Tag Archives: Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP

FlexGroup Volume Management for Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP is now available

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/flexgroup-volume-management-for-amazon-fsx-for-netapp-ontap-is-now-available/

You can now create, manage, and back up your Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP FlexGroup volumes using the AWS Management Console, the Amazon FSx CLI, and the AWS SDK. FlexGroups can be as large as 20 petabytes and offer greater performance for demanding workloads. Before this launch you could only create them using the ONTAP CLI and the ONTAP REST API (these options remain available). Also new to this launch is the ability to create Amazon FSx backups of your FlexGroup volumes.

FlexVol and FlexGroup
FSx for ONTAP supports two volume styles:

FlexVol – Support for up to 300 TiB of storage, making these volumes a good fit for general-purpose workloads.

FlexGroup – Support for up to 20 PiB of storage and billions of files per volume, making these volumes a good fit for more demanding electronic design automation (EDA), seismic analysis, and software build/test workloads.

Using FlexGroups
I will use the AWS Management Console to create a new file system. I select Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP, and click Next:

I select Standard create, enter a name for my file system (FS-Jeff-1), and select Single-AZ as the deployment type:

I can use the recommended throughput capacity, or I can specify it explicitly:

As you can surmise from the values above, the throughput is determined by the number of high availability (HA) pairs that will be used to host your file system. A single-AZ file system can be hosted on up to 6 such pairs; a multi-AZ file system must reside on a single pair. To learn more about these options visit New – Scale-out file systems for Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP.

After making my selections for Network & security, Encryption, and Default storage virtual machine configuration, I select the FlexGroup volume style, assign a name to the initial volume, and either accept the recommended number of constituents or specify it myself:

On the next page I review my choices and click Create file system:

The creation process is a good time for a lunch break. When I return the initial volume (Vol1) of my file system is ready to use. I can create additional FlexVol or FlexGroup volumes as needed:

Things to Know
Here are a couple of things to keep in mind about FlexGroup volumes:

Constituents – Although each FlexGroup volume can have as many as 200 constituents, we recommend 8 per HA pair. Given the 300 TiB per-constituent size limit, this allows you to create volumes with up to 2.4 PiB of storage per HA pair. ONTAP will balance your files across constituents automatically.

File Counts – If you are using NFSv3 and expect to store many billions of files on a FlexGroup volume, be sure to enable 64-bit identifiers on the storage virtual machine associated with the file system.

Backups – Starting today you can also create backups of FlexGroup volumes, giving you the same fully-managed built-in options that you already have for FlexVol volumes.

NetApp System Manager – You can use the ONTAP CLI and the browser-based NetApp System Manager to perform advanced operations on your ONTAP file systems, storage virtual machines, and volumes. The management endpoint and administrator credentials are available on the File system details page:

Regions – Both volume styles are available in all AWS Regions where Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP is supported.

Pricing – You pay for the SSD storage, SSD IOPS, and throughput capacity that you provision, with separate charges for capacity pool usage, backups, and SnapLock licensing; see the Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP Pricing page to learn more.

Jeff;

Introducing shared VPC support for Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-shared-vpc-support-for-amazon-fsx-for-netapp-ontap/

You can now create Multi-AZ FSx for ONTAP file systems in VPCs that have been shared with you by other accounts in the same AWS Organization. This highly requested feature enables a clean separation of duties between network administrators and storage administrators, and makes it possible to create storage that’s durable, highly available, and accessible from multiple VPCs.

Shared VPC support
Before today’s launch, you had the ability to create Single-AZ FSx for ONTAP file systems in subnets that were shared with you by another AWS account, as well as both Single – and Multi-AZ file systems in subnets that you own.

With today’s launch you can now do the same for file systems in multiple Availability Zones. Multi-AZ FSx for ONTAP file systems offer even higher availability than Single-AZ file systems, and are a great way to address and support large-scale enterprise storage needs. This new support for shared VPCs gives enterprises, many of which make use of multiple VPCs for technical and organizational reasons, to use FSx for ONTAP in Multi-AZ deployments, while allowing network administrators and storage administrators to work independently.

This is easy to set up, but you do need to make sure that there are no IP address conflicts between subnets that are not shared between VPCs. I don’t have an AWS Organization set up, so I will hand-wave through part of this process. As a network administrator (the owner account), I use the AWS Resource Access Manager (RAM) to share the appropriate subnets of my VPC with the desired participant accounts in my Organization:

Then I (or the administrators for those accounts) accept the resource shares.

Next, I use the new FSx for ONTAP Settings to enable route table updates from participant accounts, and click Submit (this gives the FSx ONTAP service permission to modify route table entries in shared subnets on behalf of participant accounts):

At this point, the storage administrators for the participant accounts can create Multi-AZ FSx for ONTAP file systems in the subnets that have been shared with them by the owner accounts.

There is no additional charge for this feature and it is available in all AWS Regions where FSx for ONTAP is supported.

Jeff;

AWS Week in Review – Updates on Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP, AWS Lambda, eksctl, Karpetner, and More – July 17, 2023

Post Syndicated from Channy Yun original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-updates-on-amazon-fsx-for-netapp-ontap-aws-lambda-eksctl-karpetner-and-more-july-17-2023/

The Data Centered: Eastern Oregon, a five-part mini-documentary series looking at the real-life impact of the more than $15 billion investment AWS has made in the local community, and how the company supports jobs, generates economic growth, provides skills training and education, and unlocks opportunities for local businesses suppliers.

Last week, I watched a new episode introducing the Data Center Technician training program offered by AWS to train people with little or no previous technical experience in the skills they need to work in data centers and other information technology (IT) roles. This video reminded me of my first days of cabling and transporting servers in data centers. Remember, there are still people behind cloud computing.

Last Week’s Launches
Here are some launches that got my attention:

Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP Updates – Jeff Barr introduced Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP support for SnapLock, an ONTAP feature that gives you the power to create volumes that provide write once read many (WORM) functionality for regulatory compliance and ransomware protection. In addition, FSx for NetApp ONTAP now supports IPSec encryption of data in transit and two additional monitoring and troubleshooting capabilities that you can use to monitor file system events and diagnose network connectivity.

AWS Lambda detects and stops recursive loops in Lambda functions – In certain scenarios, due to resource misconfiguration or code defects, a processed event might be sent back to the same service or resource that invoked the Lambda function. This can cause an unintended recursive loop and result in unintended usage and costs for customers. With this launch, Lambda will stop recursive invocations between Amazon SQS, Lambda, and Amazon SNS after 16 recursive calls. For more information, refer to our documentation or the launch blog post.

Email notification

Amazon CloudFront supports for 3072-bit RSA certificates – You can now associate their 3072-bit RSA certificates with CloudFront distributions to enhance communication security between clients and CloudFront edge locations. To get started, associate a 3072-bit RSA certificate with your CloudFront distribution using console or APIs. There are no additional fees associated with this feature. For more information, please refer to the CloudFront Developer Guide.

Running GitHub Actions with AWS CodeBuild – Two weeks ago, AWS CodeBuild started to support GitHub Actions. You can now define GitHub Actions steps directly in the BuildSpec and run them alongside CodeBuild commands. Last week, the AWS DevOps Blog published the blog post about using the Liquibase GitHub Action for deploying changes to an Amazon Aurora database in a private subnet. You can learn how to integrate AWS CodeBuild and nearly 20,000 GitHub Actions developed by the open source community.

CodeBuild configuration showing the GitHub repository URL

Amazon DynamoDB local version 2.0 – You can develop and test applications by running Amazon DynamoDB local in your local development environment without incurring any additional costs. The new 2.0 version allows Java developers to use DynamoDB local to work with Spring Boot 3 and frameworks such as Spring Framework 6 and Micronaut Framework 4 to build modernized, simplified, and lightweight cloud-native applications.

For a full list of AWS announcements, be sure to keep an eye on the What’s New at AWS page.

Open Source Updates
Last week, we introduced new open source projects and significant roadmap contributions to the Jupyter community.

New joint maintainership between Weaveworks and AWS for eksctl – Now the eksctl open source project has been moved from the Weaveworks GitHub organization to a new top level GitHub organization—eksctl-io—that will be jointly maintained by Weaveworks and AWS moving forward. The eksctl project can now be found on GitHub.

Karpenter now supports Windows containers – Karpenter is an open source flexible, high-performance Kubernetes node provisioning and management solution that you can use to quickly scale Amazon EKS clusters. With the launch of version 0.29.0, Karpenter extends the automated node provisioning support to Windows containers running on EKS. Read this blog post for a step-by-step guide on how to get started with Karpenter for Windows node groups.

Updates in Amazon Aurora and Amazon OpenSearch Service – Following the announcement of updates to the PostgreSQL database in May by the open source community, we’ve updated Amazon Aurora PostgreSQL-Compatible Edition to support PostgreSQL 15.3, 14.8, 13.11, 12.15, and 11.20. These releases contain product improvements and bug fixes made by the PostgreSQL community, along with Aurora-specific improvements. You can also run OpenSearch version 2.7 in Amazon OpenSearch Service. With OpenSearch 2.7 (also released in May), we’ve made several improvements to observability, security analytics, index management, and geospatial capabilities in OpenSearch Service.

To learn about weekly updates for open source at AWS, check out the latest AWS open source newsletter by Ricardo.

Upcoming AWS Events
Check your calendars and sign up for these AWS events:

AWS Storage Day on August 9 – Join a one-day virtual event that will help you to better understand AWS storage services and make the most of your data. Register today.

AWS Global Summits – Sign up for the AWS Summit closest to your city: Hong Kong (July 20), New York City (July 26), Taiwan (August 2-3), São Paulo (August 3), and Mexico City (August 30).

AWS Community Days – Join a community-led conference run by AWS user group leaders in your region: Malaysia (July 22), Philippines (July 29-30), Colombia (August 12), and West Africa (August 19).

AWS re:Invent 2023 – Join us to hear the latest from AWS, learn from experts, and connect with the global cloud community. Registration is now open.

You can browse all upcoming AWS-led in-person and virtual events, and developer-focused events such as AWS DevDay.

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That’s all for this week. Check back next Monday for another Week in Review!

Channy

This post is part of our Week in Review series. Check back each week for a quick roundup of interesting news and announcements from AWS!

New – Amazon FSx for NetAPP ONTAP Now Supports WORM Protection for Regulatory Compliance and Ransomware Protection

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-amazon-fsx-for-netapp-ontap-now-supports-worm-protection-for-regulatory-compliance-and-ransomware-protection/

Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP was launched in late 2021. With FSx for ONTAP you get the popular features, performance, and APIs of ONTAP file systems, with the agility, scalability, security, and resilience of AWS, all as a fully managed service.

Today we are adding support for SnapLock, an ONTAP feature that gives you the power to create volumes that provide Write Once Read Many (WORM) functionality. SnapLock volumes prevent modification or deletion of files within a specified retention period, and can be used to meet regulatory requirements and to protect business-critical data from ransomware attacks and other malicious attempts at alteration or deletion. FSx for ONTAP is the only cloud-based file system that supports SnapLock Compliance mode. FSx for ONTAP also supports tiering of WORM data to lower-cost storage for all SnapLock volumes.

Protecting Data with SnapLock
SnapLock gives you an additional layer of data protection, and can be thought of as part of your organization’s overall data protection strategy. When you create a volume and enable SnapLock, you choose one of the following retention modes:

Compliance – This mode is used to address mandates such as SEC Rule 17a-4(f), FINRA Rule 4511 and CFTC Regulation 1.31. You can use this mode to ensure a WORM file cannot be deleted by any user until after its retention period expires. Volumes in this mode cannot be renamed and cannot be deleted until the retention periods of all WORM files on the volume have expired.

Enterprise – This mode is used to enforce organizational data retention policies or to test retention settings before creating volumes in Compliance mode. You can use this mode to prevent most users from deleting WORM data, while allowing authorized users to perform deletions, if necessary. Volumes in this mode can be deleted even if they contain WORM files under an active retention period.

You also choose a default retention period. This period indicates the length of time that each file must be retained after it is committed to the WORM state, and can be as long as 100 years, and there’s also an Infinite option. You can also set a custom retention period for specific files or specific trees of files and it will apply to those files at the time that they are committed to the WORM state.

Files are committed to the WORM state when they become read-only (chmod -w on Linux or attrib +r on Windows). You can configure a per-volume autocommit period (5 minutes to 10 years) to automatically commit files that have remained as-is for the period, and you can also initiate a Legal Hold in Compliance mode in order to retain specific files for legal purposes.

You also have another interesting data protection and compliance option. You can create one volume without SnapLock enabled, and another one with it enabled, and then periodically replicate from the first one to the second using NetApp SnapVault. This will give you snapshot copies of entire volumes that you can retain for months, years, or decades as needed.

Speaking of interesting options, you can make use of FSx for ONTAP volume data tiering to keep active files on high-performance SSD storage and the other files on storage that is cost-optimized for data that is accessed infrequently.

Creating SnapLock Volumes
I can create new volumes and enable SnapLock with a couple of clicks. I enter the volume name, size, and path as usual:

As I mentioned earlier, I can also make use of a capacity pool (this is set to Auto by default, and I set a 10 day cooling period):

I scroll down to the Advanced section and click Enabled, then select Enterprise retention mode. I also set up my retention periods, enable autocommit after 9 days, and leave the other options as-is:

I add a tag, and click Create volume to move ahead:

I take a quick break, and when I come back my volume is ready to use:

At this point I can mount it in the usual way, create files, and allow SnapLock to do its thing!

Things to Know
Here are a couple of things that you should know about this powerful new feature:

Existing Volumes – You cannot enable this feature for an existing volume, but you can create a new, SnapLock-enabled volume, and copy or migrate the data to it.

Volume Deletion – As I noted earlier, you cannot delete a SnapLock Compliance volume if it contains WORM files with an unexpired retention period. Take care when setting this to avoid creating volumes that will last longer than needed.

Pricing – There’s an additional GB/month license charge for the use of SnapLock volumes; check out the Amazon FSx for NetAPP ONTAP Pricing page for more information.

Regions – This feature is available in all AWS Regions where Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP is available.

Jeff;

AWS Week in Review – December 12, 2022

Post Syndicated from Marcia Villalba original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-december-12-2022/

This post is part of our Week in Review series. Check back each week for a quick roundup of interesting news and announcements from AWS!

The world is asynchronous, is what Werner Vogels, Amazon CTO, reminded us during his keynote last week at AWS re:Invent. At the beginning of the keynote, he showed us how weird a synchronous world would be and how everything in nature is asynchronous. One example of an event-driven application he showcased during his keynote is Serverlesspresso, a project my team has been working on for the last year. And last week, we announced Serverlesspresso extensions, a new program that lets you contribute to Serverlesspresso and learn how event-driven applications can be extended.

Last Week’s Launches
Here are some launches that got my attention during the previous week.

Amazon SageMaker Studio now supports fine-grained data access control with AWS LakeFormation when accessing data through Amazon EMR. Now, when you connect to EMR clusters to SageMaker Studio notebooks, you can choose what runtime IAM role you want to connect with, and the notebooks will only access data and resources permitted by the attached runtime role.

Amazon Lex has now added support for Arabic, Cantonese, Norwegian, Swedish, Polish, and Finnish. This opens new possibilities to create chat bots and conversational experiences in more languages.

Amazon RDS Proxy now supports creating proxies in Amazon Aurora Global Database primary and secondary Regions. Now, building multi-Region applications with Amazon Aurora is simpler. RDS proxy sits between your application and the database pool and shares established database connections.

Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP launched many new features. First, it added the support for Nitro-based encryption of data in transit. It also extended NVMe read cache support to Single-AZ file systems. And it added four new features to ease the use of the service: easily assign a snapshot policy to your volumes, easily create data protection volumes, configure volumes so their tags are automatically copied to the backups, and finally, add or remove VPC route tables for your existing Multi-AZ file systems.

I would also like to mention two launches that happened before re:Invent but were not covered on the News Blog:

Amazon EventBridge Scheduler is a new capability from Amazon EventBridge that allows you to create, run, and manage scheduled tasks at scale. Using this new capability, you can schedule one-time or recurrent tasks across 270 AWS services.

AWS IoT RoboRunner is now generally available. Last year at re:Invent Channy wrote a blog post introducing the preview for this service. IoT RoboRunner is a robotic service that makes it easier to build and deploy applications for fleets of robots working seamlessly together.

For a full list of AWS announcements, be sure to keep an eye on the What’s New at AWS page.

Other AWS News
Some other updates and news that you may have missed:

I would like to recommend this really interesting Amazon Science article about federated learning. This is a framework that allows edge devices to work together to train a global model while keeping customers’ data on-device.

Podcast Charlas Técnicas de AWS – If you understand Spanish, this podcast is for you. Podcast Charlas Técnicas is one of the official AWS podcasts in Spanish, and every other week there is a new episode. Today the final episode for season three launched, and in it, we discussed many of the re:Invent launches. You can listen to all the episodes directly from your favorite podcast app or at AWS Podcasts en español.

AWS open-source news and updates–This is a newsletter curated by my colleague Ricardo to bring you the latest open-source projects, posts, events, and more.

Upcoming AWS Events
Check your calendars and sign up for these AWS events:

AWS Resiliency Hub Activation Day is a half-day technical virtual session to deep dive into the features and functionality of Resiliency Hub. You can register for free here.

AWS re:Invent recaps in your area. During the re:Invent week, we had lots of new announcements, and in the next weeks you can find in your area a recap of all these launches. All the events will be posted on this site, so check it regularly to find an event nearby.

AWS re:Invent keynotes, leadership sessions, and breakout sessions are available on demand. I recommend that you check the playlists and find the talks about your favorite topics in one collection.

That’s all for this week. Check back next Monday for another Week in Review!

— Marcia

AWS Week in Review – September 5, 2022

Post Syndicated from Danilo Poccia original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-september-5-2022/

This post is part of our Week in Review series. Check back each week for a quick roundup of interesting news and announcements from AWS!

As a new week begins, let’s quickly look back at the most significant AWS news from the previous seven days.

Last Week’s Launches
Here are the launches that got my attention last week:

AWS announces open-sourced credentials-fetcher to simplify Microsoft AD access from Linux containers. You can find more in the What’s New post.

AWS Step Functions now has 14 new intrinsic functions that help you process data more efficiently and make it easier to perform data processing tasks such as array manipulation, JSON object manipulation, and math functions within your workflows without having to invoke downstream services or add Task states.

AWS SAM CLI esbuild support is now generally available. You can now use esbuild in the SAM CLI build workflow for your JavaScript applications.

Amazon QuickSight launches a new user interface for dataset management that replaces the existing popup dialog modal with a full-page experience, providing a clearer breakdown of dataset management categories.

AWS GameKit adds Unity support. With this release for Unity, you can integrate cloud-based game features into Win64, MacOS, Android, or iOS games from both the Unreal and Unity engines with just a few clicks.

AWS and VMware announce VMware Cloud on AWS integration with Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP. Read more in Veliswa‘s blog post.

The AWS Region in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is now open. More info in Marcia‘s blog post.

View of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates

For a full list of AWS announcements, be sure to keep an eye on the What’s New at AWS page.

Other AWS News
A few more blog posts you might have missed:

Easy analytics and cost-optimization with Amazon Redshift Serverless – Four different use cases of Redshift Serverless are discussed in this post.

Building cost-effective AWS Step Functions workflows – In this blog post, Ben explains the difference between Standard and Express Workflows, including costs, migrating from Standard to Express, and some interesting ways of using both together.

How to subscribe to the new Security Hub Announcements topic for Amazon SNS – You can now receive updates about new Security Hub services and features, newly supported standards and controls, and other Security Hub changes.

Deploying AWS Lambda functions using AWS Controllers for Kubernetes (ACK) – With the ACK service controller for AWS Lambda, you can provision and manage Lambda functions with kubectl and custom resources.

For AWS open-source news and updates, here’s the latest newsletter curated by Ricardo to bring you the most recent updates on open-source projects, posts, events, and more.

Upcoming AWS Events
Depending on where you are on this planet, there are many opportunities to meet and learn:

AWS Summits – Come together to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS. Registration is open for the following in-person AWS Summits: Ottawa (September 8), New Delhi (September 9), Mexico City (September 21–22), Bogotá (October 4), and Singapore (October 6).

AWS Community DaysAWS Community Day events are community-led conferences to share and learn with one another. In September, the AWS community in the US will run events in the Bay Area, California (September 9) and Arlington, Virginia (September 30). In Europe, Community Day events will be held in October. Join us in Amersfoort, Netherlands (October 3), Warsaw, Poland (October 14), and Dresden, Germany (October 19).

That’s all from me for this week. Come back next Monday for another Week in Review!

Danilo

AWS and VMware Announce VMware Cloud on AWS integration with Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP

Post Syndicated from Veliswa Boya original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-and-vmware-announce-vmware-cloud-on-aws-integration-with-amazon-fsx-for-netapp-ontap/

Our customers are looking for cost-effective ways to continue to migrate their applications to the cloud. VMware Cloud on AWS is a fully managed, jointly engineered service that brings VMware’s enterprise-class, software-defined data center architecture to the cloud. VMware Cloud on AWS offers our customers the ability to run applications across operationally consistent VMware vSphere-based public, private, and hybrid cloud environments by bringing VMware’s Software-Defined Data Center (SDDC) to AWS.

In 2021, we announced the fully managed shared storage service Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP. This service provides our customers with access to the popular features, performance, and APIs of ONTAP file systems with the agility, scalability, security, and resiliency of AWS, making it easier to migrate on-premises applications that rely on network-attached storage (NAS) appliances to AWS.

Today I’m excited to announce the general availability of VMware Cloud on AWS integration with Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP. Prior to this announcement, customers could only use VMware VSAN where they could scale datastore capacity with compute. Now, they can scale storage independently and SDDCs can be scaled with the additional storage capacity that is made possible by FSx for NetApp ONTAP.

Customers can already add storage to their SDDCs by purchasing additional hosts or by adding AWS native storage services such as Amazon S3, Amazon EFS, and Amazon FSx for providing storage to virtual machines (VMs) on existing hosts. You may be thinking that nothing about this announcement is new.

Well, with this amazing integration, our customers now have the flexibility to add an external datastore option to support their growing workload needs. If you are running into storage constraints or are continually met with unplanned storage demands, this integration provides a cost-effective way to incrementally add capacity without the need to purchase more hosts. By taking advantage of external datastores through FSx for NetApp ONTAP, you have the flexibility to add more storage capacity when your workloads require it.

An Overview of VMware Cloud on AWS Integration with Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP
There are two account connectivity options for enabling storage provisioned by FSx for NetApp ONTAP to be made available for mounting as a datastore to a VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC. Both options use a dedicated Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) for the FSx file system to prevent routing conflicts.

The first option is to create a new Amazon VPC under the same connected AWS account and have it connected with the VMware-owned Shadow VPC using VMware Transit Connect. The diagram below shows the architecture of this option:

The first option is to enable storage under the same customer-owned account

The first option is to enable storage under the same AWS connected account

The second option is to create a new AWS account, which by default comes with an Amazon VPC for the Region. Similar to the first option, VMware Transit Connect is used to attach this new VPC with the VMware-owned Shadow VPC. Here is a diagram showing the architecture of this option:

The second option is to enable storage provisioned by FSx for NetApp ONTAP by creating a new AWS account

The second option is to enable storage by creating a new AWS account

Getting Started with VMware Cloud on AWS Integration with Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP
The first step is to create an FSx for NetApp ONTAP file system in your AWS account. The steps that you will follow to do this are the same, whether you’re using the first or second path to provision and mount your NFS datastore.

  1. Open the Amazon FSx service page.
  2. On the dashboard, choose Create file system to start the file system creation wizard.
  3. On the Select file system type page, select Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP, and then click Next which takes you to the Create ONTAP file system page. Here select the Standard create method.

The following video shows a complete guide on how to create an FSx for NetApp ONTAP:

The same process can be found in this FSx for ONTAP User Guide.

After the file system is created, locate the NFS IP address under the Storage virtual machines tab. The NFS IP address is the floating IP that is used to manage access between file system nodes, and it is required for configuring VMware Transit Connect.

Location of the NFS IP address under the Storage virtual machines tab - AWS console

Location of the NFS IP address under the Storage virtual machines tab – AWS console

Location of the NFS IP address under the Storage virtual machines tab - AWS console

Location of the NFS IP address under the Storage virtual machines tab – AWS console

You are done with creating the FSx for NetApp ONTAP file system, and now you need to create an SDDC group and configure VMware Transit Connect. In order to do this, you need to navigate between the VMware Cloud Console and the AWS console.

Sign in to the VMware Cloud Console, then go to the SDDC page. Here locate the Actions button and select Create SDDC Group. Once you’ve done this, provide the required data for Name (in the following example I used “FSx SDDC Group” for the name) and Description. For Membership, only include the SDDC in question.

After the SDDC Group is created, it shows up in your list of SDDC Groups. Select the SDDC Group, and then go to the External VPC tab.

External VPC tab Add Account - VMC Console

External VPC tab Add Account – VMC Console

Once you are in the External VPC tab, click the ADD ACCOUNT button, then provide the AWS account that was used to provision the FSx file system, and then click Add.

Now it’s time for you to go back to the AWS console and sign in to the same AWS account where you created your Amazon FSx file system. Here navigate to the Resource Access Manager service page and click the Accept resource share button.

Resource Access Manager service page to access the Accept resource share button - AWS console

Resource Access Manager service page to access the Accept resource share button – AWS console

Return to the VMC Console. By now, the External VPC is in an ASSOCIATED state. This can take several minutes to update.

External VPC tab - VMC Console

External VPC tab – VMC Console

Next, you need to attach a Transit Gateway to the VPC. For this, navigate back to the AWS console. A step-by-step guide can be found in the AWS Transit Gateway documentation.

The following is an example that represents a typical architecture of a VPC attached to a Transit Gateway:

A typical architecture of a VPC attached to a Transit Gateway

A typical architecture of a VPC attached to a Transit Gateway

You are almost at the end of the process. You now need to accept the transit gateway attachment and for this you will navigate back to the VMware Cloud Console.

Accept the Transit Gateway attachment as follows:

  1. Navigating back to the SDDC Group, External VPC tab, select the AWS account ID used for creating your FSx NetApp ONTAP, and click Accept. This process may take a few minutes.
  2. Next, you need to add the routes so that the SDDC can see the FSx file system. This is done on the same External VPC tab, where you will find a table with the VPC. In that table, there is a button called Add Routes. In the Add Route section, add two routes:
    1. The CIDR of the VPC where the FSx file system was deployed.
    2. The floating IP address of the file system.
  3. Click Done to complete the route task.

In the AWS console, create the route back to the SDDC by locating VPC on the VPC service page and navigating to the Route Table as seen below.

VPC service page Route Table navigation - AWS console

VPC service page Route Table navigation – AWS console

Ensure that you have the correct inbound rules for the SDDC Group CIDR by locating Security Groups under VPC and finding the Security Group that is being used (it should be the default one) to allow the inbound rules for SDDC Group CIDR.

Security Groups under VPC that is being used to allow the inbound rules for SDDC Group CIDR

Security Groups under VPC that are being used to allow the inbound rules for SDDC Group CIDR

Lastly, mount the NFS Datastore in the VMware Cloud Console as follows:

  1. Locate your SDDC.
  2. After selecting the SDDC, Navigate to the Storage Tab.
  3. Click Attach Datastore to mount the NFS volume(s).
  4. The next step is to select which hosts in the SDDC to mount the datastore to and click Mount to complete the task.
Attach a new datastore

Attach A New Datastore

Available Today
Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP is available today for VMware Cloud on AWS customers in US East (Ohio), US East (N. Virginia), US West (Oregon), Asia Pacific (Mumbai), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Canada (Central), Europe (Frankfurt), Europe (Ireland), Europe (London), Europe (Milan), Europe (Paris), Europe (Stockholm), South America (São Paulo), AWS GovCloud (US-East), and AWS GovCloud (US-West).

Veliswa x

AWS Backup Now Supports Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-backup-now-supports-amazon-fsx-for-netapp-ontap/

If you are a long-time reader of this blog, you know that I categorize some posts as “chocolate and peanut butter” in homage to an ancient (1970 or so) series of TV commercials for Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups. Today, I am happy to bring you the latest such post, combining AWS Backup and Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP. Before I dive into the specifics, let’s review each service:

AWS Backup helps you to automate and centrally manage your backups (read my post, AWS Backup – Automate and Centrally Manage Your Backups, for a detailed look). After you create policy-driven plans, you can monitor the status of on-going backups, verify compliance, and find/restore backups, all from a central console. We launched in 2019 with support for Amazon EBS volumes, Amazon EFS file systems, Amazon RDS databases, Amazon DynamoDB tables, and AWS Storage Gateway volumes. After that, we added support for EC2 instances, Amazon Aurora clusters, Amazon FSx for Lustre and Amazon FSx for Window File Server file systems, Amazon Neptune databases, VMware workloads, Amazon DocumentDB clusters, and Amazon S3.

Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP gives you the features, performance, and APIs of NetApp ONTAP file systems with the agility, scalability, security, and resiliency of AWS (again, read my post, New – Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP to learn more). ONTAP is an enterprise data management product that is designed to provide high-performance storage suitable for use with Oracle, SAP, VMware, Microsoft SQL Server, and so forth. Each file system supports multi-protocol access and can scale up to 176 PiB, along with inline data compression, deduplication, compaction, thin provisioning, replication, and point-in-time cloning. We launched with a multi-AZ deployment type, and introduced a single-AZ deployment type earlier this year.

Chocolate and Peanut Butter
AWS Backup now supports Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP file systems. All of the existing AWS Backup features apply, and you can add this support to an existing backup plan or you can create a new one.

Suppose I have a couple of ONTAP file systems:

I go to the AWS Backup Console and click Create Backup plan to get started:

I decide to Start with a template, and choose Daily-Monthly-1yr-Retention, then click Create plan:

Next, I examine the Resource assignments section of my plan and click Assign resources:

I create a resource assignment (Jeff-ONTAP-Resources), and select the FSx resource type. I can leave the assignment as-is in order to include all of my Amazon FSx volumes in the assignment, or I can uncheck All file systems, and then choose volumes on the file systems that I showed you earlier:

I review all of my choices, and click Assign resources to proceed. My backups will be performed in accord with the backup plan.

I can also create an on-demand backup. To do this, I visit the Protected resources page and click Create on-demand backup:

I choose a volume, set a one week retention period for my on-demand backup, and click Create on-demand backup:

The backup job starts within seconds, and is visible on the Backup jobs page:

After the job completes I can examine the vault and see my backup. Then I can select it and choose Restore from the Actions menu:

To restore the backup, I choose one of the file systems from it, enter a new volume name, and click Restore backup.

Also of Interest
We recently launched two new features for AWS Backup that you may find helpful. Both features can now be used in conjunction with Amazon FSx for ONTAP:

AWS Backup Audit Manager – You can use this feature to monitor and evaluate the compliance status of your backups. This can help you to meet business and regulatory requirements, and lets you generate reports that you can use to demonstrate compliance to auditors and regulators. To learn more, read Monitor, Evaluate, and Demonstrate Backup Compliance with AWS Backup Audit Manager.

AWS Backup Vault Lock – This feature lets you prevent your backups from being accidentally or maliciously deleted, and also enhances protection against ransomware. You can use this feature to make selected backup values WORM (write-once-read-many) compliant. Once you have done this, the backups in the vault cannot be modified manually. You can also set minimum and maximum retention periods for each vault. To learn more, read Enhance the security posture of your backups with AWS Backup Vault Lock.

Available Now
This new feature is available now and you can start using it today in all regions where AWS Backup and Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP are available.

Jeff;

Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP Update – New Single-AZ Deployment Type

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-fsx-for-netapp-ontap-update-new-single-az-deployment-type/

Last year I told you about Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP and showed you how you can create a file system in minutes with just a couple of clicks. You can use these high-performance, scalable (up to 176 PiB) file systems to migrate your on-premises applications to the cloud and to build new, cloud-native applications. As I noted in my original post, your file systems can have up to 192 TiB of fast, SSD-based primary storage, and many pebibytes of cost-optimized capacity pool storage. Your file systems also support many of ONTAP’s unique features including multi-protocol (NFS, SMB, and iSCSI) access, built-in deduplication & compression, cloning, and replication.

We launched Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP with a Multi-AZ deployment type that has AWS infrastructure in a pair of Availability Zones in the same AWS region, data replication between them, and automated failover/failback that is typically complete within seconds. This option has a 99.99% SLA (Service Level Agreement) for availability, and is suitable for hosting the most demanding storage workloads.

New Deployment Type
Today we are launching a new single-AZ deployment type that is designed to provide high availability and durability within an AZ, at a level similar to an on-premises file system. It is a great fit for many use cases including dev & test workloads, disaster recovery, and applications that manage their own replication. It is also a great for storing secondary copies of data that is stored elsewhere (either on-premises or AWS), or for data that can be recomputed if necessary.

The AWS infrastructure powering each single-AZ file system resides in separate fault domains within a single Availability Zone. As is the case with the multi-AZ option, the infrastructure is monitored and replaced automatically, and failover typically completes within seconds.

This new deployment type offers the same ease of use and data management capabilities as the multi-AZ option, with 50% lower storage costs and 40% lower throughput costs. File operations deliver sub-millisecond latency for SSD storage and tens of milliseconds for capacity pool storage, at up to hundreds of thousands of IOPS.

Creating a Single-AZ File System
I can create a single-AZ NetApp ONTAP file system using the Amazon FSx Console, the CLI (aws fsx create-file-system), or the Amazon FSx CreateFileSystem API function. From the console I click Create file system, select Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP, and enter a name. Then I select the Single-AZ deployment type, indicate the desired amount of storage, and click Next:

On the next page I review and confirm my choices, and then click Create file system. The file system Status starts out as Creating, then transitions to Available within 20 minutes or so, as detailed in my original post.

Depending on my architecture and use case, I can access my new file system in several different ways. I can simply mount it to an EC2 instance running in the same VPC. I can also access it from another VPC in the same region or in a different region across a peered (VPC or Transit Gateway) connection, and from my on-premises clients using AWS Direct Connect or AWS VPN.

Things to Know
Here are a couple of things to know:

Regions – The new deployment type is available in all regions where FSx for ONTAP is already available.

Pricing – Pricing is based on the same billing dimensions as the multi-AZ deployment type; see the Amazon FSx for NetApp Pricing page for more information.

Available Now
The new deployment type is available now and you can start using it today!

Jeff;

Running IBM MQ on AWS using High-performance Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP

Post Syndicated from Senthil Nagaraj original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/running-ibm-mq-on-aws-using-high-performance-amazon-fsx-for-netapp-ontap/

Many Amazon Web Services (AWS) customers use IBM MQ on-premises and are looking to migrate it to the AWS Cloud. For persistent storage requirements with IBM MQ on AWS, Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS) can be used for distributed storage and to provide high availability. The AWS QuickStart to deploy IBM MQ with Amazon EFS is an architecture used for applications where the file system throughput requirements are within the Amazon EFS limits.

However, there are scenarios where customers need increased capacity for their IBM MQ workloads. These could be applications that rely heavily on IBM MQ, which result in a much higher message data throughput. This means that the persistent messages must be written to and read from the shared file system more frequently. IBM MQ facilitates writing log information into the shared file system. These are two such situations where such application requirements translate to a higher number of read/write operations.

For applications using IBM MQ and requiring a higher file system throughput, Amazon provides Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP. This is a fully managed shared storage in the AWS Cloud, with the popular data access and management capabilities of ONTAP.

This blog explains how to use Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP for distributed storage and high availability with IBM MQ. Read more about Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP features, and performance details, throughput options, and performance tips.

Overview of IBM MQ architecture on AWS

For recovering queue data upon failure, you can set up IBM MQ with high availability.

The solution architecture is shown in Figure 1. This blog post assumes familiarity with AWS services such as Amazon EC2, VPCs, and subnets. For additional information on these topics, see the AWS documentation.

Figure 1. IBM MQ with Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP

Figure 1. IBM MQ with Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP

  1. IBM MQ is deployed in an Auto Scaling group spanning two Availability Zones.
  2. Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP is used for data persistence and high availability of queue message data.
  3. Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP is set up in the same Availability Zones as IBM MQ.
  4. Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP provides automatic failover that is transparent to the application and completes in 60 seconds.

Considerations for the Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP file system

When creating the Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP file system as in Figure 1, consider the following:

  1. The subnets used for the file system should have connectivity with the subnets where your IBM MQ is running. See VPC documentation.
  2. Ensure that the security group(s) used by the elastic network interfaces (ENI) for Amazon FSx allow communication with the IBM MQ environment. Read more about limiting access security groups.
  3. When choosing the storage capacity, IOPS, and throughput capacity, make sure it aligns to your application requirements.
  4. If you choose to use AWS Key Management System (KMS) encryption, configure those details correctly.
  5. Be sure to provide an appropriate name for the volume junction, as you will use it to mount the file system onto your IBM MQ instance(s).
  6. Choose appropriate backup and maintenance windows according to your application needs.

Mount the Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP file system onto the instance(s) where IBM MQ is running. Use either the DNS name or the IP address for the file system, as well as the correct volume junction name while mounting. Configure IBM MQ to make use of this mount for persisting the queue data.

This mount point must be included when updating fstab for Linux machines. This will allow for the file system to be mounted automatically in case the instance restarts. For Windows, take the appropriate steps to mount the file system automatically upon restart.

Conclusion

In this post, you have learned how to use Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP with IBM MQ to maximize queue data throughput, while continuing to have persistent message storage. You can provision the Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP file system, and mount its volume junction onto the IBM MQ instance(s).

Build a reliable, scalable, and cost-efficient IBM MQ solution on AWS, by using the fully elastic features that Amazon FSx NetApp ONTAP provides.

Related information:

Welcome to AWS Storage Day 2021

Post Syndicated from Marcia Villalba original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/welcome-to-aws-storage-day-2021/

Welcome to the third annual AWS Storage Day 2021! During Storage Day 2020 and the first-ever Storage Day 2019 we made many impactful announcements for our customers and this year will be no different. The one-day, free AWS Storage Day 2021 virtual event will be hosted on the AWS channel on Twitch. You’ll hear from experts about announcements, leadership insights, and educational content related to AWS Storage services.

AWS Storage DayThe first part of the day is the leadership track. Wayne Duso, VP of Storage, Edge, and Data Governance, will be presenting a live keynote. He’ll share information about what’s new in AWS Cloud Storage and how these services can help businesses increase agility and accelerate innovation. The keynote will be followed by live interviews with the AWS Storage leadership team, including Mai-Lan Tomsen Bukovec, VP of AWS Block and Object Storage.

The second part of the day is a technical track in which you’ll learn more about Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS), AWS Backup, Cloud Data Migration, AWS Transfer Family and Amazon FSx.

To register for the event, visit the AWS Storage Day 2021 event page.

Now as Jeff Barr likes to say, let’s get into the announcements.

Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP
Today, we are pleased to announce Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP, a new storage service that allows you to launch and run fully managed NetApp ONTAP file systems in the cloud. Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP joins Amazon FSx for Lustre and Amazon FSx for Windows File Server as the newest file system offered by Amazon FSx.

Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP provides the full ONTAP experience with capabilities and APIs that make it easy to run applications that rely on NetApp or network-attached storage (NAS) appliances on AWS without changing your application code or how you manage your data. To learn more, read New – Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP.

Amazon S3
Amazon S3 Multi-Region Access Points is a new S3 feature that allows you to define global endpoints that span buckets in multiple AWS Regions. Using this feature, you can now build multi-region applications without adding complexity to your applications, with the same system architecture as if you were using a single AWS Region.

S3 Multi-Region Access Points is built on top of AWS Global Accelerator and routes S3 requests over the global AWS network. S3 Multi-Region Access Points dynamically routes your requests to the lowest latency copy of your data, so the upload and download performance can increase by 60 percent. It’s a great solution for applications that rely on reading files from S3 and also for applications like autonomous vehicles that need to write a lot of data to S3. To learn more about this new launch, read How to Accelerate Performance and Availability of Multi-Region Applications with Amazon S3 Multi-Region Access Points.

Creating a multi-region access point

There’s also great news about the Amazon S3 Intelligent-Tiering storage class! The conditions of usage have been updated. There is no longer a minimum storage duration for all objects stored in S3 Intelligent-Tiering, and monitoring and automation charges for objects smaller than 128 KB have been removed. Smaller objects (128 KB or less) are not eligible for auto-tiering when stored in S3 Intelligent-Tiering. Now that there is no monitoring and automation charge for small objects and no minimum storage duration, you can use the S3 Intelligent-Tiering storage class by default for all your workloads with unknown or changing access patterns. To learn more about this announcement, read Amazon S3 Intelligent-Tiering – Improved Cost Optimizations for Short-Lived and Small Objects.

Amazon EFS
Amazon EFS Intelligent Tiering is a new capability that makes it easier to optimize costs for shared file storage when access patterns change. When you enable Amazon EFS Intelligent-Tiering, it will store the files in the appropriate storage class at the right time. For example, if you have a file that is not used for a period of time, EFS Intelligent-Tiering will move the file to the Infrequent Access (IA) storage class. If the file is accessed again, Intelligent-Tiering will automatically move it back to the Standard storage class.

To get started with Intelligent-Tiering, enable lifecycle management in a new or existing file system and choose a lifecycle policy to automatically transition files between different storage classes. Amazon EFS Intelligent-Tiering is perfect for workloads with changing or unknown access patterns, such as machine learning inference and training, analytics, content management and media assets. To learn more about this launch, read Amazon EFS Intelligent-Tiering Optimizes Costs for Workloads with Changing Access Patterns.

AWS Backup
AWS Backup Audit Manager allows you to simplify data governance and compliance management of your backups across supported AWS services. It provides customizable controls and parameters, like backup frequency or retention period. You can also audit your backups to see if they satisfy your organizational and regulatory requirements. If one of your monitored backups drifts from your predefined parameters, AWS Backup Audit Manager will let you know so you can take corrective action. This new feature also enables you to generate reports to share with auditors and regulators. To learn more, read How to Monitor, Evaluate, and Demonstrate Backup Compliance with AWS Backup Audit Manager.

Amazon EBS
Amazon EBS direct APIs now support creating 64 TB EBS Snapshots directly from any block storage data, including on-premises. This was increased from 16 TB to 64 TB, allowing customers to create the largest snapshots and recover them to Amazon EBS io2 Block Express Volumes. To learn more, read Amazon EBS direct API documentation.

AWS Transfer Family
AWS Transfer Family Managed Workflows is a new feature that allows you to reduce the manual tasks of preprocessing your data. Managed Workflows does a lot of the heavy lifting for you, like setting up the infrastructure to run your code upon file arrival, continuously monitoring for errors, and verifying that all the changes to the data are logged. Managed Workflows helps you handle error scenarios so that failsafe modes trigger when needed.

AWS Transfer Family Managed Workflows allows you to configure all the necessary tasks at once so that tasks can automatically run in the background. Managed Workflows is available today in the AWS Transfer Family Management Console. To learn more, read Transfer Family FAQ.

Storage Day 2021 Join us online for more!
Don’t forget to register and join us for the AWS Storage Day 2021 virtual event. The event will be live at 8:30 AM Pacific Time (11:30 AM Eastern Time) on September 2. The event will immediately re-stream for the Asia-Pacific audience with live Q&A moderators on Friday, September 3, at 8:30 AM Singapore Time. All sessions will be available on demand next week.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Marcia

New – Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-amazon-fsx-for-netapp-ontap/

Back in 2018 I wrote about the first two members of the Amazon FSx family of fully-managed, highly-reliable, and highly-performant file systems, Amazon FSx for Lustre and Amazon FSx for Windows File Server. Both of these services give you the ability to use popular open source and commercially-licensed file systems without having to deal with hardware provisioning, software configuration, patching, backups, and so forth. Since those launches, we have added many new features to both services in response to your requests:

Amazon FSx for Lustre now supports Persistent file systems with SSD- and HDD-based storage for longer-term storage and workloads, storage capacity scaling, crash-consistent backups, data compression, and storage quotas.

Amazon FSx for Windows File Server now supports many enterprise-ready features including Multi-AZ file systems, self-managed Active Directories, fine-grained file restoration, file access auditing, storage size and capacity throughput scaling, and a low cost HDD storage option.

Because these services support the file access and storage paradigms that are already well understood by Lustre and Windows File Server users, it is easy to migrate existing applications and to fine-tune existing operational regimens when you put them to use. While migration is important, so are new applications! All of the Amazon FSx systems make it easy for you to build applications that need high-performance fully managed storage along with the rich set of features provided by the file systems.

Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP
As I often tell you, we are always looking for more ways to meet the needs of our customers. To this end, we are launching Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP today. You get the popular features, performance, and APIs of ONTAP file systems with the agility, scalability, security, and resiliency of AWS, making it easier for you to migrate on-premises applications that rely on network-attached storage (NAS) appliances to AWS.

ONTAP (a NetApp product) is an enterprise data management offering designed to provide high-performance storage suitable for use with Oracle, SAP, VMware, Microsoft SQL Server, and so forth. ONTAP is flexible and scalable, with support for multi-protocol access and file systems that can scale up to 176 PiB. It supports a wide variety of features that are designed to make data management cheaper and easier including inline data compression, deduplication, compaction, thin provisioning, replication (SnapMirror), and point-in-time cloning (FlexClone).

FSx for ONTAP is fully managed so you can start to enjoy all of these features in minutes. AWS provisions the file servers and storage volumes, manages replication, installs software updates & patches, replaces misbehaving infrastructure components, manages failover, and much more. Whether you are migrating data from your on-premises NAS environment or building brand-new cloud native applications, you will find a lot to like! If you are migrating, you can enjoy all of the benefits of a fully-managed file system while taking advantage of your existing tools, workflows, processes, and operational expertise. If you are building brand-new applications, you can create a cloud-native experience that makes use of ONTAP’s rich feature set. Either way, you can scale to support hundreds of thousands of IOPS and benefit from the continued, behind-the-scenes evolution of the compute, storage, and networking components.

There are two storage tiers, and you can enable intelligent tiering to move data back and forth between them on an as-needed basis:

Primary Storage is built on high performance solid state drives (SSD), and is designed to hold the part of your data set that is active and/or sensitive to latency. You can provision up to 192 TiB of primary storage per file system.

Capacity Pool Storage grows and shrinks as needed, and can scale to pebibytes. It is cost-optimized and designed to hold data that is accessed infrequently.

Within each Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP file system you can create one or more Storage Virtual Machines (SVMs), each of which supports one or more Volumes. Volumes can be accessed via NFS, SMB, or as iSCSI LUNs for shared block storage. As you can see from this diagram, you can access each volume from AWS compute services, VMware Cloud on AWS, and from your on-premises applications:

If your on-premises applications are already making use of ONTAP in your own data center, you can easily create an ONTAP file system in the cloud, replicate your data using NetApp SnapMirror, and take advantage of all that Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP has to offer.

Getting Started with Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP
I can create my first file system from the command line, AWS Management Console, or the NetApp Cloud Manager. I can also make an API call or use a CloudFormation template. I’ll use the Management Console.

Each file system runs within a Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), so I start by choosing a VPC and a pair of subnets (preferred and standby). Every SVM has an endpoint in the Availability Zones associated with both of the subnets, with continuous monitoring, automated failover, and automated failback to ensure high availability.

I open the Amazon FSx Console, click Create file system, select Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP, and click Next:

I can choose Quick create and use a set of best practices, or Standard create and set all of the options myself. I’ll go for the first option, since I can change all of the configuration options later if necessary. I select Quick create, enter a name for my file system (jb-fsx-ontap-1), and set the storage capacity in GiB. I also choose the VPC, and enable ONTAP’s storage efficiency features:

I confirm all of my choices, and note that this option will also create a Storage Virtual Machine (fsx) and a volume (vol1) for me. Then I click Create file system to “make it so”:

The file system Status starts out as Creating, then transitions to Available within 20 minutes or so:

My first SVM transitions from Pending to Created shortly thereafter, and my first volume transitions from Pending to Created as well. I can click on the SVM to learn more about it and to see the full set of management and access endpoints that it provides:

I can click Volumes in the left-side navigation and see all of my volumes. The root volume (fsx_root) is created automatically and represents all of the storage on the SVM:

I can select a volume and click Attach to get customized instructions for attaching it to an EC2 instance running Linux or Windows:

I can select a volume and then choose Update volume from the Action menu to change the volume’s path, size, storage efficiency, or tiering policy:

To learn more about the tiering policy, read about Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP Storage.

I can click Create volume and create additional volumes within any of my file systems:

There’s a lot more than I have space to show you, so be sure to open up the Console and try it out for yourself.

Things to Know
Here are a couple of things to know about Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP:

Regions – The new file system is available in most AWS regions and in GovCloud; check out the AWS Regional Service list for more information.

Pricing – Pricing is based on multiple usage dimensions including the Primary Storage, Capacity Pool Storage, throughput capacity, additional SSD IOPS, and backup storage consumption; consult the Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP Pricing page for more information.

Connectivity – You can use AWS Direct Connect to connect your on-premises applications to your new file systems. You can use Transit Gateway to connect to VPCs in other accounts and/or regions.

Availability – As I mentioned earlier, each file system is powered by AWS infrastructure in a pair of Availability Zones. Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP automatically replicates data between the zones and monitors the AWS infrastructure, initiating a failover (typically within 60 seconds), and then replacing infrastructure components as necessary. There’s a 99.99% availability SLA for each file system.

Jeff;