Tag Archives: AWS AppSync

ICYMI: Serverless Q3 2018

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q3-2018/

Welcome to the third edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share all of the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

If you didn’t see them, catch our Q1 ICYMI and Q2 ICYMI posts for what happened then.

So, what might you have missed this past quarter? Here’s the recap.

AWS Amplify CLI

In August, AWS Amplify launched the AWS Amplify Command Line Interface (CLI) toolchain for developers.

The AWS Amplify CLI enables developers to build, test, and deploy full web and mobile applications based on AWS Amplify directly from their CLI. It has built-in helpers for configuring AWS services such as Amazon Cognito for Auth , Amazon S3 and Amazon DynamoDB for storage, and Amazon API Gateway for APIs. With these helpers, developers can configure AWS services to interact with applications built in popular web frameworks such as React.

Get started with the AWS Amplify CLI toolchain.

New features

Rejoice Microsoft application developers: AWS Lambda now supports .NET Core 2.1 and PowerShell Core!

AWS SAM had a few major enhancements to help in both testing and debugging functions. The team launched support to locally emulate an endpoint for Lambda so that you can run automated tests against your functions. This differs from the existing functionality that emulated a proxy similar to API Gateway in front of your function. Combined with the new improved support for ‘sam local generate-event’ to generate over 50 different payloads, you can now test Lambda function code that would be invoked by almost all of the various services that interface with Lambda today. On the operational front, AWS SAM can now fetch, tail, and filter logs generated by your functions running live on AWS. Finally, with integration with Delve, a debugger for the Go programming language, you can more easily debug your applications locally.

If you’re part of an organization that uses AWS Service Catalog, you can now launch applications based on AWS SAM, too.

The AWS Serverless Application Repository launched new search improvements to make it even faster to find serverless applications that you can deploy.

In July, AWS AppSync added HTTP resolvers so that now you can query your REST APIs via GraphQL! API Inception! AWS AppSync also added new built-in scalar types to help with data validation at the GraphQL layer instead of having to do this in code that you write yourself. For building your GraphQL-based applications on AWS AppSync, an enhanced no-code GraphQL API builder enables you to model your data, and the service generates your GraphQL schema, Amazon DynamoDB tables, and resolvers for your backend. The team also published a Quick Start for using Amazon Aurora as a data source via a Lambda function. Finally, the service is now available in the Asia Pacific (Seoul) Region.

Amazon API Gateway announced support for AWS X-Ray!

With X-Ray integrated in API Gateway, you can trace and profile application workflows starting at the API layer and going through the backend. You can control the sample rates at a granular level.

API Gateway also announced improvements to usage plans that allow for method level throttling, request/response parameter and status overrides, and higher limits for the number of APIs per account for regional, private, and edge APIs. Finally, the team added support for the OpenAPI 3.0 API specification, the next generation of OpenAPI 2, formerly known as Swagger.

AWS Step Functions is now available in the Asia Pacific (Mumbai) Region. You can also build workflows visually with Step Functions and trigger them directly with AWS IoT Rules.

AWS [email protected] now makes the HTTP Request Body for POST and PUT requests available.

AWS CloudFormation announced Macros, a feature that enables customers to extend the functionality of AWS CloudFormation templates by calling out to transformations that Lambda powers. Macros are the same technology that enables SAM to exist.

Serverless posts

July:

August:

September:

Tech Talks

We hold several Serverless tech talks throughout the year, so look out for them in the Serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page. Here are the three tech talks that we delivered in Q3:

Twitch

We’ve been busy streaming deeply technical content to you the past few months! Check out awesome sessions like this one by AWS’s Heitor Lessa and Jason Barto diving deep into Continuous Learning for ML and the entire “Build on Serverless” playlist.

For information about upcoming broadcasts and recent live streams, keep an eye on AWS on Twitch for more Serverless videos and on the Join us on Twitch AWS page.

For AWS Partners

In September, we announced the AWS Serverless Navigate program for AWS APN Partners. Via this program, APN Partners can gain a deeper understanding of the AWS Serverless Platform, including many of the services mentioned in this post. The program’s phases help partners learn best practices such as the Well-Architected Framework, business and technical concepts, and growing their business’s ability to better support AWS customers in their serverless projects.

Check out more at AWS Serverless Navigate.

In other news

AWS re:Invent 2018 is coming in just a few weeks! For November 26–30 in Las Vegas, Nevada, join tens of thousands of AWS customers to learn, share ideas, and see exciting keynote announcements. The agenda for Serverless talks contains over 100 sessions where you can hear about serverless applications and technologies from fellow AWS customers, AWS product teams, solutions architects, evangelists, and more.

Register for AWS re:Invent now!

Want to get a sneak peek into what you can expect at re:Invent this year? Check out the awesome re:Invent Guides put out by AWS Community Heroes. AWS Community Hero Eric Hammond (@esh on Twitter) published one for advanced serverless attendees that you will want to read before the big event.

What did we do at AWS re:Invent 2017? Check out our recap: Serverless @ re:Invent 2017.

Still looking for more?

The Serverless landing page has lots of information. The resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials. Check it out!

ICYMI: Serverless Q2 2018

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/icymi-serverless-q2-2018/

The better-late-than-never edition!

Welcome to the second edition of the AWS Serverless ICYMI (in case you missed it) quarterly recap. Every quarter, we share all of the most recent product launches, feature enhancements, blog posts, webinars, Twitch live streams, and other interesting things that you might have missed!

The second quarter of 2018 flew by so fast that we didn’t get a chance to get out this post! We’re playing catch up, and making sure that the Q3 post launches a bit sooner.

Missed our Q1 ICYMI? Catch up on everything you missed.

So, what might you have missed this past quarter? Here’s the recap….

AWS AppSync

In April, AWS AppSync went generally available (GA)!

AWS AppSync provides capabilities to build real-time, collaborative mobile and web applications. It uses GraphQL, an open standard query language that makes it easy to request data from the cloud. When AWS AppSync went GA, several features also launched. These included better in-console testing with mock data, Amazon CloudWatch support, AWS CloudFormation support, and console log access.

AWS Amplify then also launched support for AWS AppSync to make it even easier for developers to build JavaScript-based applications that can integrate with several AWS services via its simplified GraphQL interface. Click here for the documentation.

AppSync expanded to more Regions and added OIDC support in May.

New features

AWS Lambda made Node.js v8.10 available. 8.10 brings some significant improvements in supporting async/await calls that simplify the traditional callback style common in Node.js applications. Developers can also see performance improvements and lower memory consumption.

In June, the long-awaited support for Amazon SQS as a trigger for Lambda launched! With this launch, customers can easily create Lambda functions that directly consume from SQS queues without needing to manage scheduling for the invocations to poll a queue. Today, SQS is one of the most popular AWS services. It’s used by hundreds of thousands of customers at massive scales as one of the fundamental building blocks of many applications.

AWS Lambda gained support for AWS Config. With AWS Config, you can track changes to the Lambda function, runtime environments, tags, handler name, code size, memory allocation, timeout settings, and concurrency settings. You can also record changes to Lambda IAM execution roles, subnets, and security group associations. Even more fun, you can use AWS Lambda functions in AWS Config Rules to check if your Lambda functions conform to certain standards as decided by you. Inception!

Amazon API Gateway announced the availability of private API endpoints! With private API endpoints, you can now create APIs that are completely inside your own virtual private clouds (VPCs). You can use awesome API Gateway features such as Lambda custom authorizers and Amazon Cognito integration. Back your APIs with Lambda, containers running in Amazon ECS, ECS supporting AWS Fargate, and Amazon EKS, as well as on Amazon EC2.

Amazon API Gateway also launched two really useful features; support for Resource Polices for APIs and Cross-Account AWS Lambda Authorizers and Integrations. Both features offer capabilities to help developers secure their APIs whether they are public or private.

AWS SAM went open source and the AWS SAM Local tool has now been relaunched as AWS SAM CLI! As part of the relaunch, AWS SAM CLI has gained numerous capabilities, such as helping you start a brand new serverless project and better template validation. With version 0.4.0, released in June, we added Python 3.6 support. You can now perform new project creation, local development and testing, and then packaging and deployment of serverless applications for all actively supported Lambda languages.

AWS Step Functions expanded into more Regions, increased default limits, became HIPPA eligible, and is also now available in AWS GovCloud (US).

AWS [email protected] added support for Node.js v8.10.

Serverless posts

April:

May:

June:

Webinars

Here are the three webinars we delivered in Q2. We hold several Serverless webinars throughout the year, so look out for them in the Serverless section of the AWS Online Tech Talks page:

Twitch

We’ve been so busy livestreaming on Twitch that you are most certainly missing out if you aren’t following along!

Here are links to all of the Serverless Twitch sessions that we’ve done.

Keep an eye on AWS on Twitch for more Serverless videos and on the Join us on Twitch AWS page for information about upcoming broadcasts and recent live streams.

Worthwhile reading

Serverless: Changing the Face of Business Economics, A Venture Capital and Startup Perspective
In partnership with three prominent venture capitalists—Greylock Partners, Madrona Venture Group, and Accel—AWS released a whitepaper on the business benefits to serverless. Check it out to hear about opportunities for companies in the space and how several have seen significant benefits from a serverless approach.

Serverless Streaming Architectures and Best Practices
Streaming workloads are some of the biggest workloads for AWS Lambda. Customers of all shapes and sizes are using streaming workloads for near real-time processing of data from services such as Amazon Kinesis Streams. In this whitepaper, we explore three stream-processing patterns using a serverless approach. For each pattern, we describe how it applies to a real-world use case, the best practices and considerations for implementation, and cost estimates. Each pattern also includes a template that enables you to quickly and easily deploy these patterns in your AWS accounts.

In other news

AWS re:Invent 2018 is coming! From November 26—30 in Las Vegas, Nevada, join tens of thousands of AWS customers to learn, share ideas, and see exciting keynote announcements. The agenda for Serverless talks is just starting to show up now and there are always lots of opportunities to hear about serverless applications and technologies from fellow AWS customers, AWS product teams, solutions architects, evangelists, and more.

Register for AWS re:Invent now!

What did we do at AWS re:Invent 2017? Check out our recap here: Serverless @ re:Invent 2017

Attend a Serverless event!

“ServerlessDays are a family of events around the world focused on fostering a community around serverless technologies.” —https://serverlessdays.io/

The events are run by local volunteers as vendor-agnostic events with a focus on community, accessibility, and local representation. Dozens of cities around the world have folks interested in these events, with more popping up regularly.

Find a ServerlessDays event happening near you. Come ready to learn and connect with other developers, architects, hobbyists, and practitioners. AWS has members from our team at every event to connect with and share ideas and content. Maybe, just maybe, we’ll even hand out cool swag!

AWS Serverless Apps for Social Good Hackathon

Our AWS Serverless Apps for Social Good hackathon invites you to publish serverless applications for popular use cases. Your app can use Alexa skills, machine learning, media processing, monitoring, data transformation, notification services, location services, IoT, and more.

We’re looking for apps that can be used as standalone assets or as inputs that can be combined with other applications to add to the open-source serverless ecosystem. This supports the work being done by developers and nonprofit organizations around the world.

Winners will be awarded cash prizes and the opportunity to direct donations to the nonprofit partner of their choice.

Still looking for more?

The AWS Serverless landing page has lots of information. The resources page contains case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials. Check it out!

AWS AppSync – Production-Ready with Six New Features

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-appsync-production-ready-with-six-new-features/

If you build (or want to build) data-driven web and mobile apps and need real-time updates and the ability to work offline, you should take a look at AWS AppSync. Announced in preview form at AWS re:Invent 2017 and described in depth here, AWS AppSync is designed for use in iOS, Android, JavaScript, and React Native apps. AWS AppSync is built around GraphQL, an open, standardized query language that makes it easy for your applications to request the precise data that they need from the cloud.

I’m happy to announce that the preview period is over and that AWS AppSync is now generally available and production-ready, with six new features that will simplify and streamline your application development process:

Console Log Access – You can now see the CloudWatch Logs entries that are created when you test your GraphQL queries, mutations, and subscriptions from within the AWS AppSync Console.

Console Testing with Mock Data – You can now create and use mock context objects in the console for testing purposes.

Subscription Resolvers – You can now create resolvers for AWS AppSync subscription requests, just as you can already do for query and mutate requests.

Batch GraphQL Operations for DynamoDB – You can now make use of DynamoDB’s batch operations (BatchGetItem and BatchWriteItem) across one or more tables. in your resolver functions.

CloudWatch Support – You can now use Amazon CloudWatch Metrics and CloudWatch Logs to monitor calls to the AWS AppSync APIs.

CloudFormation Support – You can now define your schemas, data sources, and resolvers using AWS CloudFormation templates.

A Brief AppSync Review
Before diving in to the new features, let’s review the process of creating an AWS AppSync API, starting from the console. I click Create API to begin:

I enter a name for my API and (for demo purposes) choose to use the Sample schema:

The schema defines a collection of GraphQL object types. Each object type has a set of fields, with optional arguments:

If I was creating an API of my own I would enter my schema at this point. Since I am using the sample, I don’t need to do this. Either way, I click on Create to proceed:

The GraphQL schema type defines the entry points for the operations on the data. All of the data stored on behalf of a particular schema must be accessible using a path that begins at one of these entry points. The console provides me with an endpoint and key for my API:

It also provides me with guidance and a set of fully functional sample apps that I can clone:

When I clicked Create, AWS AppSync created a pair of Amazon DynamoDB tables for me. I can click Data Sources to see them:

I can also see and modify my schema, issue queries, and modify an assortment of settings for my API.

Let’s take a quick look at each new feature…

Console Log Access
The AWS AppSync Console already allows me to issue queries and to see the results, and now provides access to relevant log entries.In order to see the entries, I must enable logs (as detailed below), open up the LOGS, and check the checkbox. Here’s a simple mutation query that adds a new event. I enter the query and click the arrow to test it:

I can click VIEW IN CLOUDWATCH for a more detailed view:

To learn more, read Test and Debug Resolvers.

Console Testing with Mock Data
You can now create a context object in the console where it will be passed to one of your resolvers for testing purposes. I’ll add a testResolver item to my schema:

Then I locate it on the right-hand side of the Schema page and click Attach:

I choose a data source (this is for testing and the actual source will not be accessed), and use the Put item mapping template:

Then I click Select test context, choose Create New Context, assign a name to my test content, and click Save (as you can see, the test context contains the arguments from the query along with values to be returned for each field of the result):

After I save the new Resolver, I click Test to see the request and the response:

Subscription Resolvers
Your AWS AppSync application can monitor changes to any data source using the @aws_subscribe GraphQL schema directive and defining a Subscription type. The AWS AppSync client SDK connects to AWS AppSync using MQTT over Websockets and the application is notified after each mutation. You can now attach resolvers (which convert GraphQL payloads into the protocol needed by the underlying storage system) to your subscription fields and perform authorization checks when clients attempt to connect. This allows you to perform the same fine grained authorization routines across queries, mutations, and subscriptions.

To learn more about this feature, read Real-Time Data.

Batch GraphQL Operations
Your resolvers can now make use of DynamoDB batch operations that span one or more tables in a region. This allows you to use a list of keys in a single query, read records multiple tables, write records in bulk to multiple tables, and conditionally write or delete related records across multiple tables.

In order to use this feature the IAM role that you use to access your tables must grant access to DynamoDB’s BatchGetItem and BatchPutItem functions.

To learn more, read the DynamoDB Batch Resolvers tutorial.

CloudWatch Logs Support
You can now tell AWS AppSync to log API requests to CloudWatch Logs. Click on Settings and Enable logs, then choose the IAM role and the log level:

CloudFormation Support
You can use the following CloudFormation resource types in your templates to define AWS AppSync resources:

AWS::AppSync::GraphQLApi – Defines an AppSync API in terms of a data source (an Amazon Elasticsearch Service domain or a DynamoDB table).

AWS::AppSync::ApiKey – Defines the access key needed to access the data source.

AWS::AppSync::GraphQLSchema – Defines a GraphQL schema.

AWS::AppSync::DataSource – Defines a data source.

AWS::AppSync::Resolver – Defines a resolver by referencing a schema and a data source, and includes a mapping template for requests.

Here’s a simple schema definition in YAML form:

  AppSyncSchema:
    Type: "AWS::AppSync::GraphQLSchema"
    DependsOn:
      - AppSyncGraphQLApi
    Properties:
      ApiId: !GetAtt AppSyncGraphQLApi.ApiId
      Definition: |
        schema {
          query: Query
          mutation: Mutation
        }
        type Query {
          singlePost(id: ID!): Post
          allPosts: [Post]
        }
        type Mutation {
          putPost(id: ID!, title: String!): Post
        }
        type Post {
          id: ID!
          title: String!
        }

Available Now
These new features are available now and you can start using them today! Here are a couple of blog posts and other resources that you might find to be of interest:

Jeff;

 

 

AWS Online Tech Talks – April & Early May 2018

Post Syndicated from Betsy Chernoff original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-april-early-may-2018/

We have several upcoming tech talks in the month of April and early May. Come join us to learn about AWS services and solution offerings. We’ll have AWS experts online to help answer questions in real-time. Sign up now to learn more, we look forward to seeing you.

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

April & early May — 2018 Schedule

Compute

April 30, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTBest Practices for Running Amazon EC2 Spot Instances with Amazon EMR (300) – Learn about the best practices for scaling big data workloads as well as process, store, and analyze big data securely and cost effectively with Amazon EMR and Amazon EC2 Spot Instances.

May 1, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTHow to Bring Microsoft Apps to AWS (300) – Learn more about how to save significant money by bringing your Microsoft workloads to AWS.

May 2, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTDeep Dive on Amazon EC2 Accelerated Computing (300) – Get a technical deep dive on how AWS’ GPU and FGPA-based compute services can help you to optimize and accelerate your ML/DL and HPC workloads in the cloud.

Containers

April 23, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTNew Features for Building Powerful Containerized Microservices on AWS (300) – Learn about how this new feature works and how you can start using it to build and run modern, containerized applications on AWS.

Databases

April 23, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTElastiCache: Deep Dive Best Practices and Usage Patterns (200) – Learn about Redis-compatible in-memory data store and cache with Amazon ElastiCache.

April 25, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTIntro to Open Source Databases on AWS (200) – Learn how to tap the benefits of open source databases on AWS without the administrative hassle.

DevOps

April 25, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTDebug your Container and Serverless Applications with AWS X-Ray in 5 Minutes (300) – Learn how AWS X-Ray makes debugging your Container and Serverless applications fun.

Enterprise & Hybrid

April 23, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTAn Overview of Best Practices of Large-Scale Migrations (300) – Learn about the tools and best practices on how to migrate to AWS at scale.

April 24, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDeploy your Desktops and Apps on AWS (300) – Learn how to deploy your desktops and apps on AWS with Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon AppStream 2.0

IoT

May 2, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTHow to Easily and Securely Connect Devices to AWS IoT (200) – Learn how to easily and securely connect devices to the cloud and reliably scale to billions of devices and trillions of messages with AWS IoT.

Machine Learning

April 24, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Automate for Efficiency with Amazon Transcribe and Amazon Translate (200) – Learn how you can increase the efficiency and reach your operations with Amazon Translate and Amazon Transcribe.

April 26, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Perform Machine Learning at the IoT Edge using AWS Greengrass and Amazon Sagemaker (200) – Learn more about developing machine learning applications for the IoT edge.

Mobile

April 30, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTOffline GraphQL Apps with AWS AppSync (300) – Come learn how to enable real-time and offline data in your applications with GraphQL using AWS AppSync.

Networking

May 2, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT Taking Serverless to the Edge (300) – Learn how to run your code closer to your end users in a serverless fashion. Also, David Von Lehman from Aerobatic will discuss how they used [email protected] to reduce latency and cloud costs for their customer’s websites.

Security, Identity & Compliance

April 30, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTAmazon GuardDuty – Let’s Attack My Account! (300) – Amazon GuardDuty Test Drive – Practical steps on generating test findings.

May 3, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTProtect Your Game Servers from DDoS Attacks (200) – Learn how to use the new AWS Shield Advanced for EC2 to protect your internet-facing game servers against network layer DDoS attacks and application layer attacks of all kinds.

Serverless

April 24, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTTips and Tricks for Building and Deploying Serverless Apps In Minutes (200) – Learn how to build and deploy apps in minutes.

Storage

May 1, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTBuilding Data Lakes That Cost Less and Deliver Results Faster (300) – Learn how Amazon S3 Select And Amazon Glacier Select increase application performance by up to 400% and reduce total cost of ownership by extending your data lake into cost-effective archive storage.

May 3, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTIntegrating On-Premises Vendors with AWS for Backup (300) – Learn how to work with AWS and technology partners to build backup & restore solutions for your on-premises, hybrid, and cloud native environments.

Introducing AWS AppSync – Build data-driven apps with real-time and off-line capabilities

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-amazon-appsync/

In this day and age, it is almost impossible to do without our mobile devices and the applications that help make our lives easier. As our dependency on our mobile phone grows, the mobile application market has exploded with millions of apps vying for our attention. For mobile developers, this means that we must ensure that we build applications that provide the quality, real-time experiences that app users desire.  Therefore, it has become essential that mobile applications are developed to include features such as multi-user data synchronization, offline network support, and data discovery, just to name a few.  According to several articles, I read recently about mobile development trends on publications like InfoQ, DZone, and the mobile development blog AlleviateTech, one of the key elements in of delivering the aforementioned capabilities is with cloud-driven mobile applications.  It seems that this is especially true, as it related to mobile data synchronization and data storage.

That being the case, it is a perfect time for me to announce a new service for building innovative mobile applications that are driven by data-intensive services in the cloud; AWS AppSync. AWS AppSync is a fully managed serverless GraphQL service for real-time data queries, synchronization, communications and offline programming features. For those not familiar, let me briefly share some information about the open GraphQL specification. GraphQL is a responsive data query language and server-side runtime for querying data sources that allow for real-time data retrieval and dynamic query execution. You can use GraphQL to build a responsive API for use in when building client applications. GraphQL works at the application layer and provides a type system for defining schemas. These schemas serve as specifications to define how operations should be performed on the data and how the data should be structured when retrieved. Additionally, GraphQL has a declarative coding model which is supported by many client libraries and frameworks including React, React Native, iOS, and Android.

Now the power of the GraphQL open standard query language is being brought to you in a rich managed service with AWS AppSync.  With AppSync developers can simplify the retrieval and manipulation of data across multiple data sources with ease, allowing them to quickly prototype, build and create robust, collaborative, multi-user applications. AppSync keeps data updated when devices are connected, but enables developers to build solutions that work offline by caching data locally and synchronizing local data when connections become available.

Let’s discuss some key concepts of AWS AppSync and how the service works.

AppSync Concepts

  • AWS AppSync Client: service client that defines operations, wraps authorization details of requests, and manage offline logic.
  • Data Source: the data storage system or a trigger housing data
  • Identity: a set of credentials with permissions and identification context provided with requests to GraphQL proxy
  • GraphQL Proxy: the GraphQL engine component for processing and mapping requests, handling conflict resolution, and managing Fine Grained Access Control
  • Operation: one of three GraphQL operations supported in AppSync
    • Query: a read-only fetch call to the data
    • Mutation: a write of the data followed by a fetch,
    • Subscription: long-lived connections that receive data in response to events.
  • Action: a notification to connected subscribers from a GraphQL subscription.
  • Resolver: function using request and response mapping templates that converts and executes payload against data source

How It Works

A schema is created to define types and capabilities of the desired GraphQL API and tied to a Resolver function.  The schema can be created to mirror existing data sources or AWS AppSync can create tables automatically based the schema definition. Developers can also use GraphQL features for data discovery without having knowledge of the backend data sources. After a schema definition is established, an AWS AppSync client can be configured with an operation request, like a Query operation. The client submits the operation request to GraphQL Proxy along with an identity context and credentials. The GraphQL Proxy passes this request to the Resolver which maps and executes the request payload against pre-configured AWS data services like an Amazon DynamoDB table, an AWS Lambda function, or a search capability using Amazon Elasticsearch. The Resolver executes calls to one or all of these services within a single network call minimizing CPU cycles and bandwidth needs and returns the response to the client. Additionally, the client application can change data requirements in code on demand and the AppSync GraphQL API will dynamically map requests for data accordingly, allowing prototyping and faster development.

In order to take a quick peek at the service, I’ll go to the AWS AppSync console. I’ll click the Create API button to get started.

 

When the Create new API screen opens, I’ll give my new API a name, TarasTestApp, and since I am just exploring the new service I will select the Sample schema option.  You may notice from the informational dialog box on the screen that in using the sample schema, AWS AppSync will automatically create the DynamoDB tables and the IAM roles for me.It will also deploy the TarasTestApp API on my behalf.  After review of the sample schema provided by the console, I’ll click the Create button to create my test API.

After the TaraTestApp API has been created and the associated AWS resources provisioned on my behalf, I can make updates to the schema, data source, or connect my data source(s) to a resolver. I also can integrate my GraphQL API into an iOS, Android, Web, or React Native application by cloning the sample repo from GitHub and downloading the accompanying GraphQL schema.  These application samples are great to help get you started and they are pre-configured to function in offline scenarios.

If I select the Schema menu option on the console, I can update and view the TarasTestApp GraphQL API schema.


Additionally, if I select the Data Sources menu option in the console, I can see the existing data sources.  Within this screen, I can update, delete, or add data sources if I so desire.

Next, I will select the Query menu option which takes me to the console tool for writing and testing queries. Since I chose the sample schema and the AWS AppSync service did most of the heavy lifting for me, I’ll try a query against my new GraphQL API.

I’ll use a mutation to add data for the event type in my schema. Since this is a mutation and it first writes data and then does a read of the data, I want the query to return values for name and where.

If I go to the DynamoDB table created for the event type in the schema, I will see that the values from my query have been successfully written into the table. Now that was a pretty simple task to write and retrieve data based on a GraphQL API schema from a data source, don’t you think.


 Summary

AWS AppSync is currently in AWS AppSync is in Public Preview and you can sign up today. It supports development for iOS, Android, and JavaScript applications. You can take advantage of this managed GraphQL service by going to the AWS AppSync console or learn more by reviewing more details about the service by reading a tutorial in the AWS documentation for the service or checking out our AWS AppSync Developer Guide.

Tara