Tag Archives: Week in Review

AWS Week in Review – March 6, 2017

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-march-6-2017/

This edition includes all of our announcements, content from all of our blogs, and as much community-generated AWS content as I had time for!

Monday

March 6

Tuesday

March 7

Wednesday

March 8

Thursday

March 9

Friday

March 10

Saturday

March 11

Sunday

March 12

Jeff;

 

AWS Week in Review – February 27, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-february-27-2016/

This edition includes all of our announcements, content from all of our blogs, and as much community-generated AWS content as I had time for. Going forward I hope to bring back the other sections, as soon as I get my tooling and automation into better shape.

Monday

February 27

Tuesday

February 28

Wednesday

March 1

Thursday

March 2

Friday

March 3

Saturday

March 4

Sunday

March 5

Jeff;

 

AWS Week in Review – February 20, 2017

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-february-20-2017/

By popular demand, I am producing this “micro” version of the AWS Week in Review. I have included all of our announcements, content from all of our blogs, and as much community-generated AWS content as I had time for. Going forward I hope to bring back the other sections, as soon as I get my tooling and automation into better shape.

Monday

February 20

Tuesday

February 21

Wednesday

February 22

Thursday

February 23

Friday

February 24

Saturday

February 25

Jeff;

 

New for AWS Lambda – Environment Variables and Serverless Application Model (SAM)

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-for-aws-lambda-environment-variables-and-serverless-application-model/

I am thrilled by all of the excitement that I see around AWS Lambda and serverless application development. I have shared many serverless success stories, tools, and open source projects in the AWS Week in Review over the last year or two.

Today I would like to tell you about two important additions to Lambda: environment variables and the new Serverless Application Model.

Environment Variables
Every developer likes to build code that can be used in more than one environment. In order to do this in a clean and reusable fashion, the code should be able to accept configuration values at run time. The configuration values customize the environment for the code: table names, device names, file paths, and so forth. For example, many projects have distinct configurations for their development, test, and production environments.

You can now supply environment variables to your Lambda functions. This allows you to effect configuration changes without modifying or redeploying your code, and should make your serverless application development even more efficient. Each environment variable is a key/value pair. The keys and the values are encrypted using AWS Key Management Service (KMS) and decrypted on an as-needed basis. There’s no per-function limit on the number of environment variables, but the total size can be no more than 4 kb.

When you create a new version of a Lambda function, you also set the environment variables for that version of the function. You can modify the values for the latest version of the function, but not for older versions. Here’s how I would create a simple Python function, set some environment variables, and then reference them from my code (note that I had to import the os library):

There’s no charge for this feature if you use the default service key provided by Lambda (the usual per-request KMS charges apply if you choose to use your own key).

To learn more and to get some ideas for other ways to make use of this new feature, read Simplify Serverless Applications With Lambda Environment Variables on the AWS Compute Blog.

AWS Serverless Application Model
Lambda functions, Amazon API Gateway resources, and Amazon DynamoDB tables are often used together to build serverless applications. The new AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) allows you describe all of these components using a simplified syntax that is natively supported by AWS CloudFormation. In order to use this syntax, your CloudFormation template must include a Transform section (this is a new aspect of CloudFormation) that looks like this:

AWSTemplateFormatVersion: '2010-09-09'
Transform: AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31

The remainder of the template is used to specify the Lambda functions, API Gateway endpoints & resources, and DynamoDB tables. Each function declaration specifies a handler, a runtime, and a URI to a ZIP file that contains the code for the function.

APIs can be declared implicitly by defining events, or explicitly, by providing a Swagger file.

DynamoDB tables are declared using a simplified syntax that requires just a table name, a primary key (name and type), and the provisioned throughput. The full range of options is also available for you to use if necessary.

You can now generate AWS SAM files and deployment packages for your Lamba functions using a new Export operation in the Lambda Console. Simply click on the Actions menu and select Export function:

Then click on Download AWS SAM file or Download deployment package:

Here is the AWS SAM file for my function:

AWSTemplateFormatVersion: '2010-09-09'
Transform: 'AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31'
Description: A starter AWS Lambda function.
Resources:
  ShowEnv:
    Type: 'AWS::Serverless::Function'
    Properties:
      Handler: lambda_function.lambda_handler
      Runtime: python2.7
      CodeUri: .
      Description: A starter AWS Lambda function.
      MemorySize: 128
      Timeout: 3
      Role: 'arn:aws:iam::99999999999:role/LambdaGeneralRole'

The deployment package is a ZIP file with the code for my function inside. I would simply upload the file to S3 and update the CodeUri in the SAM file in order to use it as part of my serverless application. You can do this manually or you can use a pair of new CLI commands (aws cloudformation package and aws cloudformation deploy) to automate it. To learn more about this option, read the section on Deploying a Serverless app in the new Introducing Simplified Serverless Application Management and Deployment post.

You can also export Lambda function blueprints. Simply click on the download link in the corner:

And click on Download blueprint:

The ZIP file contains the AWS SAM file and the code:

To learn more and to see this new specification in action, read Introducing Simplified Serverless Application Management and Deployment on the AWS Compute Blog.

Jeff;

 

AWS Week in Review – November 7, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-november-7-2016/

Let’s take a quick look at what happened in AWS-land last week. Thanks are due to the 16 internal and external contributors who submitted pull requests!

Monday

November 7

Tuesday

November 8

Wednesday

November 9

Thursday

November 10

Friday

November 11

Saturday

November 12

Sunday

November 13

New & Notable Open Source

  • Sippy Cup is a Python nanoframework for AWS Lambda and API Gateway.
  • Yesterdaytabase is a Python tool for constantly refreshing data in your staging and test environments with Lambda and CloudFormation.
  • ebs-snapshot-lambda is a Lambda function to snapshot EBS volumes and purge old snapshots.
  • examples is a collection of boilerplates and examples of serverless architectures built with the Serverless Framework and Lambda.
  • ecs-deploy-cli is a simple and easy way to deploy tasks and update services in AWS ECS.
  • Comments-Showcase is a serverless comment webapp that uses API Gateway, Lambda, DynamoDB, and IoT.
  • serverless-offline emulates Lambda and API Gateway locally for development of Serverless projects.
  • aws-sign-web is a JavaScript implementation of AWS Signature v4 for use within web browsers.
  • Zappa implements serverless Django on Lambda and API Gateway.
  • awsping is a console tool to check latency to AWS regions.

New SlideShare Presentations

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

AWS Week in Review – October 31, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-october-31-2016/

Over 25 internal and external contributors helped out with pull requests and fresh content this week! Thank you all for your help and your support.

Monday

October 31

Tuesday

November 1

Wednesday

November 2

Thursday

November 3

Friday

November 4

Saturday

November 5

Sunday

November 6

New & Notable Open Source

New Customer Success Stories

  • Apposphere – Using AWS and bitfusion.io from the AWS Marketplace, Apposphere can scale 50 to 60 percent month-over-month while keeping customer satisfaction high. Based in Austin, Texas, the Apposphere mobile app delivers real-time leads from social media channels.
  • CADFEM – CADFEM uses AWS to make complex simulation software more accessible to smaller engineering firms, helping them compete with much larger ones. The firm specializes in simulation software and services for the engineering industry.
  • Mambu – Using AWS, Mambu helped one of its customers launch the United Kingdom’s first cloud-based bank, and the company is now on track for tenfold growth, giving it a competitive edge in the fast-growing fintech sector. Mambu is an all-in-one SaaS banking platform for managing credit and deposit products quickly, simply, and affordably.
  • Okta – Okta uses AWS to get new services into production in days instead of weeks. Okta creates products that use identity information to grant people access to applications on multiple devices at any time, while still enforcing strong security protections.
  • PayPlug – PayPlug is a startup created in 2013 that developed an online payment solution. It differentiates itself by the simplicity of its services and its ease of integration on e-commerce websites. PayPlug is a startup created in 2013 that developed an online payment solution. It differentiates itself by the simplicity of its services and its ease of integration on e-commerce websites
  • Rent-a-Center – Rent-a-Center is a leading renter of furniture, appliances, and electronics to customers in the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, and Mexico. Rent-A-Center uses AWS to manage its new e-commerce website, scale to support a 1,000 percent spike in site traffic, and enable a DevOps approach.
  • UK Ministry of Justice – By going all in on the AWS Cloud, the UK Ministry of Justice (MoJ) can use technology to enhance the effectiveness and fairness of the services it provides to British citizens. The MoJ is a ministerial department of the UK government. MoJ had its own on-premises data center, but lacked the ability to change and adapt rapidly to the needs of its citizens. As it created more digital services, MoJ turned to AWS to automate, consolidate, and deliver constituent services.

New SlideShare Presentations

New YouTube Videos

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

AWS Week in Review – October 24, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-october-24-2016/

Another busy week in AWS-land! Today’s post included submissions from 21 internal and external contributors, along with material from my RSS feeds, my inbox, and other things that come my way. To join in the fun, create (or find) some awesome AWS-related content and submit a pull request!

Monday

October 24

Tuesday

October 25

Wednesday

October 26

Thursday

October 27

Friday

October 28

Saturday

October 29

Sunday

October 30

New & Notable Open Source

  • aws-git-backed-static-website is a Git-backed static website generator powered entirely by AWS.
  • rds-pgbadger fetches log files from an Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL instance and generates a beautiful pgBadger report.
  • aws-lambda-redshift-copy is an AWS Lambda function that automates the copy command in Redshift.
  • VarnishAutoScalingCluster contains code and instructions for setting up a shared, horizontally scalable Varnish cluster that scales up and down using Auto Scaling groups.
  • aws-base-setup contains starter templates for developing AWS CloudFormation-based AWS stacks.
  • terraform_f5 contains Terraform scripts to instantiate a Big IP in AWS.
  • claudia-bot-builder creates chat bots for Facebook, Slack, Skype, Telegram, GroupMe, Kik, and Twilio and deploys them to AWS Lambda in minutes.
  • aws-iam-ssh-auth is a set of scripts used to authenticate users connecting to EC2 via SSH with IAM.
  • go-serverless sets up a go.cd server for serverless application deployment in AWS.
  • awsq is a helper script to run batch jobs on AWS using SQS.
  • respawn generates CloudFormation templates from YAML specifications.

New SlideShare Presentations

New Customer Success Stories

  • AlbemaTV – AbemaTV is an Internet media-services company that operates one of Japan’s leading streaming platforms, FRESH! by AbemaTV. The company built its microservices platform on Amazon EC2 Container Service and uses an Amazon Aurora data store for its write-intensive microservices—such as timelines and chat—and a MySQL database on Amazon RDS for the remaining microservices APIs. By using AWS, AbemaTV has been able to quickly deploy its new platform at scale with minimal engineering effort.
  • Celgene – Celgene uses AWS to enable secure collaboration between internal and external researchers, allow individual scientists to launch hundreds of compute nodes, and reduce the time it takes to do computational jobs from weeks or months to less than a day. Celgene is a global biopharmaceutical company that creates drugs that fight cancer and other diseases and disorders. Celgene runs its high-performance computing research clusters, as well as its research collaboration environment, on AWS.
  • Under Armour – Under Armour can scale its Connected Fitness apps to meet the demands of more than 180 million global users, innovate and deliver new products and features more quickly, and expand internationally by taking advantage of the reliability and high availability of AWS. The company is a global leader in performance footwear, apparel, and equipment. Under Armour runs its growing Connected Fitness app platform on the AWS Cloud.

New YouTube Videos

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

AWS Week in Review – October 17, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-october-17-2016/

Wow, a lot is happening in AWS-land these days! Today’s post included submissions from several dozen internal and external contributors, along with material from my RSS feeds, my inbox, and other things that come my way. To join in the fun, create (or find) some awesome AWS-related content and submit a pull request!

Monday

October 17

Tuesday

October 18

Wednesday

October 19

Thursday

October 20

Friday

October 21

Saturday

October 22

Sunday

October 23

New & Notable Open Source

New SlideShare Presentations

Upcoming Events

New AWS Marketplace Listings

  • Application Development
    • Joomia 3.6.0 + Apache + MySQL + AMAZONLINUX AMI by MIRI Infotech Inc, sold by Miri Infotech.
    • LAMP 5 MariaDB and LAMP 7 MariaDB, sold by Jetware.
    • Secured Acquia Drupal on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured BugNet on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured CMS Gallery on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured Kooboo CMS on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured Lemoon on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured Magento on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured MyCV on Windows 2012 R2<, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured nService on Windows 2012 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured Orchard CMS on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
  • Application Servers
    • Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2016 for Business, sold by Data Resolution.
    • Microsoft Dynamics GP 2015 for Business, sold by Data Resolution.
    • Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012 for Business, sold by Data Resolution.
    • Microsoft Dynamics SL 2015 for Business, sold by Data Resolution.
    • Redis 3.0, sold by Jetware.
  • Application Stacks
    • LAMP 5 Percona and LAMP 7 Percona, sold by Jetware.
    • MySQL 5.1, MySQL 5.6, and MySQL 5.7, sold by Jetware.
    • Percona Server for MySQL 5.7, sold by Jetware.
    • Perfect7 LAMP v1.1 Multi-PHP w/Security (HVM), sold by Archisoft.
    • Perfect7 LAMP v1.1 Multi-PHP Base (HVM), sold by Archisoft.
  • Content Management
    • DNN Platform 9 Sandbox – SQL 2016, IIS 8.5, .Net 4.6, W2K12R2, sold by Benjamin Hermann.
    • iBase 7, sold by iBase.
    • MediaWiki powered by Symetricore (Plus Edition), sold by Symetricore.
    • Secured CompositeC1 on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured Dot Net CMS on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured Gallery Server on Windows 2008 R2,sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured Joomia on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured Mayando on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured phpBB on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured Wiki Asp.net on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • SharePoint 2016 Enterprise bYOL with paid support, sold by Data Resolution.
    • WordPress Powered by AMIMOTO (Auto-Scaling ready), sold by DigitalCube Co. Ltd.
  • Databases
    • MariaDB 5.5, 10.0, and 10.1, sold by Jetware.
    • Redis 3.2, sold by Jetware
  • Databases
    • MariaDB 5.5, 10.0, and 10.1, sold by Jetware.
    • Redis 3.2, sold by Jetware.
  • eCommerce
    • Secured AspxCommerce on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured BeYourMarket on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Secured DashComerce on Windows 2008 R2, sold by Cognosys Inc.
    • Vikrio, sold by Vikrio.
  • Issue & Bug Tracking
    • Redmine 2.6 and Redmine 3.3, sold by Jetware.
  • Monitoring
    • Memcached 1.4, sold by Jetware
  • Network Infrastructure
    • 500 Mbps Load Balancer with Commercial WAF Subscription, sold by KEMP Technologies.
  • Operating System
    • Ubuntu Desktop 16.04 LTS (HVM), sold by Netspectrum Inc.
  • Security
    • AlienVault USM (Unified Security Management) Anywhere, sold by AlienVault.
    • Armor Anywhere CORE, sold by Armor Defense.
    • Hillstone CloudEdge Virtual-Firewall Advanced Edition, sold by Hillstone Networks.
    • Negative SEO Monitoring, sold by SEO Defend.

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

AWS Week in Review – September 27, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-september-27-2016/

Fourteen (14) external and internal contributors worked together to create this edition of the AWS Week in Review. If you would like to join the party (with the possibility of a free lunch at re:Invent), please visit the AWS Week in Review on GitHub.

Monday

September 26

Tuesday

September 27

Wednesday

September 28

Thursday

September 29

Friday

September 30

Saturday

October 1

Sunday

October 2

New & Notable Open Source

  • dynamodb-continuous-backup sets up continuous backup automation for DynamoDB.
  • lambda-billing uses NodeJS to automate billing to AWS tagged projects, producing PDF invoices.
  • vyos-based-vpc-wan is a complete Packer + CloudFormation + Troposphere powered setup of AMIs to run VyOS IPSec tunnels across multiple AWS VPCs, using BGP-4 for dynamic routing.
  • s3encrypt is a utility that encrypts and decrypts files in S3 with KMS keys.
  • lambda-uploader helps to package and upload Lambda functions to AWS.
  • AWS-Architect helps to deploy microservices to Lambda and API Gateway.
  • awsgi is an WSGI gateway for API Gateway and Lambda proxy integration.
  • rusoto is an AWS SDK for Rust.
  • EBS_Scripts contains some EBS tricks and triads.
  • landsat-on-aws is a web application that uses Amazon S3, Amazon API Gateway, and AWS Lambda to create an infinitely scalable interface to navigate Landsat satellite data.

New SlideShare Presentations

New AWS Marketplace Listings

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

AWS Week in Review – September 19, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-september-19-2016/

Eighteen (18) external and internal contributors worked together to create this edition of the AWS Week in Review. If you would like to join the party (with the possibility of a free lunch at re:Invent), please visit the AWS Week in Review on GitHub.

Monday

September 19

Tuesday

September 20

Wednesday

September 21

Thursday

September 22

Friday

September 23

Saturday

September 24

Sunday

September 25

New & Notable Open Source

  • ecs-refarch-cloudformation is reference architecture for deploying Microservices with Amazon ECS, AWS CloudFormation (YAML), and an Application Load Balancer.
  • rclone syncs files and directories to and from S3 and many other cloud storage providers.
  • Syncany is an open source cloud storage and filesharing application.
  • chalice-transmogrify is an AWS Lambda Python Microservice that transforms arbitrary XML/RSS to JSON.
  • amp-validator is a serverless AMP HTML Validator Microservice for AWS Lambda.
  • ecs-pilot is a simple tool for managing AWS ECS.
  • vman is an object version manager for AWS S3 buckets.
  • aws-codedeploy-linux is a demo of how to use CodeDeploy and CodePipeline with AWS.
  • autospotting is a tool for automatically replacing EC2 instances in AWS AutoScaling groups with compatible instances requested on the EC2 Spot Market.
  • shep is a framework for building APIs using AWS API Gateway and Lambda.

New SlideShare Presentations

New Customer Success Stories

  • NetSeer significantly reduces costs, improves the reliability of its real-time ad-bidding cluster, and delivers 100-millisecond response times using AWS. The company offers online solutions that help advertisers and publishers match search queries and web content to relevant ads. NetSeer runs its bidding cluster on AWS, taking advantage of Amazon EC2 Spot Fleet Instances.
  • New York Public Library revamped its fractured IT environment—which had older technology and legacy computing—to a modernized platform on AWS. The New York Public Library has been a provider of free books, information, ideas, and education for more than 17 million patrons a year. Using Amazon EC2, Elastic Load Balancer, Amazon RDS and Auto Scaling, NYPL is able to build scalable, repeatable systems quickly at a fraction of the cost.
  • MakerBot uses AWS to understand what its customers need, and to go to market faster with new and innovative products. MakerBot is a desktop 3-D printing company with more than 100 thousand customers using its 3-D printers. MakerBot uses Matillion ETL for Amazon Redshift to process data from a variety of sources in a fast and cost-effective way.
  • University of Maryland, College Park uses the AWS cloud to create a stable, secure and modern technical environment for its students and staff while ensuring compliance. The University of Maryland is a public research university located in the city of College Park, Maryland, and is the flagship institution of the University System of Maryland. The university uses AWS to migrate all of their datacenters to the cloud, as well as Amazon WorkSpaces to give students access to software anytime, anywhere and with any device.

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

AWS Week in Review – September 5, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-september-5-2016/

This is the third community-driven edition of the AWS Week in Review. Special thanks are due to the 15 internal and external contributors who helped to make this happen. If you would like to contribute, please take a look at the AWS Week in Review on GitHub.

Monday

September 5

Tuesday

September 6

Wednesday

September 7

Thursday

September 8

Friday

September 9

Saturday

September 10

Sunday

September 11

New & Notable Open Source

  • s3logs-cloudwatch is a Lambda function parsing S3 server access log files and putting extra bucket metrics in CloudWatch.
  • README.md is a curated list of AWS resources used to prepare for AWS certifications.
  • RedEye is a utility to monitor Redshift performance.
  • Dockerfile will build a Docker image, push it to the EC2 Container Registry, and deploy it to Elastic Beanstalk.
  • lambda-contact-form supports contact form posts from static websites hosted on S3/CloudFront.
  • dust is an SSH cluster shell for EC2.
  • aws-ssh-scp-connector is a utility to help connect to EC2 instances.
  • lambda-comments is a blog commenting system built with Lambda.

New SlideShare Presentations

New YouTube Videos

New Customer Stories

  • MYOB uses AWS to scale its infrastructure to support demand for new services and saves up to 30 percent by shutting down unused capacity and using Reserved Amazon EC2 Instances. MYOB provides business management software to about 1.2 million organizations in Australia and New Zealand. MYOB uses a wide range of AWS services, including Amazon Machine Learning to build smart applications incorporating predictive analytics and AWS CloudFormation scripts to create new AWS environments in the event of a disaster.
  • PATI Games needed IT solutions that would guarantee the stability and scalability of their game services for global market penetration, and AWS provided them with the most safe and cost-efficient solution. PATI Games is a Korean company primarily engaged in the development of games based on SNS platforms. AWS services including Amazon EC2, Amazon RDS (Aurora), and Amazon CloudFront enable PATI Games to maintain high reliability, decrease latency, and eventually boost customer satisfaction.
  • Rabbi Interactive scales to support a live-broadcast, second-screen app and voting system for hundreds of thousands of users, gives home television viewers real-time interactive capabilities, and reduces monthly operating costs by 60 percent by using AWS. Based in Israel, the company provides digital experiences such as second-screen apps used to interact with popular television shows such as “Rising Star” and “Big Brother.” Rabbi Interactive worked with AWS partner CloudZone to develop an interactive second-screen platform.

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

AWS Week in Review – August 29, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-august-29-2016/

This is the second community-driven edition of the AWS Week in Review. Special thanks are due to the 13 external contributors who helped to make this happen. If you would like to contribute, please take a look at the AWS Week in Review on GitHub. Adding relevant content is fast and easy and can be done from the comfort of your web browser! Just to be clear, it is perfectly fine for you to add content written by someone else. The goal is to catch it all, as they say!


Monday

August 29

Tuesday

August 30

Wednesday

August 31

Thursday

September 1

Friday

September 2

New & Notable Open Source

  • apilogs is a command-line utility to help aggregate, stream, and filter CloudWatch Log events produced by API Gateway and Lambda serverless APIs.
  • MoonMail is a fully Lambda / SES powered email marketing tool.

New SlideShare Presentations

New Customer Success Stories

  • Bustle uses AWS Lambda to process high volumes of data generated by the website in real-time, allowing the team to make faster, data-driven decisions. Bustle.com is a news, entertainment, lifestyle, and fashion website catering to women.
  • Graze continually improves its customers’ experience by staying agile—including in its infrastructure. The company sells healthy snacks through its website and via U.K. retailers. It runs all its infrastructure on AWS, including its customer-facing websites and all its internal systems from the factory floor to business intelligence.
  • Made.com migrated to AWS to support a record-breaking sales period with no downtime. The company provides a website that links home-furnishings designers directly to consumers. It now runs its e-commerce platform, website, and customer-facing applications on AWS, using services such as Amazon EC2, Amazon RDS, and Auto Scaling groups.
  • Sony DADC New Media Solutions (NMS) distributes hundreds of thousands of hours of video content monthly, spins up data analytics, renders solutions in days instead of months, and saves millions of dollars in hardware refresh costs by going all in on AWS. The organization distributes and delivers content to film studios, television broadcasters, and other providers across the globe. NMS runs its content distribution platform, broadcast playout services, and video archive on the AWS Cloud.
  • Upserve quickly develops and trains more than 100 learning models, streams restaurant sales and menu item data in real time, and gives restaurateurs the ability to predict their nightly business using Amazon Machine Learning. The company provides online payment and analytical software to thousands of restaurant owners throughout the U.S. Upserve uses Amazon Machine Learning to provide predictive analysis through its Shift Prep application.

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS feed, and contribute some content!

Jeff;

AWS Week in Review – August 22, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-august-22-2016/

Here’s the first community-driven edition of the AWS Week in Review. In response to last week’s blog post (AWS Week in Review – Coming Back With Your Help!), 9 other contributors helped to make this post a reality. That’s a great start; let’s see if we can go for 20 this week.


Monday

August 22

Tuesday

August 23

Wednesday

August 24

Thursday

August 25

Friday

August 26

Sunday

August 28

New & Notable Open Source

New SlideShare Presentations

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week, and please consider helping to make this a community-driven effort!

Jeff;

AWS Week in Review – Coming Back With Your Help!

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-coming-back-with-your-help/

Back in 2012 I realized that something interesting happened in AWS-land just about every day. In contrast to the periodic bursts of activity that were the norm back in the days of shrink-wrapped software, the cloud became a place where steady, continuous development took place.

In order to share all of this activity with my readers and to better illustrate the pace of innovation, I published the first AWS Week in Review in the spring of 2012. The original post took all of about 5 minutes to assemble, post and format. I got some great feedback on it and I continued to produce a steady stream of new posts every week for over 4 years. Over the years I added more and more content generated within AWS and from the ever-growing community of fans, developers, and partners.

Unfortunately, finding, saving, and filtering links, and then generating these posts grew to take a substantial amount of time. I reluctantly stopped writing new posts early this year after spending about 4 hours on the post for the week of April 25th.

After receiving dozens of emails and tweets asking about the posts, I gave some thought to a new model that would be open and more scalable.

Going Open
The AWS Week in Review is now a GitHub project (https://github.com/aws/aws-week-in-review). I am inviting contributors (AWS fans, users, bloggers, and partners) to contribute.

Every Monday morning I will review and accept pull requests for the previous week, aiming to publish the Week in Review by 10 AM PT. In order to keep the posts focused and highly valuable, I will approve pull requests only if they meet our guidelines for style and content.

At that time I will also create a file for the week to come, so that you can populate it as you discover new and relevant content.

Content & Style Guidelines
Here are the guidelines for making contributions:

  • Relevance -All contributions must be directly related to AWS.
  • Ownership – All contributions remain the property of the contributor.
  • Validity – All links must be to publicly available content (links to free, gated content are fine).
  • Timeliness – All contributions must refer to content that was created on the associated date.
  • Neutrality – This is not the place for editorializing. Just the facts / links.

I generally stay away from generic news about the cloud business, and I post benchmarks only with the approval of my colleagues.

And now a word or two about style:

  • Content from this blog is generally prefixed with “I wrote about POST_TITLE” or “We announced that TOPIC.”
  • Content from other AWS blogs is styled as “The BLOG_NAME wrote about POST_TITLE.”
  • Content from individuals is styled as “PERSON wrote about POST_TITLE.”
  • Content from partners and ISVs is styled as “The BLOG_NAME wrote about POST_TITLE.”

There’s room for some innovation and variation to keep things interesting, but keep it clean and concise. Please feel free to review some of my older posts to get a sense for what works.

Over time we might want to create a more compelling visual design for the posts. Your ideas (and contributions) are welcome.

Sections
Over the years I created the following sections:

  • Daily Summaries – content from this blog, other AWS blogs, and everywhere else.
  • New & Notable Open Source.
  • New SlideShare Presentations.
  • New YouTube Videos including APN Success Stories.
  • New AWS Marketplace products.
  • New Customer Success Stories.
  • Upcoming Events.
  • Help Wanted.

Some of this content comes to my attention via RSS feeds. I will post the OPML file that I use in the GitHub repo and you can use it as a starting point. The New & Notable Open Source section is derived from a GitHub search for aws. I scroll through the results and pick the 10 or 15 items that catch my eye. I also watch /r/aws and Hacker News for interesting and relevant links and discussions.

Over time, it is possible that groups or individuals may become the primary contributor for a section. That’s fine, and I would be thrilled to see this happen. I am also open to the addition to new sections, as long as they are highly relevant to AWS.

Automation
Earlier this year I tried to automate the process, but I did not like the results. You are welcome to give this a shot on your own. I do want to make sure that we continue to exercise human judgement in order to keep the posts as valuable as possible.

Let’s Do It
I am super excited about this project and I cannot wait to see those pull requests coming in. Please let me know (via a blog comment) if you have any suggestions or concerns.

I should note up front that I am very new to Git-based collaboration and that this is going to be a learning exercise for me. Do not hesitate to let me know if there’s a better way to do things!


Jeff;

 

AWS Week in Review – April 25, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-april-25-2016/

Let’s take a quick look at what happened in AWS-land last week:

Monday

April 25

Tuesday

April 26

Wednesday

April 27

Thursday

April 28

Friday

April 29

Saturday

April 30

Sunday

May 1

New & Notable Open Source

New SlideShare Presentations

New Customer Success Stories

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

Jeff;

AWS Week in Review – April 18, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-april-18-2016/

Let’s take a quick look at what happened in AWS-land last week:

Monday

April 18

Tuesday

April 19

Wednesday

April 20

Thursday

April 21

Friday

April 22

Saturday

April 23

Sunday

April 24

New & Notable Open Source

New SlideShare Presentations

New Customer Success Stories

New YouTube Videos

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

Jeff;

AWS Week in Review – April 11, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-april-11-2016/

Let’s take a quick look at what happened in AWS-land last week:

Monday

April 11

Tuesday

April 12

Wednesday

April 13

Thursday

April 14

Friday

April 15

Saturday

April 16

Sunday

April 17

New & Notable Open Source

  • cfn-include implements a Fn::Include for CloudFormation templates.
  • TumblessTemplates is a set of CloudFormation templates for quick setup of the Tumbless blogging platform.
  • s3git is Git for cloud storage.
  • s3_uploader is an S3 file uploader GUI written in Python.
  • SSH2EC2 lets you connect to EC2 instances via tags and metadata.
  • lambada is AWS Lambda for silly people.
  • aws-iam-proxy is a proxy that signs requests with IAM credentials.
  • hyperion is a Scala library and a set of abstractions for AWS Data Pipeline.
  • dynq is a DynamoDB query library.
  • cloud-custodian is a policy rules engine for AWS management.

New SlideShare Presentations

New Customer Success Stories

New YouTube Videos

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

Jeff;