Tag Archives: dashboard

Troubleshooting event publishing issues in Amazon SES

Post Syndicated from Dustin Taylor original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/ses/troubleshooting-event-publishing-issues-in-amazon-ses/

Over the past year, we’ve released several features that make it easier to track the metrics that are associated with your Amazon SES account. The first of these features, launched in November of last year, was event publishing.

Initially, event publishing let you capture basic metrics related to your email sending and publish them to other AWS services, such as Amazon CloudWatch and Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose. Some examples of these basic metrics include the number of emails that were sent and delivered, as well as the number that bounced or received complaints. A few months ago, we expanded this feature by adding engagement metrics—specifically, information about the number of emails that your customers opened or engaged with by clicking links.

As a former Cloud Support Engineer, I’ve seen Amazon SES customers do some amazing things with event publishing, but I’ve also seen some common issues. In this article, we look at some of these issues, and discuss the steps you can take to resolve them.

Before we begin

This post assumes that your Amazon SES account is already out of the sandbox, that you’ve verified an identity (such as an email address or domain), and that you have the necessary permissions to use Amazon SES and the service that you’ll publish event data to (such as Amazon SNS, CloudWatch, or Kinesis Data Firehose).

We also assume that you’re familiar with the process of creating configuration sets and specifying event destinations for those configuration sets. For more information, see Using Amazon SES Configuration Sets in the Amazon SES Developer Guide.

Amazon SNS event destinations

If you want to receive notifications when events occur—such as when recipients click a link in an email, or when they report an email as spam—you can use Amazon SNS as an event destination.

Occasionally, customers ask us why they’re not receiving notifications when they use an Amazon SNS topic as an event destination. One of the most common reasons for this issue is that they haven’t configured subscriptions for their Amazon SNS topic yet.

A single topic in Amazon SNS can have one or more subscriptions. When you subscribe to a topic, you tell that topic which endpoints (such as email addresses or mobile phone numbers) to contact when it receives a notification. If you haven’t set up any subscriptions, nothing will happen when an email event occurs.

For more information about setting up topics and subscriptions, see Getting Started in the Amazon SNS Developer Guide. For information about publishing Amazon SES events to Amazon SNS topics, see Set Up an Amazon SNS Event Destination for Amazon SES Event Publishing in the Amazon SES Developer Guide.

Kinesis Data Firehose event destinations

If you want to store your Amazon SES event data for the long term, choose Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose as a destination for Amazon SES events. With Kinesis Data Firehose, you can stream data to Amazon S3 or Amazon Redshift for storage and analysis.

The process of setting up Kinesis Data Firehose as an event destination is similar to the process for setting up Amazon SNS: you choose the types of events (such as deliveries, opens, clicks, or bounces) that you want to export, and the name of the Kinesis Data Firehose stream that you want to export to. However, there’s one important difference. When you set up a Kinesis Data Firehose event destination, you must also choose the IAM role that Amazon SES uses to send event data to Kinesis Data Firehose.

When you set up the Kinesis Data Firehose event destination, you can choose to have Amazon SES create the IAM role for you automatically. For many users, this is the best solution—it ensures that the IAM role has the appropriate permissions to move event data from Amazon SES to Kinesis Data Firehose.

Customers occasionally run into issues with the Kinesis Data Firehose event destination when they use an existing IAM role. If you use an existing IAM role, or create a new role for this purpose, make sure that the role includes the firehose:PutRecord and firehose:PutRecordBatch permissions. If the role doesn’t include these permissions, then the Amazon SES event data isn’t published to Kinesis Data Firehose. For more information, see Controlling Access with Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose in the Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose Developer Guide.

CloudWatch event destinations

By publishing your Amazon SES event data to Amazon CloudWatch, you can create dashboards that track your sending statistics in real time, as well as alarms that notify you when your event metrics reach certain thresholds.

The amount that you’re charged for using CloudWatch is based on several factors, including the number of metrics you use. In order to give you more control over the specific metrics you send to CloudWatch—and to help you avoid unexpected charges—you can limit the email sending events that are sent to CloudWatch.

When you choose CloudWatch as an event destination, you must choose a value source. The value source can be one of three options: a message tag, a link tag, or an email header. After you choose a value source, you then specify a name and a value. When you send an email using a configuration set that refers to a CloudWatch event destination, it only sends the metrics for that email to CloudWatch if the email contains the name and value that you specified as the value source. This requirement is commonly overlooked.

For example, assume that you chose Message Tag as the value source, and specified “CategoryId” as the dimension name and “31415” as the dimension value. When you want to send events for an email to CloudWatch, you must specify the name of the configuration set that uses the CloudWatch destination. You must also include a tag in your message. The name of the tag must be “CategoryId” and the value must be “31415”.

For more information about adding tags and email headers to your messages, see Send Email Using Amazon SES Event Publishing in the Amazon SES Developer Guide. For more information about adding tags to links, see Amazon SES Email Sending Metrics FAQs in the Amazon SES Developer Guide.

Troubleshooting event publishing for open and click data

Occasionally, customers ask why they’re not seeing open and click data for their emails. This issue most often occurs when the customer only sends text versions of their emails. Because of the way Amazon SES tracks open and click events, you can only see open and click data for emails that are sent as HTML. For more information about how Amazon SES modifies your emails when you enable open and click tracking, see Amazon SES Email Sending Metrics FAQs in the Amazon SES Developer Guide.

The process that you use to send HTML emails varies based on the email sending method you use. The Code Examples section of the Amazon SES Developer Guide contains examples of several methods of sending email by using the Amazon SES SMTP interface or an AWS SDK. All of the examples in this section include methods for sending HTML (as well as text-only) emails.

If you encounter any issues that weren’t covered in this post, please open a case in the Support Center and we’d be more than happy to assist.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 33

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2018/02/09/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-33/

Welcome to TimeShift The big news this week of course, was the release of Grafana 5.0 beta. This is the largest Grafana release since the project’s launch and we’re extremely excited to receive feedback from the community. Some of the bigger features include teams, dashboard folders, and permissions, but we tried to look at even little things like cleaning up icons, taking a look at the default graph color palette, and reworking the light theme.

Give Your WordPress Blog a Voice With Our New Amazon Polly Plugin

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/give-your-wordpress-blog-a-voice-with-our-new-amazon-polly-plugin/

I first told you about Polly in late 2016 in my post Amazon Polly – Text to Speech in 47 Voices and 24 Languages. After that AWS re:Invent launch, we added support for Korean, five new voices, and made Polly available in all Regions in the aws partition. We also added whispering, speech marks, a timbre effect, and dynamic range compression.

New WordPress Plugin
Today we are launching a WordPress plugin that uses Polly to create high-quality audio versions of your blog posts. You can access the audio from within the post or in podcast form using a feature that we call Amazon Pollycast! Both options make your content more accessible and can help you to reach a wider audience. This plugin was a joint effort between the AWS team our friends at AWS Advanced Technology Partner WP Engine.

As you will see, the plugin is easy to install and configure. You can use it with installations of WordPress that you run on your own infrastructure or on AWS. Either way, you have access to all of Polly’s voices along with a wide variety of configuration options. The generated audio (an MP3 file for each post) can be stored alongside your WordPress content, or in Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), with optional support for content distribution via Amazon CloudFront.

Installing the Plugin
I did not have an existing WordPress-powered blog, so I begin by launching a Lightsail instance using the WordPress 4.8.1 blueprint:

Then I follow these directions to access my login credentials:

Credentials in hand, I log in to the WordPress Dashboard:

The plugin makes calls to AWS, and needs to have credentials in order to do so. I hop over to the IAM Console and created a new policy. The policy allows the plugin to access a carefully selected set of S3 and Polly functions (find the full policy in the README):

Then I create an IAM user (wp-polly-user). I enter the name and indicate that it will be used for Programmatic Access:

Then I attach the policy that I just created, and click on Review:

I review my settings (not shown) and then click on Create User. Then I copy the two values (Access Key ID and Secret Access Key) into a secure location. Possession of these keys allows the bearer to make calls to AWS so I take care not to leave them lying around.

Now I am ready to install the plugin! I go back to the WordPress Dashboard and click on Add New in the Plugins menu:

Then I click on Upload Plugin and locate the ZIP file that I downloaded from the WordPress Plugins site. After I find it I click on Install Now to proceed:

WordPress uploads and installs the plugin. Now I click on Activate Plugin to move ahead:

With the plugin installed, I click on Settings to set it up:

I enter my keys and click on Save Changes:

The General settings let me control the sample rate, voice, player position, the default setting for new posts, and the autoplay option. I can leave all of the settings as-is to get started:

The Cloud Storage settings let me store audio in S3 and to use CloudFront to distribute the audio:

The Amazon Pollycast settings give me control over the iTunes parameters that are included in the generated RSS feed:

Finally, the Bulk Update button lets me regenerate all of the audio files after I change any of the other settings:

With the plugin installed and configured, I can create a new post. As you can see, the plugin can be enabled and customized for each post:

I can see how much it will cost to convert to audio with a click:

When I click on Publish, the plugin breaks the text into multiple blocks on sentence boundaries, calls the Polly SynthesizeSpeech API for each block, and accumulates the resulting audio in a single MP3 file. The published blog post references the file using the <audio> tag. Here’s the post:

I can’t seem to use an <audio> tag in this post, but you can download and play the MP3 file yourself if you’d like.

The Pollycast feature generates an RSS file with links to an MP3 file for each post:

Pricing
The plugin will make calls to Amazon Polly each time the post is saved or updated. Pricing is based on the number of characters in the speech requests, as described on the Polly Pricing page. Also, the AWS Free Tier lets you process up to 5 million characters per month at no charge, for a period of one year that starts when you make your first call to Polly.

Going Further
The plugin is available on GitHub in source code form and we are looking forward to your pull requests! Here are a couple of ideas to get you started:

Voice Per Author – Allow selection of a distinct Polly voice for each author.

Quoted Text – For blogs that make frequent use of embedded quotes, use a distinct voice for the quotes.

Translation – Use Amazon Translate to translate the texts into another language, and then use Polly to generate audio in that language.

Other Blogging Engines – Build a similar plugin for your favorite blogging engine.

SSML Support – Figure out an interesting way to use Polly’s SSML tags to add additional character to the audio.

Let me know what you come up with!

Jeff;

 

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 30

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2018/01/19/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-30/

Welcome to TimeShift

We’re only 6 weeks away from the next GrafanaCon and here at Grafana Labs we’re buzzing with excitement. We have some great talks lined up that you won’t want to miss.

This week’s TimeShift covers Grafana’s annotation functionality, monitoring with Prometheus, integrating Grafana with NetFlow and a peek inside Stream’s monitoring stack. Enjoy!


Latest Stable Release

Grafana 4.6.3 is now available. Latest bugfixes include:

  • Gzip: Fixes bug Gravatar images when gzip was enabled #5952
  • Alert list: Now shows alert state changes even after adding manual annotations on dashboard #99513
  • Alerting: Fixes bug where rules evaluated as firing when all conditions was false and using OR operator. #93183
  • Cloudwatch: CloudWatch no longer display metrics’ default alias #101514, thx @mtanda

Download Grafana 4.6.3 Now


From the Blogosphere

Walkthrough: Watch your Ansible deployments in Grafana!: Your graphs start spiking and your platform begins behaving abnormally. Did the config change in a deployment, causing the problem? This article covers Grafana’s new annotation functionality, and specifically, how to create deployment annotations via Ansible playbooks.

Application Monitoring in OpenShift with Prometheus and Grafana: There are many article describing how to monitor OpenShift with Prometheus running in the same cluster, but what if you don’t have admin permissions to the cluster you need to monitor?

Spring Boot Metrics Monitoring Using Prometheus & Grafana: As the title suggests, this post walks you through how to configure Prometheus and Grafana to monitor you Spring Boot application metrics.

How to Integrate Grafana with NetFlow: Learn how to monitor NetFlow from Scrutinizer using Grafana’s SimpleJSON data source.

Stream & Go: News Feeds for Over 300 Million End Users: Stream lets you build scalable newsfeeds and activity streams via their API, which is used by more than 300 million end users. In this article, they discuss their monitoring stack and why they chose particular components and technologies.


GrafanaCon EU Tickets are Going Fast!

We’re six weeks from kicking off GrafanaCon EU! Join us for talks from Google, Bloomberg, Tinder, eBay and more! You won’t want to miss two great days of open source monitoring talks and fun in Amsterdam. Get your tickets before they sell out!

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

We have a couple of plugin updates to share this week that add some new features and improvements. Updating your plugins is easy. For on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, or update with 1 click on your Hosted Grafana.

UPDATED PLUGIN

Druid Data Source – This new update is packed with new features. Notable enhancement include:

  • Post Aggregation feature
  • Support for thetaSketch
  • Improvements to the Query editor

Update Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

Breadcrumb Panel – The Breadcrumb Panel is a small panel you can include in your dashboard that tracks other dashboards you have visited – making it easy to navigate back to a previously visited dashboard. The latest release adds support for dashboards loaded from a file.

Update Now


Upcoming Events

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

SnowCamp 2018: Yves Brissaud – Application metrics with Prometheus and Grafana | Grenoble, France – Jan 24, 2018:
We’ll take a look at how Prometheus, Grafana and a bit of code make it possible to obtain temporal data to visualize the state of our applications as well as to help with development and debugging.

Register Now

Women Who Go Berlin: Go Workshop – Monitoring and Troubleshooting using Prometheus and Grafana | Berlin, Germany – Jan 31, 2018: In this workshop we will learn about one of the most important topics in making apps production ready: Monitoring. We will learn how to use tools you’ve probably heard a lot about – Prometheus and Grafana, and using what we learn we will troubleshoot a particularly buggy Go app.

Register Now

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. There is no need to register; all are welcome.

Jfokus | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 5-7, 2018:
Carl Bergquist – Quickie: Monitoring? Not OPS Problem

Why should we monitor our system? Why can’t we just rely on the operations team anymore? They use to be able to do that. What’s currently changing? Presentation content: – Why do we monitor our system – How did it use to work? – Whats changing – Why do we need to shift focus – Everyone should be on call. – Resilience is the goal (Best way of having someone care about quality is to make them responsible).

Register Now

Jfokus | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 5-7, 2018:
Leonard Gram – Presentation: DevOps Deconstructed

What’s a Site Reliability Engineer and how’s that role different from the DevOps engineer my boss wants to hire? I really don’t want to be on call, should I? Is Docker the right place for my code or am I better of just going straight to Serverless? And why should I care about any of it? I’ll try to answer some of these questions while looking at what DevOps really is about and how commodisation of servers through “the cloud” ties into it all. This session will be an opinionated piece from a developer who’s been on-call for the past 6 years and would like to convince you to do the same, at least once.

Register Now

Stockholm Metrics and Monitoring | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 7, 2018:
Observability 3 ways – Logging, Metrics and Distributed Tracing

Let’s talk about often confused telemetry tools: Logging, Metrics and Distributed Tracing. We’ll show how you capture latency using each of the tools and how they work differently. Through examples and discussion, we’ll note edge cases where certain tools have advantages over others. By the end of this talk, we’ll better understand how each of Logging, Metrics and Distributed Tracing aids us in different ways to understand our applications.

Register Now

OpenNMS – Introduction to “Grafana” | Webinar – Feb 21, 2018:
IT monitoring helps detect emerging hardware damage and performance bottlenecks in the enterprise network before any consequential damage or disruption to business processes occurs. The powerful open-source OpenNMS software monitors a network, including all connected devices, and provides logging of a variety of data that can be used for analysis and planning purposes. In our next OpenNMS webinar on February 21, 2018, we introduce “Grafana” – a web-based tool for creating and displaying dashboards from various data sources, which can be perfectly combined with OpenNMS.

Register Now


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

As we say with pie charts, use emojis wisely 😉


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

That wraps up our 30th issue of TimeShift. What do you think? Are there other types of content you’d like to see here? Submit a comment on this issue below, or post something at our community forum.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 29

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2018/01/12/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-29/

Welcome to TimeShift

intro paragraph


Latest Stable Release

Grafana 4.6.3 is now available. Latest bugfixes include:

  • Gzip: Fixes bug Gravatar images when gzip was enabled #5952
  • Alert list: Now shows alert state changes even after adding manual annotations on dashboard #99513
  • Alerting: Fixes bug where rules evaluated as firing when all conditions was false and using OR operator. #93183
  • Cloudwatch: CloudWatch no longer display metrics’ default alias #101514, thx @mtanda

Download Grafana 4.6.3 Now


From the Blogosphere

Graphite 1.1: Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks: Grafana Labs’ own Dan Cech is a contributor to the Graphite project, and has been instrumental in the addition of some of the newest features. This article discusses five of the biggest additions, how they work, and what you can expect for the future of the project.

Instrument an Application Using Prometheus and Grafana: Chris walks us through how easy it is to get useful metrics from an application to understand bottlenecks and performace. In this article, he shares an application he built that indexes your Gmail account into Elasticsearch, and sends the metrics to Prometheus. Then, he shows you how to set up Grafana to get meaningful graphs and dashboards.

Visualising Serverless Metrics With Grafana Dashboards: Part 3 in this series of blog posts on “Monitoring Serverless Applications Metrics” starts with an overview of Grafana and the UI, covers queries and templating, then dives into creating some great looking dashboards. The series plans to conclude with a post about setting up alerting.

Huawei FAT WLAN Access Points in Grafana: Huawei’s FAT firmware for their WLAN Access points lacks central management overview. To get a sense of the performance of your AP’s, why not quickly create a templated dashboard in Grafana? This article quickly steps your through the process, and includes a sample dashboard.


Grafana Plugins

Lots of updated plugins this week. Plugin authors add new features and fix bugs often, to make your plugin perform better – so it’s important to keep your plugins up to date. We’ve made updating easy; for on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, or update with 1 click if you’re using Hosted Grafana.

UPDATED PLUGIN

Clickhouse Data Source – The Clickhouse Data Source plugin has been updated a few times with small fixes during the last few weeks.

  • Fix for quantile functions
  • Allow rounding with round option for both time filters: $from and $to

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Zabbix App – The Zabbix App had a release with a redesign of the Triggers panel as well as support for Multiple data sources for the triggers panel

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

OpenHistorian Data Source – this data source plugin received some new query builder screens and improved documentation.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

BT Status Dot Panel – This panel received a small bug fix.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Carpet Plot Panel – A recent update for this panel fixes a D3 import bug.

Update


Upcoming Events

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

Women Who Go Berlin: Go Workshop – Monitoring and Troubleshooting using Prometheus and Grafana | Berlin, Germany – Jan 31, 2018: In this workshop we will learn about one of the most important topics in making apps production ready: Monitoring. We will learn how to use tools you’ve probably heard a lot about – Prometheus and Grafana, and using what we learn we will troubleshoot a particularly buggy Go app.

Register Now

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. There is no need to register; all are welcome.

Jfokus | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 5-7, 2018:
Carl Bergquist – Quickie: Monitoring? Not OPS Problem

Why should we monitor our system? Why can’t we just rely on the operations team anymore? They use to be able to do that. What’s currently changing? Presentation content: – Why do we monitor our system – How did it use to work? – Whats changing – Why do we need to shift focus – Everyone should be on call. – Resilience is the goal (Best way of having someone care about quality is to make them responsible).

Register Now

Jfokus | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 5-7, 2018:
Leonard Gram – Presentation: DevOps Deconstructed

What’s a Site Reliability Engineer and how’s that role different from the DevOps engineer my boss wants to hire? I really don’t want to be on call, should I? Is Docker the right place for my code or am I better of just going straight to Serverless? And why should I care about any of it? I’ll try to answer some of these questions while looking at what DevOps really is about and how commodisation of servers through “the cloud” ties into it all. This session will be an opinionated piece from a developer who’s been on-call for the past 6 years and would like to convince you to do the same, at least once.

Register Now

Stockholm Metrics and Monitoring | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 7, 2018:
Observability 3 ways – Logging, Metrics and Distributed Tracing

Let’s talk about often confused telemetry tools: Logging, Metrics and Distributed Tracing. We’ll show how you capture latency using each of the tools and how they work differently. Through examples and discussion, we’ll note edge cases where certain tools have advantages over others. By the end of this talk, we’ll better understand how each of Logging, Metrics and Distributed Tracing aids us in different ways to understand our applications.

Register Now

OpenNMS – Introduction to “Grafana” | Webinar – Feb 21, 2018:
IT monitoring helps detect emerging hardware damage and performance bottlenecks in the enterprise network before any consequential damage or disruption to business processes occurs. The powerful open-source OpenNMS software monitors a network, including all connected devices, and provides logging of a variety of data that can be used for analysis and planning purposes. In our next OpenNMS webinar on February 21, 2018, we introduce “Grafana” – a web-based tool for creating and displaying dashboards from various data sources, which can be perfectly combined with OpenNMS.

Register Now

GrafanaCon EU | Amsterdam, Netherlands – March 1-2, 2018:
Lock in your seat for GrafanaCon EU while there are still tickets avaialable! Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

We have some exciting talks lined up from Google, CERN, Bloomberg, eBay, Red Hat, Tinder, Automattic, Prometheus, InfluxData, Percona and more! Be sure to get your ticket before they’re sold out.

Learn More


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

Nice hack! I know I like to keep one eye on server requests when I’m dropping beats. 😉


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Thanks for reading another issue of timeShift. Let us know what you think! Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

12 B2 Power Tips for Experts and Developers

Post Syndicated from Roderick Bauer original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/advanced-cloud-storage-tips/

B2 Tips for Pros
If you’ve been using B2 Cloud Storage for a while, you probably think you know all that you can do with it. But do you?

We’ve put together a list of blazing power tips for experts and developers that will take you to the next level. Take a look below.

If you’re new to B2, we have a list of power tips for you, too.
Visit 12 Power Tips for New B2 Users.
Backblaze logo

1    Manage File Versions

Use Lifecycle Rules on a Bucket to set how many days to keep files that are no longer the current version. This is a great way to manage the amount of space your B2 account is using.

Backblaze logo

2    Easily Stay on Top of Your B2 Account Limits

Set usage caps and get text/email alerts for your B2 account when you approach limits that you define.

Backblaze logo

3    Bring on Your Big Files

You can upload files as large as 10TB to B2.

Backblaze logo

4    You Can Use FedEx to Get Your Data into B2

If you have over 20TB of data, you can use Backblaze’s Fireball hard disk array to load large volumes of data directly into your B2 account. We ship a Fireball to you and you ship it back.

Backblaze logo

5    You Have Command-Line Control of All B2 Functions

You have complete control over B2 using our command line tool that is available for Macintosh, Windows, and Linux.

Backblaze logo

6    You Can Use Your Own Domain Name To Front a Public B2 Bucket

You can create a vanity URL for your B2 account.

Backblaze logo

7    See What’s Happening in Your Account with Graphical Reports

You can view graphical reports summarizing your B2 usage — transactions, downloads, averages, data stored — in your B2 account dashboard.

Backblaze logo

8    Create a B2 SDK

You can build your own B2 SDK for JVM-based or JVM-compatible languages using our B2 Java SDK on Github.

Backblaze logo

9    B2’s API is Easy to Use

B2’s API is similar to, but simpler than Amazon’s S3 API, making it super easy for developers to integrate with B2 Cloud Storage.

Backblaze logo

10    View Code Examples To Get Your B2 Project Started

The B2 API is well documented and has code examples for cURL, Java, Python, Swift, Ruby, C#, and PHP. For example, here’s how to create a B2 Bucket.

Backblaze logo

11    Developers can set the B2 part size as low as 5 MB

When working with large files, the minimum file part size can be set as low as 5MB or as high as 5GB. This gives developers the ability to maximize the throughput of B2 data uploads and downloads. See Large Files and Downloading for more developer tips.

Backblaze logo

12    Your App or Device Can Work with B2, as well

Your B2 integration can be listed on Backblaze’s website. Visit Submit an Integration to get started.

Want to Learn More About B2?

You can find more information on B2 on our website and in our help pages.

The post 12 B2 Power Tips for Experts and Developers appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Combine Transactional and Analytical Data Using Amazon Aurora and Amazon Redshift

Post Syndicated from Re Alvarez-Parmar original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/combine-transactional-and-analytical-data-using-amazon-aurora-and-amazon-redshift/

A few months ago, we published a blog post about capturing data changes in an Amazon Aurora database and sending it to Amazon Athena and Amazon QuickSight for fast analysis and visualization. In this post, I want to demonstrate how easy it can be to take the data in Aurora and combine it with data in Amazon Redshift using Amazon Redshift Spectrum.

With Amazon Redshift, you can build petabyte-scale data warehouses that unify data from a variety of internal and external sources. Because Amazon Redshift is optimized for complex queries (often involving multiple joins) across large tables, it can handle large volumes of retail, inventory, and financial data without breaking a sweat.

In this post, we describe how to combine data in Aurora in Amazon Redshift. Here’s an overview of the solution:

  • Use AWS Lambda functions with Amazon Aurora to capture data changes in a table.
  • Save data in an Amazon S3
  • Query data using Amazon Redshift Spectrum.

We use the following services:

Serverless architecture for capturing and analyzing Aurora data changes

Consider a scenario in which an e-commerce web application uses Amazon Aurora for a transactional database layer. The company has a sales table that captures every single sale, along with a few corresponding data items. This information is stored as immutable data in a table. Business users want to monitor the sales data and then analyze and visualize it.

In this example, you take the changes in data in an Aurora database table and save it in Amazon S3. After the data is captured in Amazon S3, you combine it with data in your existing Amazon Redshift cluster for analysis.

By the end of this post, you will understand how to capture data events in an Aurora table and push them out to other AWS services using AWS Lambda.

The following diagram shows the flow of data as it occurs in this tutorial:

The starting point in this architecture is a database insert operation in Amazon Aurora. When the insert statement is executed, a custom trigger calls a Lambda function and forwards the inserted data. Lambda writes the data that it received from Amazon Aurora to a Kinesis data delivery stream. Kinesis Data Firehose writes the data to an Amazon S3 bucket. Once the data is in an Amazon S3 bucket, it is queried in place using Amazon Redshift Spectrum.

Creating an Aurora database

First, create a database by following these steps in the Amazon RDS console:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console, and open the Amazon RDS console.
  2. Choose Launch a DB instance, and choose Next.
  3. For Engine, choose Amazon Aurora.
  4. Choose a DB instance class. This example uses a small, since this is not a production database.
  5. In Multi-AZ deployment, choose No.
  6. Configure DB instance identifier, Master username, and Master password.
  7. Launch the DB instance.

After you create the database, use MySQL Workbench to connect to the database using the CNAME from the console. For information about connecting to an Aurora database, see Connecting to an Amazon Aurora DB Cluster.

The following screenshot shows the MySQL Workbench configuration:

Next, create a table in the database by running the following SQL statement:

Create Table
CREATE TABLE Sales (
InvoiceID int NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
ItemID int NOT NULL,
Category varchar(255),
Price double(10,2), 
Quantity int not NULL,
OrderDate timestamp,
DestinationState varchar(2),
ShippingType varchar(255),
Referral varchar(255),
PRIMARY KEY (InvoiceID)
)

You can now populate the table with some sample data. To generate sample data in your table, copy and run the following script. Ensure that the highlighted (bold) variables are replaced with appropriate values.

#!/usr/bin/python
import MySQLdb
import random
import datetime

db = MySQLdb.connect(host="AURORA_CNAME",
                     user="DBUSER",
                     passwd="DBPASSWORD",
                     db="DB")

states = ("AL","AK","AZ","AR","CA","CO","CT","DE","FL","GA","HI","ID","IL","IN",
"IA","KS","KY","LA","ME","MD","MA","MI","MN","MS","MO","MT","NE","NV","NH","NJ",
"NM","NY","NC","ND","OH","OK","OR","PA","RI","SC","SD","TN","TX","UT","VT","VA",
"WA","WV","WI","WY")

shipping_types = ("Free", "3-Day", "2-Day")

product_categories = ("Garden", "Kitchen", "Office", "Household")
referrals = ("Other", "Friend/Colleague", "Repeat Customer", "Online Ad")

for i in range(0,10):
    item_id = random.randint(1,100)
    state = states[random.randint(0,len(states)-1)]
    shipping_type = shipping_types[random.randint(0,len(shipping_types)-1)]
    product_category = product_categories[random.randint(0,len(product_categories)-1)]
    quantity = random.randint(1,4)
    referral = referrals[random.randint(0,len(referrals)-1)]
    price = random.randint(1,100)
    order_date = datetime.date(2016,random.randint(1,12),random.randint(1,30)).isoformat()

    data_order = (item_id, product_category, price, quantity, order_date, state,
    shipping_type, referral)

    add_order = ("INSERT INTO Sales "
                   "(ItemID, Category, Price, Quantity, OrderDate, DestinationState, \
                   ShippingType, Referral) "
                   "VALUES (%s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s)")

    cursor = db.cursor()
    cursor.execute(add_order, data_order)

    db.commit()

cursor.close()
db.close() 

The following screenshot shows how the table appears with the sample data:

Sending data from Amazon Aurora to Amazon S3

There are two methods available to send data from Amazon Aurora to Amazon S3:

  • Using a Lambda function
  • Using SELECT INTO OUTFILE S3

To demonstrate the ease of setting up integration between multiple AWS services, we use a Lambda function to send data to Amazon S3 using Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose.

Alternatively, you can use a SELECT INTO OUTFILE S3 statement to query data from an Amazon Aurora DB cluster and save it directly in text files that are stored in an Amazon S3 bucket. However, with this method, there is a delay between the time that the database transaction occurs and the time that the data is exported to Amazon S3 because the default file size threshold is 6 GB.

Creating a Kinesis data delivery stream

The next step is to create a Kinesis data delivery stream, since it’s a dependency of the Lambda function.

To create a delivery stream:

  1. Open the Kinesis Data Firehose console
  2. Choose Create delivery stream.
  3. For Delivery stream name, type AuroraChangesToS3.
  4. For Source, choose Direct PUT.
  5. For Record transformation, choose Disabled.
  6. For Destination, choose Amazon S3.
  7. In the S3 bucket drop-down list, choose an existing bucket, or create a new one.
  8. Enter a prefix if needed, and choose Next.
  9. For Data compression, choose GZIP.
  10. In IAM role, choose either an existing role that has access to write to Amazon S3, or choose to generate one automatically. Choose Next.
  11. Review all the details on the screen, and choose Create delivery stream when you’re finished.

 

Creating a Lambda function

Now you can create a Lambda function that is called every time there is a change that needs to be tracked in the database table. This Lambda function passes the data to the Kinesis data delivery stream that you created earlier.

To create the Lambda function:

  1. Open the AWS Lambda console.
  2. Ensure that you are in the AWS Region where your Amazon Aurora database is located.
  3. If you have no Lambda functions yet, choose Get started now. Otherwise, choose Create function.
  4. Choose Author from scratch.
  5. Give your function a name and select Python 3.6 for Runtime
  6. Choose and existing or create a new Role, the role would need to have access to call firehose:PutRecord
  7. Choose Next on the trigger selection screen.
  8. Paste the following code in the code window. Change the stream_name variable to the Kinesis data delivery stream that you created in the previous step.
  9. Choose File -> Save in the code editor and then choose Save.
import boto3
import json

firehose = boto3.client('firehose')
stream_name = ‘AuroraChangesToS3’


def Kinesis_publish_message(event, context):
    
    firehose_data = (("%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s\n") %(event['ItemID'], 
    event['Category'], event['Price'], event['Quantity'],
    event['OrderDate'], event['DestinationState'], event['ShippingType'], 
    event['Referral']))
    
    firehose_data = {'Data': str(firehose_data)}
    print(firehose_data)
    
    firehose.put_record(DeliveryStreamName=stream_name,
    Record=firehose_data)

Note the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of this Lambda function.

Giving Aurora permissions to invoke a Lambda function

To give Amazon Aurora permissions to invoke a Lambda function, you must attach an IAM role with appropriate permissions to the cluster. For more information, see Invoking a Lambda Function from an Amazon Aurora DB Cluster.

Once you are finished, the Amazon Aurora database has access to invoke a Lambda function.

Creating a stored procedure and a trigger in Amazon Aurora

Now, go back to MySQL Workbench, and run the following command to create a new stored procedure. When this stored procedure is called, it invokes the Lambda function you created. Change the ARN in the following code to your Lambda function’s ARN.

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS CDC_TO_FIREHOSE;
DELIMITER ;;
CREATE PROCEDURE CDC_TO_FIREHOSE (IN ItemID VARCHAR(255), 
									IN Category varchar(255), 
									IN Price double(10,2),
                                    IN Quantity int(11),
                                    IN OrderDate timestamp,
                                    IN DestinationState varchar(2),
                                    IN ShippingType varchar(255),
                                    IN Referral  varchar(255)) LANGUAGE SQL 
BEGIN
  CALL mysql.lambda_async('arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:XXXXXXXXXXXXX:function:CDCFromAuroraToKinesis', 
     CONCAT('{ "ItemID" : "', ItemID, 
            '", "Category" : "', Category,
            '", "Price" : "', Price,
            '", "Quantity" : "', Quantity, 
            '", "OrderDate" : "', OrderDate, 
            '", "DestinationState" : "', DestinationState, 
            '", "ShippingType" : "', ShippingType, 
            '", "Referral" : "', Referral, '"}')
     );
END
;;
DELIMITER ;

Create a trigger TR_Sales_CDC on the Sales table. When a new record is inserted, this trigger calls the CDC_TO_FIREHOSE stored procedure.

DROP TRIGGER IF EXISTS TR_Sales_CDC;
 
DELIMITER ;;
CREATE TRIGGER TR_Sales_CDC
  AFTER INSERT ON Sales
  FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
  SELECT  NEW.ItemID , NEW.Category, New.Price, New.Quantity, New.OrderDate
  , New.DestinationState, New.ShippingType, New.Referral
  INTO @ItemID , @Category, @Price, @Quantity, @OrderDate
  , @DestinationState, @ShippingType, @Referral;
  CALL  CDC_TO_FIREHOSE(@ItemID , @Category, @Price, @Quantity, @OrderDate
  , @DestinationState, @ShippingType, @Referral);
END
;;
DELIMITER ;

If a new row is inserted in the Sales table, the Lambda function that is mentioned in the stored procedure is invoked.

Verify that data is being sent from the Lambda function to Kinesis Data Firehose to Amazon S3 successfully. You might have to insert a few records, depending on the size of your data, before new records appear in Amazon S3. This is due to Kinesis Data Firehose buffering. To learn more about Kinesis Data Firehose buffering, see the “Amazon S3” section in Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose Data Delivery.

Every time a new record is inserted in the sales table, a stored procedure is called, and it updates data in Amazon S3.

Querying data in Amazon Redshift

In this section, you use the data you produced from Amazon Aurora and consume it as-is in Amazon Redshift. In order to allow you to process your data as-is, where it is, while taking advantage of the power and flexibility of Amazon Redshift, you use Amazon Redshift Spectrum. You can use Redshift Spectrum to run complex queries on data stored in Amazon S3, with no need for loading or other data prep.

Just create a data source and issue your queries to your Amazon Redshift cluster as usual. Behind the scenes, Redshift Spectrum scales to thousands of instances on a per-query basis, ensuring that you get fast, consistent performance even as your dataset grows to beyond an exabyte! Being able to query data that is stored in Amazon S3 means that you can scale your compute and your storage independently. You have the full power of the Amazon Redshift query model and all the reporting and business intelligence tools at your disposal. Your queries can reference any combination of data stored in Amazon Redshift tables and in Amazon S3.

Redshift Spectrum supports open, common data types, including CSV/TSV, Apache Parquet, SequenceFile, and RCFile. Files can be compressed using gzip or Snappy, with other data types and compression methods in the works.

First, create an Amazon Redshift cluster. Follow the steps in Launch a Sample Amazon Redshift Cluster.

Next, create an IAM role that has access to Amazon S3 and Athena. By default, Amazon Redshift Spectrum uses the Amazon Athena data catalog. Your cluster needs authorization to access your external data catalog in AWS Glue or Athena and your data files in Amazon S3.

In the demo setup, I attached AmazonS3FullAccess and AmazonAthenaFullAccess. In a production environment, the IAM roles should follow the standard security of granting least privilege. For more information, see IAM Policies for Amazon Redshift Spectrum.

Attach the newly created role to the Amazon Redshift cluster. For more information, see Associate the IAM Role with Your Cluster.

Next, connect to the Amazon Redshift cluster, and create an external schema and database:

create external schema if not exists spectrum_schema
from data catalog 
database 'spectrum_db' 
region 'us-east-1'
IAM_ROLE 'arn:aws:iam::XXXXXXXXXXXX:role/RedshiftSpectrumRole'
create external database if not exists;

Don’t forget to replace the IAM role in the statement.

Then create an external table within the database:

 CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE IF NOT EXISTS spectrum_schema.ecommerce_sales(
  ItemID int,
  Category varchar,
  Price DOUBLE PRECISION,
  Quantity int,
  OrderDate TIMESTAMP,
  DestinationState varchar,
  ShippingType varchar,
  Referral varchar)
ROW FORMAT DELIMITED
      FIELDS TERMINATED BY ','
LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'
LOCATION 's3://{BUCKET_NAME}/CDC/'

Query the table, and it should contain data. This is a fact table.

select top 10 * from spectrum_schema.ecommerce_sales

 

Next, create a dimension table. For this example, we create a date/time dimension table. Create the table:

CREATE TABLE date_dimension (
  d_datekey           integer       not null sortkey,
  d_dayofmonth        integer       not null,
  d_monthnum          integer       not null,
  d_dayofweek                varchar(10)   not null,
  d_prettydate        date       not null,
  d_quarter           integer       not null,
  d_half              integer       not null,
  d_year              integer       not null,
  d_season            varchar(10)   not null,
  d_fiscalyear        integer       not null)
diststyle all;

Populate the table with data:

copy date_dimension from 's3://reparmar-lab/2016dates' 
iam_role 'arn:aws:iam::XXXXXXXXXXXX:role/redshiftspectrum'
DELIMITER ','
dateformat 'auto';

The date dimension table should look like the following:

Querying data in local and external tables using Amazon Redshift

Now that you have the fact and dimension table populated with data, you can combine the two and run analysis. For example, if you want to query the total sales amount by weekday, you can run the following:

select sum(quantity*price) as total_sales, date_dimension.d_season
from spectrum_schema.ecommerce_sales 
join date_dimension on spectrum_schema.ecommerce_sales.orderdate = date_dimension.d_prettydate 
group by date_dimension.d_season

You get the following results:

Similarly, you can replace d_season with d_dayofweek to get sales figures by weekday:

With Amazon Redshift Spectrum, you pay only for the queries you run against the data that you actually scan. We encourage you to use file partitioning, columnar data formats, and data compression to significantly minimize the amount of data scanned in Amazon S3. This is important for data warehousing because it dramatically improves query performance and reduces cost.

Partitioning your data in Amazon S3 by date, time, or any other custom keys enables Amazon Redshift Spectrum to dynamically prune nonrelevant partitions to minimize the amount of data processed. If you store data in a columnar format, such as Parquet, Amazon Redshift Spectrum scans only the columns needed by your query, rather than processing entire rows. Similarly, if you compress your data using one of the supported compression algorithms in Amazon Redshift Spectrum, less data is scanned.

Analyzing and visualizing Amazon Redshift data in Amazon QuickSight

Modify the Amazon Redshift security group to allow an Amazon QuickSight connection. For more information, see Authorizing Connections from Amazon QuickSight to Amazon Redshift Clusters.

After modifying the Amazon Redshift security group, go to Amazon QuickSight. Create a new analysis, and choose Amazon Redshift as the data source.

Enter the database connection details, validate the connection, and create the data source.

Choose the schema to be analyzed. In this case, choose spectrum_schema, and then choose the ecommerce_sales table.

Next, we add a custom field for Total Sales = Price*Quantity. In the drop-down list for the ecommerce_sales table, choose Edit analysis data sets.

On the next screen, choose Edit.

In the data prep screen, choose New Field. Add a new calculated field Total Sales $, which is the product of the Price*Quantity fields. Then choose Create. Save and visualize it.

Next, to visualize total sales figures by month, create a graph with Total Sales on the x-axis and Order Data formatted as month on the y-axis.

After you’ve finished, you can use Amazon QuickSight to add different columns from your Amazon Redshift tables and perform different types of visualizations. You can build operational dashboards that continuously monitor your transactional and analytical data. You can publish these dashboards and share them with others.

Final notes

Amazon QuickSight can also read data in Amazon S3 directly. However, with the method demonstrated in this post, you have the option to manipulate, filter, and combine data from multiple sources or Amazon Redshift tables before visualizing it in Amazon QuickSight.

In this example, we dealt with data being inserted, but triggers can be activated in response to an INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE trigger.

Keep the following in mind:

  • Be careful when invoking a Lambda function from triggers on tables that experience high write traffic. This would result in a large number of calls to your Lambda function. Although calls to the lambda_async procedure are asynchronous, triggers are synchronous.
  • A statement that results in a large number of trigger activations does not wait for the call to the AWS Lambda function to complete. But it does wait for the triggers to complete before returning control to the client.
  • Similarly, you must account for Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose limits. By default, Kinesis Data Firehose is limited to a maximum of 5,000 records/second. For more information, see Monitoring Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose.

In certain cases, it may be optimal to use AWS Database Migration Service (AWS DMS) to capture data changes in Aurora and use Amazon S3 as a target. For example, AWS DMS might be a good option if you don’t need to transform data from Amazon Aurora. The method used in this post gives you the flexibility to transform data from Aurora using Lambda before sending it to Amazon S3. Additionally, the architecture has the benefits of being serverless, whereas AWS DMS requires an Amazon EC2 instance for replication.

For design considerations while using Redshift Spectrum, see Using Amazon Redshift Spectrum to Query External Data.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Capturing Data Changes in Amazon Aurora Using AWS Lambda and 10 Best Practices for Amazon Redshift Spectrum


About the Authors

Re Alvarez-Parmar is a solutions architect for Amazon Web Services. He helps enterprises achieve success through technical guidance and thought leadership. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time with his two kids and exploring outdoors.

 

 

 

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 28

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2018/01/05/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-28/

Happy new year! Grafana Labs is getting back in the swing of things after taking some time off to celebrate 2017, and spending time with family and friends. We’re diligently working on the new Grafana v5.0 release (planning v5.0 beta release by end of January), which includes a ton of new features, a new layout engine, and a polished UI. We’d love to hear your feedback!


Latest Stable Release

Grafana 4.6.3 is now available. Latest bugfixes include:

  • Gzip: Fixes bug Gravatar images when gzip was enabled #5952
  • Alert list: Now shows alert state changes even after adding manual annotations on dashboard #99513
  • Alerting: Fixes bug where rules evaluated as firing when all conditions was false and using OR operator. #93183
  • Cloudwatch: CloudWatch no longer display metrics’ default alias #101514, thx @mtanda

Download Grafana 4.6.3 Now


From the Blogosphere

Why Observability Matters – Now and in the Future: Our own Carl Bergquist teamed up with Neil Gehani, Director of Product at Weaveworks to discuss best practices on how to get started with monitoring your application and infrastructure. This video focuses on modern containerized applications instrumented to use Prometheus to generate metrics and Grafana to visualize them.

How to Install and Secure Grafana on Ubuntu 16.04: In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to install and secure Grafana with a SSL certificate and a Nginx reverse proxy, then you’ll modify Grafana’s default settings for even tighter security.

Monitoring Informix with Grafana: Ben walks us through how to use Grafana to visualize data from IBM Informix and offers a practical demonstration using Docker containers. He also talks about his philosophy of sharing dashboards across teams, important metrics to collect, and how he would like to improve his monitoring stack.

Monitor your hosts with Glances + InfluxDB + Grafana: Glances is a cross-platform system monitoring tool written in Python. This article takes you step by step through the pieces of the stack, installation, confirguration and provides a sample dashboard to get you up and running.


GrafanaCon Tickets are Going Fast!

Lock in your seat for GrafanaCon EU while there are still tickets avaialable! Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

We have some exciting talks lined up from Google, CERN, Bloomberg, eBay, Red Hat, Tinder, Fastly, Automattic, Prometheus, InfluxData, Percona and more! You can see the full list of speakers below, but be sure to get your ticket now.

Get Your Ticket Now

GrafanaCon EU will feature talks from:

“Google Bigtable”
Misha Brukman
PROJECT MANAGER,
GOOGLE CLOUD
GOOGLE

“Monitoring at Bloomberg”
Stig Sorensen
HEAD OF TELEMETRY
BLOOMBERG

“Monitoring at Bloomberg”
Sean Hanson
SOFTWARE DEVELOPER
BLOOMBERG

“Monitoring Tinder’s Billions of Swipes with Grafana”
Utkarsh Bhatnagar
SR. SOFTWARE ENGINEER
TINDER

“Grafana at CERN”
Borja Garrido
PROJECT ASSOCIATE
CERN

“Monitoring the Huge Scale at Automattic”
Abhishek Gahlot
SOFTWARE ENGINEER
Automattic

“Real-time Engagement During the 2016 US Presidential Election”
Anna MacLachlan
CONTENT MARKETING MANAGER
Fastly

“Real-time Engagement During the 2016 US Presidential Election”
Gerlando Piro
FRONT END DEVELOPER
Fastly

“Grafana v5 and the Future”
Torkel Odegaard
CREATOR | PROJECT LEAD
GRAFANA

“Prometheus for Monitoring Metrics”
Brian Brazil
FOUNDER
ROBUST PERCEPTION

“What We Learned Integrating Grafana with Prometheus”
Peter Zaitsev
CO-FOUNDER | CEO
PERCONA

“The Biz of Grafana”
Raj Dutt
CO-FOUNDER | CEO
GRAFANA LABS

“What’s New In Graphite”
Dan Cech
DIR, PLATFORM SERVICES
GRAFANA LABS

“The Design of IFQL, the New Influx Functional Query Language”
Paul Dix
CO-FOUNTER | CTO
INFLUXDATA

“Writing Grafana Dashboards with Jsonnet”
Julien Pivotto
OPEN SOURCE CONSULTANT
INUITS

“Monitoring AI Platform at eBay”
Deepak Vasthimal
MTS-2 SOFTWARE ENGINEER
EBAY

“Running a Power Plant with Grafana”
Ryan McKinley
DEVELOPER
NATEL ENERGY

“Performance Metrics and User Experience: A “Tinder” Experience”
Susanne Greiner
DATA SCIENTIST
WÜRTH PHOENIX S.R.L.

“Analyzing Performance of OpenStack with Grafana Dashboards”
Alex Krzos
SENIOR SOFTWARE ENGINEER
RED HAT INC.

“Storage Monitoring at Shell Upstream”
Arie Jan Kraai
STORAGE ENGINEER
SHELL TECHNICAL LANDSCAPE SERVICE

“The RED Method: How To Instrument Your Services”
Tom Wilkie
FOUNDER
KAUSAL

“Grafana Usage in the Quality Assurance Process”
Andrejs Kalnacs
LEAD SOFTWARE DEVELOPER IN TEST
EVOLUTION GAMING

“Using Prometheus and Grafana for Monitoring my Power Usage”
Erwin de Keijzer
LINUX ENGINEER
SNOW BV

“Weather, Power & Market Forecasts with Grafana”
Max von Roden
DATA SCIENTIST
ENERGY WEATHER

“Weather, Power & Market Forecasts with Grafana”
Steffen Knott
HEAD OF IT
ENERGY WEATHER

“Inherited Technical Debt – A Tale of Overcoming Enterprise Inertia”
Jordan J. Hamel
HEAD OF MONITORING PLATFORMS
AMGEN

“Grafanalib: Dashboards as Code”
Jonathan Lange
VP OF ENGINEERING
WEAVEWORKS

“The Journey of Shifting the MQTT Broker HiveMQ to Kubernetes”
Arnold Bechtoldt
SENIOR SYSTEMS ENGINEER
INOVEX

“Graphs Tell Stories”
Blerim Sheqa
SENIOR DEVELOPER
NETWAYS

[email protected] or How to Store Millions of Metrics per Second”
Vladimir Smirnov
SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR
Booking.com


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. There is no need to register; all are welcome.

Jfokus | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 5-7, 2018:
Carl Bergquist – Quickie: Monitoring? Not OPS Problem

Why should we monitor our system? Why can’t we just rely on the operations team anymore? They use to be able to do that. What’s currently changing? Presentation content: – Why do we monitor our system – How did it use to work? – Whats changing – Why do we need to shift focus – Everyone should be on call. – Resilience is the goal (Best way of having someone care about quality is to make them responsible).

Register Now

Jfokus | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 5-7, 2018:
Leonard Gram – Presentation: DevOps Deconstructed

What’s a Site Reliability Engineer and how’s that role different from the DevOps engineer my boss wants to hire? I really don’t want to be on call, should I? Is Docker the right place for my code or am I better of just going straight to Serverless? And why should I care about any of it? I’ll try to answer some of these questions while looking at what DevOps really is about and how commodisation of servers through “the cloud” ties into it all. This session will be an opinionated piece from a developer who’s been on-call for the past 6 years and would like to convince you to do the same, at least once.

Register Now

Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

Awesome! Let us know if you have any questions – we’re happy to help out. We also have a bunch of screencasts to help you get going.


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

That’s a wrap! Let us know what you think about timeShift. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. See you next year!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

12 B2 Power Tips for New Users

Post Syndicated from Roderick Bauer original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/newbie-cloud-storage-guide/

B2 Tips for Beginners
You probably know that B2 is Backblaze’s fast and economical general purpose cloud storage, but do you know everything that you can do with it?

If you’re a B2 newbie, here are some blazing power tips to help you get the most out of B2 Cloud Storage.

If you’re a B2 expert or a developer, stay tuned. We’ll be publishing power tips for you in the near future. Enter your email address using the Join button at the top of the page and you won’t miss any upcoming blog posts.
Backblaze logo

1    Drag and Drop Files to B2

Use Backblaze’s drag-and-drop web interface to store, restore, and share B2 files.

Backblaze logo

2    Share Files You Have in B2

You can designate a B2 bucket as private or public. If the bucket is public and you’d like to share a file with others, you can create and copy a Friendly URL and paste it into an email or message.

Backblaze logo

3    Use B2 Just Like Any Other Drive

Use B2 just as if it were a drive on your computer — drag and drop files and folders, save files to it — using one of a number of integrations that let you mount B2 as a volume in your Windows or Macintosh file system (Mountain Duck, ExpanDrive, odrive). Pick the files you want to save, drop them in a desktop folder, and they are automatically saved to B2.

Backblaze logo

4    Drag and Drop To and From B2 from the Desktop, Too

Use Cyberduck, a B2 integration partner, to drag-and-drop files to and from B2 right from the Windows or Macintosh desktop.

Backblaze logo

5    Determine the Speed of your Connection to B2

You can check the speed and latency of your internet connection between your location and Backblaze’s data centers, and see how much data you could theoretically transfer in a day, at https://www.backblaze.com/speedtest/.

Backblaze logo

6    No Matter What Type of Data you Have, B2 Can Handle It

You can transfer any type or amount of data to B2 from any device that can connect to the internet, including Windows, Macintosh, Linux, servers, mobile devices, external drives, and NAS.

Backblaze logo

7    Get Your Files from B2 by Mail

You have a choice of how to receive your data from B2. You can download data directly or request that your data be shipped to you via FedEx.

Backblaze logo

8    Back Up Your Backups to B2

You can automatically back up your Apple Time Machine backup or Windows backup to a NAS and then back that up to B2 to give you both local and cloud backups for a 3-2-1 backup solution.

Backblaze logo

9    Protect Your B2 Account with Two-Factor Verification

You can (and should) protect your Backblaze account with two-factor verification (such as using an app on your smartphone), and you can use backup codes and SMS verification in case you lose access to your smartphone.

Backblaze logo

10    Preview Photos Stored on B2 from the Web

Preview your photos as thumbnails (and optionally download individual photos) in common image formats (including jpg, png, img, tiff, and gif) with the B2 web interface.

Backblaze logo

11    B2 Has Group Management, Too

Backblaze Groups works for B2, too — just like Backblaze Personal Backup and Business Backup. You can manage billing, group membership, and control access using Group Management in your Backblaze account dashboard.

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12    B2 Integrations Make B2 More Powerful and Useful

There are over 30+ software and hardware integrations that make B2 more powerful. You can visit our integrations page to find a solution that works for you.

Want to Learn More About B2?

You can find more information on B2 on our website and in our help pages.

The post 12 B2 Power Tips for New Users appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

HiveMQ 3.3.2 released

Post Syndicated from The HiveMQ Team original https://www.hivemq.com/blog/hivemq-3-3-2-released/

The HiveMQ team is pleased to announce the availability of HiveMQ 3.3.2. This is a maintenance release for the 3.3 series and brings the following improvements:

  • Improved unsubscribe performance
  • Webinterface now shows a warning if different HiveMQ versions are in a cluster
  • At Startup HiveMQ shows the enabled cipher suites and protocols for TLS listeners in the log
  • The Web UI Dashboard now shows MQTT Publishes instead of all MQTT messages in the graphs
  • Updated integrated native SSL/TLS library to latest version
  • Improved message ordering while the cluster topology changes
  • Fixed a cosmetic NullPointerException with background cleanup jobs
  • Fixed an issue where Web UI Popups could not be closed on IE/Edge and Safari
  • Fixed an issue which could lead to an IllegalArgumentException with a QoS 0 message in a rare edge-case
  • Improved persistence migrations for updating single HiveMQ deployments
  • Fixed a reference counting issue
  • Fixed an issue with rolling upgrades if the AsyncMetricService is used while the update is in progress

You can download the new HiveMQ version here.

We recommend to upgrade if you are an HiveMQ 3.3.x user.

Have a great day,
The HiveMQ Team

Now Open AWS EU (Paris) Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-eu-paris-region/

Today we are launching our 18th AWS Region, our fourth in Europe. Located in the Paris area, AWS customers can use this Region to better serve customers in and around France.

The Details
The new EU (Paris) Region provides a broad suite of AWS services including Amazon API Gateway, Amazon Aurora, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon CloudWatch, CloudWatch Events, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), EC2 Container Registry, Amazon ECS, Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon EMR, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon Glacier, Amazon Kinesis Streams, Polly, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Route 53, Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Direct Connect, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS Key Management Service (KMS), AWS Lambda, AWS Marketplace, AWS OpsWorks Stacks, AWS Personal Health Dashboard, AWS Server Migration Service, AWS Service Catalog, AWS Shield Standard, AWS Snowball, AWS Snowball Edge, AWS Snowmobile, AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Support (including AWS Trusted Advisor), Elastic Load Balancing, and VM Import.

The Paris Region supports all sizes of C5, M5, R4, T2, D2, I3, and X1 instances.

There are also four edge locations for Amazon Route 53 and Amazon CloudFront: three in Paris and one in Marseille, all with AWS WAF and AWS Shield. Check out the AWS Global Infrastructure page to learn more about current and future AWS Regions.

The Paris Region will benefit from three AWS Direct Connect locations. Telehouse Voltaire is available today. AWS Direct Connect will also become available at Equinix Paris in early 2018, followed by Interxion Paris.

All AWS infrastructure regions around the world are designed, built, and regularly audited to meet the most rigorous compliance standards and to provide high levels of security for all AWS customers. These include ISO 27001, ISO 27017, ISO 27018, SOC 1 (Formerly SAS 70), SOC 2 and SOC 3 Security & Availability, PCI DSS Level 1, and many more. This means customers benefit from all the best practices of AWS policies, architecture, and operational processes built to satisfy the needs of even the most security sensitive customers.

AWS is certified under the EU-US Privacy Shield, and the AWS Data Processing Addendum (DPA) is GDPR-ready and available now to all AWS customers to help them prepare for May 25, 2018 when the GDPR becomes enforceable. The current AWS DPA, as well as the AWS GDPR DPA, allows customers to transfer personal data to countries outside the European Economic Area (EEA) in compliance with European Union (EU) data protection laws. AWS also adheres to the Cloud Infrastructure Service Providers in Europe (CISPE) Code of Conduct. The CISPE Code of Conduct helps customers ensure that AWS is using appropriate data protection standards to protect their data, consistent with the GDPR. In addition, AWS offers a wide range of services and features to help customers meet the requirements of the GDPR, including services for access controls, monitoring, logging, and encryption.

From Our Customers
Many AWS customers are preparing to use this new Region. Here’s a small sample:

Societe Generale, one of the largest banks in France and the world, has accelerated their digital transformation while working with AWS. They developed SG Research, an application that makes reports from Societe Generale’s analysts available to corporate customers in order to improve the decision-making process for investments. The new AWS Region will reduce latency between applications running in the cloud and in their French data centers.

SNCF is the national railway company of France. Their mobile app, powered by AWS, delivers real-time traffic information to 14 million riders. Extreme weather, traffic events, holidays, and engineering works can cause usage to peak at hundreds of thousands of users per second. They are planning to use machine learning and big data to add predictive features to the app.

Radio France, the French public radio broadcaster, offers seven national networks, and uses AWS to accelerate its innovation and stay competitive.

Les Restos du Coeur, a French charity that provides assistance to the needy, delivering food packages and participating in their social and economic integration back into French society. Les Restos du Coeur is using AWS for its CRM system to track the assistance given to each of their beneficiaries and the impact this is having on their lives.

AlloResto by JustEat (a leader in the French FoodTech industry), is using AWS to to scale during traffic peaks and to accelerate their innovation process.

AWS Consulting and Technology Partners
We are already working with a wide variety of consulting, technology, managed service, and Direct Connect partners in France. Here’s a partial list:

AWS Premier Consulting PartnersAccenture, Capgemini, Claranet, CloudReach, DXC, and Edifixio.

AWS Consulting PartnersABC Systemes, Atos International SAS, CoreExpert, Cycloid, Devoteam, LINKBYNET, Oxalide, Ozones, Scaleo Information Systems, and Sopra Steria.

AWS Technology PartnersAxway, Commerce Guys, MicroStrategy, Sage, Software AG, Splunk, Tibco, and Zerolight.

AWS in France
We have been investing in Europe, with a focus on France, for the last 11 years. We have also been developing documentation and training programs to help our customers to improve their skills and to accelerate their journey to the AWS Cloud.

As part of our commitment to AWS customers in France, we plan to train more than 25,000 people in the coming years, helping them develop highly sought after cloud skills. They will have access to AWS training resources in France via AWS Academy, AWSome days, AWS Educate, and webinars, all delivered in French by AWS Technical Trainers and AWS Certified Trainers.

Use it Today
The EU (Paris) Region is open for business now and you can start using it today!

Jeff;

 

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 26

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/12/15/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-26/

Welcome to TimeShift

Big news this week: Grafana v5.0 has been merged into master and is available in the nightly builds! We are really excited to share this with the community, and look forward to receiving community feedback (good or bad) on the new features and enhancements. As you see in the video below, there are some big changes that aim to improve workflow, team organization, permissions, and overall user experience. Check out the video below to see it in action, and give it a spin yourself.

  • New Grid Layout Engine: Make it easier to build dashboards and enable more complex layouts
  • Dashboard Folders & Permissions
  • User Teams
  • Improved Dashboard Settings UX
  • Improved Page Design and Navigation

NOTE: That’s actually Torkel Odegaard, creator of Grafana shredding on the soundtrack!


Latest Stable Release

Grafana 4.6.3 is available and includes some bug fixes:

  • Gzip: Fixes bug Gravatar images when gzip was enabled #5952
  • Alert list: Now shows alert state changes even after adding manual annotations on dashboard #99513
  • Alerting: Fixes bug where rules evaluated as firing when all conditions was false and using OR operator. #93183
  • Cloudwatch: CloudWatch no longer display metrics’ default alias #101514, thx @mtanda

Download Grafana 4.6.3 Now


From the Blogosphere

Monitoring MySQL with Prometheus and Grafana: Julien Pivotto (who will be speaking at GrafanaCon EU), gave a great presentation last month on Monitoring MySQL with Prometheus and Grafana. You can also check out his slides.

Monitor your Docker Containers: docker stats doesn’t often give you the level of insight you need to effectively manage your containers. This article discuses how to use cAdvisor, Prometheus and Grafana to get a handle on your Docker performance.

Magento Performance Monitoring with Grafana Dashboards and Alerts: This Christmas-themed post walks you through how to monitor the performance of Magento, start building dashboards, and setup Slack alerts, all while sitting in your rocking chair, sipping eggnog.

Icinga Web2 and Grafana Working Together: This is a follow-up post about displaying service performance data from Icinga2 in Grafana. Now that we know how to list the services on a dashboard, it would be helpful to filter this list so that specific teams can know the status of services they specifically manage.

Setup of sitespeed in AWS with Peter Hedenskog: In this video, Peter Hedenskop from Wikimedia and Stefan Judis set up a video call to go over setting up sitespeed in AWS. They create a fully functional Grafana dashboard, including web performance metrics from Stefan’s personal website running in the cloud.

Deploying Grafana to Access Zabbix in Alibaba Cloud ECS: This article walks you through how to deploy Grafana on Alibaba Cloud ECS to access Zabbix to visualize performance data for your website or application.

Let’s Summarize the Test Results with Grafana Annotations + Prometheus: The engineers of NTT Communications Corporation have created something of an Advent Calendar, with new posts each day. December 14th’s post focused on Grafana’s new annotation functionality via the UI and the API.


New Speakers Added!

We have added new speakers, and talk titles to the lineup at grafanacon.org. Only a few left to include, which should be added in the next few days.

Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and many other topics.

This year we have speakers from Bloomberg, CERN, Tinder, Red Hat, Prometheus, InfluxData, Fastly, Automattic, Percona, and more!

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

This week we have a new plugin for the popular IoT platform DeviceHive, and an update to our own Kubernetes App. To install or update any plugin in an on-prem Grafana instance, use the Grafana-cli tool, or install and update with 1 click on Hosted Grafana.

NEW PLUGIN

DeviceHive is an IOT Platform and now has a data source plugin, which means you can visualize the live commands and notifications from a device.


Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

Kubernetes App – The Grafana Kubernetes App allows you to monitor your Kubernetes cluster’s performance. It includes 4 dashboards, Cluster, Node, Pod/Container and Deployment, and also comes with Intel Snap collectors that are deployed to your cluster to collect health metrics.


Update


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and we’ve heard there were some great talks submitted. There is no need to register; all are welcome.


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove


Ok, ok – This tweet isn’t showing a off a dashboard, but we can’t help but be thrilled when someone post about our poster series. We’ll be working on the fourth poster to be unveiled at GrafanaCon EU!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Let us know what you think about timeShift. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Find an article I haven’t included? Send it my way. Help us make timeShift better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

New – Amazon CloudWatch Agent with AWS Systems Manager Integration – Unified Metrics & Log Collection for Linux & Windows

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-amazon-cloudwatch-agent-with-aws-systems-manager-integration-unified-metrics-log-collection-for-linux-windows/

In the past I’ve talked about several agents, deaemons, and scripts that you could use to collect system metrics and log files for your Windows and Linux instances and on-premise services and publish them to Amazon CloudWatch. The data collected by this somewhat disparate collection of tools gave you visibility into the status and behavior of your compute resources, along with the power to take action when a value goes out of range and indicates a potential issue. You can graph any desired metrics on CloudWatch Dashboards, initiate actions via CloudWatch Alarms, and search CloudWatch Logs to find error messages, while taking advantage of our support for custom high-resolution metrics.

New Unified Agent
Today we are taking a nice step forward and launching a new, unified CloudWatch Agent. It runs in the cloud and on-premises, on Linux and Windows instances and servers, and handles metrics and log files. You can deploy it using AWS Systems Manager (SSM) Run Command, SSM State Manager, or from the CLI. Here are some of the most important features:

Single Agent – A single agent now collects both metrics and logs. This simplifies the setup process and reduces complexity.

Cross-Platform / Cross-Environment – The new agent runs in the cloud and on-premises, on 64-bit Linux and 64-bit Windows, and includes HTTP proxy server support.

Configurable – The new agent captures the most useful system metrics automatically. It can be configured to collect hundreds of others, including fine-grained metrics on sub-resources such as CPU threads, mounted filesystems, and network interfaces.

CloudWatch-Friendly – The new agent supports standard 1-minute metrics and the newer 1-second high-resolution metrics. It automatically includes EC2 dimensions such as Instance Id, Image Id, and Auto Scaling Group Name, and also supports the use of custom dimensions. All of the dimensions can be used for custom aggregation across Auto Scaling Groups, applications, and so forth.

Migration – You can easily migrate existing AWS SSM and EC2Config configurations for use with the new agent.

Installing the Agent
The CloudWatch Agent uses an IAM role when running on an EC2 instance, and an IAM user when running on an on-premises server. The role or the user must include the AmazonSSMFullAccess and AmazonEC2ReadOnlyAccess policies. Here’s my role:

I can easily add it to a running instance (this is a relatively new and very handy EC2 feature):

The SSM Agent is already running on my instance. If it wasn’t, I would follow the steps in Installing and Configuring SSM Agent to set it up.

Next, I install the CloudWatch Agent using the AWS Systems Manager:

This takes just a few seconds. Now I can use a simple wizard to set up the configuration file for the agent:

The wizard also lets me set up the log files to be monitored:

The wizard generates a JSON-format config file and stores it on the instance. It also offers me the option to upload the file to my Parameter Store so that I can deploy it to my other instances (I can also do fine-grained customization of the metrics and log collection configuration by editing the file):

Now I can start the CloudWatch Agent using Run Command, supplying the name of my configuration in the Parameter Store:

This runs in a few seconds and the agent begins to publish metrics right away. As I mentioned earlier, the agent can publish fine-grained metrics on the resources inside of or attached to an instance. For example, here are the metrics for each filesystem:

There’s a separate log stream for each monitored log file on each instance:

I can view and search it, just like I can do for any other log stream:

Now Available
The new CloudWatch Agent is available now and you can start using it today in all public AWS Regions, with AWS GovCloud (US) and the Regions in China to follow.

There’s no charge for the agent; you pay the usual CloudWatch prices for logs and custom metrics.

Jeff;

How to Manage Amazon GuardDuty Security Findings Across Multiple Accounts

Post Syndicated from Tom Stickle original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-manage-amazon-guardduty-security-findings-across-multiple-accounts/

Introduced at AWS re:Invent 2017, Amazon GuardDuty is a managed threat detection service that continuously monitors for malicious or unauthorized behavior to help you protect your AWS accounts and workloads. In an AWS Blog post, Jeff Barr shows you how to enable GuardDuty to monitor your AWS resources continuously. That blog post shows how to get started with a single GuardDuty account and provides an overview of the features of the service. Your security team, though, will probably want to use GuardDuty to monitor a group of AWS accounts continuously.

In this post, I demonstrate how to use GuardDuty to monitor a group of AWS accounts and have their findings routed to another AWS account—the master account—that is owned by a security team. The method I demonstrate in this post is especially useful if your security team is responsible for monitoring a group of AWS accounts over which it does not have direct access—known as member accounts. In this solution, I simplify the work needed to enable GuardDuty in member accounts and configure findings by simplifying the process, which I do by enabling GuardDuty in the master account and inviting member accounts.

Enable GuardDuty in a master account and invite member accounts

To get started, you must enable GuardDuty in the master account, which will receive GuardDuty findings. The master account should be managed by your security team, and it will display the findings from all member accounts. The master account can be reverted later by removing any member accounts you add to it. Adding member accounts is a two-way handshake mechanism to ensure that administrators from both the master and member accounts formally agree to establish the relationship.

To enable GuardDuty in the master account and add member accounts:

  1. Navigate to the GuardDuty console.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Accounts.
    Screenshot of the Accounts choice in the navigation pane
  1. To designate this account as the GuardDuty master account, start adding member accounts:
    • You can add individual accounts by choosing Add Account, or you can add a list of accounts by choosing Upload List (.csv).
  1. Now, add the account ID and email address of the member account, and choose Add. (If you are uploading a list of accounts, choose Browse, choose the .csv file with the member accounts [one email address and account ID per line], and choose Add accounts.)
    Screenshot of adding an account

For security reasons, AWS checks to make sure each account ID is valid and that you’ve entered each member account’s email address that was used to create the account. If a member account’s account ID and email address do not match, GuardDuty does not send an invitation.
Screenshot showing the Status of Invite

  1. After you add all the member accounts you want to add, you will see them listed in the Member accounts table with a Status of Invite. You don’t have to individually invite each account—you can choose a group of accounts and when you choose to invite one account in the group, all accounts are invited.
  2. When you choose Invite for each member account:
    1. AWS checks to make sure the account ID is valid and the email address provided is the email address of the member account.
    2. AWS sends an email to the member account email address with a link to the GuardDuty console, where the member account owner can accept the invitation. You can add a customized message from your security team. Account owners who receive the invitation must sign in to their AWS account to accept the invitation. The service also sends an invitation through the AWS Personal Health Dashboard in case the member email address is not monitored. This invitation appears in the member account under the AWS Personal Health Dashboard alert bell on the AWS Management Console.
    3. A pending-invitation indicator is shown on the GuardDuty console of the member account, as shown in the following screenshot.
      Screenshot showing the pending-invitation indicator

When the invitation is sent by email, it is sent to the account owner of the GuardDuty member account.
Screenshot of the invitation sent by email

The account owner can click the link in the email invitation or the AWS Personal Health Dashboard message, or the account owner can sign in to their account and navigate to the GuardDuty console. In all cases, the member account displays the pending invitation in the member account’s GuardDuty console with instructions for accepting the invitation. The GuardDuty console walks the account owner through accepting the invitation, including enabling GuardDuty if it is not already enabled.

If you prefer to work in the AWS CLI, you can enable GuardDuty and accept the invitation. To do this, call CreateDetector to enable GuardDuty, and then call AcceptInvitation, which serves the same purpose as accepting the invitation in the GuardDuty console.

  1. After the member account owner accepts the invitation, the Status in the master account is changed to Monitored. The status helps you track the status of each AWS account that you invite.
    Screenshot showing the Status change to Monitored

You have enabled GuardDuty on the member account, and all findings will be forwarded to the master account. You can now monitor the findings about GuardDuty member accounts from the GuardDuty console in the master account.

The member account owner can see GuardDuty findings by default and can control all aspects of the experience in the member account with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) permissions. Users with the appropriate permissions can end the multi-account relationship at any time by toggling the Accept button on the Accounts page. Note that ending the relationship changes the Status of the account to Resigned and also triggers a security finding on the side of the master account so that the security team knows the member account is no longer linked to the master account.

Working with GuardDuty findings

Most security teams have ticketing systems, chat operations, security information event management (SIEM) systems, or other security automation systems to which they would like to push GuardDuty findings. For this purpose, GuardDuty sends all findings as JSON-based messages through Amazon CloudWatch Events, a scalable service to which you can subscribe and to which AWS services can stream system events. To access these events, navigate to the CloudWatch Events console and create a rule that subscribes to the GuardDuty-related findings. You then can assign a target such as Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose that can place the findings in a number of services such as Amazon S3. The following screenshot is of the CloudWatch Events console, where I have a rule that pulls all events from GuardDuty and pushes them to a preconfigured AWS Lambda function.

Screenshot of a CloudWatch Events rule

The following example is a subset of GuardDuty findings that includes relevant context and information about the nature of a threat that was detected. In this example, the instanceId, i-00bb62b69b7004a4c, is performing Secure Shell (SSH) brute-force attacks against IP address 172.16.0.28. From a Lambda function, you can access any of the following fields such as the title of the finding and its description, and send those directly to your ticketing system.

Example GuardDuty findings

You can use other AWS services to build custom analytics and visualizations of your security findings. For example, you can connect Kinesis Data Firehose to CloudWatch Events and write events to an S3 bucket in a standard format, which can be encrypted with AWS Key Management Service and then compressed. You also can use Amazon QuickSight to build ad hoc dashboards by using AWS Glue and Amazon Athena. Similarly, you can place the data from Kinesis Data Firehose in Amazon Elasticsearch Service, with which you can use tools such as Kibana to build your own visualizations and dashboards.

Like most other AWS services, GuardDuty is a regional service. This means that when you enable GuardDuty in an AWS Region, all findings are generated and delivered in that region. If you are regulated by a compliance regime, this is often an important requirement to ensure that security findings remain in a specific jurisdiction. Because customers have let us know they would prefer to be able to enable GuardDuty globally and have all findings aggregated in one place, we intend to give the choice of regional or global isolation as we evolve this new service.

Summary

In this blog post, I have demonstrated how to use GuardDuty to monitor a group of GuardDuty member accounts and aggregate security findings in a central master GuardDuty account. You can use this solution whether or not you have direct control over the member accounts.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about using GuardDuty, start a thread in the GuardDuty forum or contact AWS Support.

-Tom

Managing AWS Lambda Function Concurrency

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/managing-aws-lambda-function-concurrency/

One of the key benefits of serverless applications is the ease in which they can scale to meet traffic demands or requests, with little to no need for capacity planning. In AWS Lambda, which is the core of the serverless platform at AWS, the unit of scale is a concurrent execution. This refers to the number of executions of your function code that are happening at any given time.

Thinking about concurrent executions as a unit of scale is a fairly unique concept. In this post, I dive deeper into this and talk about how you can make use of per function concurrency limits in Lambda.

Understanding concurrency in Lambda

Instead of diving right into the guts of how Lambda works, here’s an appetizing analogy: a magical pizza.
Yes, a magical pizza!

This magical pizza has some unique properties:

  • It has a fixed maximum number of slices, such as 8.
  • Slices automatically re-appear after they are consumed.
  • When you take a slice from the pizza, it does not re-appear until it has been completely consumed.
  • One person can take multiple slices at a time.
  • You can easily ask to have the number of slices increased, but they remain fixed at any point in time otherwise.

Now that the magical pizza’s properties are defined, here’s a hypothetical situation of some friends sharing this pizza.

Shawn, Kate, Daniela, Chuck, Ian and Avleen get together every Friday to share a pizza and catch up on their week. As there is just six of them, they can easily all enjoy a slice of pizza at a time. As they finish each slice, it re-appears in the pizza pan and they can take another slice again. Given the magical properties of their pizza, they can continue to eat all they want, but with two very important constraints:

  • If any of them take too many slices at once, the others may not get as much as they want.
  • If they take too many slices, they might also eat too much and get sick.

One particular week, some of the friends are hungrier than the rest, taking two slices at a time instead of just one. If more than two of them try to take two pieces at a time, this can cause contention for pizza slices. Some of them would wait hungry for the slices to re-appear. They could ask for a pizza with more slices, but then run the same risk again later if more hungry friends join than planned for.

What can they do?

If the friends agreed to accept a limit for the maximum number of slices they each eat concurrently, both of these issues are avoided. Some could have a maximum of 2 of the 8 slices, or other concurrency limits that were more or less. Just so long as they kept it at or under eight total slices to be eaten at one time. This would keep any from going hungry or eating too much. The six friends can happily enjoy their magical pizza without worry!

Concurrency in Lambda

Concurrency in Lambda actually works similarly to the magical pizza model. Each AWS Account has an overall AccountLimit value that is fixed at any point in time, but can be easily increased as needed, just like the count of slices in the pizza. As of May 2017, the default limit is 1000 “slices” of concurrency per AWS Region.

Also like the magical pizza, each concurrency “slice” can only be consumed individually one at a time. After consumption, it becomes available to be consumed again. Services invoking Lambda functions can consume multiple slices of concurrency at the same time, just like the group of friends can take multiple slices of the pizza.

Let’s take our example of the six friends and bring it back to AWS services that commonly invoke Lambda:

  • Amazon S3
  • Amazon Kinesis
  • Amazon DynamoDB
  • Amazon Cognito

In a single account with the default concurrency limit of 1000 concurrent executions, any of these four services could invoke enough functions to consume the entire limit or some part of it. Just like with the pizza example, there is the possibility for two issues to pop up:

  • One or more of these services could invoke enough functions to consume a majority of the available concurrency capacity. This could cause others to be starved for it, causing failed invocations.
  • A service could consume too much concurrent capacity and cause a downstream service or database to be overwhelmed, which could cause failed executions.

For Lambda functions that are launched in a VPC, you have the potential to consume the available IP addresses in a subnet or the maximum number of elastic network interfaces to which your account has access. For more information, see Configuring a Lambda Function to Access Resources in an Amazon VPC. For information about elastic network interface limits, see Network Interfaces section in the Amazon VPC Limits topic.

One way to solve both of these problems is applying a concurrency limit to the Lambda functions in an account.

Configuring per function concurrency limits

You can now set a concurrency limit on individual Lambda functions in an account. The concurrency limit that you set reserves a portion of your account level concurrency for a given function. All of your functions’ concurrent executions count against this account-level limit by default.

If you set a concurrency limit for a specific function, then that function’s concurrency limit allocation is deducted from the shared pool and assigned to that specific function. AWS also reserves 100 units of concurrency for all functions that don’t have a specified concurrency limit set. This helps to make sure that future functions have capacity to be consumed.

Going back to the example of the consuming services, you could set throttles for the functions as follows:

Amazon S3 function = 350
Amazon Kinesis function = 200
Amazon DynamoDB function = 200
Amazon Cognito function = 150
Total = 900

With the 100 reserved for all non-concurrency reserved functions, this totals the account limit of 1000.

Here’s how this works. To start, create a basic Lambda function that is invoked via Amazon API Gateway. This Lambda function returns a single “Hello World” statement with an added sleep time between 2 and 5 seconds. The sleep time simulates an API providing some sort of capability that can take a varied amount of time. The goal here is to show how an API that is underloaded can reach its concurrency limit, and what happens when it does.
To create the example function

  1. Open the Lambda console.
  2. Choose Create Function.
  3. For Author from scratch, enter the following values:
    1. For Name, enter a value (such as concurrencyBlog01).
    2. For Runtime, choose Python 3.6.
    3. For Role, choose Create new role from template and enter a name aligned with this function, such as concurrencyBlogRole.
  4. Choose Create function.
  5. The function is created with some basic example code. Replace that code with the following:

import time
from random import randint
seconds = randint(2, 5)

def lambda_handler(event, context):
time.sleep(seconds)
return {"statusCode": 200,
"body": ("Hello world, slept " + str(seconds) + " seconds"),
"headers":
{
"Access-Control-Allow-Headers": "Content-Type,X-Amz-Date,Authorization,X-Api-Key,X-Amz-Security-Token",
"Access-Control-Allow-Methods": "GET,OPTIONS",
}}

  1. Under Basic settings, set Timeout to 10 seconds. While this function should only ever take up to 5-6 seconds (with the 5-second max sleep), this gives you a little bit of room if it takes longer.

  1. Choose Save at the top right.

At this point, your function is configured for this example. Test it and confirm this in the console:

  1. Choose Test.
  2. Enter a name (it doesn’t matter for this example).
  3. Choose Create.
  4. In the console, choose Test again.
  5. You should see output similar to the following:

Now configure API Gateway so that you have an HTTPS endpoint to test against.

  1. In the Lambda console, choose Configuration.
  2. Under Triggers, choose API Gateway.
  3. Open the API Gateway icon now shown as attached to your Lambda function:

  1. Under Configure triggers, leave the default values for API Name and Deployment stage. For Security, choose Open.
  2. Choose Add, Save.

API Gateway is now configured to invoke Lambda at the Invoke URL shown under its configuration. You can take this URL and test it in any browser or command line, using tools such as “curl”:


$ curl https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01
Hello world, slept 2 seconds

Throwing load at the function

Now start throwing some load against your API Gateway + Lambda function combo. Right now, your function is only limited by the total amount of concurrency available in an account. For this example account, you might have 850 unreserved concurrency out of a full account limit of 1000 due to having configured a few concurrency limits already (also the 100 concurrency saved for all functions without configured limits). You can find all of this information on the main Dashboard page of the Lambda console:

For generating load in this example, use an open source tool called “hey” (https://github.com/rakyll/hey), which works similarly to ApacheBench (ab). You test from an Amazon EC2 instance running the default Amazon Linux AMI from the EC2 console. For more help with configuring an EC2 instance, follow the steps in the Launch Instance Wizard.

After the EC2 instance is running, SSH into the host and run the following:


sudo yum install go
go get -u github.com/rakyll/hey

“hey” is easy to use. For these tests, specify a total number of tests (5,000) and a concurrency of 50 against the API Gateway URL as follows(replace the URL here with your own):


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01

The output from “hey” tells you interesting bits of information:


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01

Summary:
Total: 381.9978 secs
Slowest: 9.4765 secs
Fastest: 0.0438 secs
Average: 3.2153 secs
Requests/sec: 13.0891
Total data: 140024 bytes
Size/request: 28 bytes

Response time histogram:
0.044 [1] |
0.987 [2] |
1.930 [0] |
2.874 [1803] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
3.817 [1518] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
4.760 [719] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
5.703 [917] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
6.647 [13] |
7.590 [14] |
8.533 [9] |
9.477 [4] |

Latency distribution:
10% in 2.0224 secs
25% in 2.0267 secs
50% in 3.0251 secs
75% in 4.0269 secs
90% in 5.0279 secs
95% in 5.0414 secs
99% in 5.1871 secs

Details (average, fastest, slowest):
DNS+dialup: 0.0003 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0332 secs
DNS-lookup: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0046 secs
req write: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0005 secs
resp wait: 3.2149 secs, 0.0438 secs, 9.4472 secs
resp read: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0004 secs

Status code distribution:
[200] 4997 responses
[502] 3 responses

You can see a helpful histogram and latency distribution. Remember that this Lambda function has a random sleep period in it and so isn’t entirely representational of a real-life workload. Those three 502s warrant digging deeper, but could be due to Lambda cold-start timing and the “second” variable being the maximum of 5, causing the Lambda functions to time out. AWS X-Ray and the Amazon CloudWatch logs generated by both API Gateway and Lambda could help you troubleshoot this.

Configuring a concurrency reservation

Now that you’ve established that you can generate this load against the function, I show you how to limit it and protect a backend resource from being overloaded by all of these requests.

  1. In the console, choose Configure.
  2. Under Concurrency, for Reserve concurrency, enter 25.

  1. Click on Save in the top right corner.

You could also set this with the AWS CLI using the Lambda put-function-concurrency command or see your current concurrency configuration via Lambda get-function. Here’s an example command:


$ aws lambda get-function --function-name concurrencyBlog01 --output json --query Concurrency
{
"ReservedConcurrentExecutions": 25
}

Either way, you’ve set the Concurrency Reservation to 25 for this function. This acts as both a limit and a reservation in terms of making sure that you can execute 25 concurrent functions at all times. Going above this results in the throttling of the Lambda function. Depending on the invoking service, throttling can result in a number of different outcomes, as shown in the documentation on Throttling Behavior. This change has also reduced your unreserved account concurrency for other functions by 25.

Rerun the same load generation as before and see what happens. Previously, you tested at 50 concurrency, which worked just fine. By limiting the Lambda functions to 25 concurrency, you should see rate limiting kick in. Run the same test again:


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01

While this test runs, refresh the Monitoring tab on your function detail page. You see the following warning message:

This is great! It means that your throttle is working as configured and you are now protecting your downstream resources from too much load from your Lambda function.

Here is the output from a new “hey” command:


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01
Summary:
Total: 379.9922 secs
Slowest: 7.1486 secs
Fastest: 0.0102 secs
Average: 1.1897 secs
Requests/sec: 13.1582
Total data: 164608 bytes
Size/request: 32 bytes

Response time histogram:
0.010 [1] |
0.724 [3075] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
1.438 [0] |
2.152 [811] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
2.866 [11] |
3.579 [566] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
4.293 [214] |∎∎∎
5.007 [1] |
5.721 [315] |∎∎∎∎
6.435 [4] |
7.149 [2] |

Latency distribution:
10% in 0.0130 secs
25% in 0.0147 secs
50% in 0.0205 secs
75% in 2.0344 secs
90% in 4.0229 secs
95% in 5.0248 secs
99% in 5.0629 secs

Details (average, fastest, slowest):
DNS+dialup: 0.0004 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0537 secs
DNS-lookup: 0.0002 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0184 secs
req write: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0016 secs
resp wait: 1.1892 secs, 0.0101 secs, 7.1038 secs
resp read: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0005 secs

Status code distribution:
[502] 3076 responses
[200] 1924 responses

This looks fairly different from the last load test run. A large percentage of these requests failed fast due to the concurrency throttle failing them (those with the 0.724 seconds line). The timing shown here in the histogram represents the entire time it took to get a response between the EC2 instance and API Gateway calling Lambda and being rejected. It’s also important to note that this example was configured with an edge-optimized endpoint in API Gateway. You see under Status code distribution that 3076 of the 5000 requests failed with a 502, showing that the backend service from API Gateway and Lambda failed the request.

Other uses

Managing function concurrency can be useful in a few other ways beyond just limiting the impact on downstream services and providing a reservation of concurrency capacity. Here are two other uses:

  • Emergency kill switch
  • Cost controls

Emergency kill switch

On occasion, due to issues with applications I’ve managed in the past, I’ve had a need to disable a certain function or capability of an application. By setting the concurrency reservation and limit of a Lambda function to zero, you can do just that.

With the reservation set to zero every invocation of a Lambda function results in being throttled. You could then work on the related parts of the infrastructure or application that aren’t working, and then reconfigure the concurrency limit to allow invocations again.

Cost controls

While I mentioned how you might want to use concurrency limits to control the downstream impact to services or databases that your Lambda function might call, another resource that you might be cautious about is money. Setting the concurrency throttle is another way to help control costs during development and testing of your application.

You might want to prevent against a function performing a recursive action too quickly or a development workload generating too high of a concurrency. You might also want to protect development resources connected to this function from generating too much cost, such as APIs that your Lambda function calls.

Conclusion

Concurrent executions as a unit of scale are a fairly unique characteristic about Lambda functions. Placing limits on how many concurrency “slices” that your function can consume can prevent a single function from consuming all of the available concurrency in an account. Limits can also prevent a function from overwhelming a backend resource that isn’t as scalable.

Unlike monolithic applications or even microservices where there are mixed capabilities in a single service, Lambda functions encourage a sort of “nano-service” of small business logic directly related to the integration model connected to the function. I hope you’ve enjoyed this post and configure your concurrency limits today!

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 25

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/12/08/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-25/

Welcome to TimeShift

This week, a few of us from Grafana Labs, along with 4,000 of our closest friends, headed down to chilly Austin, TX for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2017. We got to see a number of great talks and were thrilled to see Grafana make appearances in some of the presentations. We were also a sponsor of the conference and handed out a ton of swag (we overnighted some of our custom Grafana scarves, which came in handy for Thursday’s snow).

We also announced Grafana Labs has joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as a Silver member! We’re excited to share our expertise in time series data visualization and open source software with the CNCF community.


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6.2 is available and includes some bug fixes:

  • Prometheus: Fixes bug with new Prometheus alerts in Grafana. Make sure to download this version if you’re using Prometheus for alerting. More details in the issue. #9777
  • Color picker: Bug after using textbox input field to change/paste color string #9769
  • Cloudwatch: build using golang 1.9.2 #9667, thanks @mtanda
  • Heatmap: Fixed tooltip for “time series buckets” mode #9332
  • InfluxDB: Fixed query editor issue when using > or < operators in WHERE clause #9871

Download Grafana 4.6.2 Now


From the Blogosphere

Grafana Labs Joins the CNCF: Grafana Labs has officially joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). We look forward to working with the CNCF community to democratize metrics and help unify traditionally disparate information.

Automating Web Performance Regression Alerts: Peter and his team needed a faster and easier way to find web performance regressions at the Wikimedia Foundation. Grafana 4’s alerting features were exactly what they needed. This post covers their journey on setting up alerts for both RUM and synthetic testing and shares the alerts they’ve set up on their dashboards.

How To Install Grafana on Ubuntu 17.10: As you probably guessed from the title, this article walks you through installing and configuring Grafana in the latest version of Ubuntu (or earlier releases). It also covers installing plugins using the Grafana CLI tool.

Prometheus: Starting the Server with Alertmanager, cAdvisor and Grafana: Learn how to monitor Docker from scratch using cAdvisor, Prometheus and Grafana in this detailed, step-by-step walkthrough.

Monitoring Java EE Servers with Prometheus and Payara: In this screencast, Adam uses firehose; a Java EE 7+ metrics gateway for Prometheus, to convert the JSON output into Prometheus statistics and visualizes the data in Grafana.

Monitoring Spark Streaming with InfluxDB and Grafana: This article focuses on how to monitor Apache Spark Streaming applications with InfluxDB and Grafana at scale.


GrafanaCon EU, March 1-2, 2018

We are currently reaching out to everyone who submitted a talk to GrafanaCon and will soon publish the final schedule at grafanacon.org.

Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

Lots of plugin updates and a new OpenNMS Helm App plugin to announce! To install or update any plugin in an on-prem Grafana instance, use the Grafana-cli tool, or install and update with 1 click on Hosted Grafana.

NEW PLUGIN

OpenNMS Helm App – The new OpenNMS Helm App plugin replaces the old OpenNMS data source. Helm allows users to create flexible dashboards using both fault management (FM) and performance management (PM) data from OpenNMS® Horizon™ and/or OpenNMS® Meridian™. The old data source is now deprecated.


Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

PNP Data Source – This data source plugin (that uses PNP4Nagios to access RRD files) received a small, but important update that fixes template query parsing.


Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Vonage Status Panel – The latest version of the Status Panel comes with a number of small fixes and changes. Below are a few of the enhancements:

  • Threshold settings – removed Show Always option, and replaced it with 2 options:
    • Display Alias – Select when to show the metric alias.
    • Display Value – Select when to show the metric value.
  • Text format configuration (bold / italic) for warning / critical / disabled states.
  • Option to change the corner radius of the panel. Now you can change the panel’s shape to have rounded corners.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Google Calendar Plugin – This plugin received a small update, so be sure to install version 1.0.4.


Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Carpet Plot Panel – The Carpet Plot Panel received a fix for IE 11, and also added the ability to choose custom colors.


Update


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

Docker Meetup @ Tuenti | Madrid, Spain – Dec 12, 2017: Javier Provecho: Intro to Metrics with Swarm, Prometheus and Grafana

Learn how to gain visibility in real time for your micro services. We’ll cover how to deploy a Prometheus server with persistence and Grafana, how to enable metrics endpoints for various service types (docker daemon, traefik proxy and postgres) and how to scrape, visualize and set up alarms based on those metrics.

RSVP

Grafana Lyon Meetup n ° 2 | Lyon, France – Dec 14, 2017: This meetup will cover some of the latest innovations in Grafana and discussion about automation. Also, free beer and chips, so – of course you’re going!

RSVP

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and we’ve heard there were some great talks submitted. There is no need to register; all are welcome.


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

We were thrilled to see our dashboards bigger than life at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon this week. Thanks for snapping a photo and sharing!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Hard to believe this is the 25th issue of Timeshift! I have a blast writing these roundups, but Let me know what you think. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Find an article I haven’t included? Send it my way. Help us make timeShift better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 24

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/12/01/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-24/

Welcome to TimeShift

It’s hard to believe it’s already December. Here at Grafana Labs we’ve been spending a lot of time working on new features and enhancements for Grafana v5, and finalizing our selections for GrafanaCon EU. This week we have some interesting articles to share and a number of plugin updates. Enjoy!


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6.2 is now available and includes some bug fixes:

  • Prometheus: Fixes bug with new Prometheus alerts in Grafana. Make sure to download this version if you’re using Prometheus for alerting. More details in the issue. #9777
  • Color picker: Bug after using textbox input field to change/paste color string #9769
  • Cloudwatch: build using golang 1.9.2 #9667, thanks @mtanda
  • Heatmap: Fixed tooltip for “time series buckets” mode #9332
  • InfluxDB: Fixed query editor issue when using > or < operators in WHERE clause #9871

Download Grafana 4.6.2 Now


From the Blogosphere

Monitoring Camel with Prometheus in Red Hat OpenShift: This in-depth walk-through will show you how to build an Apache Camel application from scratch, deploy it in a Kubernetes environment, gather metrics using Prometheus and display them in Grafana.

How to run Grafana with DeviceHive: We see more and more examples of people using Grafana in IoT. This article discusses how to gather data from the IoT platform, DeviceHive, and build useful dashboards.

How to Install Grafana on Linux Servers: Pretty self-explanatory, but this tutorial walks you installing Grafana on Ubuntu 16.04 and CentOS 7. After installation, it covers configuration and plugin installation. This is the first article in an upcoming series about Grafana.

Monitoring your AKS cluster with Grafana: It’s important to know how your application is performing regardless of where it lives; the same applies to Kubernetes. This article focuses on aggregating data from Kubernetes with Heapster and feeding it to a backend for Grafana to visualize.

CoinStatistics: With the price of Bitcoin skyrocketing, more and more people are interested in cryptocurrencies. This is a cool dashboard that has a lot of stats about popular cryptocurrencies, and has a calculator to let you know when you can buy that lambo.

Using OpenNTI As A Collector For Streaming Telemetry From Juniper Devices: Part 1: This series will serve as a quick start guide for getting up and running with streaming real-time telemetry data from Juniper devices. This first article covers some high-level concepts and installation, while part 2 covers configuration options.

How to Get Metrics for Advance Alerting to Prevent Trouble: What good is performance monitoring if you’re never told when something has gone wrong? This article suggests ways to be more proactive to prevent issues and avoid the scramble to troubleshoot issues.

Thoughtworks: Technology Radar: We got a shout-out in the latest Technology Radar in the Tools section, as the dashboard visualization tool of choice for Prometheus!


GrafanaCon Tickets are Going Fast

Tickets are going fast for GrafanaCon EU, but we still have a seat reserved for you. Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

We have a number of plugin updates to highlight this week. Authors improve plugins regularly to fix bugs and improve performance, so it’s important to keep your plugins up to date. We’ve made updating easy; for on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, or update with 1 click if you’re using Hosted Grafana.

UPDATED PLUGIN

Clickhouse Data Source – The Clickhouse Data Source received a substantial update this week. It now has support for Ace Editor, which has a reformatting function for the query editor that automatically formats your sql. If you’re using Clickhouse then you should also have a look at CHProxy – see the plugin readme for more details.


Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Influx Admin Panel – This panel received a number of small fixes. A new version will be coming soon with some new features.

Some of the changes (see the release notes) for more details):

  • Fix issue always showing query results
  • When there is only one row, swap rows/cols (ie: SHOW DIAGNOSTICS)
  • Improve auto-refresh behavior
  • Show ‘message’ response. (ie: please use POST)
  • Fix query time sorting
  • Show ‘status’ field (killed, etc)

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Gnocchi Data Source – The latest version of the Gnocchi Data Source adds support for dynamic aggregations.


Update

UPDATED PLUGINS

BT Plugins – All of the BT panel plugins received updates this week.


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We have some awesome talks and events coming soon. Hope to see you at one of these!

KubeCon | Austin, TX – Dec. 6-8, 2017: We’re sponsoring KubeCon 2017! This is the must-attend conference for cloud native computing professionals. KubeCon + CloudNativeCon brings together leading contributors in:

  • Cloud native applications and computing
  • Containers
  • Microservices
  • Central orchestration processing
  • And more

Buy Tickets

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and we’ve heard there were some great talks submitted. There is no need to register; all are welcome.


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

YIKES! Glad it’s not – there’s good attention and bad attention.


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Let us know if you’re finding these weekly roundups valuable. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Find an article I haven’t included? Send it my way. Help us make timeShift better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Announcing Alexa for Business: Using Amazon Alexa’s Voice Enabled Devices for Workplaces

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/launch-announcing-alexa-for-business-using-amazon-alexas-voice-enabled-devices-for-workplaces/

There are only a few things more integrated into my day-to-day life than Alexa. I use my Echo device and the enabled Alexa Skills for turning on lights in my home, checking video from my Echo Show to see who is ringing my doorbell, keeping track of my extensive to-do list on a weekly basis, playing music, and lots more. I even have my family members enabling Alexa skills on their Echo devices for all types of activities that they now cannot seem to live without. My mother, who is in a much older generation (please don’t tell her I said that), uses her Echo and the custom Alexa skill I built for her to store her baking recipes. She also enjoys exploring skills that have the latest health and epicurean information. It’s no wonder then, that when I go to work I feel like something is missing. For example, I would love to be able to ask Alexa to read my flash briefing when I get to the office.

 

 

For those of you that would love to have Alexa as your intelligent assistant at work, I have exciting news. I am delighted to announce Alexa for Business, a new service that enables businesses and organizations to bring Alexa into the workplace at scale. Alexa for Business not only brings Alexa into your workday to boost your productivity, but also provides tools and resources for organizations to set up and manage Alexa devices at scale, enable private skills, and enroll users.

Making Workplaces Smarter with Alexa for Business

Alexa for Business brings the Alexa you know and love into the workplace to help all types of workers to be more productive and organized on both personal and shared Echo devices. In the workplace, shared devices can be placed in common areas for anyone to use, and workers can use their personal devices to connect at work and at home.

End users can use shared devices or personal devices. Here’s what they can do from each.

Shared devices

  1. Join meetings in conference rooms: You can simply say “Alexa, start the meeting”. Alexa turns on the video conferencing equipment, dials into your conference call, and gets the meeting going.
  2. Help around the office: access custom skills to help with directions around the office, finding an open conference room, reporting a building equipment problem, or ordering new supplies.

Personal devices

  1. Enable calling and messaging: Alexa helps make phone calls, hands free and can also send messages on your behalf.
  2. Automatically dial into conference calls: Alexa can join any meeting with a conference call number via voice from home, work, or on the go.
  3. Intelligent assistant: Alexa can quickly check calendars, help schedule meetings, manage to-do lists, and set reminders.
  4. Find information: Alexa can help find information in popular business applications like Salesforce, Concur, or Splunk.

Here are some of the controls available to administrators:

  1. Provision & Manage Shared Alexa Devices: You can provision and manage shared devices around your workplace using the Alexa for Business console. For each device you can set a location, such as a conference room designation, and assign public and private skills for the device.
  2. Configure Conference Room Settings: Kick off your meetings with a simple “Alexa, start the meeting.” Alexa for Business allows you to configure your conference room settings so you can use Alexa to start your meetings and control your conference room equipment, or dial in directly from the Amazon Echo device in the room.
  3. Manage Users: You can invite users in your organization to enroll their personal Alexa account with your Alexa for Business account. Once your users have enrolled, you can enable your custom private skills for them to use on any of the devices in their personal Alexa account, at work or at home.
  4. Manage Skills: You can assign public skills and custom private skills your organization has created to your shared devices, and make private skills available to your enrolled users.  You can create skills groups, which you can then assign to specific shared devices.
  5. Build Private Skills & Use Alexa for Business APIs:  Dig into the Alexa Skills Kit and build your own skills.  Then you can make these available to the shared devices and enrolled users in your Alexa for Business account, all without having to publish them in the public Alexa Skills Store.  Alexa for Business offers additional APIs, which you can use to add context to your skills and automate administrative tasks.

Let’s take a quick journey into Alexa for Business. I’ll first log into the AWS Console and go to the Alexa for Business service.

 

Once I log in to the service, I am presented with the Alexa for Business dashboard. As you can see, I have access to manage Rooms, Shared devices, Users, and Skills, as well as the ability to control conferencing, calendars, and user invitations.

First, I’ll start by setting up my Alexa devices. Alexa for Business provides a Device Setup Tool to setup multiple devices, connect them to your Wi-Fi network, and register them with your Alexa for Business account. This is quite different from the setup process for personal Alexa devices. With Alexa for Business, you can provision 25 devices at a time.

Once my devices are provisioned, I can create location profiles for the locations where I want to put these devices (such as in my conference rooms). We call these locations “Rooms” in our Alexa for Business console. I can go to the Room profiles menu and create a Room profile. A Room profile contains common settings for the Alexa device in your room, such as the wake word for the device, the address, time zone, unit of measurement, and whether I want to enable outbound calling.

The next step is to enable skills for the devices I set up. I can enable any skill from the Alexa Skills store, or use the private skills feature to enable skills I built myself and made available to my Alexa for Business account. To enable skills for my shared devices, I can go to the Skills menu option and enable skills. After I have enabled skills, I can add them to a skill group and assign the skill group to my rooms.

Something I really like about Alexa for Business, is that I can use Alexa to dial into conference calls. To enable this, I go to the Conferencing menu option and select Add provider. At Amazon we use Amazon Chime, but you can choose from a list of different providers, or you can even add your own provider if you want to.

Once I’ve set this up, I can say “Alexa, join my meeting”; Alexa asks for my Amazon Chime meeting ID, after which my Echo device will automatically dial into my Amazon Chime meeting. Alexa for Business also provides an intelligent way to start any meeting quickly. We’ve all been in the situation where we walk into a meeting room and can’t find the meeting ID or conference call number. With Alexa for Business, I can link to my corporate calendar, so Alexa can figure out the meeting information for me, and automatically dial in – I don’t even need my meeting ID. Here’s how you do that:

Alexa can also control the video conferencing equipment in the room. To do this, all I need to do is select the skill for the equipment that I have, select the equipment provider, and enable it for my conference rooms. Now when I ask Alexa to join my meeting, Alexa will dial-in from the equipment in the room, and turn on the video conferencing system, without me needing to do anything else.

 

Let’s switch to enrolled users next.

I’ll start by setting up the User Invitation for my organization so that I can invite users to my Alexa for Business account. To allow a user to use Alexa for Business within an organization, you invite them to enroll their personal Alexa account with the service by sending a user invitation via email from the management console. If I choose, I can customize the user enrollment email to contain additional content. For example, I can add information about my organization’s Alexa skills that can be enabled after they’ve accepted the invitation and completed the enrollment process. My users must join in order to use the features of Alexa for Business, such as auto dialing into conference calls, linking their Microsoft Exchange calendars, or using private skills.

Now that I have customized my User Invitation, I will invite users to take advantage of Alexa for Business for my organization by going to the Users menu on the Dashboard and entering their email address.  This will send an email with a link that can be used to join my organization. Users will join using the Amazon account that their personal Alexa devices are registered to. Let’s invite Jeff Barr to join my Alexa for Business organization.

After Jeff has enrolled in my Alexa for Business account, he can discover the private skills I’ve enabled for enrolled users, and he can access his work skills and join conference calls from any of his personal devices, including the Echo in his home office.

Summary

We’ve only scratched the surface in our brief review of the Alexa for Business console and service features.  You can learn more about Alexa for Business by viewing the Alexa for Business website, reading the admin and API guides in the AWS documentation, or by watching the Getting Started videos within the Alexa for Business console.

You can learn more about Alexa for Business by viewing the Alexa for Business website, watching the Alexa for Business overview video, reading the admin and API guides in the AWS documentation, or by watching the Getting Started videos within the Alexa for Business console.

Alexa, Say Goodbye and Sign off the Blog Post.”

Tara