their customers to embrace digital transformation and continuous innovation. The new Region will provide even more companies with real-time visibility into the operation of their systems and infrastructure.

Redcentric is a NHS Digital-approved N3 Commercial Aggregator. Their work allows health and care providers such as NHS acute, emergency and mental trusts, clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), and the ISV community to connect securely to AWS. The London Region will allow health and care providers to deliver new digital services and to improve outcomes for citizens and patients.

Visit the AWS Partner Network page to read some case studies and to learn how to join.

Compliance & Connectivity
Every AWS Region is designed and built to meet rigorous compliance standards including ISO 27001, ISO 9001, ISO 27017, ISO 27018, SOC 1, SOC 2, SOC3, PCI DSS Level 1, and many more. Our Cloud Compliance page includes information about these standards, along with those that are specific to the UK, including Cyber Essentials Plus.

The UK Government recognizes that local datacenters from hyper scale public cloud providers can deliver secure solutions for OFFICIAL workloads. In order to meet the special security needs of public sector organizations in the UK with respect to OFFICIAL workloads, we have worked with our Direct Connect Partners to make sure that obligations for connectivity to the Public Services Network (PSN) and N3 can be met.

Use it Today
The London Region is open for business now and you can start using it today! If you need additional information about this Region, please feel free to contact our UK team at [email protected].

Jeff;

Now Open AWS Canada (Central) Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-canada-central-region/

We are growing the AWS footprint once again. Our new Canada (Central) Region is now available and you can start using it today. AWS customers in Canada and the northern parts of the United States have fast, low-latency access to the suite of AWS infrastructure services.

The Details
The new Canada (Central) Region supports Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) and related services including Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, Elastic Load Balancing, NAT Gateway, Spot Instances, and Dedicated Hosts.

It also supports Amazon Aurora, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, Amazon CloudFront, AWS CloudHSM, AWS CloudTrail, Amazon CloudWatch, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Direct Connect, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon ECS, EC2 Container Registry, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon EMR, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Glacier, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS Snowball, AWS Key Management Service (KMS), Amazon Kinesis, AWS Marketplace, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Route 53, AWS Shield Standard, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Trusted Advisor, VM Import/Export, and AWS WAF.

The Region supports all sizes of C4, D2, M4, T2, and X1 instances.

As part of our on-going focus on making cloud computing available to you in an environmentally friendly fashion, AWS data centers in Canada draw power from a grid that generates 99% of its electricity using hydropower (read about AWS Sustainability to learn more).

Well Connected
After receiving a lot of positive feedback on the network latency metrics that I shared when we launched the AWS Region in Ohio, I am happy to have a new set to share as part of today’s launch (these times represent a lower bound on latency and may change over time).

The first set of metrics are to other Canadian cities:

  • 9 ms to Toronto.
  • 14 ms to Ottawa.
  • 47 ms to Calgary.
  • 49 ms to Edmonton.
  • 60 ms to Vancouver.

The second set are to locations in the US:

  • 9 ms to New York.
  • 19 ms to Chicago.
  • 16 ms to US East (Northern Virginia).
  • 27 ms to US East (Ohio).
  • 75 ms to US West (Oregon).

Canada is also home to CloudFront edge locations in Toronto, Ontario, and Montreal, Quebec.

And Canada Makes 15
Today’s launch brings our global footprint to 15 Regions and 40 Availability Zones, with seven more Availability Zones and three more Regions coming online through the next year. As a reminder, each Region is a physical location where we have two or more Availability Zones or AZs. Each Availability Zone, in turn, consists of one or more data centers, each with redundant power, networking, and connectivity, all housed in separate facilities. Having two or more AZ’s in each Region gives you the ability to run applications that are more highly available, fault tolerant, and durable than would be the case if you were limited to a single AZ.

For more information about current and future AWS Regions, take a look at the AWS Global Infrastructure page.

Jeff;


Région AWS Canada (Centre) Maintenant Ouverte

Nous étendons la portée d’AWS une fois de plus. Notre nouvelle Région du Canada (Centre) est maintenant disponible et vous pouvez commencer à l’utiliser dès aujourd’hui. Les clients d’AWS au Canada et dans les régions du nord des États-Unis ont un accès rapide et à latence réduite à l’ensemble des services d’infrastructure AWS.

Les détails
La nouvelle Région du Canada (Centre) supporte Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) et les services associés incluant Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, Elastic Load Balancing, NAT Gateway, Spot Instances et Dedicated Hosts.

Également supportés sont Amazon Aurora, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, Amazon CloudFront, AWS CloudHSM, AWS CloudTrail, Amazon CloudWatch, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Direct Connect, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon ECS, EC2 Container Registry, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon EMR, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Glacier, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS Snowball, AWS Key Management Service (KMS), Amazon Kinesis, AWS Marketplace, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Route 53, AWS Shield Standard, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Trusted Advisor, VM Import/Export, et AWS WAF.

La région supporte toutes les tailles des instances C4, D2, M4, T2 et X1.

Dans le cadre de notre mission continue de vous offrir des services infonuagiques de manière écologique, les centres de données d’AWS au Canada sont alimentés par un réseau électrique dont 99 pour cent de l’énergie fournie est de nature hydroélectrique (consultez AWS Sustainability pour en savoir plus).

Bien connecté
Après avoir reçu beaucoup de commentaires positifs sur les mesures de latence du réseau dont je vous ai fait part lorsque nous avons lancé la région AWS en Ohio, je suis heureux de vous faire part d’un nouvel ensemble de mesures dans le cadre du lancement d’aujourd’hui (ces mesures représentent une limite inférieure à la latence et pourraient changer au fil du temps).

Le premier ensemble de mesures concerne d’autres villes canadiennes:

  • 9 ms à Toronto.
  • 14 ms à Ottawa.
  • 47 ms à Calgary.
  • 49 ms à Edmonton.
  • 60 ms à Vancouver.

Le deuxième ensemble concerne des emplacements aux États-Unis :

  • 9 ms à New York.
  • 19 ms à Chicago.
  • 16 ms à USA Est (Virginie du Nord).
  • 27 ms à USA Est (Ohio).
  • 75 ms à USA Ouest (Oregon).

Le Canada compte également des emplacements périphériques CloudFront à Toronto, en Ontario, et à Montréal, au Québec.

Et le Canada fait 15
Le lancement d’aujourd’hui porte notre présence mondiale à 15 régions et 40 zones de disponibilité avec sept autres zones de disponibilité et trois autres régions qui seront mises en opération au cours de la prochaine année. Pour vous rafraîchir la mémoire, chaque région est un emplacement physique où nous avons deux ou plusieurs zones de disponibilité. Chaque zone de disponibilité, à son tour, comprend un ou plusieurs centres de données, chacun doté d’une alimentation, d’une mise en réseau et d’une connectivité redondantes dans des installations distinctes. Avoir deux zones de disponibilité ou plus dans chaque région vous donne la possibilité d’opérer des applications qui sont plus disponibles, plus tolérantes aux pannes et plus durables qu’elles ne le seraient si vous étiez limité à une seule zone de disponibilité.

Pour plus d’informations sur les régions AWS actuelles et futures, consultez la page Infrastructure mondiale AWS.

Jeff;

Friday, December 2: Security and Compliance Sessions Today at re:Invent

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/friday-december-2-security-and-compliance-sessions-today-at-reinvent/

re:Invent stage photo

Today, the following security and compliance sessions will be presented at AWS re:Invent 2016 in Las Vegas (all times local). See the re:Invent Session Catalog for complete information about every session. You can also download the AWS re:Invent 2016 Event App for the latest updates and information.

If you are not attending re:Invent 2016, keep in mind that all videos of and slide decks from these sessions will be made available next week. We will publish a post on the Security Blog next week that links to all videos and slide decks from security and compliance sessions.

9:00 A.M.

9:30 A.M.

10:30 A.M.

11:00 A.M.

12:30 P.M.

– Craig

AWS Shield – Protect your Applications from DDoS Attacks

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-shield-protect-your-applications-from-ddos-attacks/

The online world can be an unfriendly place! As soon as you put a web site online, it can become the target of many different types of attacks, all aimed at causing trouble and taking the site offline. DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attacks are one very common trouble spot. They draw on compromised resources all over the web and focus their activities on a designated target.

There are three common types of DDoS attacks:

Application-Layer Attacks consist of well-formed but malicious requests (HTTP GETs and DNS queries are popular) that are designed to consume application resources. For example, opening up multiple HTTP connections and reading the responses over the course of many seconds or minutes will consume excessive memory and prevent legitimate requests from being serviced.

State-Exhaustion Attacks abuse stateful protocols and cause stress on firewalls and load balancers by consuming large numbers of per-connection resources.

Volumetric Attacks disrupt networks by flooding them with more traffic than they can handle or by issuing fake queries that will flood an unsuspecting victim with a surprising amount of low-level “surprise” replies (also known as Reflection attacks).

New – AWS Shield
AWS Shield is a new managed service that protects your web applications against DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attacks. It works in conjunction with Elastic Load Balancing, Amazon CloudFront, and Amazon Route 53 and protects you from DDoS attacks of many types, shapes, and sizes. There are two tiers of service:

AWS Shield Standard is available to all AWS customers at no extra cost. It protects you from 96% of the most common attacks today, including SYN/ACK floods, Reflection attacks, and HTTP slow reads. This protection is applied automatically and transparently to your Elastic Load Balancers, CloudFront distributions, and Route 53 resources.

AWS Shield Advanced provides additional DDoS mitigation capability for volumetric attacks, intelligent attack detection, and mitigation for attacks at the application & network layers. You get 24×7 access to our DDoS Response Team (DRT) for custom mitigation during attacks, advanced real time metrics and reports, and DDoS cost protection to guard against bill spikes in the aftermath of a DDoS attack.

To learn more, read about AWS Shield or Get Started with AWS Shield Advanced.

Jeff;