Tag Archives: AWS CloudFormation

Adding voice to a CircuitPython project using Amazon Polly

Post Syndicated from Moheeb Zara original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/adding-voice-to-a-circuitpython-project-using-amazon-polly/

An Adafruit PyPortal displaying a quote while synthesizing and playing speech using Amazon Polly.

An Adafruit PyPortal displaying a quote while synthesizing and playing speech using Amazon Polly.

As a natural means of communication, voice is a powerful way to humanize an experience. What if you could make anything talk? This guide walks through how to leverage the cloud to add voice to an off-the-shelf microcontroller. Use it to develop more advanced ideas, like a talking toaster that encourages healthy breakfast habits or a house plant that can express its needs.

This project uses an Adafruit PyPortal, an open-source IoT touch display programmed using CircuitPython, a lightweight version of Python that works on embedded hardware. You copy your code to the PyPortal like you would to a thumb drive and it runs. Random quotes from the PaperQuotes API are periodically displayed on the PyPortal LCD.

A microcontroller can’t do speech synthesis on its own so I use Amazon Polly, a natural text to speech synthesis service, to generate audio. Adding speech also extends accessibility to the visually impaired. This project includes an example for requesting arbitrary speech in addition to random quotes. Use this example to add a voice to any CircuitPython project.

An Adafruit PyPortal, an external speaker, and a microSD card.

An Adafruit PyPortal, an external speaker, and a microSD card.

I deploy the backend to the AWS Cloud using the AWS Serverless Application Repository. The code on the PyPortal makes a REST call to the backend to fetch a quote and synthesize speech audio for playback on the device.

Prerequisites

You need the following to complete the project:

Deploy the backend application

An architecture diagram of the serverless backend when requesting speech synthesis of a text string.

An architecture diagram of the serverless backend when requesting speech synthesis of a text string.

The serverless backend consists of an Amazon API Gateway endpoint that invokes an AWS Lambda function. If called with a JSON object containing text and voiceId attributes, it uses Amazon Polly to synthesize speech and uploads an MP3 file as a public object to Amazon S3. Upon completion, it returns the URL for downloading the audio file. It also processes the submitted text and adds return lines so that it can appear text-wrapped when displayed on the PyPortal. For a full list of voices, see the Amazon Polly documentation. An example response:

To fetch quotes instead of a text field, call the endpoint with a comma-separated list of tags as shown in the following diagram. The Lambda function then calls the PaperQuotes API. It fetches up to 50 quotes per tag and selects a random one to synthesize as speech. As with arbitrary text, it returns a URL and a text-wrapped representation of the quote.

An architecture diagram of the serverless backend when requesting a random quote from the PaperQuotes API to synthesize as speech.

An architecture diagram of the serverless backend when requesting a random quote from the PaperQuotes API to synthesize as speech.

I use the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) to create the backend template. While it can be deployed using the AWS SAM CLI, you can also deploy from the AWS Management Console:

  1. Generate a free PaperQuotes API key at paperquotes.com. The serverless backend requires this to fetch quotes.
  2. Navigate to the aws-serverless-pyportal-polly application in the AWS Serverless Application Repository.
  3. Under Application settings, enter the parameter, PaperQuotesAPIKey.
  4. Choose Deploy.
  5. Once complete, choose View CloudFormation Stack.
  6. Select the Outputs tab and make a note of the SpeechApiUrl. This is required for configuring the PyPortal.
  7. Click the link listed for SpeechApiKey in the Outputs tab.
  8. Click Show to reveal the API key. Make a note of this. This is required for authenticating requests from the PyPortal to the SpeechApiUrl.

PyPortal setup

The following instructions walk through installing the latest version of the Adafruit CircuityPython libraries and firmware. It also shows how to enable an external speaker module.

  1. Follow these instructions from Adafruit to install the latest version of the CircuitPython bootloader. At the time of writing, the latest version is 5.3.0.
  2. Follow these instructions to install the latest Adafruit CircuitPython library bundle. I use bundle version 5.x.
  3. Insert the microSD card in the slot located on the back of the device.
  4. Cut the jumper pad on the back of the device labeled A0. This enables you to use an external speaker instead of the built-in speaker.
  5. Plug the external speaker connector into the port labeled SPEAKER on the back of the device.
  6. Optionally install the Mu Editor, a multi-platform code editor and serial debugger compatible with Adafruit CircuitPython boards. This can help with troubleshooting issues.
  7. Optionally if you have a 3D printer at home, you can print a case for your PyPortal. This can protect and showcase your project.

Code PyPortal

As with regular Python, CircuitPython does not need to be compiled to execute. You can flash new firmware on the PyPortal by copying a Python file and necessary assets to a mounted volume. The bootloader runs code.py anytime the device starts or any files are updated.

  1. Use a USB cable to plug the PyPortal into your computer and wait until a new mounted volume CIRCUITPY is available.
  2. Download the project from GitHub. Inside the project, copy the contents of /circuit-python on to the CIRCUITPY volume.
  3. Inside the volume, open and edit the secrets.py file. Include your Wi-Fi credentials along with the SpeechApiKey and SpeechApiUrl API Gateway endpoint. These can be found under Outputs in the AWS CloudFormation stack created by the AWS Serverless Application Repository.
  4. Save the file, and the device restarts. It takes a moment to connect to Wi-Fi and make the first request.
    Optionally, if you installed the Mu Editor, you can click on “Serial” to follow along the device log.

The PyPortal takes a few moments to connect to the Wi-Fi network and make its first request. On success, you hear it greet you and describe itself. The default interval is set to then display and read a quote every five minutes.

Understanding the CircuitPython code

See the bottom of circuit-python/code.py from the GitHub project. When the PyPortal connects to Wi-Fi, the first thing it does is synthesize an arbitrary “hello world” text for display. It then begins periodically displaying and “speaking” quotes.

# Connect to WiFi
print("Connecting to WiFi...")
wifi.connect()
print("Connected!")

displayQuote("Ready!")

speakText('Hello world! I am an Adafruit PyPortal running Circuit Python speaking to you using AWS Serverless', 'Joanna')

while True:
    speakQuote('equality, humanity', 'Joanna')
    time.sleep(60*secrets['interval'])

Both the speakText and speakQuote function call the synthesizeSpeech function. The difference is whether text or tags are passed to the API.

def speakText(text, voice):
    data = { "text": text, "voiceId": voice }
    synthesizeSpeech(data)

def speakQuote(tags, voice):
    data = { "tags": tags, "voiceId": voice }
    synthesizeSpeech(data)

The synthesizeSpeech function posts the data to the API Gateway endpoint. It then invokes the Lambda function and returns the MP3 URL and the formatted text. The downloadfile function is called to fetch the MP3 file and store it on the SD card. displayQuote is called to display the quote on the LCD. Finally, the playMP3 opens the file and plays the speech audio using the built-in or external speaker.

def synthesizeSpeech(data):
    response = postToAPI(secrets['endpoint'], data)
    downloadfile(response['url'], '/sd/cache.mp3')
    displayQuote(response['text'])
    playMP3("/sd/cache.mp3")

Modifying the Lambda function

The serverless application includes a Lambda function, SynthesizeSpeechFunction, which can be modified directly in the Lambda console. The AWS SAM template used to deploy the AWS Serverless Application Repository application adds policies for accessing the S3 bucket where audio is stored. It also grants access to Amazon Polly for synthesizing speech. It also adds the PaperQuote API token as an environment variable and sets API Gateway as an event source.

SynthesizeSpeechFunction:
    Type: AWS::Serverless::Function
    Properties:
      CodeUri: lambda_functions/SynthesizeSpeech/
      Handler: app.lambda_handler
      Runtime: python3.8
      Policies:
        - S3FullAccessPolicy:
            BucketName: !Sub "${AWS::StackName}-audio"
        - Version: '2012-10-17'
          Statement:
            - Effect: Allow
              Action:
                - polly:*
              Resource: '*'
      Environment:
        Variables:
          BUCKET_NAME: !Sub "${AWS::StackName}-audio"
          PAPER_QUOTES_TOKEN: !Ref PaperQuotesAPIKey
      Events:
        Speech:
          Type: Api
          Properties:
            RestApiId: !Ref SpeechApi
            Path: /speech
            Method: post

To edit the Lambda function, navigate back to the CloudFormation stack and click on the SpeechSynthesizeFunction under the Resources tab.

From here, you can edit the Lambda function code directly. Clicking Save deploys the new code.

The getQuotes function is called to fetch quotes from the PaperQuotes API. You can change this to call from a different source, such as a custom selection of quotes. Try modifying it to fetch social media posts or study questions.

Conclusion

I show how to add natural sounding text to speech on a microcontroller using a serverless backend. This is accomplished by deploying an application through the AWS Serverless Application Repository. The deployed API uses API Gateway to securely invoke a Lambda function that fetches quotes from the PaperQuotes API and generates speech using Amazon Polly. The speech audio is uploaded to S3.

I then show how to program a microcontroller, the Adafruit PyPortal, using CircuitPython. The code periodically calls the serverless API to fetch a quote and to download speech audio for playback. The sample code also demonstrates synthesizing arbitrary text to speech, meaning it can be used for any project you can conceive. Check out my previous guide on using the PyPortal to create a Martian weather display for inspiration.

AWS Solutions Constructs – A Library of Architecture Patterns for the AWS CDK

Post Syndicated from Danilo Poccia original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-solutions-constructs-a-library-of-architecture-patterns-for-the-aws-cdk/

Cloud applications are built using multiple components, such as virtual servers, containers, serverless functions, storage buckets, and databases. Being able to provision and configure these resources in a safe, repeatable way is incredibly important to automate your processes and let you focus on the unique parts of your implementation.

With the AWS Cloud Development Kit, you can leverage the expressive power of your favorite programming languages to model your applications. You can use high-level components called constructs, preconfigured with “sensible defaults” that you can customize, to quickly build a new application. The CDK provisions your resources using AWS CloudFormation to get all the benefits of managing your infrastructure as code. One of the reasons I like the CDK, is that you can compose and share your own custom components as higher-level constructs.

As you can imagine, there are recurring patterns that can be useful to more than one customer. For this reason, today we are launching the AWS Solutions Constructs, an open source extension library for the CDK that provides well-architected patterns to help you build your unique solutions. CDK constructs mostly cover single services. AWS Solutions Constructs provide multi-service patterns that combine two or more CDK resources, and implement best practices such as logging and encryption.

Using AWS Solutions Constructs
To see the power of a pattern-based approach, let’s take a look at how that works when building a new application. As an example, I want to build an HTTP API to store data in a Amazon DynamoDB table. To keep the content of the table small, I can use DynamoDB Time to Live (TTL) to expire items after a few days. After the TTL expires, data is deleted from the table and sent, via DynamoDB Streams, to a AWS Lambda function to archive the expired data on Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3).

To build this application, I can use a few components:

  • An Amazon API Gateway endpoint for the API.
  • A DynamoDB table to store data.
  • A Lambda function to process the API requests, and store data in the DynamoDB table.
  • DynamoDB Streams to capture data changes.
  • A Lambda function processing data changes to archive the expired data.

Can I make it simpler? Looking at the available patterns in the AWS Solutions Constructs, I find two that can help me build my app:

  • aws-apigateway-lambda, a Construct that implements an API Gateway REST API connected to a Lambda function. As an example of the “sensible defaults” used by AWS Solutions Constructs, this pattern enables CloudWatch logging for the API Gateway.
  • aws-dynamodb-stream-lambda, a Construct implementing a DynamoDB table streaming data changes to a Lambda function with the least privileged permissions.

To build the final architecture, I simply connect those two Constructs together:

I am using TypeScript to define the CDK stack, and Node.js for the Lambda functions. Let’s start with the CDK stack:

 

import * as cdk from '@aws-cdk/core';
import * as lambda from '@aws-cdk/aws-lambda';
import * as apigw from '@aws-cdk/aws-apigateway';
import * as dynamodb from '@aws-cdk/aws-dynamodb';
import { ApiGatewayToLambda } from '@aws-solutions-constructs/aws-apigateway-lambda';
import { DynamoDBStreamToLambda } from '@aws-solutions-constructs/aws-dynamodb-stream-lambda';

export class DemoConstructsStack extends cdk.Stack {
  constructor(scope: cdk.Construct, id: string, props?: cdk.StackProps) {
    super(scope, id, props);

    const apiGatewayToLambda = new ApiGatewayToLambda(this, 'ApiGatewayToLambda', {
      deployLambda: true,
      lambdaFunctionProps: {
        code: lambda.Code.fromAsset('lambda'),
        runtime: lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_12_X,
        handler: 'restApi.handler'
      },
      apiGatewayProps: {
        defaultMethodOptions: {
          authorizationType: apigw.AuthorizationType.NONE
        }
      }
    });

    const dynamoDBStreamToLambda = new DynamoDBStreamToLambda(this, 'DynamoDBStreamToLambda', {
      deployLambda: true,
      lambdaFunctionProps: {
        code: lambda.Code.fromAsset('lambda'),
        runtime: lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_12_X,
        handler: 'processStream.handler'
      },
      dynamoTableProps: {
        tableName: 'my-table',
        partitionKey: { name: 'id', type: dynamodb.AttributeType.STRING },
        timeToLiveAttribute: 'ttl'
      }
    });

    const apiFunction = apiGatewayToLambda.lambdaFunction;
    const dynamoTable = dynamoDBStreamToLambda.dynamoTable;

    dynamoTable.grantReadWriteData(apiFunction);
    apiFunction.addEnvironment('TABLE_NAME', dynamoTable.tableName);
  }
}

At the beginning of the stack, I import the standard CDK constructs for the Lambda function, the API Gateway endpoint, and the DynamoDB table. Then, I add the two patterns from the AWS Solutions Constructs, ApiGatewayToLambda and DynamoDBStreamToLambda.

After declaring the two ApiGatewayToLambda and DynamoDBStreamToLambda constructs, I store the Lambda function, created by the ApiGatewayToLambda constructs, and the DynamoDB table, created by DynamoDBStreamToLambda, in two variables.

At the end of the stack, I “connect” the two patterns together by granting permissions to the Lambda function to read/write in the DynamoDB table, and add the name of the DynamoDB table to the environment of the Lambda function, so that it can be used in the function code to store data in the table.

The code of the two Lambda functions is in the lambda folder of the CDK application. I am using the Node.js 12 runtime.

The restApi.js function implements the API and writes data to the DynamoDB table. The URL path is used as partition key, all the query string parameters in the URL are stored as attributes. The TTL for the item is computed adding a time window of 7 days to the current time.

const { DynamoDB } = require("aws-sdk");

const docClient = new DynamoDB.DocumentClient();

const TABLE_NAME = process.env.TABLE_NAME;
const TTL_WINDOW = 7 * 24 * 60 * 60; // 7 days expressed in seconds

exports.handler = async function (event) {

  const item = event.queryStringParameters;
  item.id = event.pathParameters.proxy;

  const now = new Date(); 
  item.ttl = Math.round(now.getTime() / 1000) + TTL_WINDOW;

  const response = await docClient.put({
    TableName: TABLE_NAME,
    Item: item
  }).promise();

  let statusCode = 204;
  
  if (response.err != null) {
    console.error('request: ', JSON.stringify(event, undefined, 2));
    console.error('error: ', response.err);
    statusCode = 500
  }

  return {
    statusCode: statusCode
  };
};

The processStream.js function is processing data capture records from the DynamoDB Stream, looking for the items deleted by TTL. The archive functionality is not implemented in this sample code.

exports.handler = async function (event) {
  event.Records.forEach((record) => {
    console.log('Stream record: ', JSON.stringify(record, null, 2));
    if (record.userIdentity.type == "Service" &&
      record.userIdentity.principalId == "dynamodb.amazonaws.com") {

      // Record deleted by DynamoDB Time to Live (TTL)
      
      // I can archive the record to S3, for example using Kinesis Data Firehose.
    }
  }
};

Let’s see if this works! First, I need to install all dependencies. To simplify dependencies, each release of AWS Solutions Constructs is linked to the corresponding version of the CDK. I this case, I am using version 1.46.0 for both the CDK and the AWS Solutions Constructs patterns. The first three commands are installing plain CDK constructs. The last two commands are installing the AWS Solutions Constructs patterns I am using for this application.

npm install @aws-cdk/[email protected]
npm install @aws-cdk/[email protected]
npm install @aws-cdk/[email protected]
npm install @aws-solutions-constructs/[email protected]
npm install @aws-solutions-constructs/[email protected]

Now, I build the application and use the CDK to deploy the application.

npm run build
cdk deploy

Towards the end of the output of the cdk deploy command, a green light is telling me that the deployment of the stack is completed. Just next, in the Outputs, I find the endpoint of the API Gateway.

 ✅  DemoConstructsStack

Outputs:
DemoConstructsStack.ApiGatewayToLambdaLambdaRestApiEndpoint9800D4B5 = https://1a2c3c4d.execute-api.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/prod/

I can now use curl to test the API:

curl "https://1a2c3c4d.execute-api.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/prod/danilop?name=Danilo&company=AWS"

Let’s have a look at the DynamoDB table:

The item is stored, and the TTL is set. After a week, the item will be deleted and sent via DynamoDB Streams to the processStream.js function.

After I complete my testing, I use the CDK again to quickly delete all resources created for this application:

cdk destroy

Available Now
The AWS Solutions Constructs are available now for TypeScript and Python. The AWS Solutions Builders team is working to make these constructs also available when using Java and C# with the CDK, stay tuned. There is no cost in using the AWS Solutions Constructs, or the CDK, you only pay for the resources created when deploying the stack.

In this first release, 25 patterns are included, covering lots of different use cases. Which new patterns and features should we focus now? Give use your feedback in the open source project repository!

Danilo

Building well-architected serverless applications: Approaching application lifecycle management – part 3

Post Syndicated from Julian Wood original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-well-architected-serverless-applications-approaching-application-lifecycle-management-part-3/

This series of blog posts uses the AWS Well-Architected Tool with the Serverless Lens to help customers build and operate applications using best practices. In each post, I address the nine serverless-specific questions identified by the Serverless Lens along with the recommended best practices. See the Introduction post for a table of contents and explanation of the example application.

Question OPS2: How do you approach application lifecycle management?

This post continues part 2 of this Operational Excellence question where I look at deploying to multiple stages using temporary environments, and rollout deployments. In part 1, I cover using infrastructure as code with version control to deploy applications in a repeatable manner.

Good practice: Use configuration management

Use environment variables and configuration management systems to make and track configuration changes. These systems reduce errors caused by manual processes, reduce the level of effort to deploy changes, and help isolate configuration from business logic.

Environment variables are suited for infrequently changing configuration options such as logging levels, and database connection strings. Configuration management systems are for dynamic configuration that might change frequently or contain sensitive data such as secrets.

Environment variables

The serverless airline example used in this series uses AWS Amplify Console environment variables to store application-wide settings.

For example, the Stripe payment keys for all branches, and names for individual branches, are visible within the Amplify Console in the Environment variables section.

AWS Amplify environment variables

AWS Amplify environment variables

AWS Lambda environment variables are set up as part of the function configuration stored using the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM).

For example, the airline booking ReserveBooking AWS SAM template sets global environment variables including the LOG_LEVEL with the following code.

Globals:
    Function:
        Environment:
            Variables:
                LOG_LEVEL: INFO

This is visible in the AWS Lambda console within the function configuration.

AWS Lambda environment variables in console

AWS Lambda environment variables in console

See the AWS Documentation for more information on using AWS Lambda environment variables and also how to store sensitive data. Amazon API Gateway can also pass stage-specific metadata to Lambda functions.

Dynamic configuration

Dynamic configuration is also stored in configuration management systems to specify external values and is unique to each environment. This configuration may include values such as an Amazon Simple Notification Service (Amazon SNS) topic, Lambda function name, or external API credentials. AWS System Manager Parameter Store, AWS Secrets Manager, and AWS AppConfig have native integrations with AWS CloudFormation to store dynamic configuration. For more information, see the examples for referencing dynamic configuration from within AWS CloudFormation.

For the serverless airline application, dynamic configuration is stored in AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store. During CloudFormation stack deployment, a number of parameters are stored in Systems Manager. For example, in the booking service AWS SAM template, the booking SNS topic ARN is stored.

BookingTopicParameter:
    Type: "AWS::SSM::Parameter"
    Properties:
        Name: !Sub /${Stage}/service/booking/messaging/bookingTopic
        Description: Booking SNS Topic ARN
        Type: String
        Value: !Ref BookingTopic

View the stored SNS topic value by navigating to the Parameter Store console, and search for BookingTopic.

Finding Systems Manager Parameter Store values

Finding Systems Manager Parameter Store values

Select the Parameter name and see the Amazon SNS ARN.

Viewing SNS topic value

Viewing SNS topic value

The loyalty service then references this value within another stack.

When the Amplify Console Makefile deploys the loyalty service, it retrieves this value for the booking service from Parameter Store, and references it as a parameter-override. The deployment is also parametrized with the $${AWS_BRANCH} environment variable if there are multiple environments within the same AWS account and Region.

sam deploy \
	--parameter-overrides \
	BookingSNSTopic=/$${AWS_BRANCH}/service/booking/messaging/bookingTopic

Environment variables and configuration management systems help with managing application configuration.

Improvement plan summary

  1. Use environment variables for configuration options that change infrequently such as logging levels, and database connection strings.
  2. Use a configuration management system for dynamic configuration that might change frequently or contain sensitive data such as secrets.

Best practice: Use CI/CD including automated testing across separate accounts

Continuous integration/delivery/deployment is one of the cornerstones of cloud application development and a vital part of a DevOps initiative.

Explanation of CI/CD stages

Explanation of CI/CD stages

Building CI/CD pipelines increases software delivery quality and feedback time for detecting and resolving errors. I cover how to deploy multiple stages in isolated environments and accounts, which helps with creating separate testing CI/CD pipelines in part 2. As the serverless airline example is using AWS Amplify Console, this comes with a built-in CI/CD pipeline.

Automate the build, deployment, testing, and rollback of the workload using KPI and operational alerts. This eases troubleshooting, enables faster remediation and feedback time, and enables automatic and manual rollback/roll-forward should an alert trigger.

I cover metrics, KPIs, and operational alerts in this series in the Application Health part 1, and part 2 posts. I cover rollout deployments with traffic shifting based on metrics in this question’s part 2.

CI/CD pipelines should include integration, and end-to-end tests. I cover local unit testing for Lambda and API Gateway in part 2.

Add an optional testing stage to Amplify Console to catch regressions before pushing code to production. Use the test step to run any test commands at build time using any testing framework of your choice. Amplify Console has deeper integration with the Cypress test suite that allows you to generate a UI report for your tests. Here is an example to set up end-to-end tests with Cypress.

Cypress testing example

Cypress testing example

There are a number of AWS and third-party solutions to host code and create CI/CD pipelines for serverless applications.

AWS Code Suite

AWS Code Suite

For more information on how to use the AWS Code* services together, see the detailed Quick Start deployment guide Serverless CI/CD for the Enterprise on AWS.

All these AWS services have a number of integrations with third-party products so you can integrate your serverless applications with your existing tools. For example, CodeBuild can build from GitHub and Atlassian Bitbucket repositories. CodeDeploy integrates with a number of developer tools and configuration management systems. CodePipeline has a number of pre-built integrations to use existing tools for your serverless applications. For more information specifically on using CircleCI for serverless applications, see Simplifying Serverless CI/CD with CircleCI and the AWS Serverless Application Model.

Improvement plan summary

  1. Use a continuous integration/continuous deployment (CI/CD) pipeline solution that deploys multiple stages in isolated environments/accounts.
  2. Automate testing including but not limited to unit, integration, and end-to-end tests.
  3. Favor rollout deployments over all-at-once deployments for more resilience, and gradually learn what metrics best determine your workload’s health to appropriately alert on.
  4. Use a deployment system that supports traffic shifting as part of your pipeline, and rollback/roll-forward traffic to previous versions if an alert is triggered.

Good practice: Review function runtime deprecation policy

Lambda functions created using AWS provided runtimes follow official long-term support deprecation policies. Third-party provided runtime deprecation policy may differ from official long-term support. Review your runtime deprecation policy and have a mechanism to report on runtimes that, if deprecated, may affect your workload to operate as intended.

Review the AWS Lambda runtime policy support page to understand the deprecation schedule for your runtime.

AWS Health provides ongoing visibility into the state of your AWS resources, services, and accounts. Use the AWS Personal Health Dashboard for a personalized view and automate custom notifications to communication channels other than your AWS Account email.

Use AWS Config to report on AWS Lambda function runtimes that might be near their deprecation. Run compliance and operational checks with AWS Config for Lambda functions.

If you are unable to migrate to newer runtimes within the deprecation schedule, use AWS Lambda custom runtimes as an interim solution.

Improvement plan summary

  1. Identify and report runtimes that might deprecate and their support policy.

Conclusion

Introducing application lifecycle management improves the development, deployment, and management of serverless applications. In part 1, I cover using infrastructure as code with version control to deploy applications in a repeatable manner. This reduces errors caused by manual processes and gives you more confidence your application works as expected. In part 2, I cover prototyping new features using temporary environments, and rollout deployments to gradually shift traffic to new application code.

In this post I cover configuration management, CI/CD for serverless applications, and managing function runtime deprecation.

In an upcoming post, I will cover the first Security question from the Well-Architected Serverless Lens – Controlling access to serverless APIs.

Building well-architected serverless applications: Approaching application lifecycle management – part 2

Post Syndicated from Julian Wood original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-well-architected-serverless-applications-approaching-application-lifecycle-management-part-2/

This series of blog posts uses the AWS Well-Architected Tool with the Serverless Lens to help customers build and operate applications using best practices. In each post, I address the nine serverless-specific questions identified by the Serverless Lens along with the recommended best practices. See the Introduction post for a table of contents and explanation of the example application.

Question OPS2: How do you approach application lifecycle management?

This post continues part 1 of this Operational Excellence question. Previously, I covered using infrastructure as code with version control to deploy applications in a repeatable manner.

Good practice: Prototype new features using temporary environments

Storing application configuration as infrastructure as code allows deployment of multiple, repeatable, isolated versions of an application.

Create multiple temporary environments for new features you may need to prototype, and tear them down as you complete them. Temporary environments enable fine grained feature isolation and higher fidelity development when interacting with managed services. This allows you to gain confidence your workload integrates and operates as intended.

These environments can also be in separate accounts which help isolate limits, access to data, and resiliency. For best practices on multi-account deployments, see the AWS Partner Network blog post: Best Practices Guide for Multi-Account AWS Deployments.

There are a number of ways to deploy separate environments for an application. To make the deployment simpler, it is good practice to separate dynamic configuration from your infrastructure logic.

For an application managed via the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM), use an AWS SAM CLI parameter to specify a new stack-name which deploys a new copy of the application as a separate stack.

For example, there is an existing AWS SAM application with a stack-name of app-test. To deploy a new copy, specify a new stack-name of app-newtest with the following command line:

sam deploy --stack-name app-newtest

This deploys a whole new copy of the application in the same account as a separate stack.

For the serverless airline example used in this series, deploy a whole new copy of the application following the deployment instructions, either into the same AWS account, or a completely different account. This is useful when each developer in a team has a sandbox environment. In this example, you only need to configure payment provider credentials as environment variables and seed the database with possible flights as these are currently manual post installation tasks.

However, maintaining an entirely separate codebase copy of an application becomes difficult to manage and reconcile over time.

As the airline application code is stored in a fork in a GitHub account, use git branches for separate environments. In typical development teams, developers may deploy a main branch to production, have a dev branch as staging, and create feature branches when working on new functionality. This allows safe prototyping in sandbox environments without affecting the main codebase, and use git as a mechanism to merge code and resolve conflicts. Changes are automatically pushed to production once they are merged into the main (or production) branch.

Git branching flow

Git branching flow

As the airline example is using AWS Amplify Console, there are a few different options to create a new environment linked to a feature branch.

You can create a whole new Amplify Console app deployment, either in a separate Region, or in a separate AWS account, which then connects to a feature branch by following the deployment instructions. Create a new branch called new-feature in GitHub and in the Amplify Console, select Connect App, and navigate to the repository and the new-feature branch. Configure the payment provider credentials as environment variables.

Deploy new application pointing to feature branch

You can also connect the existing Amplify Console deployment to a git branch, deploying the new-feature branch into the same AWS account and Region.

Amplify Environments

Amplify Environments

In the Amplify Console, navigate to the existing app, select Connect Branch, and choose the new-feature branch. Create a new Backend environment to deploy the full stack. If the feature branch is only frontend code changes, you can choose to use the same backend components.

Connect Amplify Console to feature branch

Connect Amplify Console to feature branch

Amplify Console then deploys a new stack in addition to the develop branch based on the code in the feature-branch.

New feature branch deploying within existing deployment.

New feature branch deploying within existing deployment.

You do not need to add the payment provider environment variables as these are stored per application, per Region, for all branches.

Amplify environment variables for All Branches.

Amplify environment variables for All Branches.

Using git and branching with Amplify Console, you have automatic deployments when any changes are pushed to the GitHub repository. If there are any issues with a particular deployment, you can revert the changes in git which will kick off a redeploy to a known good version. Once you are happy with the feature, you can merge the changes into the production branch which will again kick off another deployment.

As it is simple to set up multiple test environments, make sure to practice good application hygiene, as well as cost management, by identifying and deleting any temporary environments that are no longer required. It may be helpful to include the stack owner’s contact details via CloudFormation tags. Use Amazon CloudWatch scheduled tasks to notify and tag temporary environments for deletion, and provide a mechanism to delay its deletion if needed.

Prototyping locally

With AWS SAM or a third-party framework, you can run API Gateway, and invoke Lambda function code locally for faster development iteration. Local debugging and testing can help for quick confirmation that function code is working, and is also useful for some unit tests. Local testing cannot duplicate the full functionality of the cloud. It is suited to testing services with custom logic, such as Lambda, rather than trying to duplicate all cloud managed services such as Amazon SNS, or Amazon S3 locally. Don’t try to bring the cloud to the test, rather bring the testing to the cloud.

Here is an example of executing a function locally.

I use AWS SAM CLI to invoke the Airline-GetLoyalty Lambda function locally to test some functionality. AWS SAM CLI uses Docker to simulate the Lambda runtime. As the function only reads from DynamoDB, I use stubbed data, or can set up DynamoDB Local.

1. I pass a JSON event to the function to simulate the event from API Gateway, as well as passing in environment variables as JSON. Create sample events using sam local generate-event.

2. I run sam build GetFunc to build the function dependencies, in this case NodeJS.

$ sam build GetFunc
Building resource 'GetFunc'
Running NodejsNpmBuilder:NpmPack
Running NodejsNpmBuilder:CopyNpmrc
Running NodejsNpmBuilder:CopySource
Running NodejsNpmBuilder:NpmInstall
Running NodejsNpmBuilder:CleanUpNpmrc

Build Succeeded

3. I run sam local invoke passing in the event payload and environment variables. This spins up a Docker container, executes the function, and returns the result.

$ sam local invoke --event src/get/event.json --env-vars local-env-vars.json GetFunc
Invoking index.handler (nodejs10.x)

Fetching lambci/lambda:nodejs10.x Docker container image......
Mounting /home/ec2-user/environment/samples/aws-serverless-airline-booking/src/backend/loyalty/.aws-sam/build/GetFunc as /var/task:ro,delegated inside runtime container
START RequestId: 7be7e9a5-9f2f-1520-fbd1-a013485105d3 Version: $LATEST
END RequestId: 7be7e9a5-9f2f-1520-fbd1-a013485105d3
REPORT RequestId: 7be7e9a5-9f2f-1520-fbd1-a013485105d3 Init Duration: 249.89 ms Duration: 76.40 ms Billed Duration: 100 ms Memory Size: 512 MB Max Memory Used: 54 MB

{"statusCode": 200,"body": "{\"points\":0,\"level\":\"bronze\",\"remainingPoints\":50000}"}

For more information on using AWS SAM to run API Gateway, and invoke Lambda functions locally, see the AWS Documentation. For third-part framework solutions, see Invoking AWS Lambda functions locally with Serverless framework and Develop locally against cloud services with Stackery.

Improvement plan summary:

  1. Use a serverless framework to deploy temporary environments named after a feature.
  2. Implement a process to identify temporary environments that may not have been deleted over an extended period of time
  3. Prototype application code locally and test integrations directly with managed services

Good practice: Use a rollout deployment mechanism

Use a rollout deployment for production workloads as opposed to all-at-once mechanisms. Rollout deployments reduce the risk of a failed deployment by gradually deploying application changes to a limited set of customers. Use all-at-once deployments to deploy the entire application. This is best suited for non-production systems.

AWS Lambda versions and aliases

For production Lambda functions, it is best to deploy a new function version for every deployment. Versions can represent the stable version or reflect particular features. Create Lambda aliases which are pointers to particular function versions. Invoke Lambda functions using the aliases, with a specific alias for the stable production version. If an alias is not specified, the latest application code deployment is invoked which may not reflect a stable version or a desired feature. Use the new feature alias version for testing without affecting users of the stable production version.

AWS Lambda function versions and aliases

AWS Lambda function versions and aliases

See AWS Documentation to manage Lambda function versions and aliases using the AWS Management Console, or Lambda API.

Alias routing

Use Lambda alias’ routing configuration to introduce traffic shifting to send a small percentage of traffic to a second function alias or version for a rolling deployment. This is commonly called a canary release.

For example, configure Lambda alias named stable to point to function version 2. A new function version 3 is deployed with alias new-feature. Use the new-feature alias to test the new deployment without impacting production traffic to the stable version.

During production rollout, use alias routing. For example, 90% of invocations route to the stable version while 10% route to alias new-feature pointing to version 3. If the 10% is successful, deployment can continue until all traffic is migrated to version 3, and the stable alias is then pointed to version 3.

AWS Lambda alias routing

AWS Lambda alias routing

AWS SAM supports gradual Lambda deployments with a feature called Safe Lambda deployments using AWS CodeDeploy. This creates new versions of a Lambda function, and automatically creates aliases pointing to the new version. Customer traffic gradually shifts to the new version or rolls back automatically if any specified CloudWatch alarms trigger. AWS SAM supports canary, linear, and all-at-once deployments preference types.

Pre-traffic and post-traffic Lambda functions can also verify if the newly deployed code is working as expected.

In the airline example, create a safe deployment for the ReserveBooking Lambda function by adding the example AWS SAM template code specified in the instructions. This migrates 10 percent of traffic every 10 minutes with CloudWatch alarms to check for any function errors. You could also alarm on latency, or any custom metric.

During the Amplify Console build phase, the safe deployment is initiated. Navigate to the CodeDeploy console and see the deployment in progress.

AWS CodeDeploy deployment in progress

AWS CodeDeploy deployment in progress

Selecting the deployment, you can see the Traffic shifting progress and the Deployment details.

AWS CodeDeploy traffic shifting in progress.

AWS CodeDeploy traffic shifting in progress.

Within Deployment details, select the DeploymentGroup, and view the CloudWatch Alarms CodeDeploy is using to test the rollout.

Amazon CloudWatch Alarms AWS CodeDeploy is using to test the rollout

Amazon CloudWatch Alarms AWS CodeDeploy is using to test the rollout

Within Deployment details, select the Application, select the Revisions tab, and select the latest Revision location and view the CurrentVersion and TargetVersion for this deployment.

View deployment versions

View deployment versions

View Deployment status and see the traffic has now shifted to the new version. The Amplify Console build also continues.

Traffic shifting complete

Traffic shifting complete

View the Lambda function versions and aliases in the Lambda console, selecting Qualifiers.

Viewing Lambda function version and aliases

Viewing Lambda function version and aliases

Amazon API Gateway also supports canary release deployments at the API layer.

A rollout deployment provides traffic shifting, A/B testing, and the ability to roll back to any version at any point in time. AWS SAM makes it simple to add safe deployments to serverless applications.

Improvement plan summary

  1. For production systems, use a linear deployment strategy to gradually rollout changes to customers.
  2. For high volume production systems, use a canary deployment strategy when you want to limit changes to a fixed percentage of customers for an extended period of time.

Conclusion

Introducing application lifecycle management improves the development, deployment, and management of serverless applications. In this post I cover a number of methods to prototype new features using temporary environments. I show how to use rollout deployments to gradually shift traffic to new application code.

This well-architected question will continue in an upcoming post where I look at configuration management, CI/CD for serverless applications, and managing function runtime deprecation.

Building well-architected serverless applications: Approaching application lifecycle management – part 1

Post Syndicated from Julian Wood original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-well-architected-serverless-applications-approaching-application-lifecycle-management-part-1/

This series of blog posts uses the AWS Well-Architected Tool with the Serverless Lens to help customers build and operate applications using best practices. In each post, I address the nine serverless-specific questions identified by the Serverless Lens along with the recommended best practices. See the Introduction post for a table of contents and explanation of the example application.

Question OPS2: How do you approach application lifecycle management?

Adopt lifecycle management approaches that improve the flow of changes to production with higher fidelity, fast feedback on quality, and quick bug fixing. These practices help you rapidly identify, remediate, and limit changes that impact customer experience. By having an approach to application lifecycle management, you can reduce errors caused by manual process and increase the levels of control to gain confidence your workload operates as intended.

Required practice: Use infrastructure as code and stages isolated in separate environments

Infrastructure as code is a process of provisioning and managing cloud resources by storing application configuration in a template file. Using infrastructure as code helps to deploy applications in a repeatable manner, reducing errors caused by manual processes such as creating resources in the AWS Management Console.

Storing code in a version control system enables tracking and auditing of changes and releases over time. This is used to roll back changes safely to a known working state if there is an issue with an application deployment.

Infrastructure as code

For AWS Cloud development the built-in choice for infrastructure as code is AWS CloudFormation. The template file, written in JSON or YAML, contains a description of the resources an application needs. CloudFormation automates the deployment and ongoing updates of the resources by creating CloudFormation stacks.

CloudFormation code example creating infrastructure

CloudFormation code example creating infrastructure

There are a number of higher-level tools and frameworks that abstract and then generate CloudFormation. A serverless specific framework helps model the infrastructure necessary for serverless workloads, providing either declarative or imperative mechanisms to define event sources for functions. It wires permissions between resources automatically, adds resource configuration, code packaging, and any infrastructure necessary for a serverless application to run.

The AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) is an AWS open-source framework optimized for serverless applications. The AWS Cloud Development Kit allows you to provision cloud resources using familiar programming languages such as TypeScript, JavaScript, Python, Java, and C#/.Net. There are also third-party solutions for creating serverless cloud resources such as the Serverless Framework.

The AWS Amplify Console provides a git-based workflow for building, deploying, and hosting serverless applications including both the frontend and backend. The AWS Amplify CLI toolchain enables you to add backend resources using CloudFormation.

For a large number of resources, consider breaking common functionality such as monitoring, alarms, or dashboards into separate infrastructure as code templates. With CloudFormation, use nested stacks to help deploy them as part of your serverless application stack. When using AWS SAM, import these nested stacks as nested applications from the AWS Serverless Application Repository.

AWS CloudFormation nested stacks

AWS CloudFormation nested stacks

Here is an example AWS SAM template using nested stacks. There are two AWS::Serverless::Application nested resources, api.template.yaml and database.template.yaml. For more information on nested stacks, see the AWS Partner Network blog post: CloudFormation Nested Stacks Primer.

Version control

The serverless airline example application used in this series uses Amplify Console to provide part of the backend resources, including authentication using Amazon Cognito, and a GraphQL API using AWS AppSync.

The airline application code is stored in GitHub as a version control system. Fork, or copy, the application to your GitHub account. Configure Amplify Console to connect to the GitHub fork.

When pushing code changes to a fork, Amplify Console automatically deploys these backend resources along with the rest of the application. It hosts the application at the Production branch URL, and you can also configure a custom domain name if needed.

AWS Amplify Console App details

AWS Amplify Console App details

The Amplify Console configuration to create the API and Authentication backend resources is found in the backend-config.json file. The resources are provisioned during the Amplify Console build phase.

To view the deployed resources, within the Amplify Console, navigate to the awsserverlessairline application. Select Backend environments and then select an environment, in this example sampledev.

Select the API and Authentication tabs to view the created backend resources.

AWS Amplify Console deployed backend resources

AWS Amplify Console deployed backend resources

Using multiple tools

Applications can use multiple tools and frameworks even within a single project to manage the infrastructure as code. Within the airline application, AWS SAM is also used to provision the rest of the serverless infrastructure using nested stacks. During the Amplify Console build process, the Makefile contains the AWS SAM build instructions for each application service.

For example, the AWS SAM build instructions to deploy the booking service are as follows:

deploy.booking: ##=> Deploy booking service using SAM
	$(info [*] Packaging and deploying Booking service...)
	cd src/backend/booking && \
		sam build && \
		sam package \
			--s3-bucket $${DEPLOYMENT_BUCKET_NAME} \
			--output-template-file packaged.yaml && \
		sam deploy \
			--template-file packaged.yaml \
			--stack-name $${STACK_NAME}-booking-$${AWS_BRANCH} \
			--capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM \
			--parameter-overrides \
	BookingTable=/$${AWS_BRANCH}/service/amplify/storage/table/booking \
	FlightTable=/$${AWS_BRANCH}/service/amplify/storage/table/flight \
	CollectPaymentFunction=/$${AWS_BRANCH}/service/payment/function/collect \
	RefundPaymentFunction=/$${AWS_BRANCH}/service/payment/function/refund \
	AppsyncApiId=/$${AWS_BRANCH}/service/amplify/api/id \
	Stage=$${AWS_BRANCH}

Each service has its own AWS SAM template.yml file. The files contain the resources for each of the booking, catalog, log-processing, loyalty, and payment services. This means that the services can be managed independently within the application as separate stacks. In larger applications, these services may be managed by separate teams, or be in separate repositories, environments or AWS accounts. It may make sense to split out some common functionality such as alarms, or dashboards into separate infrastructure as code templates.

AWS SAM can also use IAM roles to assume temporary credentials and deploy a serverless application to separate AWS accounts.

For more information on managing serverless code, see Best practices for organizing larger serverless applications.

View the deployed resources in the AWS CloudFormation Console. Select Stacks from the left-side navigation bar, and select the View nested toggle.

Viewing CloudFormation nested stacks

Viewing CloudFormation nested stacks

The serverless airline application is a more complex example application comprising multiple services composed of multiple CloudFormation stacks. Some stacks are managed via Amplify Console and others via AWS SAM. Using infrastructure as code is not only for large and complex applications. As a best practice, we suggest using SAM or another framework for even simple, small serverless applications with a single stack. For a getting started tutorial, see the example Deploying a Hello World Application.

Improvement plan summary:

  1. Use a serverless framework to help you execute functions locally, build and package application code. Separate packaging from deployment, deploy to isolated stages in separate environments, and support secrets via configuration management systems.
  2. For a large number of resources, consider breaking common functionalities such as alarms into separate infrastructure as code templates.

Conclusion

Introducing application lifecycle management improves the development, deployment, and management of serverless applications. In this post I cover using infrastructure as code with version control to deploy applications in a repeatable manner. This reduces errors caused by manual processes and gives you more confidence your application works as expected.

This well-architected question will continue in an upcoming post where I look further at deploying to multiple stages using temporary environments, and rollout deployments.

How to create SAML providers with AWS CloudFormation

Post Syndicated from Rich McDonough original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-create-saml-providers-with-aws-cloudformation/

As organizations grow, they often experience an inflection point where it becomes impractical to manually manage separate user accounts in disparate systems. Managing multiple AWS accounts is no exception. Many large organizations have dozens or even hundreds of AWS accounts spread across multiple business units.

AWS provides many solutions that can orchestrate a person’s identity across multiple accounts. AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), SAML, and OpenID can all help. The solution I describe in this post uses these features and services and can scale to thousands of AWS accounts. It provides a repeatable and automated means for deploying a unified identity management structure across all of your AWS environments. It does this while extending existing identity management into AWS without needing to change your current sources of user information.

About multi-account management

This approach uses AWS CloudFormation StackSets to deploy an identity provider and AWS IAM roles into multiple accounts. Roles may be tailored for your business needs and mapped to administrators, power users, or highly specialized roles that perform domain-specific tasks within your environment. StackSets are a highly scalable tool for multi-account orchestration and enforcement of policies across an organization.

Before deploying this solution across your organization, I recommend that you deploy the stack below into a single AWS account for testing purposes. Then, extend the solution using StackSets across your organization once tested. For more information about AWS CloudFormation Stacks and StackSets, see our documentation.

About SAML and SAML providers

Security Assertion Markup Language 2.0 (SAML) is an open standard for exchanging identity and security information with applications and other external systems. For example, if your organization uses Microsoft Active Directory, you can federate your user accounts to other organizations by way of SAML assertions. Actions that users take in the external organization can then be mapped to the identity of the original user and executed with a role that has predetermined privileges.

If you’re new to SAML, don’t worry! Not only is it ubiquitous, it’s also well documented. Many websites use it to drive their security and infrastructure, and you may have already used it without knowing it. For more information about SAML and AWS, I suggest you start with Enabling SAML for Your AWS Resources.

Properly configured SAML federation provides core security requirements for authentication and authorization, while maintaining a single source of truth for who your users are. It also enables important constraints such as multi-factor authentication and centralized access management. Within AWS IAM, you setup a SAML trust by configuring your identity provider with information about AWS and the AWS IAM roles that you want your federated users to use. SAML is secured using public key authentication.

This solution is a companion to the blog post AWS Federated Authentication with Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS), but it can be applied to any SAML provider.

Solution overview

To orchestrate SAML providers across multiple accounts, you will need the following:

  • A basic understanding of federated users.
  • An identity provider that supports SAML, such as Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS), or Shibboleth.
  • An Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) bucket to host the provider’s federation metadata file.
  • An AWS account that can create StackSets in other accounts. Usually, this is an AWS Organizations master account, with StackSets provisioned into member accounts. See the AWS Organizations User Guide for more details.

Note: You can adapt this solution to retrieve federation metadata from a HTTPS endpoint, such as those published by publicly hosted identity providers, but this solution does not currently offer that.

At this time, CloudFormation does not directly support provisioning a SAML provider. However, you can accomplish this by using a custom resource Lambda function. The sample code provided in this post takes this one step further and deploys your federation metadata from a secure Amazon S3 bucket, as some organizations have requirements about how this metadata is stored.
 

Figure 1: Architecture diagram

Figure 1: Architecture diagram

Here’s what the solution architecture looks like, as shown in Figure 1:

  1. An AWS CloudFormation template is created within an AWS account. Most commonly this is your master account within AWS Organizations, but it can be a standalone account as well.
  2. The AWS CloudFormation template is deployed to other AWS accounts within your organization using AWS CloudFormation StackSets.
  3. The AWS CloudFormation StackSet creates the following resources:
    1. A new read-only role within AWS IAM that uses the new identity provider as the principal in the IAM role’s trust policy. This is a sample that I use to demonstrate how you can deploy IAM Roles that are bound to a single, dedicated identity provider.
    2. An execution role for a custom resource AWS Lambda function.
    3. The AWS Lambda function, which creates the identity provider within the destination account.
  4. The new AWS Lambda function is executed, pulling your federation metadata from the master account’s S3 Bucket and creating the new Identity Provider.

Step 1: Upload your federation metadata to a restricted S3 bucket

To ensure that your SAML provider’s federation metadata is exposed only to accounts within your AWS organization, you can upload the metadata to an Amazon S3 bucket and then restrict access to accounts within your organization. The bucket policy follows this template:


{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Id": "Policy1545178796950",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Principal": {
                "AWS": "*"
            },
            "Action": "s3:GetObject",
            "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::<replace with bucket name>/*",
            "Condition": {
                "StringEquals": {
                    "aws:PrincipalOrgID": "<replace with organization ID>"
                }
            }
        }
    ]
}

Once this Amazon S3 bucket policy is in place, upload your federation metadata document to the bucket and note the object URL.

If your organization can share your federation metadata publicly, then there’s no need for this bucket policy. Simply upload your file to the S3 bucket, and make the bucket publicly accessible.

Step 2: Launch the CloudFormation template

To create the SAML provider within AWS IAM, this solution uses a custom resource Lambda function, as CloudFormation does not currently offer the ability to create the configuration directly. In this case, I show you how to use the AWS API to create a SAML provider in each of your member accounts, pulling the federation metadata from an S3 bucket owned by the organization master account.

The actual CloudFormation template follows. A sample read-only role has been included, but I encourage you to replace this with IAM roles that make sense for your environment. Save this template to your local workstation, or to your code repository for tracking infrastructure changes (if you need a source code management system, we recommend AWS CodeCommit).


---
AWSTemplateFormatVersion: 2010-09-09
Description: Create SAML provider

Parameters:
  FederationName:
    Type: String
    Description: Name of SAML provider being created in IAM
  FederationBucket:
    Type: String
    Description: Bucket containing federation metadata
  FederationFile:
    Type: String
    Description: Name of file containing the federation metadata

Resources:
  FederatedReadOnlyRole:
    Type: AWS::IAM::Role
    Properties:
      RoleName: Federated-ReadOnly
      AssumeRolePolicyDocument:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Statement:
          - Effect: Allow
            Action: sts:AssumeRoleWithSAML
            Principal:
              Federated: !Sub arn:aws:iam::${AWS::AccountId}:saml-provider/${FederationName}
            Condition:
              StringEquals:
                SAML:aud: https://signin.aws.amazon.com/saml
      Path: '/'
      ManagedPolicyArns:
        - arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/ReadOnlyAccess

  SAMLProviderCustomResourceLambdaExecutionRole:
    Type: AWS::IAM::Role
    Properties:
      AssumeRolePolicyDocument:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Statement:
          - Effect: Allow
            Principal:
              Service:
                - lambda.amazonaws.com
            Action:
              - sts:AssumeRole
      Path: "/"
      Policies:
        - PolicyName: root
          PolicyDocument:
            Version: '2012-10-17'
            Statement:
              - Effect: Allow
                Action:
                  - logs:CreateLogGroup
                  - logs:CreateLogStream
                  - logs:PutLogEvents
                Resource: 'arn:aws:logs:*:*:log-group:/aws/lambda/*-SAMLProviderCustomResourceLambda-*:*'
              - Effect: Allow
                Action:
                  - iam:CreateSAMLProvider
                  - iam:DeleteSAMLProvider
                Resource: !Sub arn:aws:iam::${AWS::AccountId}:saml-provider/${FederationName}
              - Effect: Allow
                Action:
                  - iam:ListSAMLProviders
                Resource: '*'
              - Effect: Allow
                Action:
                  - s3:GetObject
                Resource: !Sub 'arn:aws:s3:::${FederationBucket}/*'

  CustomResource:
    Type: Custom::CustomResource
    DependsOn:
      - SAMLProviderCustomResourceLambda
      - SAMLProviderCustomResourceLambdaExecutionRole
    Properties:
      ServiceToken: !GetAtt SAMLProviderCustomResourceLambda.Arn

  SAMLProviderCustomResourceLambda:
    Type: "AWS::Lambda::Function"
    Properties:
      Handler: index.lambda_handler
      Role: !GetAtt SAMLProviderCustomResourceLambdaExecutionRole.Arn
      Runtime: python3.7
      Timeout: 300
      Environment:
        Variables:
          FEDERATION_NAME: !Ref FederationName
          FEDERATION_BUCKET: !Ref FederationBucket
          FEDERATION_FILE: !Ref FederationFile
      Code:
        ZipFile: |
          import boto3, json, os, urllib.request, ssl, time, traceback


          BUCKET = os.getenv('FEDERATION_BUCKET')
          FILE = os.getenv('FEDERATION_FILE')
          NAME = os.getenv('FEDERATION_NAME')


          class SAMLProvider(object):
              def __init__(self):
                  self.iam_client = boto3.client('iam')
                  self.existing_providers = []
                  self._list_saml_providers()
                  self.s3 = boto3.resource('s3')

              def get_federation_metadata(self):
                  try:
                      self.s3.Bucket(BUCKET).download_file(FILE, '/tmp/' + FILE)
                      handle = open('/tmp/' + FILE)
                      data = handle.read()
                      handle.close()
                      os.remove('/tmp/' + FILE)
                      return data
                  except:
                      traceback.print_exc()
                      raise

              def _list_saml_providers(self):
                  providers = []
                  response = self.iam_client.list_saml_providers()
                  for provider in response['SAMLProviderList']:
                      self.existing_providers.append(provider['Arn'])

              def add_saml_provider(self, name):
                  for arn in self.existing_providers:
                      if arn.split('/')[1] == name:
                          print(name + ' already exists as a provider')
                          return False
                  response = self.iam_client.create_saml_provider(SAMLMetadataDocument=self.get_federation_metadata(), Name=name)
                  print('Create response: ' + str(response))
                  return True

              def delete_saml_provider(self, name):
                  for arn in self.existing_providers:
                      if arn.split('/')[1] == name:
                          response = self.iam_client.delete_saml_provider(SAMLProviderArn=arn)
                          print('Delete response: ' + str(response))

          def send_response(event, context, response_status, response_data):
              response_body = json.dumps({
                  'Status': response_status,
                  'Reason': 'See the details in CloudWatch Log Stream: ' + context.log_stream_name,
                  'PhysicalResourceId': context.log_stream_name,
                  'StackId': event['StackId'],
                  'RequestId': event['RequestId'],
                  'LogicalResourceId': event['LogicalResourceId'],
                  'Data': response_data
              })
              print('ResponseURL: %s', event['ResponseURL'])
              print('ResponseBody: %s', response_body)
              try:
                  opener = urllib.request.build_opener(urllib.request.HTTPHandler)
                  request = urllib.request.Request(event['ResponseURL'], data=response_body.encode())
                  request.add_header('Content-Type', '')
                  request.add_header('Content-Length', len(response_body))
                  request.get_method = lambda: 'PUT'
                  response = opener.open(request)
                  print("Status code: %s", response.getcode())
                  print("Status message: %s", response.msg)
              except:
                  traceback.print_exc()


          def lambda_handler(event, context):
              print(event)
              print(context)
              saml = SAMLProvider()
              try:
                  if event['RequestType'] == 'Create':
                      saml.add_saml_provider(NAME)
                      send_response(event, context, 'SUCCESS', {"Message": "Resource creation successful!"})
                  if event['RequestType'] == 'Update':
                      saml.delete_saml_provider(NAME)
                      time.sleep(10)
                      saml.add_saml_provider(NAME)
                      send_response(event, context, 'SUCCESS', {"Message": "Resource update successful!"})
                  if event['RequestType'] == 'Delete':
                      saml.delete_saml_provider(NAME)
                      send_response(event, context, 'SUCCESS', {"Message": "Resource deletion successful!"})
              except:
                  send_response(event, context, "FAILED", {"Message": "Exception during processing"})
                  traceback.print_exc()

As you review this template, note that a Python Lambda function is embedded in the template body itself. This is a useful way to package code along with your CloudFormation templates. The limit for the length of code inline within a CloudFormation template is fixed, as detailed in the AWS CloudFormation user guide. Code that exceeds this length must be saved to a separate location within an Amazon S3 bucket and referenced from your template. However, the preceding snippet is short enough to be included all in one CloudFormation template.

Step 3: Create the StackSet

With your SAML provider metadata securely uploaded to your Amazon S3 bucket, it’s time to create the StackSet.

  1. First, navigate to the CloudFormation console and select StackSets, then Create StackSet.
     
    Figure 2: Creating a new StackSet

    Figure 2: Creating a new StackSet

  2. Select Template is ready, then Upload a template file. Select Choose file to choose the location of the CloudFormation template, then select Next.
     
    Figure 3: Specifying the template details

    Figure 3: Specifying the template details

  3. Enter a value for StackSet name. Then provide the following configuration parameters and select Next:
    1. FederationName: The name of the SAML provider. This is the name of the provider as you see it in IAM once provisioned, and it appears in the ARN of the SAML provider.
    2. FederationFile: The file name within S3.
    3. FederationBucket: The name of the S3 bucket.

     

    Figure 4: Specifying the StackSet parameters

    Figure 4: Specifying the StackSet parameters

  4. In the Account numbers field, enter the list of accounts into which you wish to provision this stack. Select a Region from the drop-down menu, then select any concurrent deployment options that you need. For most customers, the concurrent and failure tolerance options generally remain unmodified.

    Important: When you enter your list of accounts, you must use the 12-digit account number for each destination, without spaces, and separated by commas.

    Because IAM is a global service, there is no need to deploy this to multiple regions. The template must be deployed once per AWS account, although it is managed by a CloudFormation Stack that exists in a single Region.
     

    Figure 5: Selecting your deployment options

    Figure 5: Selecting your deployment options

  5. Depending on your organization’s security posture, you may have chosen to use self-managed permissions. If that is the case, then you must specify an AWS IAM role that is permitted to execute StackSet deployments, as well as an execution role in the destination accounts. For more info, visit the StackSets’ Grant Self-Managed Permissions documentation page.
  6. Review your selections, accept the IAM role creation acknowledgment, and click Submit to create your stacks. Once completed, ensure that the new identity provider is present in each account by visiting the AWS IAM console.

Summary

Creating a SAML provider across multiple AWS accounts enables enterprises to extend their existing authentication infrastructure into the cloud.

You can extend the solution provided here to deploy different federation metadata to AWS accounts based on specific criteria—for example, if your development and staging accounts have a separate identity provider. You can also add simple logic to the Lambda function that I’ve included in the CloudFormation template. Additionally, you might need to create any number of predefined roles within your AWS organization—using the StackSets approach enables a zero-touch means for creating these roles from a central location.

Organizations looking for even stronger controls over multiple accounts should implement this solution with AWS Organizations. Combined with federated access and centrally managed IAM roles, Organizations provides Service Control Policies and a common framework for deploying CloudFormation Stacks across multiple business units.

If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below. If you have questions about this post, contact AWS Support.

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Author

Rich McDonough

Rich McDonough is a Solutions Architect for Amazon Web Services based in Toronto. His primary focus is on Management and Governance, helping customers scale their use of AWS safely and securely. Before joining AWS two years ago, he specialized in helping migrate customers into the cloud. Rich loves helping customers learn about AWS CloudFormation, AWS Config, and AWS Control Tower.

Building a CI/CD pipeline for multi-region deployment with AWS CodePipeline

Post Syndicated from Akash Kumar original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/building-a-ci-cd-pipeline-for-multi-region-deployment-with-aws-codepipeline/

This post discusses the benefits of and how to build an AWS CI/CD pipeline in AWS CodePipeline for multi-region deployment. The CI/CD pipeline triggers on application code changes pushed to your AWS CodeCommit repository. This automatically feeds into AWS CodeBuild for static and security analysis of the CloudFormation template. Another CodeBuild instance builds the application to generate an AMI image as output. AWS Lambda then copies the AMI image to other Regions. Finally, AWS CloudFormation cross-region actions are triggered and provision the instance into target Regions based on AMI image.

The solution is based on using a single pipeline with cross-region actions, which helps in provisioning resources in the current Region and other Regions. This solution also helps manage the complete CI/CD pipeline at one place in one Region and helps as a single point for monitoring and deployment changes. This incurs less cost because a single pipeline can deploy the application into multiple Regions.

As a security best practice, the solution also incorporates static and security analysis using cfn-lint and cfn-nag. You use these tools to scan CloudFormation templates for security vulnerabilities.

The following diagram illustrates the solution architecture.

Multi region AWS CodePipeline architecture

Multi region AWS CodePipeline architecture

Prerequisites

Before getting started, you must complete the following prerequisites:

  • Create a repository in CodeCommit and provide access to your user
  • Copy the sample source code from GitHub under your repository
  • Create an Amazon S3 bucket in the current Region and each target Region for your artifact store

Creating a pipeline with AWS CloudFormation

You use a CloudFormation template for your CI/CD pipeline, which can perform the following actions:

  1. Use CodeCommit repository as source code repository
  2. Static code analysis on the CloudFormation template to check against the resource specification and block provisioning if this check fails
  3. Security code analysis on the CloudFormation template to check against secure infrastructure rules and block provisioning if this check fails
  4. Compilation and unit test of application code to generate an AMI image
  5. Copy the AMI image into target Regions for deployment
  6. Deploy into multiple Regions using the CloudFormation template; for example, us-east-1, us-east-2, and ap-south-1

You use a sample web application to run through your pipeline, which requires Java and Apache Maven for compilation and testing. Additionally, it uses Tomcat 8 for deployment.

The following table summarizes the resources that the CloudFormation template creates.

Resource NameTypeObjective
CloudFormationServiceRoleAWS::IAM::RoleService role for AWS CloudFormation
CodeBuildServiceRoleAWS::IAM::RoleService role for CodeBuild
CodePipelineServiceRoleAWS::IAM::RoleService role for CodePipeline
LambdaServiceRoleAWS::IAM::RoleService role for Lambda function
SecurityCodeAnalysisServiceRoleAWS::IAM::RoleService role for security analysis of provisioning CloudFormation template
StaticCodeAnalysisServiceRoleAWS::IAM::RoleService role for static analysis of provisioning CloudFormation template
StaticCodeAnalysisProjectAWS::CodeBuild::ProjectCodeBuild for static analysis of provisioning CloudFormation template
SecurityCodeAnalysisProjectAWS::CodeBuild::ProjectCodeBuild for security analysis of provisioning CloudFormation template
CodeBuildProjectAWS::CodeBuild::ProjectCodeBuild for compilation, testing, and AMI creation
CopyImageAWS::Lambda::FunctionPython Lambda function for copying AMI images into other Regions
AppPipelineAWS::CodePipeline::PipelineCodePipeline for CI/CD

To start creating your pipeline, complete the following steps:

  • Launch the CloudFormation stack with the following link:
Launch button for CloudFormation

Launch button for CloudFormation

  • Choose Next.
  • For Specify details, provide the following values:
ParameterDescription
Stack nameName of your stack
OtherRegion1Input the target Region 1 (other than current Region) for deployment
OtherRegion2Input the target Region 2 (other than current Region) for deployment
RepositoryBranchBranch name of repository
RepositoryNameRepository name of the project
S3BucketNameInput the S3 bucket name for artifact store
S3BucketNameForOtherRegion1Create a bucket in target Region 1 and specify the name for artifact store
S3BucketNameForOtherRegion2Create a bucket in target Region 2 and specify the name for artifact store

Choose Next.

  • On the Review page, select I acknowledge that this template might cause AWS CloudFormation to create IAM resources.
  • Choose Create.
  • Wait for the CloudFormation stack status to change to CREATE_COMPLETE (this takes approximately 5–7 minutes).

When the stack is complete, your pipeline should be ready and running in the current Region.

  • To validate the pipeline, check the images and EC2 instances running into the target Regions and also refer the AWS CodePipeline Execution summary as below.
AWS CodePipeline Execution Summary

AWS CodePipeline Execution Summary

We will walk you through the following steps for creating a multi-region deployment pipeline:

1. Using CodeCommit as your source code repository

The deployment workflow starts by placing the application code on the CodeCommit repository. When you add or update the source code in CodeCommit, the action generates a CloudWatch event, which triggers the pipeline to run.

2. Static code analysis of CloudFormation template to provision AWS resources

Historically, AWS CloudFormation linting was limited to the ValidateTemplate action in the service API. This action tells you if your template is well-formed JSON or YAML, but doesn’t help validate the actual resources you’ve defined.

You can use a linter such as the cfn-lint tool for static code analysis to improve your AWS CloudFormation development cycle. The tool validates the provisioning CloudFormation template properties and their values (mappings, joins, splits, conditions, and nesting those functions inside each other) against the resource specification. This can cover the most common of the underlying service constraints and help encode some best practices.

The following rules cover underlying service constraints:

  • E2530 – Checks that Lambda functions have correctly configured memory sizes
  • E3025 – Checks that your RDS instances use correct instance types for the database engine
  • W2001 – Checks that each parameter is used at least once

You can also add this step as a pre-commit hook for your GIT repository if you are using CodeCommit or GitHub.

You provision a CodeBuild project for static code analysis as the first step in CodePipeline after source. This helps in early detection of any linter issues.

3. Security code analysis of CloudFormation template to provision AWS resources

You can use Stelligent’s cfn_nag tool to perform additional validation of your template resources for security. The cfn-nag tool looks for patterns in CloudFormation templates that may indicate insecure infrastructure provisioning and validates against AWS best practices. For example:

  • IAM rules that are too permissive (wildcards)
  • Security group rules that are too permissive (wildcards)
  • Access logs that aren’t enabled
  • Encryption that isn’t enabled
  • Password literals

You provision a CodeBuild project for security code analysis as the second step in CodePipeline. This helps detect any insecure infrastructure provisioning issues.

4. Compiling and testing application code and generating an AMI image

Because you use a Java-based application for this walkthrough, you use Amazon Corretto as your JVM. Corretto is a no-cost, multi-platform, production-ready distribution of the Open Java Development Kit (OpenJDK). Corretto comes with long-term support that includes performance enhancements and security fixes.

You also use Apache Maven as a build automation tool to build the sample application, and the HashiCorp Packer tool to generate an AMI image for the application.

You provision a CodeBuild project for compilation, unit testing, AMI generation, and storing the AMI ImageId in the Parameter Store, which the CloudFormation template uses as the next step of the pipeline.

5. Copying the AMI image into target Regions

You use a Lambda function to copy the AMI image into target Regions so the CloudFormation template can use it to provision instances into that Region as the next step of the pipeline. It also writes the target Region AMI ImageId into the target Region’s Parameter Store.

6. Deploying into multiple Regions with the CloudFormation template

You use the CloudFormation template as a cross-region action to provision AWS resources into a target Region. CloudFormation uses Parameter Store’s ImageId as reference and provisions the instances into the target Region.

Cleaning up

To avoid additional charges, you should delete the following AWS resources after you validate the pipeline:

  • The cross-region CloudFormation stack in the target and current Regions
  • The main CloudFormation stack in the current Region
  • The AMI you created in the target and current Regions
  • The Parameter Store AMI_VERSION in the target and current Regions

Conclusion

You have now created a multi-region deployment pipeline in CodePipeline without having to worry about the mechanics of creating and copying AMI images across Regions. CodePipeline abstracts the creating and copying of the images in the background in each Region. You can now upload new source code changes to the CodeCommit repository in the primary Region, and changes deploy automatically to other Regions. Cross-region actions are very powerful and are not limited to deploy actions. You can also use them with build and test actions.

Building well-architected serverless applications: Understanding application health – part 2

Post Syndicated from Julian Wood original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-well-architected-serverless-applications-understanding-application-health-part-2/

This series of blog posts uses the AWS Well-Architected Tool with the Serverless Lens to help customers build and operate applications using best practices. In each post, I address the nine serverless-specific questions identified by the Serverless Lens along with the recommended best practices. See the Introduction post for a table of contents and explaining the example application.

Question OPS1: How do you evaluate your serverless application’s health?

This post continues part 1 of this Operational Excellence question. Previously, I covered using Amazon CloudWatch out-of-the-box standard metrics and alerts, and structured and centralized logging with the Embedded Metrics Format.

Best practice: Use application, business, and operations metrics

Identifying key performance indicators (KPIs), including business, customer, and operations outcomes, in additional to application metrics, helps to show a higher-level view of how the application and business is performing.

Business KPIs measure your application performance against business goals. For example, if fewer flight reservations are flowing through the system, the business would like to know.

Customer experience KPIs highlight the overall effectiveness of how customers use the application over time. Examples are perceived latency, time to find a booking, make a payment, etc.

Operational metrics help to see how operationally stable the application is over time. Examples are continuous integration/delivery/deployment feedback time, mean-time-between-failure/recovery, number of on-call pages and time to resolution, etc.

Custom Metrics

Embedded Metrics Format can also emit custom metrics to help understand your workload health’s impact on business.

The airline booking service uses AWS Step Functions, AWS Lambda, Amazon SNS, and Amazon DynamoDB.

In the confirm booking module function handler, I add a new namespace and dimension to associate this set of logs with this application and service.

metrics.set_namespace("ServerlessAirlineEMF")
metrics.put_dimensions({"service":"confirm_booking"})

Within the try statement within the try/except block, I emit a metric for a successful booking:

metrics.put_metric("BookingSuccessful", 1, "Count")

And within the except statement within the try/except block, I emit a metric for a failed booking:

metrics.put_metric("BookingFailed", 1, "Count")

Once I make a booking, within the CloudWatch console, I navigate to Logs | Log groups and select the Airline-ConfirmBooking-develop group. I select a log stream and find the custom metric as part of the structured log entry.

structured-log-entry

Custom metric structured log entry

I can also create a custom metric graph. Within the CloudWatch console, I navigate to Metrics. I see the ServerlessAirlineEMF Custom Namespace is available.

custom-namespace

Custom metric namespace

I select the Namespace and the available metric.

available-namespace

Available metric

I select a Line graph, add a name, and see the successful booking now plotted on the graph.

custom-metric-plotted

Plotted CloudWatch metric

I can also visualize and analyze this metric using CloudWatch Insights.

Once a booking is made, within the CloudWatch console, I navigate to Logs | Insights. I select the /aws/lambda/Airline-ConfirmBooking-develop log group. I choose Run query which shows a list of discovered fields on the right of the console.

I can search for discovered booking related fields.

cloudwatch-insights-discovered-fieldsI then enter the following in the query pane to search the logs and plot the sum of BookingReference and choose Run Query:

fields @timestamp, @message
| stats sum(@BookingReference)

cloudwatch-insights-displayed-bookingreference

CloudWatch Insights query

There are a number of other component metrics that are important to measure. Track interactions between upstream and downstream components such as message queue length, integration latency, and throttling.

Improvement plan summary:

  1. Identify user journeys and metrics from each customer transaction.
  2. Create custom metrics asynchronously instead of synchronously for improved performance, cost, and reliability outcomes.
  3. Emit business metrics from within your workload to measure application performance against business goals.
  4. Create and analyze component metrics to measure interactions with upstream and downstream components.
  5. Create and analyze operational metrics to assess the health of your continuous delivery pipeline and operational processes.

Good practice: Use distributed tracing and code is instrumented with additional context

Logging provides information on the individual point in time events the application generates. Tracing provides a wider continuous view of an application. Tracing helps to follow a user journey or transaction through the application.

AWS X-Ray is an example of a distributed tracing solution, there are a number of third-party options as well. X-Ray collects data about the requests that your application serves and also builds a service graph, which shows all the components of an application. This provides visibility to understand how upstream/downstream services may affect workload health.

For the most comprehensive view, enable X-Ray across as many services as possible and include X-Ray tracing instrumentation in code. This is the list of AWS Services integrated with X-Ray.

X-Ray receives data from services as segments. Segments for a common request are then grouped into traces. Segments can be further broken down into more granular subsegments. Custom data key-value pairs are added to segments and subsegments with annotations and metadata. Traces can also be grouped which helps with filter expressions.

AWS Lambda instruments incoming requests for all supported languages. Lambda application code can be further instrumented to emit information about its status, correlation identifiers, and business outcomes to determine transaction flows across your workload.

X-Ray tracing for a Lambda function is enabled in the Lambda Console. Select a Lambda function. I select the Airline-ReserveBooking-develop function. In the Configuration pane, I select to enable X-Ray Active tracing.

x-ray-enable

X-Ray tracing enabled

X-Ray can also be enabled via CloudFormation with the following code:

TracingConfig:
  Mode: Active

Lambda IAM permissions to write to X-Ray are added automatically when active tracing is enabled via the console. When using CloudFormation, Allow the Actions xray:PutTraceSegments and xray:PutTelemetryRecords

It is important to understand what invocations X-Ray does trace. X-Ray applies a sampling algorithm. If an upstream service, such as API Gateway with X-Ray tracing enabled, has already sampled a request, the Lambda function request is also sampled. Without an upstream request, X-Ray traces data for the first Lambda invocation each second, and then 5% of additional invocations.

For the airline application, X-Ray tracing is initiated within the shared library with the code:

from aws_xray_sdk.core import models, patch_all, xray_recorder

Segments, subsegments, annotations, and metadata are added to functions with the following example code:

segment = xray_recorder.begin_segment('segment_name')
# Start a subsegment
subsegment = xray_recorder.begin_subsegment('subsegment_name')
# Add metadata and annotations
segment.put_metadata('key', dict, 'namespace')
subsegment.put_annotation('key', 'value')
# Close the subsegment and segment
xray_recorder.end_subsegment()
xray_recorder.end_segment()

For example, within the collect payment module, an annotation is added for a successful payment with:

tracer.put_annotation("PaymentStatus", "SUCCESS")

CloudWatch ServiceLens

Once a booking is made and payment is successful, the tracing is available in the X-Ray console.

I explore how Amazon CloudWatch ServiceLens connects metrics, logs and the X-Ray tracing. Within the CloudWatch console, I navigate to ServiceLens | Service Map.

I can visualize all application resources and dependencies where X-Ray is enabled. I can trace performance or availability issues. If there was an issue connecting to SNS for example, this would be shown.

I select the Airline-CollectPayment-develop node and can view the out-of-the-box standard Lambda metrics.

I can select View Logs to jump to the CloudWatch Logs Insights console.

cloudwatch-insights-service-map-view

CloudWatch Insights Service map

I select View dashboard to see the function metrics, node map, and function details.

cloudwatch-insights-service-map-dashboard

CloudWatch Insights Service Map dashboard

I select View traces and can filter by the custom metric PaymentStatus. I select SUCCESS and chose Add to filter. I then select a trace.

cloudwatch-insights-service-map-select-trace

CloudWatch Insights Filtered traces

I see the full trace details, which show the full application transaction of a payment collection.

cloudwatch-insights-service-map-view-trace

Segments timeline

Selecting the Lambda handler subsegment – ## lambda_handler, I can view the trace Annotations and Metadata, which include the business transaction details such as Customer and PaymentStatus.

cloudwatch-insights-service-map-view-trace-annotations

X-Ray annotations

Trace groups are another feature of X-Ray and ServiceLens. Trace groups use filter expressions such as Annotation.PaymentStatus = "FAILED" which are used to view traces that match the particular group. Service graphs can also be viewed, and CloudWatch alarms created based on the group.

CloudWatch ServiceLens provides powerful capabilities to understand application performance bottlenecks and issues, helping determine how users are impacted.

Improvement plan summary:

  1. Identify common business context and system data that are commonly present across multiple transactions.
  2. Instrument SDKs and requests to upstream/downstream services to understand the flow of a transaction across system components.

Recent announcements

There have been a number of recent announcements for X-Ray and CloudWatch to improve how to evaluate serverless application health.

Conclusion

Evaluating application health helps you identify which services should be optimized to improve your customer’s experience. In part 1, I cover out-of-the-box standard metrics and alerts, as well as structured and centralized logging. In this post, I explore custom metrics and distributed tracing and show how to use ServiceLens to view logs, metrics, and traces together.

In an upcoming post, I will cover the next Operational Excellence question from the Well-Architected Serverless Lens – Approaching application lifecycle management.

A public data lake for analysis of COVID-19 data

Post Syndicated from AWS Data Lake Team original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/a-public-data-lake-for-analysis-of-covid-19-data/

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten and take lives around the world, we must work together across organizations and scientific disciplines to fight this disease. Innumerable healthcare workers, medical researchers, scientists, and public health officials are already on the front lines caring for patients, searching for therapies, educating the public, and helping to set policy. At AWS, we believe that one way we can help is to provide these experts with the data and tools needed to better understand, track, plan for, and eventually contain and neutralize the virus that causes COVID-19.

Today, we are making a public AWS COVID-19 data lake available – a centralized repository of up-to-date and curated datasets on or related to the spread and characteristics of the novel corona virus (SARS-CoV-2) and its associated illness, COVID-19. Globally, there are several efforts underway to gather this data, and we are working with partners to make this crucial data freely available and keep it up-to-date. Hosted on the AWS cloud, we have seeded our curated data lake with COVID-19 case tracking data from Johns Hopkins and The New York Times, hospital bed availability from Definitive Healthcare, and over 45,000 research articles about COVID-19 and related coronaviruses from the Allen Institute for AI. We will regularly add to this data lake as other reliable sources make their data publicly available.

The breakthroughs that can win the battle against this disease arrive faster when it’s easy for everyone to access and experiment with this vital information. The AWS COVID-19 data lake allows experimenters to quickly run analyses on the data in place without wasting time extracting and wrangling data from all the available data sources. They can use AWS or third-party tools to perform trend analysis, do keyword search, perform question/answer analysis, build and run machine learning models, or run custom analyses to meet their specific needs. Since every stakeholder in this battle brings their own perspective, users can choose to work with the public data lake, combine it with their own data, or subscribe to the source datasets directly through AWS Data Exchange.

We imagine local health authorities could build dashboards to track infections and collaborate to efficiently deploy vital resources like hospital beds and ventilators. Or epidemiologists could complement their own models and datasets to generate better forecasts of hotspots and trends.

For example, at Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, a nonprofit where leaders in science and technology collaborate to cure, prevent, or manage disease, scientists are using the AWS COVID-19 data lake for new epidemiological insights. “Our team of researchers is now analyzing trends in disease spread, its geography, and time evolution by leveraging datasets from the AWS COVID-19 data lake, combined with our own data, in order to better predict COVID epidemiology,” said Jim Karkanias, Vice President of Data Science and Information Technology at Chan Zuckerberg Biohub.

This post walks you through examples of how to use the AWS COVID-19 data lake for analysis. This data lake is comprised of data in a publicly readable Amazon S3 bucket (s3://covid19-lake). The post shows how to set up the definitions for that data in an AWS Glue Data Catalog to expose it to analytics engines. You can then query the AWS COVID-19 data lake with Amazon Athena, a serverless SQL query engine.

Prerequisites

This post assumes you have the following:

  • Access to an AWS account
  • Permissions to create an AWS CloudFormation stack
  • Permissions to create AWS Glue resources (catalog databases and tables)

Configuring access to the data using a CloudFormation template

To make the data from the AWS COVID-19 data lake available in the Data Catalog in your AWS account, create a CloudFormation stack using the following template. If you are signed in to your AWS account, the following link fills out most of the stack creation form for you. All you need to do is choose Create stack. For instructions on creating a CloudFormation stack, see Get Started in the Cloud Formation documentation.

This template creates a covid-19 database in your Data Catalog and tables that point to the public AWS COVID-19 data lake. You do not need to host the data in your account, and you can rely on AWS to refresh the data as datasets are updated through AWS Data Exchange.

Exploring the data through the Data Catalog in your AWS account

When the CloudFormation stack shows a status of CREATE_COMPLETE, access the Glue Data Catalog to see the tables that the template created. You should see the following tables:

  • Global Coronavirus (COVID-19) Data – Tracks confirmed COVID-19 cases in provinces, states, and countries across the world with a breakdown to the county level in the US.

 

Table NameDescriptionSourceProvider
enigma_jhuConfirmed COVID-19 casesJohns HopkinsEnigma

 

 

Table NameDescriptionSourceProvider
nytimes_statesData on COVID-19 cases at US state levelNY TimesRearc
nytimes_countiesData on COVID-19 cases at US county level

 

 

Table NameDescriptionSourceProvider
covid_testing_states_dailyUSA total test daily trend by stateCOVID Tracking ProjectRearc
covid_testing_us_dailyUSA total test daily trend
covid_testing_us_totalUSA total tests

 

 

Table NameDescriptionSourceProvider
hospital_bedsHospital beds and their utilization in the USDefinitive HealthcareRearc

 

 

Table NameDescriptionSource/Provider
alleninstitute_metadataMetadata on papers pulled from the CORD-19 dataset. The sha column indicates the paper ID, which is the file name of the paper in the data lake.Allen Institute for AI
alleninstitute_comprehend_medicalResults from Amazon Comprehend Medical run against the CORD-19 dataset.

 

  • Lookup tables to support visualizations.

 

Table NameDescription
country_codesLookup table for country codes
county_populationsLookup table for the population for each county based on recent census data
us_state_abbreviationsLookup table for US state abbreviations

In addition, you can see descriptions of the columns in these tables. For example, the following screenshot shows the metadata of the table containing COVID-19 cases from Johns Hopkins.

Querying data via Amazon Athena

This section demonstrates how to query these tables using Athena. Athena is a serverless interactive query service that makes it easy to analyze the data in the AWS COVID19 data lake. Athena supports SQL, a common language that data analysts use for analyzing structured data. To query the data, complete the following steps:

  1. Sign in to the Athena console.

If this is the first time you are using Athena, you must specify a query result location on Amazon S3.

  1. From the drop-down menu, choose the covid-19 database.
  2. Enter your query.

The following query returns the growth of confirmed cases for the past 7 days joined side-by-side with hospital bed availability, broken down by US county:

SELECT 
  cases.fips, 
  admin2 as county, 
  province_state, 
  confirmed,
  growth_count, 
  sum(num_licensed_beds) as num_licensed_beds, 
  sum(num_staffed_beds) as num_staffed_beds, 
  sum(num_icu_beds) as num_icu_beds
FROM 
  "covid-19"."hospital_beds" beds, 
  ( SELECT 
      fips, 
      admin2, 
      province_state, 
      confirmed, 
      last_value(confirmed) over (partition by fips order by last_update) - first_value(confirmed) over (partition by fips order by last_update) as growth_count,
      first_value(last_update) over (partition by fips order by last_update desc) as most_recent,
      last_update
    FROM  
      "covid-19"."enigma_jhu" 
    WHERE 
      from_iso8601_timestamp(last_update) > now() - interval '7' day AND country_region = 'US') cases
WHERE 
  beds.fips = cases.fips AND last_update = most_recent
GROUP BY cases.fips, confirmed, growth_count, admin2, province_state
ORDER BY growth_count desc

The following screenshot shows the results of this query.

Athena also allows you to run these queries through REST APIs, for example, for building your own visualizations. Moreover, Athena is just one of the many engines that you can use on the data lake. For example, you can use Amazon Redshift Spectrum to join lake data with other datasets in your Redshift data warehouse, or use Amazon QuickSight to visualize your datasets.

We have also created a public Amazon QuickSight dashboard from the COVID-19 case tracking data, testing data, and hospital bed data. You can track daily updates with this dashboard. You can also drill-down to see breakdowns by country, province, and county without having to write a line of SQL. The following is a recent screenshot of the dashboard.

CORD-19 research articles

The CORD-19 dataset is a collection of metadata and full-text of research articles about COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, and related coronaviruses. You can index this data with Amazon Kendra for question/answer exploration, or enrich the data with Amazon Comprehend Medical. We have already done the latter and put it in the table called alleninstitute_comprehend_medical.

The alleninsitute_metadata table provides detailed fields for each paper, such as the title, authors, journal, and URL. The alleninstitute_comprehend_medical table contains key medical concepts such as medical condition, medication, dosage, strength, and frequency. With this metadata, you can quickly query over concepts, analyze or aggregate over authors and journals, and locate papers.

Aggregating over journals

Using IL-6 inhibitors is a possible therapy for COVID-19, and clinical trials are underway. To demonstrate how to use these tables, this post presents a use case in which you want to understand which journals discuss IL-6 the most by counting the papers they published. You can do this by running the following query:

SELECT m.journal,
       count(distinct(cm.paper_id)) as paper_count
FROM "covid-19".alleninstitute_metadata m
JOIN "covid-19".alleninstitute_comprehend_medical cm
    ON (contains(split(m.sha, '; '), cm.paper_id))
WHERE contains(generic_name, 'IL-6')
GROUP BY  m.journal
ORDER BY paper_count desc

The following screenshot shows an example of the results. The data provider updates this dataset over time, so your results may look different (here, we notice that the second highest count has no journal information).

Drilling down into papers

To see the URLs and the titles of the papers in one of these journals, you simply query both these tables again. For example, to drill into IL-6 related papers in the Crit Care journal, enter the following query:

SELECT distinct m.url, m.title
FROM "covid-19".alleninstitute_metadata m
JOIN "covid-19".alleninstitute_comprehend_medical cm
    ON (contains(split(m.sha, '; '), cm.paper_id))
WHERE contains(generic_name, 'IL-6')
      AND m.journal = 'Crit Care'

The following screenshot shows an example of the results.

These examples are a few of the innumerable analyses you can run on the public data lake. You incur no additional cost for accessing the AWS COVID-19 data lake beyond the standard charges for the AWS services that you use. For example, if you use Athena, you will incur the costs for running queries and the data storage in the S3 query result location, but incur no costs for accessing the data lake. In addition, if you want this data in raw form, you can subscribe to, download, and stay up-to-date through AWS Data Exchange. We encourage you to try using the public AWS COVID-19 data lake yourself.

Conclusion

Combining our efforts across organizations and scientific disciplines can help us win the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. With the AWS COVID-19 data lake, anyone can experiment with and analyze curated data related to the disease, as well as share their own data and results. We believe that through an open and collaborative effort that combines data, technology, and science, we can inspire insights and foster breakthroughs necessary to contain, curtail, and ultimately cure COVID-19.

For daily updates on how AWS is addressing the crisis, see Amazon’s COVID-19 blog.

 


About the Authors

The AWS Data Lake Team members are Roy Ben-Alta, Jason Berkowitz, Chris Casey, Patrick Combes, Lucy Friedmann, Fred Lee, Megan Maxwell, Rourke McNamara, Herain Oberoi, Stephen Orban, Brian Ross, Nikki Rouda, Noah Schwartz, Noritaka Sekiyama, Mehul A. Shah, Ben Snively, and Ying Wang.

Building well-architected serverless applications: Understanding application health – part 1

Post Syndicated from Julian Wood original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/building-well-architected-serverless-applications-understanding-application-health-part-1/

This series of blog posts uses the AWS Well-Architected Tool with the Serverless Lens to help customers build and operate applications using best practices. In each post, I address the nine serverless-specific questions identified by the Serverless Lens along with the recommended best practices. See the Introduction post for a table of contents and explaining the example application.

Question OPS1: How do you evaluate your serverless application’s health?

Evaluating your metrics, distributed tracing, and logging gives you insight into business and operational events, and helps you understand which services should be optimized to improve your customer’s experience. By understanding the health of your Serverless Application, you will know whether it is functioning as expected, and can proactively react to any signals that indicate it is becoming unhealthy.

Required practice: Understand, analyze, and alert on metrics provided out of the box

It is important to understand metrics for every AWS service used in your application so you can decide how to measure its behavior. AWS services provide a number of out-of-the-box standard metrics to help monitor the operational health of your application.

As these metrics are generated automatically, it is a simple way to start monitoring your application and can also be augmented with custom metrics.

The first stage is to identify which services the application uses. The airline booking component uses AWS Step Functions, AWS Lambda, Amazon SNS, and Amazon DynamoDB.

When I make a booking, as shown in the Introduction post, AWS services emit metrics to Amazon CloudWatch. These are processed asynchronously without impacting the application’s performance.

There are two default CloudWatch dashboards to visualize key metrics quickly: per service and cross service.

Per service

To view the per service metrics dashboard, I open the CloudWatch console.

per-service-metrics-dashboardI select a service where Overview is shown, such as Lambda. Now I can view the metrics for all Lambda functions in the account.

per-service-metrics-lambdaCross service

To see an overview of key metrics across all AWS services, open the CloudWatch console and choose View cross service dashboard.

cross-service-metrics-dashboardI see a list of all services with one or two key metrics displayed. This provides a good overview of all services your application uses.

Alerting

The next stage is to identify the key metrics for comparison and set up alerts for under- and over-performing services. Here are some recommended metrics to alarm on for a number of AWS services.

Alerts can be configured manually or via infrastructure as code tools such as the AWS Serverless Application Model, AWS CloudFormation, or third-party tools.

To configure a manual alert for Lambda function errors using CloudWatch Alarms:

  1. I open the CloudWatch console and select Alarms and select Create Alarm.
  2. I choose Select Metric and from AWS Namespaces, select Lambda, Across All Functions and select Errors and select Select metric.add-metric-to-alert
  3. I change the Statistic to Sum and the Period to 1 minute.metric-values
  4. Under Conditions, I select a Static threshold Greater than 1 and select Next.

Alarms can also be created using anomaly detection rather than static values if there is a discernible pattern or trend. Anomaly detection looks at past metric data and uses machine learning to create a model of expected values. Alerts can then be configured if they fall outside this band of “normal” values. I use a Static threshold for this alarm.

  1. For the notification, I set the trigger to alarm to an existing SNS topic with my email address, then choose Next.metric-notification
  2. I enter a descriptive alarm name such as serverlessairline-lambda-prod-errors > 1, select Next, and choose Create alarm.

I have now manually set up an alarm.

Use CloudWatch composite alarms to combine multiple alarms to reduce noise and focus on critical issues. For example, a single alarm could trigger if there are both Lambda function errors as well as high Lambda concurrent executions.

It is simpler and more scalable to include alerting within infrastructure as code. Here is an example of alerting programmatically using CloudFormation.

I view the out of the box standard metrics and in this example, manually create an alarm for Lambda function errors.

Improvement plan summary:

  1. Understand what metrics and dimensions each managed service used provides.
  2. Configure alerts on relevant metrics for when services are unhealthy.

Good practice: Use structured and centralized logging

Central logging provides a single place to search and analyze logs. Structured logging means selecting a consistent log format and content structure to simplify querying across multiple components.

To identify a business transaction across components, such as a particular flight booking, log operational information from upstream and downstream services. Add information such as customer_id along with business outcomes such as order=accepted or order=confirmed. Make sure you are not logging any sensitive or personal identifying data in any logs.

Use JSON as your logging output format. Log multiple fields in a single object or dictionary rather than many one line messages for simpler searching.

Here is an example of a structured logging format.

The airline booking component, which is written in Python, currently uses a shared library with a separate log processing stack.

Embedded Metrics Format is a simpler mechanism to replace the shared library and use structured logging. CloudWatch Embedded Metrics adds environmental metadata such as Lambda Function version and also automatically extracts custom metrics so you can visualize and alarm on them. There are open-source client libraries available for Node.js and Python.

I then add embedded metrics to the individual confirm booking module with the following steps:

  1. I install the aws-embedded-metrics library using the instructions.
  2. In the function init code, I import the module and create a metric_scope with the following code

from aws_embedded_metrics import metric_scope
@metric_scope

  1. In the function handler, I log the generated bookingReference with the following code.

metrics.set_property("BookingReference", ret["bookingReference"])

In this example I also log the entire incoming event details.

metrics.set_property("event", event)

It is best practice to only log what is required to avoid unnecessary costs. Ensure the event does not have any sensitive or personal identifying data which is available to anyone who has access to the logs.

To avoid the duplicate logging in this example airline application which adds cost, I remove the existing shared library logger.*() lines.

When I make a booking, the CloudWatch log message is in structured JSON format. It contains the properties I set event, BookingReference, as well as function metadata.

I can then search for all log activity related to a specific booking across multiple functions with booking_id. I can track customer activity across multiple bookings using customer_id.

Logging is often created as a shared library resource which all functions reference. Another option is using Lambda Layers, which lets functions import additional code such as external libraries. Multiple functions can share this code.

Improvement plan summary:

  1. Log request identifiers from downstream services, component name, component runtime information, unique correlation identifiers, and information that helps identify a business transaction.
  2. Use JSON as the logging output. Prefer logging entire objects/dictionaries rather than many one line messages. Mask or remove sensitive data when logging.
  3. Minimize logging debugging information to a minimum as they can incur both costs and increase noise to signal ratio

Conclusion

Evaluating serverless application health helps understand which services should be optimized to improve your customer’s experience. I cover out of the box metrics and alerts, as well as structured and centralized logging.

This well-architected question will be continued in an upcoming post where I look at custom metrics and distributed tracing.

How to define least-privileged permissions for actions called by AWS services

Post Syndicated from Michael Switzer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-define-least-privileged-permissions-for-actions-called-by-aws-services/

When you perform certain actions in AWS, the service you called sometimes takes additional actions in other AWS services on your behalf. AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) now includes condition keys to make it easier to grant only the minimum level of access necessary for IAM principals (users and roles) and AWS services to take those actions. Using the aws:CalledVia condition key, you can create distinct access rules for the actions performed by your IAM principals, and for the subsequent actions taken by AWS services on your behalf.

For example, if you use AWS CloudFormation to launch an Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instance, the CloudFormation service independently uses your credentials to launch the instance in EC2. Your principals need permissions from both services. Based on the principle of granting least privileged permissions, you might want to prevent your principals from taking each of those actions independently. Using the new condition, you can grant your IAM principals the ability to launch EC2 instances only by using CloudFormation, without granting them direct access to EC2.

You can also use the aws:CalledVia condition key to define rules for the initial call made to AWS by your principals, without impacting the additional calls the service makes. For example, you can require that all initial calls to AWS services come from inside your Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) or your private IP subnet, but you will not impose the same rule for downstream requests to other services, since those requests come from AWS rather than your private network.

In this post, I explain the aws:CalledVia condition key and outline the context it provides during authorization. Then, I walk through a detailed use case with examples that show you how to secure access to a database managed in Amazon Athena behind a VPC. In the examples, I’ll cover how to grant access to execute queries in Athena without granting direct access to dependent services such as Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3). I will also explain how you can use the aws:CalledVia condition key to prevent access to your databases from outside your private networks.

How to use the aws:CalledVia condition key

The aws:CalledVia condition key contains an ordered list of each service principal that triggers the AWS action in another service using your credentials. It is a global condition key, meaning you can use it in combination with any AWS service action. For example, say that you use CloudFormation to read and write from an Amazon DynamoDB table that uses encryption supplied by the AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS). When you call CloudFormation, it calls Amazon DynamoDB to read from the table, then Amazon DynamoDB calls AWS KMS to decrypt the data. Each call gets its own authorization check, and the aws:CalledVia key keeps track of who called whom.

  • For the call to CloudFormation, aws:CalledVia will be empty.
  • For the call from CloudFormation to Amazon DynamoDB, aws:CalledVia will contain [ “cloudformation.amazonaws.com” ]
  • For the call from Amazon DynamoDB to AWS KMS, aws:CalledVia will contain [ “cloudformation.amazonaws.com” , “dynamodb.amazonaws.com” ]

    Important: The aws:CalledVia context is only available when AWS reuses your credentials after you make a request. For example, if you provided a service role to CloudFormation instead of triggering the action directly, the aws:CalledVia context would be empty for a call from CloudFormation to Amazon DynamoDB.

To identify the service principal that aws:CalledVia returns for each AWS service, see to the CalledVia Services table in the documentation. AWS will update this list as more services add support for this key.

You can use condition operators, such as StringLike and StringEquals, in your policies to check the contents of the key during authorization. Because aws:CalledVia is a multivalued condition key, you also need to use the ForAnyValue or ForAllValues set operators along with your comparison operators to check the content of the key. For more information, see Creating a Condition with Multiple Keys or Values in the IAM documentation.

Here’s an example policy that follows this use case.


{ 
   "Version":"2012-10-17",
   "Statement":[ 
      { 
         "Sid":"AllowCFNActions",
         "Effect":"Allow",
         "Action":[ 
            "cloudformation:CreateStack*"
         ],
         "Resource":"*"
      },
      { 
         "Sid":"AllowDDBActionsViaCFN",
         "Effect":"Allow",
         "Action":[ 
            "dynamodb:GetItem",
            "dynamodb:BatchGetItem",
            "dynamodb:PutItem",
            "dynamodb:UpdateItem",
            "dynamodb:DeleteItem"
         ],
         "Resource":"arn:aws:dynamodb:region:111122223333:table",
         "Condition":{ 
            "ForAnyValue:StringEquals":{ 
               "aws:CalledVia":[ 
                  "cloudformation.amazonaws.com"
               ]
            }
         }
      },
      { 
         "Sid":"AllowKMSActionsViaDDB",
         "Effect":"Allow",
         "Action":[ 
            "kms:Encrypt",
            "kms:Decrypt",
            "kms:ReEncrypt*",
            "kms:GenerateDataKey",
            "kms:DescribeKey"
         ],
         "Resource":[
            "arn:aws:kms:region:111122223333:key/example"
         ],
         "Condition":{ 
            "ForAnyValue:StringEquals":{ 
               "aws:CalledVia":[ 
                  "dynamodb.amazonaws.com"
               ]
            }
         }
      }
   ]
}

I’ll walk you through each statement in this policy. In the first statement, AllowCFNActions, I grant access to use CloudFormation to create stacks and stack sets. The second statement, AllowDDBActionsViaCFN, grants access to read and write from a specific DynamoDB table, but only if CloudFormation took the action. Finally, the third statement AllowKMSActionsViaDDB allows AWS KMS encrypt and decrypt operations that are triggered through Amazon DynamoDB, using the customer master key (CMK) specified in the Resource element. Each condition statement uses the ForAnyValue:StringEquals combination of operators to check for the existence of the CloudFormation or DynamoDB service principals. Putting it all together, the policy allows an IAM principal to do the following:

  1. Create stacks and stack sets by using CloudFormation.
  2. Read and write to Amazon DynamoDB tables via CloudFormation.
  3. Encrypt and decrypt by using AWS KMS actions via Amazon DynamoDB.

Controlling access based on the first and last requesting services

Along with aws:CalledVia, AWS has introduced two companion keys to make it easy to retrieve the first and last services in the chain of requests. The aws:CalledViaFirst condition key returns the first service principal in the chain, and aws:CalledViaLast returns the last service principal in the chain. For example, if aws:CalledVia contained [ “cloudformation.amazonaws.com” , “dynamodb.amazonaws.com” ], then aws:CalledViaFirst would contain “cloudformation.amazonaws.com” and aws:CalledViaLast would contain “dynamodb.amazonaws.com”.

Still following the previous example, here’s a policy that uses aws:CalledViaFirst to allow access to Amazon DynamoDB and AWS KMS, as long as the entry point is CloudFormation. You can use this policy to ensure that Amazon DynamoDB tables in your organization are accessed according to the best practices you’ve defined in your CloudFormation templates.


{ 
   "Version":"2012-10-17",
   "Statement":[ 
      { 
         "Sid":"AllowCFNActions",
         "Effect":"Allow",
         "Action":[ 
            "cloudformation:CreateStack*"
         ],
         "Resource":"*"
      },
      { 
         "Sid":"AllowDDBAndKMSActionsViaCFN",
         "Effect":"Allow",
         "Action":[ 
            "dynamodb:GetItem",
            "dynamodb:BatchGetItem",
            "dynamodb:PutItem",
            "dynamodb:UpdateItem",
            "dynamodb:DeleteItem",
            "kms:Encrypt",
            "kms:Decrypt",
            "kms:ReEncrypt*",
            "kms:GenerateDataKey",
            "kms:DescribeKey"
         ],
         "Resource":[
            "arn:aws:dynamodb:region:111122223333:table"
            "arn:aws:kms:region:111122223333:key/example"
         ],
         "Condition":{ 
            "StringEquals":{ 
               "aws:CalledViaFirst":[ 
                  "cloudformation.amazonaws.com"
               ]
            }
         }
      }
   ]
}

I’ll walk you through each statement in this policy. The first statement of the policy, AllowCFNActions, enables the principal to create stacks and stack sets through CloudFormation. The second statement, AllowDDBAndKMSActionsViaCFN, allows Amazon DynamoDB and AWS KMS actions for a specific CMK and table, but only under the condition that the first request made by the principal was to the CloudFormation service.

Now that I’ve described the conditions and their usage, I’ll share detailed examples in the use case that follows.

Use case: Permissions to use Athena inside your Virtual Private Cloud

Amazon Athena is a service you can use to analyze data in Amazon S3 by using standard SQL. Athena is serverless, which makes it cost-effective for operating a data lake. In this example, I define the IAM permissions for a role that manages and executes Athena queries from behind a secure network perimeter.

In this use case, my business metrics team needs an IAM role to execute queries against my data lake that is stored in Amazon S3. They’ll use the IAM role to manage the BizMetrics workgroup in Athena, which is responsible for managing exploratory queries and generating regular reports for key performance indicators within my company. Because my business metrics are internal to my organization, I want to ensure the data is only accessible inside my Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). VPCs let you create a logically-isolated section of the AWS Cloud and connect it to your private network. For more information about VPCs, see What is Amazon VPC? in the VPC documentation.

When an IAM role makes a call to Athena to execute a query inside a VPC, Athena makes subsequent calls to Amazon S3 and other services to complete the task. You can see the interaction on the following diagram.
 

Figure 1: IAM role makes a call to Athena to execute a query inside a VPC

Figure 1: IAM role makes a call to Athena to execute a query inside a VPC

The calls from the IAM role to Athena, and from Athena to Amazon S3, use the same role credentials. This means that the principal needs permissions for both Athena and Amazon S3 actions to accomplish the query. You can also see that the IAM role calls Athena through the VPC endpoint, rather than the public AWS endpoint. VPC endpoints allow you to communicate with AWS from your private network without a connection to the public internet. For more information about VPC endpoints, see Interface VPC Endpoints (AWS PrivateLink) in the VPC documentation.

The subsequent calls between Athena and Amazon S3 don’t use the VPC endpoint. If I want to require that each call to Athena must use the VPC endpoint, I cannot apply the same restriction to Athena’s calls to Amazon S3. I will need to use aws:CalledVia to define distinct permissions for the initial call to Athena, and the call to Amazon S3 from Athena. I’ll apply these permissions to the IAM role I create, as well as the Amazon S3 bucket that contains the data.

Step 1: Define permissions for the IAM Role

For the purposes of this use case, my organization’s data lake has one database, revenuedata, in the bucket called examplecorp-business-data. When you follow along with these examples, you should replace the bucket and database names in the policies with your own resources.

  1. First, I create the IAM role BizMetricsQuery. I can create the role in the IAM console without any permission policies attached. If you haven’t created a role before, see Creating IAM Roles in the IAM documentation.
  2. Next, I create a managed policy that defines permissions for the BizMetricsQuery role. For more information about creating a managed policy or attaching it to the BizMetricsQuery role, see Managing IAM Policies in the IAM documentation.

    The following policy grants the permissions I need:

    
    	{
        "Version": "2012-10-17",
        "Statement": [
            {
                "Sid": "AllowAthenaReadActions",
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": [
                    "athena:ListWorkGroups",
                    "athena:GetExecutionEngine",
                    "athena:GetExecutionEngines",
                    "athena:GetNamespace",
                    "athena:GetCatalogs",
                    "athena:GetNamespaces",
                    "athena:GetTables",
                    "athena:GetTable"
                ],
                "Resource": "*",
                "Condition":{ 
                   "StringEquals":{ 
                      "aws:SourceVpce":[ 
                         "vpce-0e880cb0a9EXAMPLE"
                      ]
                   }
                }
            },
            {
                "Sid": "AllowAthenaWorkgroupActions",
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": [
                    "athena:StartQueryExecution",
                    "athena:GetQueryResults",
                    "athena:DeleteNamedQuery",
                    "athena:GetNamedQuery",
                    "athena:ListQueryExecutions",
                    "athena:StopQueryExecution",
                    "athena:GetQueryResultsStream",
                    "athena:ListNamedQueries",
                    "athena:CreateNamedQuery",
                    "athena:GetQueryExecution",
                    "athena:BatchGetNamedQuery",
                    "athena:BatchGetQueryExecution",
                    "athena:GetWorkGroup"
                ],
                "Resource": [
                    "arn:aws:athena:us-east-1:111122223333:workgroup/BizMetrics"
                ],
                "Condition":{ 
                   "StringEquals":{ 
                      "aws:SourceVpce":[ 
                         "vpce-0e880cb0a9EXAMPLE"
                      ]
                   }
                }
            },
            {
                "Sid": "AllowGlueActionsViaVPCE",
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": [
                    "glue:GetDatabase",
                    "glue:GetDatabases",
                    "glue:CreateDatabase",
                    "glue:GetTables",
                    "glue:GetTable"
                ],
                "Resource": [
                    "arn:aws:glue:us-east-1:111122223333:catalog",
                    "arn:aws:glue:us-east-1:111122223333:database/default",
                    "arn:aws:glue:us-east-1:111122223333:database/revenuedata",
                    "arn:aws:glue:us-east-1:111122223333:table/revenuedata/*"
                ],
                "Condition":{ 
                   "StringEquals":{ 
                      "aws:SourceVpce":[ 
                         "vpce-0e880cb0a9EXAMPLE"
                      ]
                   }
                }
            },
            {
                "Sid": "AllowGlueActionsViaAthena",
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": [
                    "glue:GetDatabase",
                    "glue:GetDatabases",
                    "glue:CreateDatabase",
                    "glue:GetTables",
                    "glue:GetTable"
                ],
                "Resource": [
                    "arn:aws:glue:us-east-1:111122223333:catalog",
                    "arn:aws:glue:us-east-1:111122223333:database/default",
                    "arn:aws:glue:us-east-1:111122223333:database/revenuedata",
                    "arn:aws:glue:us-east-1:111122223333:table/revenuedata/*"
                ],
                "Condition":{ 
                   "ForAnyValue:StringEquals":{ 
                      "aws:CalledVia":[ 
                         "athena.amazonaws.com"
                      ]
                   }
                }
            },
    
            {
                "Sid": "AllowS3ActionsViaAthena",
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": [
                    "s3:GetBucketLocation",
                    "s3:GetObject",
                    "s3:ListBucket",
                    "s3:ListBucketMultipartUploads",
                    "s3:ListMultipartUploadParts",
                    "s3:AbortMultipartUpload",
                    "s3:CreateBucket",
                    "s3:PutObject"
                ],
                "Resource": [
                    "arn:aws:s3:::examplecorp-business-data/*",
                    "arn:aws:s3:::athena-examples-*"
                ],
                "Condition":{ 
                   "ForAnyValue:StringEquals":{ 
                      "aws:CalledVia":[ 
                         "athena.amazonaws.com"
                      ]
                   }
                }
            }
        ]
    }
    	

    I’ll walk you through each statement in this policy. First, the AllowAthenaReadActions and AllowAthenaWorkgroupActions statements allow the role to use Athena actions within the BizMetrics workgroup. The role calls Athena directly from inside the VPC, so there is a condition on these statements that requires that the calls must come from my VPC endpoint.

    Next, the AllowGlueActionsViaVPCE and AllowGlueActionsViaAthena statements allow the role to access the AWS Glue Data Catalog and view the tables within my data lake. AWS Glue makes it easy to catalog your data and make it searchable, queryable, and available for ETL operations. To view the database and tables in the Athena console, I need access to these AWS Glue actions. The role calls AWS Glue directly, and allows Athena to call AWS Glue, so the policy has two statements that allow both paths of communication respectively. For more information about required permissions for Athena and AWS Glue, see Fine-Grained Access to Databases and Tables in the AWS Glue Data Catalog in the Amazon Athena documentation.

    Finally, the AllowS3ActionsViaAthena statement enables Athena to call Amazon S3 on my behalf. I use the aws:CalledVia condition to require that these S3 actions are only available through Athena. In the resource section of the policy, I specify that the access is limited to the examplecorp-business-data bucket, as well as the Athena examples repository, which is required for using Athena with the AWS console.

  3. Next, I attach the policy to the BizMetricsQuery role. With this policy attached, I ensure the role can use Athena to access data in the Amazon S3 bucket without granting permissions to access the bucket directly. I also ensure that the role can only access the data through the VPC endpoint located within my private network.

Step 2: Define permissions on the S3 bucket

I need to make sure the BizMetricsQuery role is the only IAM identity that has access to the data in the examplecorp-business-data S3 bucket. To do this, I need to update the bucket policy that is attached to the bucket.

The following bucket policy grants the BizMetricsQuery role access to the data through the VPC endpoint.


{
	"Version": "2012-10-17",
	"Statement": [
    {
      "Sid": "AllowS3ActionsThroughAthena",
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "AWS": "arn:aws:iam::111122223333:role/BizMetricsQuery"
      },
      "Action": [
        "s3:GetBucketLocation",
        "s3:GetObject",
        "s3:ListBucketMultipartUploads",
        "s3:ListMultipartUploadParts",
        "s3:AbortMultipartUpload",
        "s3:PutObject"
      ],
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::examplecorp-business-data/*",
        "arn:aws:s3:::examplecorp-business-data"
      ],
      "Condition": {
        "ForAnyValue:StringEquals": {
          "aws:CalledVia": [
            "athena.amazonaws.com"
          ]
        }
      }
    }
  ]
}

This policy is very similar to the statement on the role policy that grants permissions to Amazon S3. In this policy, I allow the role to take Amazon S3 operations, but only if the aws:CalledVia context includes the Athena service. In the Principal element of the policy, I include the BizMetricsQuery role’s ARN. This is an important step because without this requirement, anyone could interact with the data in the bucket as long as they make the call using Athena. I want to require that the only role that can reach the data is BizMetricsQuery, which is also subject to the VPC rules.

With this policy attached to the examplecorp-business-data bucket, I ensure that access to the databases is only available through the BizMetricsQuery role. Because the BizMetricsQuery role can only access the data through Athena, and all calls to Athena must use my VPC endpoint, this also ensures the Amazon S3 data is only accessible from within my VPC.

Step 3: Run the Athena queries

I’ll try a simple query in Athena from inside the VPC to make sure everything works as expected. I use the BizMetricsQuery role to view the service_revenue table in the revenuedata database. If you are following along with this example, you should replace the database and table in the query with your own resource names.

  1. In the Athena console, on the Query Editor page, enter the following query in a new tab:
     
    SELECT * FROM “revenuedata”.”service_revenue” limit 10;
     
    Then select Run query.
     
    Figure 2: Run an Athena test query

    Figure 2: Run an Athena test query

    When I run this test query, my role performs the StartQueryExecution action. For this request, the aws:CalledVia context is empty because the role takes the action directly. The role is allowed to use Athena actions, so it passes the first authorization check.

    To perform the query, Athena subsequently calls the Amazon S3 service. These requests have the aws:CalledVia context athena.amazonaws.com. The role has access to the Amazon S3 actions when aws:CalledVia is equal to this value, so it passes the second and final authorization check.

  2. When I try to access the data directly by using Amazon S3, I get an Access Denied error message.
     
    Figure 3: Error message attempting to access directly from Amazon S3

    Figure 3: Error message attempting to access directly from Amazon S3

    In this case, the aws:CalledVia context is empty because I made the call directly to the Amazon S3 service. The policy requires me to call Amazon S3 only through Athena, so this request is denied.

  3. When I call Athena by using the same query from outside my VPC, I get the following error message.
     
    Figure 4: Error message attempting to call Athena from outside my VPC

    Figure 4: Error message attempting to call Athena from outside my VPC

In the Athena case, the SourceVPCE context is not present because I didn’t make the call using the VPC endpoint. In Amazon S3, the policy requires that the calls can only happen from inside my private network, so I get an access denied message in that case, as well. With this policy and example, I’ve demonstrated that I can only call Athena from within the VPC, and shown that calling the dependent services directly is not possible.

Next steps

By using the aws:CalledVia condition key, you can now define specific permissions for when AWS services make calls to other services on your behalf. This makes it easier to ensure that your company’s guidelines are followed consistently. For more information about aws:CalledVia and other IAM conditions, see AWS Global Condition Context Keys in the IAM documentation. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please reach out to AWS Support or our Identity and Access Management Forums.

If you have feedback about this blog post, submit comments in the Comments section below.

Want more AWS Security how-to content, news, and feature announcements? Follow us on Twitter.

Author

Michael Switzer

Mike is the product manager for the Identity and Access Management service at AWS. He enjoys working directly with customers to identify solutions to their challenges, and using data-driven decision making to drive his work. Outside of work, Mike is an avid cyclist and outdoorsperson. He holds a master’s degree in computational mathematics from the University of Washington.

NextGen Healthcare: Build and Deployment Pipelines with AWS

Post Syndicated from Annik Stahl original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/nextgen-healthcare-build-and-deployment-pipelines-with-aws/

Owen Zacharias, Vice President of Application Delivery at NextGen Healthcare, explains to AWS Solutions Architect Andrea Sabet how his company developed a series of build and deployment pipelines using native AWS services in the highly regulated healthcare sector.

Learn how the following services can be used to build and deploy infrastructure and application code:

Discover how AWS resources can be rapidly created and updated as part of a CI/CD pipeline while ensuring HIPAA compliance through approved/vetted AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles that AWS CloudFormation is permitted to assume.

February’s AWS Architecture Monthly magazine is all about healthcare. Check it out on Kindle Newsstand, download the PDF, or see it on Flipboard.

*Check out more This Is My Architecture video series.

New: Use AWS CloudFormation StackSets for Multiple Accounts in an AWS Organization

Post Syndicated from Sébastien Stormacq original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-use-aws-cloudformation-stacksets-for-multiple-accounts-in-an-aws-organization/

Infrastructure-as-code is the process of managing and creating IT infrastructure through machine-readable text files, such as JSON or YAML definitions or using familiar programming languages, such as Java, Python, or TypeScript. AWS Customers typically uses AWS CloudFormation or the AWS Cloud Development Kit to automate the creation and management of their cloud infrastructure.

CloudFormation StackSets allow you to roll out CloudFormation stacks over multiple AWS accounts and in multiple Regions with just a couple of clicks. When we launched StackSets, grouping accounts was primarily for billing purposes. Since the launch of AWS Organizations, you can centrally manage multiple AWS accounts across diverse business needs including billing, access control, compliance, security and resource sharing.

Use CloudFormation StackSets with Organizations
Today, we are simplifying the use of CloudFormation StackSets for customers managing multiple accounts with AWS Organizations.

You can now centrally orchestrate any AWS CloudFormation enabled service across multiple AWS accounts and regions. For example, you can deploy your centralized AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles, provision Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances or AWS Lambda functions across AWS Regions and accounts in your organization. CloudFormation StackSets simplify the configuration of cross-accounts permissions and allow for automatic creation and deletion of resources when accounts are joining or are removed from your Organization.

You can get started by enabling data sharing between CloudFormation and Organizations from the StackSets console. Once done, you will be able to use StackSets in the Organizations master account to deploy stacks to all accounts in your organization or in specific organizational units (OUs). A new service managed permission model is available with these StackSets. Choosing Service managed permissions allows StackSets to automatically configure the necessary IAM permissions required to deploy your stack to the accounts in your organization.

In addition to setting permissions, CloudFormation StackSets now offers the option for automatically creating or removing your CloudFormation stacks when a new AWS account joins or quits your Organization. You do not need to remember to manually connect to the new account to deploy your common infrastructure or to delete infrastructure when an account is removed from your Organization. When an account leaves the organization, the stack will be removed from the management of StackSets. However, you can choose to either delete or retain the resources managed by the stack.

Lastly, you choose whether to deploy a stack to your entire Organization or just to one or more Organization Units (OU). You also choose a couple of deployment options: how many accounts will be prepared in parallel, and how many failures you tolerate before stopping the entire deployment.

For a full description how StackSets works, you can read the initial blog article from Jeff.

There is no extra cost for using AWS CloudFormation StackSet with AWS Organizations. The integration is available in all AWS Regions where StackSets is available.

— seb

AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) – Java and .NET are Now Generally Available

Post Syndicated from Martin Beeby original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-cloud-development-kit-cdk-java-and-net-are-now-generally-available/

Today, we are happy to announce that Java and .NET support inside the AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) is now generally available. The AWS CDK is an open-source software development framework to model and provision your cloud application resources through AWS CloudFormationAWS CDK also offers support for TypeScript and Python.

With the AWS CDK, you can design, compose, and share your own custom resources that incorporate your unique requirements. For example, you can use the AWS CDK to model a VPC, with its associated routing and security configurations. You could then wrap that code into a construct and then share it with the rest of your organization. In this way, you can start to build up libraries of these constructs that you can use to standardize the way your organization creates AWS resources.

I like that by using the AWS CDK, you can build your application, including the infrastructure, in your favorite IDE, using the same programming language that you use for your application code. As you code your AWS CDK model in either .NET or Java, you get productivity benefits like code completion and inline documentation, which make it faster to model your infrastructure.

How the AWS CDK Works
Everything in the AWS CDK is a construct. You can think of constructs as cloud components that can represent architectures of any complexity: a single resource, such as a Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) bucket or a Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) topic, a static website, or even a complex, multi-stack application that spans multiple AWS accounts and regions. You compose constructs together into stacks that you can deploy into an AWS environment, and apps – a collection of one or more stacks.

The AWS CDK includes the AWS Construct Library, which contains constructs representing AWS resources.

How to use the AWS CDK
I’m going to use the AWS CDK to build a simple queue, but rather than handcraft a CloudFormation template in YAML or JSON, the AWS CDK allows me to use a familiar programming language to generate and deploy AWS CloudFormation templates.

To get started, I need to install the AWS CDK command-line interface using NPM. Once this download completes, I can code my infrastructure in either TypeScript, Python, JavaScript, Java, or, .NET.

npm i -g aws-cdk

On my local machine, I create a new folder and navigate into it.

mkdir cdk-newsblog-dotnet && cd cdk-newsblog-dotnet

Now I have installed the CLI I can execute commands such as cdk init and pass a language switch, in this instance, I am using .NET, and the sample app with the csharp language switch.

cdk init sample-app --language csharp

If I wanted to use Java rather than .NET, I would change the --language switch to java.

cdk init sample-app --language java

Since I am in the terminal, I type code . which is a shortcut to open the current folder in VS Code. You could, of course, use any editor, such as Visual Studio or JetBrains Rider. As you can see below, the init command has created a basic .NET AWS CDK project.

If I look into the Program.cs, the Main void creates an App and then a CDKDotnetStack. This stack CDKDotnetStack is defined in the CDKDotnetStack.cs file. This is where the meat of the project resides and where all the AWS resources are defined.

Inside the CDKDotnetStack.cs file, some code creates a Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS) then a topic and then finally adds a Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) subscription to the topic.

Now that I have written the code, the next step is to deploy it. When I do, the AWS CDK will compile and execute this project, converting my .NET code into a AWS CloudFormation template.

If I were to just deploy this now, I wouldn’t actually see the CloudFormation template, so the AWS CDK provides a command cdk synth that takes my application, compiles it, executes it, and then outputs a CloudFormation template.

This is just standard CloudFormation, if you look through it, you will find the following items:

  • AWS::SQS::Queue – The queue I added.
  • AWS::SQS::QueuePolicy – An IAM policy that allows my topic to send messages to my queue. I didn’t actually define this in code, but the AWS CDK is smart enough to know I need one of these, and so creates one.
  • AWS::SNS::Topic – The topic I created.
  • AWS::SNS::Subscription – The subscription between the queue and the topic.
  • AWS::CDK::Metadata This section is specific to the AWS CDK and is automatically added by the toolkit to every stack. It is used by the AWS CDK team for analytics and to allow us to identify versions if there are any issues.

Before I deploy this project to my AWS account, I will use cdk bootstrap. The bootstrap command will create a Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) bucket for me, which will be used by the AWS CDK to store any assets that might be required during deployment. In this example, I am not using any assets, so technically, I could skip this step. However, it is good practice to bootstrap your environment from the start, so you don’t get deployment errors later if you choose to use assets.

I’m now ready to deploy my project and to do that I issue the following command cdk deploy

This command first creates the AWS CloudFormation template then deploys it into my account. Since my project will make a security change, it asks me if I wish to deploy these changes. I select yes, and a CloudFormation changeset is created, and my resources start building.

Once complete, I can go over to the CloudFormation console and see that all the resources are now part of a AWS CloudFormation stack.

That’s it, my resources have been successfully built in the cloud, all using .NET.

With the addition of Java and .NET, the AWS CDK now supports 5 programming languages in total, giving you more options in how you build your AWS resources. Why not install the AWS CDK today and give it a try in whichever language is your favorite?

— Martin

 

Deploying applications at FINRA using AWS CodeDeploy

Post Syndicated from Nikunj Vaidya original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/deploying-applications-at-finra-using-aws-codedeploy/

by Geethalaksmi Ramachandran (FINRA – Director, Application Engineering), Avinash Chukka (FINRA – Senior Application Engineer)

At FINRA, a financial regulatory organization that oversees the broker-dealer industry with market intelligence, we have been utilizing the AWS CodeDeploy services to deploy applications on the cloud as well as on on-premises production servers. This blog post provides insight into our operations and experience with CodeDeploy.

Migration overview

Since 2014, we have gone through a systematic effort to migrate over 100 applications from on-premises resources to the AWS Cloud for everything from case management to data ingestion and processing. The applications comprise multiple components or microservices as individually deployable units or a single monolith application with multiple shared components.

Most of the application components, running on Linux and Windows, were entirely redesigned, containerized, and gradually deployed from on-premises to cloud-based Amazon ECS clusters. Fifteen applications were to be deferred for migration or planned for retirement due to other dependencies. Those deferred applications are currently running on on-premises bare-metal servers hosted across 38 Windows servers and 15 Linux servers per environment with a total of 150 Windows servers and 60 Linux servers across all the environments.

The applications were deployed to the on-premises servers earlier using the XL Deploy tool from XebiaLabs. The tool has now been decommissioned and replaced by CodeDeploy to attain more reliability and consistency in deployments across various applications.

Infrastructure and Workflow overview

FINRA’s AWS Cloud infrastructure consists of Amazon EC2 instances, ECS, Amazon EMR clusters, and many resources from other AWS services. We host web applications in ECS clusters, running approximately 200 clusters on each environment and EC2 instances. The infrastructure uses AWS CloudFormation and AWS Java SDK as Infrastructure-as-Code (IaC).

The CI/CD pipeline comprises of:

  • A source stage (per branch) stored in a BitBucket repository
  • A build stage executed on Jenkins build slaves
  • A deploy stage involving deployment from:
    • AWS CloudFormation and SDK to ECS clusters
    • CodeDeploy to EC2 instances
    • CodeDeploy Service to on-premises servers across various development, quality assurance (QA), staging, and production environments.

Jenkins masters running on EC2 instances within an Auto Scaling group orchestrate the CI/CD pipeline. The master spawns the build slaves as ECS tasks to execute a build job. Once the image is built and containerized in the build stage, the build artifact is stored in Artifactory repos for shared common libraries or staged in S3 to be used in deployments. The Jenkins slave invokes the appropriate deployment service – AWS CloudFormation and SDK or CodeDeploy depending on the target server environment, as detailed in the preceding paragraphs. On completion of the deployment, the automated smoke tests are launched.

The following diagram depicts the CD workflow for the on-premises instances:

The Delivery pipeline deploys across various environments such as development, QA, user acceptance testing (UAT), and production. Approval gates control deployments to UAT and production.

CodeDeploy Operations

Our experience of utilizing CodeDeploy services has been “very smooth” since we moved from the XebiaLabs XL Deploy tool three months ago. The main factors that led FINRA to select CodeDeploy for our organization were:

  • Being able to use the same set of deployment tools between on-premises and cloud-based instances
  • Easy portability and reuse of scripts
  • Shared community knowledge rather than isolated expertise

The default deployment parameters were well-suited for our environments and didn’t require altering values or customization. Depending on the application being deployed, deployments can be carried out on cloud-based instances or on-premises instances. Cloud-based instances use AWS CloudFormation templates to trigger CodeDeploy; on-premises instances use AWS CLI-based scripts to trigger CodeDeploy.

The cloud-based deployments in production follow “blue-green” strategy for some of the applications, in which rollback is a critical requirement for minimal disruption. Other applications in cloud follow the “rolling updates” method, where as the on-premises servers in production are upgraded using “in-place” deployment method. The CodeDeploy agents running on on-premises servers are configured with roles to query for required artifacts stored on specific S3 buckets when deploying the package.

The applications’ deployment mappings to the instances are configured based on EC2 Auto Scaling groups in the cloud and based on tags for on-premises resources. Each component is logically mapped to a CodeDeploy deployment group. However, at one point, the maximum number of tags added to the CodeDeploy on-premises instance was restricted to a maximum tag limit of 10, but the instance needed 13 tags corresponding to 13 deployment groups.

We overcame this limitation by adding a common tenth tag on the on-premises instance and also on the remaining deployment groups (10-13) and stored the mapping of instances to deployment groups externally. The deployment script first looks up the mapping and proceeds with the deployment by validating if it matches the target server name, then runs deployments only on the matching target servers and skips deployments on the unmatched servers, as shown in the following diagram.

CodeDeploy offers the following benefits to FINRA:

  • Deployment configurations written as code: CodeDeploy configuration uses CloudFormation templates as Infrastructure-as-Code, which makes it easier to create and maintain.
  • Version controlled deployment code: AWS CloudFormation templates, deployment configuration, and deployment scripts are maintained in the source code repository and version-controlled.
  • Reusability: Most CodeDeploy resource provisioning code is reusable across all the on-premises instances and on different platforms, such as Linux (RHEL) and Windows.
  • Zero maintenance of deployment tool: As a managed service, CodeDeploy does not require maintenance and upgrade.
  • Secrets Management: CodeDeploy integrates with central secrets management systems, and externalizes environment configurations.

Monitoring

FINRA uses the in-house developed DevOps Dashboard to monitor the build and deploy stages, based upon a Grafana UI extracting CI and CD data from Jenkins.

The cloud instances and on-premises servers are configured with agents to stream the real-time logs to a central Splunk Server, where the logs are analyzed and health-monitored. Optionally, the deployment logs are forwarded to the functional owners via email attachments. These logs become critical for the troubleshooting activity in post-mortems of past events. Due to the restrictions on accessing the base instances across various functional teams, the above mechanism enables us to gain visibility into health of the CI/CD infrastructure.

Looking Forward

We plan to migrate the remaining on-premises applications to the cloud after necessary refactoring and retiring of the application dependencies over the next few years.

Our eventual goal is to move towards serverless technologies to eliminate server infrastructure management.

Conclusion

This post reviewed the Infrastructure at FINRA on both AWS Cloud and on-premises, the CI/CD pipeline, and the CodeDeploy workflow integration, as well as examining insights into CodeDeploy use.

The content and opinions in this blog are those of the third-party author and AWS is not responsible for the content or accuracy of this post.

 

 

Announcing CloudTrail Insights: Identify and Respond to Unusual API Activity

Post Syndicated from Brandon West original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/announcing-cloudtrail-insights-identify-and-respond-to-unusual-api-activity/

Building software in the cloud makes it easy to instrument systems for logging from the very beginning. With tools like AWS CloudTrail, tracking every action taken on AWS accounts and services is straightforward, providing a way to find the event that caused a given change. But not all log entries are useful. When things are running smoothly, those log entries are like the steady, reassuring hum of machinery on a factory floor. When things start going wrong, that hum can make it harder to hear which piece of equipment has gone a bit wobbly. The same is true with large scale software systems: the volume of log data can be overwhelming. Sifting through those records to find actionable information is tedious. It usually requires a lot of custom software or custom integrations, and can result in false positives and alert fatigue when new services are added.

That’s where software automation and machine learning can help. Today, we’re launching AWS CloudTrail Insights in all commercial AWS regions. CloudTrail Insights automatically analyzes write management events from CloudTrail trails and alerts you to unusual activity. For example, if there is an increase in TerminateInstance events that differs from established baselines, you’ll see it as an Insight event. These events make finding and responding to unusual API activity easier than ever.

Enabling AWS CloudTrail Insights

CloudTrail tracks user activity and API usage. It provides an event history of AWS account activity, including actions taken through the AWS Management Console, AWS SDKs, command line tools, and other AWS services. With the launch of AWS CloudTrail Insights, you can enable machine learning models that detect unusual activity in these logs with just a few clicks. AWS CloudTrail Insights will analyze historical API calls, identifying usage patterns and generating Insight Events for unusual activity.

Screenshot showing how to enable CloudTrail Insights

You can also enable Insights on a trail from the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) by using the put-insight-selectors command:

$ aws cloudtrail put-insight-selectors --trail-name trail_name --insight-selectors '{"InsightType": "ApiCallRateInsight"}'

Once enabled, CloudTrail Insights sends events to the S3 bucket specified on the trail details page. Events are also sent to CloudWatch Events, and optionally to an CloudWatch Logs log group, just like other CloudTrail Events. This gives you options when it comes to alerting, from sophisticated rules that respond to CloudWatch events to custom AWS Lambda functions. After enabling Insights, historical events for the trail will be analyzed. Anomalous usage patterns found will appear in the CloudTrail Console within 30 minutes.

Using CloudTrail Insights

In this post we’ll take a look at some AWS CloudTrail Insights Events from the AWS Console. If you’d like to view Insight events from the AWS CLI, you use the CloudTrail LookupEvents call with the event-category parameter.

$ aws cloudtrail lookup-events --event-category insight [--max-item] [--lookup-attributes]

Quickly scanning the list of CloudTrail Insights, the RunInstances event jumps out to me. Spinning up more EC2 instances can be expensive, and I’ve definitely mis-configured things such that I created more instances than needed before, so I want to take a closer look. Let’s filter the list down to just these events and see what we can learn from AWS CloudTrail Insights.

Let’s dig in to the latest event.

Here we see that over the course of one minute, there was a spike in RunInstances API call volume. From the Insights graph, we can see the raw event as JSON.

{
    "Records": [
        {
            "eventVersion": "1.07",
            "eventTime": "2019-11-07T13:25:00Z",
            "awsRegion": "us-east-1",
            "eventID": "a9edc959-9488-4790-be0f-05d60e56b547",
            "eventType": "AwsCloudTrailInsight",
            "recipientAccountId": "-REDACTED-",
            "sharedEventID": "c2806063-d85d-42c3-9027-d2c56a477314",
            "insightDetails": {
                "state": "Start",
                "eventSource": "ec2.amazonaws.com",
                "eventName": "RunInstances",
                "insightType": "ApiCallRateInsight",
                "insightContext": {
                    "statistics": {
                        "baseline": {
                            "average": 0.0020833333},
                        "insight": {
                            "average": 6}
                    }
                }
            },
            "eventCategory": "Insight"},
        {
            "eventVersion": "1.07",
            "eventTime": "2019-11-07T13:26:00Z",
            "awsRegion": "us-east-1",
            "eventID": "33a52182-6ff8-49c8-baaa-9caac16a96ce",
            "eventType": "AwsCloudTrailInsight",
            "recipientAccountId": "-REDACTED-",
            "sharedEventID": "c2806063-d85d-42c3-9027-d2c56a477314",
            "insightDetails": {
                "state": "End",
                "eventSource": "ec2.amazonaws.com",
                "eventName": "RunInstances",
                "insightType": "ApiCallRateInsight",
                "insightContext": {
                    "statistics": {
                        "baseline": {
                            "average": 0.0020833333},
                        "insight": {
                            "average": 6},
                        "insightDuration": 1}
                }
            },
            "eventCategory": "Insight"}
    ]}

Here we can see that the baseline API call volume is 0.002. That means that there’s usually one call to RunInstances roughly once every 500 minutes, so the activity we see in the graph is definitely not normal. By clicking over to the CloudTrail Events tab we can see the individual events that are grouped into this Insight event. It looks like this was probably a normal EC2 autoscaling activity, but I still want to dig in and confirm.

By expanding an event in this tab and clicking “View Event,” I can head directly to the event in CloudTrail for more information. After reviewing the event metadata and associated EC2 and IAM resources, I’ve confirmed that while this behavior was unusual, it’s not a cause for concern. It looks like autoscaling did what it was supposed to and that the correct type of instance was created.

Things to Know

Before you get started, here are some important things to know:

  • CloudTrail Insights costs $0.35 for every 100,000 write management events analyzed for each Insight type. At launch, API call volume insights are the only type available.
  • Activity baselines are scoped to the region and account in which the CloudTrail trail is operating.
  • After an account enables Insights events for the first time, if an unusual activity is detected, you can expect to receive the first Insights events within 36 hours of enabling Insights..
  • New unusual activity is logged as it is discovered, sending Insight Events to your destination S3 buckets and the AWS console within 30 minutes in most cases.

Let me know if you have any questions or feature requests, and happy building!

— Brandon

 

Continuously monitor unused IAM roles with AWS Config

Post Syndicated from Michael Chan original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/continuously-monitor-unused-iam-roles-aws-config/

Developing in the cloud encourages you to iterate frequently as your applications and resources evolve. You should also apply this iterative approach to the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles you create. Periodically ensuring that all the resources you’ve created are still being used can reduce operational complexity by eliminating the need to track unnecessary resources. It also improves security: identifying unused IAM roles helps reduce the potential for improper or unintended access to your critical infrastructure and workloads.

The IAM API now provides you with information about when a role has last been used to make an AWS request. In this post, I demonstrate how you can identify inactive roles using role last used information. Additionally, I’ll show you how to implement continuous monitoring of role activity using AWS Config.

AWS services and features used

This solution uses the following services and features:

  • AWS IAM: This service enables you to manage access to AWS services and resources securely. It provides an API to retrieve the timestamp of an IAM role’s last use when making an AWS request, and the region where the request was made.
  • AWS Config: This service allows you to continuously monitor and record your AWS resource configurations. It will periodically trigger your AWS Config rule (see next bullet) and will record compliance status.
  • AWS Config Rule: This resource represents your desired configuration settings for specific AWS resources or for an entire AWS account. This resource will check the compliance status of your AWS resources. You can provide the logic that determines compliance, which enables you to mark IAM roles in use as “compliant” and inactive roles as “non-compliant.”
  • AWS Lambda: This service lets you run code without provisioning or managing servers. Lambda will be used to execute API calls to retrieve role last used information and to provide compliance evaluations to AWS Config.
  • Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3): This is a highly available and durable object store. You’ll use it to store your Lambda code in .zip format prior to deploying your Lambda function.
  • AWS CloudFormation: This service provides a common language for you to describe and provision all the infrastructure resources in your cloud environment. You’ll use it to provision all the resources described in this solution.

Solution logic

This solution identifies unused IAM roles within your account. First, you’ll identify unused roles based on a time window (last number of days) you set. I use 60 days in my example, but this range is configurable. Second, you’ll use AWS Lambda to process all the roles in your account. Third, you’ll determine if they’re compliant based on their creation time and role last used information. Last, you’ll send your evaluations to AWS Config, which records the results and reports if each role is compliant or not. If not, you can take steps to remediate, such as denying all actions that the role can perform.

Prerequisites

This solution has the following prerequisites:

Solution architecture

 

Figure 1: Solution architecture

Figure 1: Solution architecture

As shown in the diagram, AWS Config (1) executes the AWS Config custom rule daily, and this frequency is configurable (2), which in turn invokes the Lambda function (3). The Lambda function enumerates each role and determines its creation date and role last used timestamp, both of which are provided via IAM’s GetAccountAuthorizationDetails API (4). When the Lambda function has determined the compliance of all your roles, the function returns the compliance results to AWS Config (5). AWS Config retains the history of compliance changes evaluated by the rule. If configured, compliance notifications can be sent to an Amazon Simple Notification Service (Amazon SNS) topic. Compliance status is viewable either in the AWS Management Console or through use of the AWS CLI or AWS SDK.

Deploying the solution

The resources for this solution are deployed through AWS CloudFormation. You must prepare the Lambda function’s source code for packaging before AWS CloudFormation can deploy the complete solution into your account.

Step 1: Prepare the Lambda deployment

First, make sure you’re running a *nix prompt (Linux, Mac, or Windows subsystem for Linux). Follow the commands below to create an empty folder named iam-role-last-used where you’ll place your Lambda source code.


mkdir iam-role-last-used
cd iam-role-last-used
touch lambda_function.py

Note that the directory you create and the code it contains will later be compressed into a .zip file by the AWS CLI’s cloudformation package command. This command also uploads the deployment .zip file to your S3 bucket. The cloudformation deploy command will reference this bucket when deploying the solution.

Next, create a Lambda layer with the latest boto3 package. This ensures that your Lambda function is using an up-to-date boto3 SDK and allows you to control the dependencies in your function’s deployment package. You can do this by following steps 1 through 4 in these directions. Be sure to record the Lambda layer ARN that you create because you will use it later.

Finally, open the lambda_function.py file in your favorite editor or integrated development environment (IDE), and place the following code into the lambda_function.py file:


import boto3
from botocore.exceptions import ClientError
from botocore.config import Config
import datetime
import fnmatch
import json
import os
import re
import logging


logger = logging.getLogger()
logging.basicConfig(
    format="[%(asctime)s] %(levelname)s [%(module)s.%(funcName)s:%(lineno)d] %(message)s", datefmt="%H:%M:%S"
)
logger.setLevel(os.getenv('log_level', logging.INFO))

# Configure boto retries
BOTO_CONFIG = Config(retries=dict(max_attempts=5))

# Define the default resource to report to Config Rules
DEFAULT_RESOURCE_TYPE = 'AWS::IAM::Role'

CONFIG_ROLE_TIMEOUT_SECONDS = 60

# Set to True to get the lambda to assume the Role attached on the Config service (useful for cross-account).
ASSUME_ROLE_MODE = False

# Evaluation strings for Config evaluations
COMPLIANT = 'COMPLIANT'
NON_COMPLIANT = 'NON_COMPLIANT'


# This gets the client after assuming the Config service role either in the same AWS account or cross-account.
def get_client(service, execution_role_arn):
    if not ASSUME_ROLE_MODE:
        return boto3.client(service)
    credentials = get_assume_role_credentials(execution_role_arn)
    return boto3.client(service, aws_access_key_id=credentials['AccessKeyId'],
                        aws_secret_access_key=credentials['SecretAccessKey'],
                        aws_session_token=credentials['SessionToken'],
                        config=BOTO_CONFIG
                        )


def get_assume_role_credentials(execution_role_arn):
    sts_client = boto3.client('sts')
    try:
        assume_role_response = sts_client.assume_role(RoleArn=execution_role_arn,
                                                      RoleSessionName="configLambdaExecution",
                                                      DurationSeconds=CONFIG_ROLE_TIMEOUT_SECONDS)
        return assume_role_response['Credentials']
    except ClientError as ex:
        if 'AccessDenied' in ex.response['Error']['Code']:
            ex.response['Error']['Message'] = "AWS Config does not have permission to assume the IAM role."
        else:
            ex.response['Error']['Message'] = "InternalError"
            ex.response['Error']['Code'] = "InternalError"
        raise ex


# Validates role pathname whitelist as passed via AWS Config parameters and returns a list of comma separated patterns.
def validate_whitelist(unvalidated_role_pattern_whitelist):
    # Names of users, groups, roles must be alphanumeric, including the following common
    # characters: plus (+), equal (=), comma (,), period (.), at (@), underscore (_), and hyphen (-).

    if not unvalidated_role_pattern_whitelist:
        return None

    regex = re.compile('^[-a-zA-Z0-9+=,[email protected]_/|*]+')
    if regex.search(unvalidated_role_pattern_whitelist):
        raise ValueError("[Error] Provided whitelist has invalid characters")

    return unvalidated_role_pattern_whitelist.split('|')


# This uses Unix filename pattern matching (as opposed to regular expressions), as documented here:
# https://docs.python.org/3.7/library/fnmatch.html.  Please note that if using a wildcard, e.g. "*", you should use
# it sparingly/appropriately.
# If the rolename matches the pattern, then it is whitelisted
def is_whitelisted_role(role_pathname, pattern_list):
    if not pattern_list:
        return False

    # If role_pathname matches pattern, then return True, else False
    # eg. /service-role/aws-codestar-service-role matches pattern /service-role/*
    # https://docs.python.org/3.7/library/fnmatch.html
    for pattern in pattern_list:
        if fnmatch.fnmatch(role_pathname, pattern):
            # whitelisted
            return True

    # not whitelisted
    return False


# Form an evaluation as a dictionary. Suited to report on scheduled rules.  More info here:
#   https://boto3.amazonaws.com/v1/documentation/api/latest/reference/services/config.html#ConfigService.Client.put_evaluations
def build_evaluation(resource_id, compliance_type, notification_creation_time, resource_type=DEFAULT_RESOURCE_TYPE, annotation=None):
    evaluation = {}
    if annotation:
        evaluation['Annotation'] = annotation
    evaluation['ComplianceResourceType'] = resource_type
    evaluation['ComplianceResourceId'] = resource_id
    evaluation['ComplianceType'] = compliance_type
    evaluation['OrderingTimestamp'] = notification_creation_time
    return evaluation


# Determine if any roles were used to make an AWS request
def determine_last_used(role_name, role_last_used, max_age_in_days, notification_creation_time):

    last_used_date = role_last_used.get('LastUsedDate', None)
    used_region = role_last_used.get('Region', None)

    if not last_used_date:
        compliance_result = NON_COMPLIANT
        reason = "No record of usage"
        logger.info(f"NON_COMPLIANT: {role_name} has never been used")
        return build_evaluation(role_name, compliance_result, notification_creation_time, resource_type=DEFAULT_RESOURCE_TYPE, annotation=reason)


    days_unused = (datetime.datetime.now() - last_used_date.replace(tzinfo=None)).days

    if days_unused > max_age_in_days:
        compliance_result = NON_COMPLIANT
        reason = f"Was used {days_unused} days ago in {used_region}"
        logger.info(f"NON_COMPLIANT: {role_name} has not been used for {days_unused} days, last use in {used_region}")
        return build_evaluation(role_name, compliance_result, notification_creation_time, resource_type=DEFAULT_RESOURCE_TYPE, annotation=reason)

    compliance_result = COMPLIANT
    reason = f"Was used {days_unused} days ago in {used_region}"
    logger.info(f"COMPLIANT: {role_name} used {days_unused} days ago in {used_region}")
    return build_evaluation(role_name, compliance_result, notification_creation_time, resource_type=DEFAULT_RESOURCE_TYPE, annotation=reason)


# Returns a list of docts, each of which has authorization details of each role.  More info here:
#   https://boto3.amazonaws.com/v1/documentation/api/latest/reference/services/iam.html#IAM.Client.get_account_authorization_details
def get_role_authorization_details(iam_client):

    roles_authorization_details = []
    roles_list = iam_client.get_account_authorization_details(Filter=['Role'])

    while True:
        roles_authorization_details += roles_list['RoleDetailList']
        if 'Marker' in roles_list:
            roles_list = iam_client.get_account_authorization_details(Filter=['Role'], MaxItems=100, Marker=roles_list['Marker'])
        else:
            break

    return roles_authorization_details


# Check the compliance of each role by determining if role last used is > than max_days_for_last_used
def evaluate_compliance(event, context):

    # Initialize our AWS clients
    iam_client = get_client('iam', event["executionRoleArn"])
    config_client = get_client('config', event["executionRoleArn"])

    # List of resource evaluations to return back to AWS Config
    evaluations = []

    # List of dicts of each role's authorization details as returned by boto3
    all_roles = get_role_authorization_details(iam_client)

    # Timestamp of when AWS Config triggered this evaluation
    notification_creation_time = str(json.loads(event['invokingEvent'])['notificationCreationTime'])

    # ruleParameters is received from AWS Config's user-defined parameters
    rule_parameters = json.loads(event["ruleParameters"])

    # Maximum allowed days that a role can be unused, or has been last used for an AWS request
    max_days_for_last_used = int(os.environ.get('max_days_for_last_used', '60'))
    if 'max_days_for_last_used' in rule_parameters:
        max_days_for_last_used = int(rule_parameters['max_days_for_last_used'])

    whitelisted_role_pattern_list = []
    if 'role_whitelist' in rule_parameters:
        whitelisted_role_pattern_list = validate_whitelist(rule_parameters['role_whitelist'])

    # Iterate over all our roles.  If the creation date of a role is <= max_days_for_last_used, it is compliant
    for role in all_roles:

        role_name = role['RoleName']
        role_path = role['Path']
        role_creation_date = role['CreateDate']
        role_last_used = role['RoleLastUsed']
        role_age_in_days = (datetime.datetime.now() - role_creation_date.replace(tzinfo=None)).days

        if is_whitelisted_role(role_path + role_name, whitelisted_role_pattern_list):
            compliance_result = COMPLIANT
            reason = "Role is whitelisted"
            evaluations.append(
                build_evaluation(role_name, compliance_result, notification_creation_time, resource_type=DEFAULT_RESOURCE_TYPE, annotation=reason))
            logger.info(f"COMPLIANT: {role} is whitelisted")
            continue

        if role_age_in_days <= max_days_for_last_used:
            compliance_result = COMPLIANT
            reason = f"Role age is {role_age_in_days} days"
            evaluations.append(
                build_evaluation(role_name, compliance_result, notification_creation_time, resource_type=DEFAULT_RESOURCE_TYPE, annotation=reason))
            logger.info(f"COMPLIANT: {role_name} - {role_age_in_days} is newer or equal to {max_days_for_last_used} days")
            continue

        evaluation_result = determine_last_used(role_name, role_last_used, max_days_for_last_used, notification_creation_time)
        evaluations.append(evaluation_result)

    # Iterate over our evaluations 100 at a time, as put_evaluations only accepts a max of 100 evals.
    evaluations_copy = evaluations[:]
    while evaluations_copy:
        config_client.put_evaluations(Evaluations=evaluations_copy[:100], ResultToken=event['resultToken'])
        del evaluations_copy[:100]

Here’s how the above code works. The AWS Config custom rule invokes the Lambda function, calling the evaluate_compliance() method. evaluate_compliance() does the following:

  1. Retrieves information on all roles from IAM using the GetAccountAuthorizationDetails API as mentioned previously. This includes each role’s creation date and role last used timestamp.
  2. Marks each role as compliant if the role name matches one of the patterns in your whitelisted_role_pattern_list. This pattern list is passed to your rule via a user-configurable AWS CloudFormation parameter named RolePatternWhitelist. “Whitelisting roles,” below, provides instructions about how to do this.
  3. Marks each role as compliant if the age of the role in days (role_age_in_days) is less than or equal to the parameter MaxDaysForLastUsed (max_days_for_last_used). This is set via a user-configurable parameter in your CloudFormation stack. You’ll use this parameter to set the time window for how long a role can be inactive.
  4. If neither of the above conditions are met, then determine_last_used() is called, and each role will be marked as non-compliant if days_unused is greater than max_age_in_days.
  5. Finally, evaluate_compliance() calls put_evaluations() against AWS Config to store your evaluations of each role.

Step 2: Deploy the AWS CloudFormation template

Next, create an AWS CloudFormation template file named  iam-role-last-used.yml. This template uses the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM), which is an extension of CloudFormation. AWS SAM simplifies the deployment so that you don’t have to manually upload your deployment .zip file to your Amazon S3 bucket. To ensure that your template knows the location of your code .zip file, place the file on the same directory level as the iam-role-last-used directory that you created above. Then copy and paste the code below and save it to the iam-role-last-used.yml file.


AWSTemplateFormatVersion: '2010-09-09'
Description: "Creates an AWS Config rule and Lambda to check all roles' last used compliance"
Transform: 'AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31'
Parameters:

  MaxDaysForLastUsed:
    Description: Checks the number of days allowed for a role to not be used before being non-compliant
    Type: Number
    Default: 60
    MaxValue: 365

  NameOfSolution:
    Type: String
    Default: iam-role-last-used
    Description: The name of the solution - used for naming of created resources

  RolePatternWhitelist:
    Description: Pipe separated whitelist of role pathnames using simple pathname matching
    Type: String
    Default: ''
    AllowedPattern: '[-a-zA-Z0-9+=,[email protected]_/|*]+|^$'

  LambdaLayerArn:
    Type: String
    Description: The ARN for the Lambda Layer you will use.
  
Resources:
  LambdaInvokePermission:
    Type: 'AWS::Lambda::Permission'
    DependsOn: CheckRoleLastUsedLambda
    Properties: 
      FunctionName: !GetAtt CheckRoleLastUsedLambda.Arn
      Action: lambda:InvokeFunction
      Principal: config.amazonaws.com
      SourceAccount: !Ref 'AWS::AccountId'

  LambdaExecutionRole:
    Type: 'AWS::IAM::Role'
    Properties:
      RoleName: !Sub '${NameOfSolution}-${AWS::Region}'
      AssumeRolePolicyDocument:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Statement:
        - Effect: Allow
          Principal:
            Service: lambda.amazonaws.com
          Action:
          - sts:AssumeRole
      Path: /
      Policies:
      - PolicyName: !Sub '${NameOfSolution}'
        PolicyDocument:
          Version: '2012-10-17'
          Statement:
          - Effect: Allow
            Action:
            - config:PutEvaluations
            Resource: '*'
          - Effect: Allow
            Action:
            - iam:GetAccountAuthorizationDetails
            Resource: '*'
          - Effect: Allow
            Action:
            - logs:CreateLogStream
            - logs:PutLogEvents
            Resource:
            - !Sub 'arn:${AWS::Partition}:logs:${AWS::Region}:*:log-group:/aws/lambda/${NameOfSolution}:log-stream:*'

  CheckRoleLastUsedLambda:
    Type: 'AWS::Serverless::Function'
    Properties:
      Description: "Checks IAM roles' last used info for AWS Config"
      FunctionName: !Sub '${NameOfSolution}'
      Handler: lambda_function.evaluate_compliance
      MemorySize: 256
      Role: !GetAtt LambdaExecutionRole.Arn
      Runtime: python3.7
      Timeout: 300
      CodeUri: ./iam-role-last-used
      Layers:
      - !Ref LambdaLayerArn

  LambdaLogGroup:
    Type: 'AWS::Logs::LogGroup'
    Properties: 
      LogGroupName: !Sub '/aws/lambda/${NameOfSolution}'
      RetentionInDays: 30

  ConfigCustomRule:
    Type: 'AWS::Config::ConfigRule'
    DependsOn:
    - LambdaInvokePermission
    - LambdaExecutionRole
    Properties:
      ConfigRuleName: !Sub '${NameOfSolution}'
      Description: Checks the number of days that an IAM role has not been used to make a service request. If the number of days exceeds the specified threshold, it is marked as non-compliant.
      InputParameters: !Sub '{"role-whitelist":"${RolePatternWhitelist}","max_days_for_last_used":"${MaxDaysForLastUsed}"}'
      Source: 
        Owner: CUSTOM_LAMBDA
        SourceDetails: 
        - EventSource: aws.config
          MaximumExecutionFrequency: TwentyFour_Hours
          MessageType: ScheduledNotification
        SourceIdentifier: !GetAtt CheckRoleLastUsedLambda.Arn

For your reference, below is a summary of the template.

  • Parameters (these are user-configurable variables):
    • MaxDaysForLastUsed—maximum amount of days allowed for a role that has not been used to make an AWS request before becoming non-compliant
    • NameOfSolution—the name of the solution, used for naming of created resources
    • RolePatternWhitelist—a pipe (“|”) separated whitelist of role pathnames using simple pathname matching (see Whitelisting roles below)
    • LambdaLayerArn—the unique ARN for your Lambda layer
  • Resources (these are the AWS resources that will be created within your account):
    • LambdaInvokePermission—allows AWS Config to invoke your Lambda function
    • LambdaExecutionRole—the role and permissions that Lambda will assume to process your roles. The policies assigned to this role allow you to perform the iam:GetAccountAuthorizationDetails, config:PutEvaluations, logs:CreateLogStream, and logs:PutLogEvents actions. The PutEvaluations action allows you to send evaluation results back to AWS Config. The CreateLogStream and PutLogEvents actions allows you to write the Lambda execution logs to AWS CloudWatch Logs.
    • CheckRoleLastUsedLambda—defines your Lambda function and its attributes
    • LambdaLogGroup—logs from Lambda will be written to this CloudWatch Log Group
    • ConfigCustomRule—defines your custom AWS Config rule and its attributes

With the CloudFormation template you created above, use the AWS CLI’s cloudformation package command to zip the deployment package and upload it to the S3 bucket that you specify, as shown below. Make sure to replace <YOUR S3 BUCKET> with your bucket name only. Do not include the s3:// prefix:


aws cloudformation package --region <YOUR REGION> --template-file iam-role-last-used.yml \
--s3-bucket <YOUR S3 BUCKET> \
--output-template-file iam-role-last-used-transformed.yml

This will create the file iam-role-last-used-transformed.yml, which adds a reference to the S3 bucket and the pathname needed by CloudFormation to deploy your Lambda function.

Finally, deploy the solution into your AWS account using the cloudformation deploy command below. You can provide different values for NameOfSolutionMaxDaysForLastAccess, or RolePatternWhitelist by using the –parameter-overrides option. Otherwise, defaults will be used. These are specified at the top of the AWS Cloudformation template pasted above, under the Parameters section.


aws cloudformation deploy --region <YOUR REGION> --template-file iam-role-last-used-transformed.yml \
--stack-name iam-role-last-used \
--parameter-overrides NameOfSolution='iam-role-last-used' \
MaxDaysForLastUsed=60 \
RolePatternWhitelist='/breakglass-role|/security-*' \
LambdaLayerArn='<YOUR LAMBDA LAYER ARN>' \
--capabilities CAPABILITY_NAMED_IAM

The deployment is complete after the AWS CLI indicates success. This typically takes only a few minutes:


Waiting for changeset to be created..
Waiting for stack create/update to complete
Successfully created/updated stack - iam-role-last-used

Step 3: View your findings

Now that your deployment is complete, you can view your compliance findings by going to the AWS Config console.

  1. Select the same region where you deployed the CloudFormation template.
  2. Select Rules in the left pane, which brings up the current list of rules in your account.
  3. Select the iam-role-last-used rule to view the rule’s details, as shown in Figure 2.

When a successful evaluation is indicated in the Overall rule status field, the compliance evaluation is complete. You may need to wait a few minutes for the function to complete successfully as results may not be available yet. You can periodically refresh your web browser to check for completion.
 

Figure 2: AWS Config rule details

Figure 2: AWS Config custom rule details

After the rule completes its evaluations of your roles, you’ll be able to view your compliance results on the same page. In the screenshot below, you can see that there are multiple non-compliant roles. You can switch between viewing compliant and non-compliant resources by selecting the dropdown menu under Compliance status.
 

Figure 3: Viewing the compliance status

Figure 3: Viewing the compliance status

For more insight, you can hover over the “i” symbol, which provides additional information about the role’s non-compliant status (see Figure 4).
 

Figure 4: Hover over the information icon

Figure 4: Hover over the information icon

Step 4: Export a report of your compliance

Once a successful evaluation has completed, you may want to create an exportable report of compliance. You can use the AWS CLI to programmatically script and automatically generate reports for your application, infrastructure, and security teams. They can use these reports to review non-compliant roles and take action if the role is no longer needed. The AWS CLI command below demonstrates how you can achieve this. Note that the command below encompasses a single line:

aws configservice get-compliance-details-by-config-rule –config-rule-name iam-role-last-used –output text –query ‘EvaluationResults [*].{A:EvaluationResultIdentifier.EvaluationResultQualifier.ResourceId,B:ComplianceType,C:Annotation}’

The output is tab-delimited and will be similar to the lines below. The first column displays the role name. The second column states the compliance status. The last column explains the reason for the compliance status:

AdminRole   COMPLIANT      Was last used in us-west-2 46 days ago
Ec2DevRole  NON_COMPLIANT  No record of usage

Remediation

Now that you have a report of non-compliant roles, you must decide what to do with them. If your teams agree that a role is not necessary, the remediation can be to simply delete the role. If unsure, you can retain the role but deny it from performing any action. You can do this by attaching a new permissions policy that will deny all actions for all resources. Re-enabling the role would be as easy as removing the added policy. Otherwise, if the role is necessary but not frequently used, you can whitelist the role through the method below.

Whitelisting roles

Whitelisted roles will be reported as compliant by the custom rule even if left unused. You might have roles such as a security incident response or a break-glass role that require whitelisting.

The whitelist is supplied via the CloudFormation parameter RolePatternWhitelist and is stored as an AWS Config rule parameter. The syntax uses UNIX filename pattern matching. If you need to specify multiple patterns, you can use the | (pipe) character as a delimiter between each pattern. Each delimited pattern will then be matched against the role name, including the path. For example, if you wish to whitelist the breakglass-role, security-incident-response-role and security-audit-role roles, the whitelist patterns you provide to the AWS CloudFormation template might be:

/breakglass-role|/security-*

Important: The use of wildcards (*) should be used thoughtfully, as they will match anything.

Enhancements

In this walkthrough, I’ve kept the architecture and code simple to make the solution easier to follow. You can further customize the solution through the following enhancements:

Conclusion

In this post, I’ve shown you how to use AWS IAM and AWS Config to implement a detective security control that provides visibility into your IAM roles and their last time of use. I’ve also shown how you can view the results in the AWS Management Console and export them using the AWS CLI. Finally, I’ve presented different options for remediation and a means to whitelist roles that are necessary but infrequently used. These techniques can augment your security and compliance program by preventing unintended access through your IAM roles.

Additional resources

If you have feedback about this blog post, submit comments in the Comments section below. If you have questions about this blog post, start a new thread on the IAM forum or contact AWS Support.

Want more AWS Security news? Follow us on Twitter.

Michael Chan

Michael Chan

Michael is a Developer Advocate for AWS Identity. Prior to this, he was a Professional Services Consultant who assisted customers with their journey to AWS. He enjoys understanding customer problems and working backwards to provide practical solutions.

Roland AbiHanna

Roland is a Sr. Solutions Architect with Amazon Web Services. He’s focused on helping enterprise customers realize their business needs through cloud solutions, specializing in DevOps and automation. Prior to AWS, Roland ran DevOps for a variety of start-ups in Europe and the Middle East. Outside of work, Roland enjoys hiking and searching for the perfect blend of hops, barley, and water.

CloudFormation Update – CLI + Third-Party Resource Support + Registry

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/cloudformation-update-cli-third-party-resource-support-registry/

CloudFormation was launched in 2011 (AWS CloudFormation – Create Your AWS Stack From a Recipe) and has become an indispensable tool for many AWS customers. They love the fact that they can define a template once and then use it to reliably provision their AWS resources. They also make frequent use of Change Sets, and count on them to provide insights into the actions (additions, changes, and deletions) that will take place when the change set is executed.

As I have written about in the past, CloudFormation takes special care to implement a model that is consistent, stable, and uniform. This is an important, yet often overlooked, element of CloudFormation, but one that our customers tell us that they highly value!

Let’s take a look at a couple of the most frequent requests from our customers:

Performance – Over the past year, the number of operations performed on CloudFormation stacks has grown by 30% per quarter! The development team has worked non-stop to make CloudFormation faster and more efficient, even as usage grows like a weed, using a combination of architectural improvements and low-level optimizations. Over the past couple of months, this work has allowed us to raise a number of soft and hard limits associated with CloudFormation, and drove a significant reduction in average and maximum latency for Create and Update operations.

Coverage – We release new services and new features very rapidly, and sometimes without CloudFormation support. Our goal is to support new services and new features as quickly as possible, and I believe that we are making progress. We are also using the new CloudFormation Coverage Roadmap as a primary source of input to our development process, and have already addressed 43 of the issues.

Extensibility – Customers who make extensive use of CloudFormation tell us that they want to automate the creation of non-AWS resources. This includes resources created by their own development teams and by third-party suppliers of SaaS applications, monitoring tools, and so forth. They are already making good use of Custom Resources, but as always want even more control and power, and a simple way to manage them.

CloudFormation Registry and CloudFormation CLI
Today we are addressing your requests for more coverage and better extensibility with the launch of the CloudFormation CLI as an open source project.

You can use this kit to define and create resource providers that automate the creation of resources in a safe & systematic way. You create a schema, define a handler for five core operations, test it locally, and then publish your provider to a new provider registry that is associated with your AWS account.

We have also been working with a select set of third-party vendors, helping them to create resource providers for their SaaS applications, monitoring tools, and so forth. You will be able to obtain the providers from the vendors of interest and add them to your provider registry.

Finally, we are making a set of AWS resource providers available in open source form. You can use them to learn how to write a robust provider, and you can also extend them (in your own namespace), as desired.

Let’s dive in!

CloudFormation CLI
This set of tools gives you everything you need to build your own resource providers, including detailed documentation and sample code. The cfn (CloudFormation Command Line Interface) command helps you to initialize your project, generate skeleton code, test your provider, and register it with CloudFormation.

Here are the principal steps:

Model – Create and validate a schema that serves as the canonical description of your resource.

Develop – Write a handler (Java and Go now, with other languages to follow) that defines five core operations (Create, Read, Update, Delete, and List) on your resource, and test it locally.

Register – Register the provider with CloudFormation so that it can be used in your CloudFormation templates.

Modeling a Resource
The schema for a resource must conform to the Resource Provider Definition Schema. It defines the resource, its properties, and its attributes. The properties can be defined as read-only, write-only, and create-only; this provides CloudFormation with the information it needs to have in order to be able to modify existing resources when it is executing an operation on a stack. Here is a simple definition:

{
  "additionalProperties": false,
  "createOnlyProperties": [
    "/properties/Name"
  ],
  "primaryIdentifier": [
    "/properties/Name"
  ],
  "properties": {
    "Name": {
      "description": "The name of the configuration set.",
      "maxLength": 64,
      "pattern": "^[a-zA-Z0-9_-]{0,64}$",
      "type": "string"
    }
  },
  "typeName": "AWS::SES::ConfigurationSet",
  "description": "A sample resource"
}

Develop
The handlers make use of a framework that takes care of error handling, throttling of calls to downstream APIs, credential management, and so forth. The CloudFormation CLI contains complete sample code; you can also study the Amazon SES Resource Provider (or any of the others) to learn more.

To learn more, read Walkthrough: Develop a Resource Provider in the CloudFormation CLI documentation.

Register
After you have developed and locally tested your resource provider, you need to tell CloudFormation about it. Using the CloudFormation CLI, you submit the package (schema and compiled handlers) to the desired AWS region(s). The acceptance process is asynchronous; once it completes you can use the new resource type in your CloudFormation templates.

Cloudformation Registry
The CloudFormation registry provides per-account, per-region storage for your resource providers. You can access it from the CloudFormation Console:

Select Public to view the native AWS resources (AWS::*::*); select Private to view resources that you create, and those that you obtain from third parties.

You can also access the registry programmatically using the RegisterType, DeregisterType, ListTypes, ListTypeRegistrations, ListTypeVersions, and DescribeType functions.

Third-Party Support
As I mentioned earlier, a select set of third-party vendors have been working to create resource providers ahead of today’s launch. Here’s the initial list:

After registering the provider from a vendor, you will be able to reference the corresponding resource types in your CloudFormation templates. For example, you can use Datadog::Monitors::Monitor to create a Datadog monitor.

If you are a third-party vendor and are interested in creating a resource provider for your product, send an email to [email protected].

Available Now
You can use the CloudFormation CLI to build resource providers for use in all public AWS regions.

Jeff;

New – Import Existing Resources into a CloudFormation Stack

Post Syndicated from Danilo Poccia original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-import-existing-resources-into-a-cloudformation-stack/

With AWS CloudFormation, you can model your entire infrastructure with text files. In this way, you can treat your infrastructure as code and apply software development best practices, such as putting it under version control, or reviewing architectural changes with your team before deployment.

Sometimes AWS resources initially created using the console or the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) need to be managed using CloudFormation. For example, you (or a different team) may create an IAM role, a Virtual Private Cloud, or an RDS database in the early stages of a migration, and then you have to spend time to include them in the same stack as the final application. In such cases, you often end up recreating the resources from scratch using CloudFormation, and then migrating configuration and data from the original resource.

To make these steps easier for our customers, you can now import existing resources into a CloudFormation stack!

It was already possible to remove resources from a stack without deleting them by setting the DeletionPolicy to Retain. This, together with the new import operation, enables a new range of possibilities. For example, you are now able to:

  • Create a new stack importing existing resources.
  • Import existing resources in an already created stack.
  • Migrate resources across stacks.
  • Remediate a detected drift.
  • Refactor nested stacks by deleting children stacks from one parent and then importing them into another parent stack.

To import existing resources into a CloudFormation stack, you need to provide:

  • A template that describes the entire stack, including both the resources to import and (for existing stacks) the resources that are already part of the stack.
  • Each resource to import must have a DeletionPolicy attribute in the template. This enables easy reverting of the operation in a completely safe manner.
  • A unique identifier for each target resource, for example the name of the Amazon DynamoDB table or of the Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) bucket you want to import.

During the resource import operation, CloudFormation checks that:

  • The imported resources do not already belong to another stack in the same region (be careful with global resources such as IAM roles).
  • The target resources exist and you have sufficient permissions to perform the operation.
  • The properties and configuration values are valid against the resource type schema, which defines its required, acceptable properties, and supported values.

The resource import operation does not check that the template configuration and the actual configuration are the same. Since the import operation supports the same resource types as drift detection, I recommend running drift detection after importing resources in a stack.

Importing Existing Resources into a New Stack
In my AWS account, I have an S3 bucket and a DynamoDB table, both with some data inside, and I’d like to manage them using CloudFormation. In the CloudFormation console, I have two new options:

  • I can create a new stack importing existing resources.

  • I can import resources into an existing stack.

In this case, I want to start from scratch, so I create a new stack. The next step is to provide a template with the resources to import.

I upload the following template with two resources to import: a DynamoDB table and an S3 bucket.

AWSTemplateFormatVersion: "2010-09-09"
Description: Import test
Resources:

  ImportedTable:
    Type: AWS::DynamoDB::Table
    DeletionPolicy: Retain
    Properties: 
      BillingMode: PAY_PER_REQUEST
      AttributeDefinitions: 
        - AttributeName: id
          AttributeType: S
      KeySchema: 
        - AttributeName: id
          KeyType: HASH

  ImportedBucket:
    Type: AWS::S3::Bucket
    DeletionPolicy: Retain

In this template I am setting DeletionPolicy  to Retain for both resources. In this way, if I remove them from the stack, they will not be deleted. This is a good option for resources which contain data you don’t want to delete by mistake, or that you may want to move to a different stack in the future. It is mandatory for imported resources to have a deletion policy set, so you can safely and easily revert the operation, and be protected from mistakenly deleting resources that were imported by someone else.

I now have to provide an identifier to map the logical IDs in the template with the existing resources. In this case, I use the DynamoDB table name and the S3 bucket name. For other resource types, there may be multiple ways to identify them and you can select which property to use in the drop-down menus.

In the final recap, I review changes before applying them. Here I check that I’m targeting the right resources to import with the right identifiers. This is actually a CloudFormation Change Set that will be executed when I import the resources.

When importing resources into an existing stack, no changes are allowed to the existing resources of the stack. The import operation will only allow the Change Set action of Import. Changes to parameters are allowed as long as they don’t cause changes to resolved values of properties in existing resources. You can change the template for existing resources to replace hard coded values with a Ref to a resource being imported. For example, you may have a stack with an EC2 instance using an existing IAM role that was created using the console. You can now import the IAM role into the stack and replace in the template the hard coded value used by the EC2 instance with a Ref to the role.

Moving on, each resource has its corresponding import events in the CloudFormation console.

When the import is complete, in the Resources tab, I see that the S3 bucket and the DynamoDB table are now part of the stack.

To be sure the imported resources are in sync with the stack template, I use drift detection.

All stack-level tags, including automatically created tags, are propagated to resources that CloudFormation supports. For example, I can use the AWS CLI to get the tag set associated with the S3 bucket I just imported into my stack. Those tags give me the CloudFormation stack name and ID, and the logical ID of the resource in the stack template:

$ aws s3api get-bucket-tagging --bucket danilop-toimport

{
  "TagSet": [
    {
      "Key": "aws:cloudformation:stack-name",
      "Value": "imported-stack"
    },
    {
      "Key": "aws:cloudformation:stack-id",
      "Value": "arn:aws:cloudformation:eu-west-1:123412341234:stack/imported-stack/..."
    },
    {
      "Key": "aws:cloudformation:logical-id",
      "Value": "ImportedBucket"
    }
  ]
}

Available Now
You can use the new CloudFormation import operation via the console, AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), or AWS SDKs, in the following regions: US East (Ohio), US East (N. Virginia), US West (N. California), US West (Oregon), Canada (Central), Asia Pacific (Mumbai), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), EU (Frankfurt), EU (Ireland), EU (London), EU (Paris), and South America (São Paulo).

It is now simpler to manage your infrastructure as code, you can learn more on bringing existing resources into CloudFormation management in the documentation.

Danilo

ICYMI: Serverless Q3 2019

Post Syndicated from James Beswick original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q3-2019/

This post is courtesy of Julian Wood, Senior Developer Advocate – AWS Serverless

Welcome to the seventh edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share all of the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

In case you missed our last ICYMI, checkout what happened last quarter here.

ICYMI calendar

Launches/New products

Amazon EventBridge was technically launched in this quarter although we were so excited to let you know, we squeezed it into the Q2 2019 update. If you missed it, EventBridge is the serverless event bus that connects application data from your own apps, SaaS, and AWS services. This allows you to create powerful event-driven serverless applications using a variety of event sources.

The AWS Bahrain Region has opened, the official name is Middle East (Bahrain) and the API name is me-south-1. AWS Cloud now spans 22 geographic Regions with 69 Availability Zones around the world.

AWS Lambda

In September we announced dramatic improvements in cold starts for Lambda functions inside a VPC. With this announcement, you see faster function startup performance and more efficient usage of elastic network interfaces, drastically reducing VPC cold starts.

VPC to VPC NAT

These improvements are rolling out to all existing and new VPC functions at no additional cost. Rollout is ongoing, you can track the status from the announcement post.

AWS Lambda now supports custom batch window for Kinesis and DynamoDB Event sources, which helps fine-tune Lambda invocation for cost optimization.

You can now deploy Amazon Machine Images (AMIs) and Lambda functions together from the AWS Marketplace using using AWS CloudFormation with just a few clicks.

AWS IoT Events actions now support AWS Lambda as a target. Previously you could only define actions to publish messages to SNS and MQTT. Now you can define actions to invoke AWS Lambda functions and even more targets, such as Amazon Simple Queue Service and Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose, and republish messages to IoT Events.

The AWS Lambda Console now shows recent invocations using CloudWatch Logs Insights. From the monitoring tab in the console, you can view duration, billing, and memory statistics for the 10 most recent invocations.

AWS Step Functions

AWS Step Functions example

AWS Step Functions has now been extended to support probably its most requested feature, Dynamic Parallelism, which allows steps within a workflow to be executed in parallel, with a new Map state type.

One way to use the new Map state is for fan-out or scatter-gather messaging patterns in your workflows:

  • Fan-out is applied when delivering a message to multiple destinations, and can be useful in workflows such as order processing or batch data processing. For example, you can retrieve arrays of messages from Amazon SQS and Map sends each message to a separate AWS Lambda function.
  • Scatter-gather broadcasts a single message to multiple destinations (scatter), and then aggregates the responses back for the next steps (gather). This is useful in file processing and test automation. For example, you can transcode ten 500-MB media files in parallel, and then join to create a 5-GB file.

Another important update is AWS Step Functions adds support for nested workflows, which allows you to orchestrate more complex processes by composing modular, reusable workflows.

AWS Amplify

A new Predictions category as been added to the Amplify Framework to quickly add machine learning capabilities to your web and mobile apps.

Amplify framework

With a few lines of code you can add and configure AI/ML services to configure your app to:

  • Identify text, entities, and labels in images using Amazon Rekognition, or identify text in scanned documents to get the contents of fields in forms and information stored in tables using Amazon Textract.
  • Convert text into a different language using Amazon Translate, text to speech using Amazon Polly, and speech to text using Amazon Transcribe.
  • Interpret text to find the dominant language, the entities, the key phrases, the sentiment, or the syntax of unstructured text using Amazon Comprehend.

AWS Amplify CLI (part of the open source Amplify Framework) has added local mocking and testing. This allows you to mock some of the most common cloud services and test your application 100% locally.

For this first release, the Amplify CLI can mock locally:

amplify mock

AWS CloudFormation

The CloudFormation team has released the much-anticipated CloudFormation Coverage Roadmap.

Styled after the popular AWS Containers Roadmap, the CloudFormation Coverage Roadmap provides transparency about our priorities, and the opportunity to provide your input.

The roadmap contains four columns:

  • Shipped – Available for use in production in all public AWS Regions.
  • Coming Soon – Generally a few months out.
  • We’re working on It – Work in progress, but further out.
  • Researching – We’re thinking about the right way to implement the coverage.

AWS CloudFormation roadmap

Amazon DynamoDB

NoSQL Workbench for Amazon DynamoDB has been released in preview. This is a free, client-side application available for Windows and macOS. It helps you more easily design and visualize your data model, run queries on your data, and generate the code for your application.

Amazon Aurora

Amazon Aurora Serverless is a dynamically scaling version of Amazon Aurora. It automatically starts up, shuts down, and scales up or down, based on your application workload.

Aurora Serverless has had a MySQL compatible edition for a while, now we’re excited to bring more serverless joy to databases with the PostgreSQL compatible version now GA.

We also have a useful post on Reducing Aurora PostgreSQL storage I/O costs.

AWS Serverless Application Repository

The AWS Serverless Application Repository has had some useful SAR apps added by Serverless Developer Advocate James Beswick.

  • S3 Auto Translator which automatically converts uploaded objects into other languages specified by the user, using Amazon Translate.
  • Serverless S3 Uploader allows you to upload JPG files to Amazon S3 buckets from your web applications using presigned URLs.

Serverless posts

July

August

September

Tech talks

We hold several AWS Online Tech Talks covering serverless tech talks throughout the year. These are listed in the Serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page.

Here are the ones from Q3:

Twitch

July

August

September

There are also a number of other helpful video series covering Serverless available on the AWS Twitch Channel.

AWS re:Invent

AWS re:Invent

December 2 – 6 in Las Vegas, Nevada is peak AWS learning time with AWS re:Invent 2019. Join tens of thousands of AWS customers to learn, share ideas, and see exciting keynote announcements.

Be sure to take a look at the growing catalog of serverless sessions this year. Make sure to book time for Builders SessionsChalk Talks, and Workshops as these sessions will fill up quickly. The schedule is updated regularly so if your session is currently fully booked, a repeat may be scheduled.

Register for AWS re:Invent now!

What did we do at AWS re:Invent 2018? Check out our recap here: AWS re:Invent 2018 Recap at the San Francisco Loft.

Our friends at IOPipe have written 5 tips for avoiding serverless FOMO at this year’s re:Invent.

AWS Serverless Heroes

We are excited to welcome some new AWS Serverless Heroes to help grow the serverless community. We look forward to some amazing content to help you with your serverless journey.

Still looking for more?

The Serverless landing page has much more information. The Lambda resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials.